The city of Stoke-on-Trent
Schools

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Victoria County History

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J. G. Jenkins (editor)

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1963

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307-328

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'The city of Stoke-on-Trent: Schools ', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 8 (1963), pp. 307-328. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53385 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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SCHOOLS (fn. 1)

Endowed Schools and Grammar Schools

The first schools in the area seem to have been those set up in the early 17th century by John Weston, Rector of Stoke (d. 1617). One of these was at Stoke, where 40 boys were taught reading, writing, and the catechism. The other was at Shelton, 'near the head of Snape Marsh, at the Row where the Rector did at some time dwell', and here girls were taught to read, spin, knit, and sew. (fn. 2) The subsequent history of these schools is unknown, but it may have been the former of the two at which William Adey was licensed in 1732 to teach. (fn. 3)

Thomas Allen, Rector of Stoke 1699–1732, (fn. 4) founded a school at Meir Lane (fn. 5) which continued as a charity school until some date in the mid-18th century. The income then lapsed because the Allen family, genuinely doubting whether the trust was binding, discontinued payment. (fn. 6) The endowment was retrieved, however, and in 1832 the school was reopened. In 1835 it was educating about 30 boys, some of them fee-payers. (fn. 7) It had closed again by 1840, (fn. 8) but was again in existence by 1870 when the Fenton Improvement Commissioners allowed the use of the courthouse as a day and Sunday school for a few weeks. (fn. 9) The further history of this charity school is not known.

In 1760 John Bourne, who also founded the churches of Longton and Hanley, (fn. 10) endowed a small school and house at Longton (fn. 11) where about 30 of the poorest children of Lane End were to be taught. (fn. 12) Land for a school-house was settled in trust in 1763 and a school-house erected on it. (fn. 13) By 1825 the schoolmaster received a salary of £15 a year and 18 boys were being taught in the school-house by the master and 20 girls in the master's house by his wife. The trustees were then proposing to transfer the endowments to the new St. John's National School. (fn. 14) This was apparently done and the school ceased to have a separate existence. (fn. 15) The National School closed at some date between 1859 and 1872. (fn. 16) By 1873 the Bourne endowment was again applied to a separate school regulated in that year as a secondary school by a Scheme of the Charity Commissioners. (fn. 17) At the same time much of the revenue of Dilhorne Free School was applied to Longton School, half of the exhibitions at Longton School going to children from the public elementary schools at Dilhorne. (fn. 18) Longton School continued on this basis as a secondary grammar school until 1900. The number of pupils at the school gradually decreased, however, and in January 1900 there were only 36. (fn. 19) By 1900, too, the liabilities of the school considerably exceeded its assets. The Charity Commissioners recommended that the school be taken over by the Longton Borough Council and conducted as a mixed boys' and girls' school. Pending a decision by the council the school was closed in July 1900. (fn. 20) The council agreed to administer the school in conjunction with the Sutherland Technical Institute, situated close to it in the Stone road and under the same head master. Extensive alterations were made to the High School, as it was by then called; in particular, science laboratories were built and the Upper School was recognized as a school of science by the Board of Education. (fn. 21) The school was also opened to girls at this date, and in the formation of the curriculum special attention was given to the needs of the local industries of pottery and metallurgy. (fn. 22) The close relationship with the Technical Institute continued at least until 1905, the teaching staff being common to both institutions. (fn. 23) In 1947 the school, called Longton Grammar School, moved into new buildings in London Road, Meir. The girls had been transferred in 1938 to Thistley Hough School for Girls in Newcastle Lane, Penkhull, opened in that year to provide separate grammar-school education for girls in the south of the Potteries. (fn. 24)

At the end of the 17th century there is mention of a school at Hanley noviter erecta at which John Strettell literatus was licensed in 1698 to teach. (fn. 25) This may have been the same school which in 1825 was occupied by Peter Tock, aged 80, who had been in possession of the school since about 1790 and was said to have kept a school there for some time but to have given it up in recent years. Before he acquired the tenancy a man named Gill had kept a school in the house and Tock paid him £15 to give up possession. When Tock first began his school he received £6 a year from the Adams family of Newcastle to educate 10 children free. The last payment was made about 1807 (fn. 26) and there is no evidence that the school was in existence after that date.

Burslem Free School was started by subscription in 1740, (fn. 27) one of the principal contributors being John Bourne of Newcastle, founder of Longton School. The school was to be an English school, not a grammar school, and it was open to all religious denominations, the only stipulation being that pupils whose parents belonged to the Church of England should attend church regularly on Sundays. In 1825 the school premises consisted of a school room and a master's house. By 1823 the buildings had fallen into disrepair, the school master was very old and incompetent, there were no trustees, and no children were admitted free. Some of the inhabitants of Burslem took matters in hand and in 1823 new trustees and a new master were appointed, and the school buildings repaired. The master was to be allowed to teach 30 boys and his wife 20 girls in addition to the free scholars. The trustees, however, in 1825 felt that the funds of the school would be better applied to the National School, (fn. 28) but the proposal was not carried out. In 1832 the old school in Liverpool Road was sold and a new school built in Moorland Road. About 1849, however, this became unusable because of mining subsidence and in 1851 the school was being held in a room of the former school building rented from the owner. It was a grammar school by this date with 2 masters and 25 pupils, of whom 14 were taught English free under the terms of the endowment. (fn. 29) In 1859 it was said to have been closed for two years (fn. 30) but by 1861 was again in use. (fn. 31) It had closed by 1868. (fn. 32)

Cobridge Free School for 120 children (paying 2d. to 6d. a week each) was built in 1766 by subscription; it was situated at what is now the junction of Sneyd Street, Elder Road, and Leek New Road, and consisted of a school and two dwelling-rooms below. The premises, which were repaired in 1821, were stated to have been conveyed to trustees who, however, were all dead by 1860. The school ceased to be used c. 1850. It was demolished in 1897, (fn. 33) but it is still commemorated by an inscribed plinth.

Tunstall Endowed School originated outside the city in an endowment by Dr. Robert Hulme of Oddrode (Ches.) by will dated 1708. In 1825 the school was at Newchapel, (fn. 34) the head master being appointed by the Child family of Tunstall. (fn. 35) Between 1876 and 1880 it was transferred to Tunstall. (fn. 36) It closed between 1884 and 1892. (fn. 37)

There was only one endowed school in the area added to the county borough in 1922. (fn. 38) This was Bucknall School founded under the will (dated 1719) of William Shallcross of Uttoxeter, by which the testator gave £5 yearly to a school master to teach 12 poor children, provided the freeholders of Bucknall and Eaves built a school-house. (fn. 39) The endowment was charged on Blakeloe farm by 1825, the property of John Tomlinson of Cliffville in Stoke. (fn. 40) This school subsequently became a National School. (fn. 41) Thus out of these old educational foundations in the Potteries only one grammar school, that at Longton, remains at the present time.

A Higher Grade Elementary school was opened by Hanley School Board in 1893. (fn. 42) The junior and middle schools followed an advanced elementary course and the boys in the higher school were taught all the normal subjects of a grammar school including Latin and Greek (fn. 43) and the girls a more limited course which, however, included Latin. (fn. 44) Since the courses in the upper part of the school were those of a grammar school the Board of Education was reluctant to recognize it as an elementary school but eventually did so; it continued as such until 1905 when it was officially closed and reopened as Hanley High School. (fn. 45) It remained as a mixed grammar school until 1938 when the girls were transferred to Thistley Hough School for Girls. (fn. 46) Hanley High School buildings were condemned in 1940 because of mining subsidence and the school was moved into the new buildings intended for Chell Senior School. From 1948 to 1953 it was run as a bilateral school with Chell Secondary Modern School and in the latter year moved into new buildings in Corneville Road, Bucknall. (fn. 47)

Two Roman Catholic grammar schools have been established in the present century. The first, a girls' school, developed out of a school opened by the nuns at the Dominican Convent at Hartshill. (fn. 48) A house called Cliffville near the convent was bought in 1922 and the senior part of the school moved there; the junior part followed in 1929. (fn. 49) The school acquired aided status under the 1944 Education Act as a girls' grammar school. (fn. 50) The second, a boys' school, was established at Trent Vale by the Irish Christian Brothers in 1932. (fn. 51)

Elementary Education before 1870

During the earlier 19th century the educational facilities offered by the endowed schools began to be supplemented by schools founded by the various churches and the two schools' societies, the National Society and the British and Foreign Schools Society. The first such school to be founded was the Wesleyan Day School in Burslem in 1814, followed there by a National School in 1817 in connexion with St. John's Church. National Schools were founded in Stoke in 1815 and in Hanley in 1816. In Hanley the National School was quickly followed by a nonconformist school, the British School in Pall Mall, founded by the Ridgway family, who were leaders of the Methodist New Connexion in the area. Longton (St. John's) National School was founded in 1822 and St. James's National School in 1836, but Tunstall and Fenton National Schools were not founded until 1839. By 1850 thirteen National Schools had been established in the various Pottery towns and there was a parish school at Bucknall. In Stoke itself the Church of England was particularly active in this matter. Apart from the main National School, attached to St. Peter's Church, schools had by 1850 been founded at Hartshill, Trent Vale, and Penkhull. There were also two Wesleyan schools, one unsectarian school, one British school, and two Roman Catholic schools in the Potteries area by 1851. Many of these schools owed their existence, not to the churches, but to particular individuals who promoted them and to a great extent maintained them. Such were the British School for boys at Hanley (founded 1819) supported by the Ridgway family, the unsectarian school at Etruria (founded 1846) maintained by the Wedgwood family, particularly Francis Wedgwood, (fn. 52) and the National Schools in Stoke, Longton, and Hanley which benefited by a bequest of £3,000 by J. C. Woodhouse, Dean of Lichfield and formerly Rector of Stoke. (fn. 53)

During the period 1851–70 a notable feature of education in the Potteries was the great increase in the number of National Schools. Many were built in the small villages or hamlets which developed under the influence of the six towns, such as the infants' school at Line Houses near Tunstall and the school at Sneyd near Burslem. Many more were established as branch schools of the main National School in each town to serve some small, densely populated area of working-class houses. Such were the second National School at Tunstall (St. Mary's School), Cobridge National School in Burslem, St. Paul's National School in Burslem serving the Dale Hall area, Eastwood Vale National School, Hanley, Wellington National School, Hanley, Northwood National School, Hanley, Trinity National School serving the Hope Street area of Hanley, China Street National School, Fenton, Mount Pleasant National School, Fenton, St. John's Branch School at Park Hall Street, Longton, and Mount Pleasant National School, Longton.

Another development of the period was the growth of the Ragged Schools. These schools for very poor children were sometimes a private and sometimes a church enterprise. Two were established in Hanley in 1852, one an evening school (known as the Ragged School from 1856) and the other Bryan Street Ragged School in a building known as the Workmen's Refuge. (fn. 54) Another was opened at Ashley Street, Hanley, in 1856 (fn. 55) and all three were managed by the same master. In 1861 they were amalgamated as the Borough Ragged Schools. (fn. 56) In 1861, too, one was opened in Longton (fn. 57) and by that year there was one at Burslem. (fn. 58)

Private philanthropy also played some part in the provision of elementary education in this period, illustrated not only by the interest of Francis Wedgwood in the British School at Etruria (fn. 59) but also by the school built by Lord Granville for his iron and steel workers. (fn. 60) By 1870 there were in the Potteries 28 National Schools, 5 Wesleyan schools, 4 other nonconformist, including British, schools, 6 Roman Catholic schools, and 2 non-sectarian schools, Granville School and Etruria Unsectarian School.

Elementary Education 1870–1910

This period covers the establishment of a state system of education in the Pottery district under the various school boards and, after the 1902 Education Act, by the Education Committees of the various borough and urban district councils and by the Staffordshire County Council.

Under the guidance of its first chairman, Sir Lovelace Stamer, Rector of Stoke, who was also chairman of the National Schools Board in Stoke, (fn. 61) the Stoke School Board co-operated with the latter to provide new church schools and new board schools. (fn. 62) The school board district covered a wide area, some of it outside the present city. It extended from Butterton near Whitmore to Stanley Pool near Endon station, the townships included being Seabridge, Clayton, Penkhull-cum-Boothen, Fenton Culvert, Fenton Vivian, Botteslow, Bucknall, and Bagnall. (fn. 63) In 1871 the total number of children at school in the district was just over 3,600, most of them in National Schools which educated children of both churchmen and others. (fn. 64) It was then estimated that 1,300 more places in schools were needed. The deficiency was met partly by the opening by the board of a number of temporary schools, some in nonconformist Sunday schools. (fn. 65) By 1876 there were 6 schools under the Stoke School Board: Mount Tabor, Cross Street, Harpfield, Penkhull, Bagnall, and Clayton. (fn. 66) On the formation of Stoke and Fenton Education Committees in 1903 there were 3 board schools in Stoke itself and 3 in Fenton. (fn. 67) There was no notable development in elementary education made by either of these two committees between 1903 and 1910. A novel experiment, however, was made in Stoke in 1905, when the senior boys of St. Peter's School and of Boothen School were transferred to a new school, Stoke Central National School.

Longton School Board encountered the difficulty of having too few children in its first school and so it took over the part-time pupils of a private school occupying the former St. John's National School. (fn. 68) Later the board proceeded to establish other permanent schools, namely, Cooke Street Schools (1891), High Street Schools (1879), and the Central School (1898), now Queensberry Schools. This board was more enterprising than the Stoke School Board and in 1898 established a Higher Elementary School at Queensberry Road to provide semi-technical and more advanced education. (fn. 69) After its formation Longton Education Committee maintained the emphasis on technical education, instanced by its taking over of the High School and the Technical College, which were managed as a joint institution from 1900 by the Technical Education Committee of the borough in conjunction with the county. (fn. 70)

Of the other school boards in the area Hanley, which had the largest population, probably faced the most difficult task. In view of its heavy financial obligations in the educational sphere it was officially recognized as a 'necessitous school board' under the Act of 1897. This greatly benefited the board which was already receiving extra grants under Section 97 of the Act of 1870. (fn. 71) The work of the board was chiefly directed towards meeting the scholastic needs of the rapidly increasing school population particularly in the late 1880's and in the 1890's. For example, Cauldon Road Schools, erected in 1891 for boys', girls', and infants' departments to serve part of Shelton, were already overcrowded by 1896 because of the rapid growth of the district. The board, therefore, erected a senior mixed school there in that year with accommodation for 620. (fn. 72) In 1896 Wharf Lane Schools also had to be extended and in the following year York Street Schools. (fn. 73) A similar policy was followed by the Hanley Education Committee after its formation in 1903. (fn. 74) In 1906 Broom Street Schools, Wellington Schools, and the Central Board Schools (Glass Street) in Hanley were reorganized into infants', junior, and senior schools, the Central Schools taking the senior boys and Broom Street Schools the senior girls. (fn. 75) Thus some of the recommendations of the Hadow Report were put into effect 20 years before its publication.

Hanley School Board, despite financial difficulties, nevertheless made some provision for secondary and adult education. The Higher Elementary School, which later became Hanley High School, has been described above. (fn. 76) By the 1890's a number of evening schools existed, administered at first by the board and later by Hanley Education Committee. (fn. 77) The curriculum of the evening classes started at the High School in 1894 included theoretical and practical chemistry, mathematics, physics, geometry, geology, botany, and drawing. All these subjects had some relevance to industry, (fn. 78) a practice general throughout the Potteries wherever further education was pursued.

Burslem School Board established in 1874 started somewhat later than the other Potteries boards. (fn. 79) It was faced with much the same problems as Hanley, a large child population, with resultant overcrowding in its schools. (fn. 80) The number of full-time pupils steadily rose until the number in its schools in 1896 was nearly 10,000. It appears to have been a more conservative board than that of Hanley, and, although it made provision for evening continuation classes on an adequate scale, the subjects taught were less advanced. (fn. 81) It made no attempt to run a Higher Elementary School and Burslem Education Committee after its formation in 1903 pursued this same policy of adequate elementary education but without attempting what may be termed advanced education, except in the field of art. (fn. 82) It should be noted, however, that in the early part of the present century many children from the Potteries area were attending the Orme Schools in Newcastle.

Tunstall came under Wolstanton School Board which has been treated elsewhere. (fn. 83) This board established only one school in Tunstall, Forster Street School, in 1875. In 1890, however, it took over the Wesleyan School and built the new High Street Schools to replace it in 1894. The problems of overcrowding and a large child population were not so great here as in Burslem, Hanley, or Longton, and with the numerous schools already in the area, the demand for board schools was not so imperative. (fn. 84) After the Act of 1902 Tunstall had its own education committee which inter alia administered Tunstall Technical College, founded in 1890. (fn. 85)

Some educational enterprises affecting the whole area were the result of joint action by the various education committees. The Blind and Deaf School at the Mount in Stoke, opened in 1897, (fn. 86) falls into this category. In the first decade of the present century all the education authorities adopted the School Meals Act (fn. 87) which eventually led to the present system of subsidized school dinners. (fn. 88) Tunstall was the last to do so, in 1910; in 1909 the North Staffs. Federation of the Independent Labour Party petitioned the Education Committee to adopt the Act as there were 5,000 unemployed in Tunstall. (fn. 89)

1911 to the Present Day

In 1911 Stoke-on-Trent Education Committee was formed. Stoke as a county borough was responsible for education generally in the area, including further education, much of which had previously been the responsibility of the county. The task of welding all the component elements into a comprehensive educational system was undertaken by R. P. G. Williamson, formerly Education Officer for Burslem. In the sphere of higher education the new authority controlled various technical colleges, evening continuation classes, and two grammar schools. In elementary education the most important change came in the late 1920's and early 1930's when the Education Committee decided to follow the principles laid down in the Hadow Report. An over-all plan was drawn up for the establishment of senior schools, involving frequently the separation of boys and girls. (fn. 90) The plan was not put into effect in its entirety, the eventual reorganization being carried out in stages and on an empirical basis by the Director of Education and by H.M. Inspectors of Schools. (fn. 91) The reorganization was carried out separately in each of the six towns, Tunstall being dealt with in 1929, Burslem and Longton in 1931, Hanley and Stoke in 1931–2, and Fenton in 1932. The schools of Tunstall were divided into two groups, those of Burslem into three, and those of Hanley and Stoke into four each; there was no such division in Longton and Fenton. The changes are shown in Table XI. In some cases the Church of England schools were grouped with local authority schools and in others reorganized in their own groups. The Roman Catholic schools did not join in the scheme. Some were reorganized later on the same lines, but many were still all-age schools at the end of the Second World War. (fn. 92)

The Education Act of 1944 made necessary a second reorganization involving the conversion of senior schools generally into secondary modern schools. The growth in the population of the area, the extension of the school-leaving age, and the inadequacy by modern standards of many of the old school buildings necessitated the erection of many new schools after the war. (fn. 93)

Table IX - Schools in the Six Towns (fn. 94)

Abbreviations: C. = County, C.S. = County Secondary, C.E. = Church of England, R.C. = Roman Catholic, B = Boys, G = Girls, J = Junior, I = Infants, SB = Senior Boys, SG = Senior Girls, JB = Junior Boys, JG = Junior Girls, M = Mixed, SM = Senior Mixed, / = Separate departments

SchoolDate of openingChanges in organizationBuildings
TUNSTALL
Blessed William Southerne R.C.C.S. School, (fn. 95) Little Chell Lane1957
Central C. Infants' School (fn. 96) (formerly Forster Street School), Forster St.1875Reorganized 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group A).See Central C. Junior School.
Central C. Junior School, (fn. 97) Forster St.1875Reorganized as JB, JG, 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group A). Boys' and girls' departments amalgamated 1956.Opened in Wesleyan Sunday School, Tunstall. New buildings 1880.
Chell C. Infants' School, (fn. 98) High Lane, Chell1878See Chell C. Junior School for early history. Reorganized as Chell C. Infants' School in 1946– 7.
Chell C. Junior School, (fn. 99) High Lane, Chell1878Opened as BG/I. Reorganized as JB, JG in 1946–7 (see Chell C.S. School).Opened in Wesleyan Sunday School. New buildings August 1878. Enlarged 1891.
Chell C.S. School, (fn. 100) St. Michael's Rd., Chell1947From 1947 occupied premises of Methodist Sunday School. In 1948 some classes at Smallthorne, some at Pitts Hill. In November 1948 Hanley High School became bilateral, this school forming the secondary modern side. In 1953 it was separated from Hanley High School.Built 1940 for Chell C.S. School but occupied by Hanley High School till 1953.
Chell Wesleyan School, (fn. 101) St. Michael's Rd., Chell1874–6Transferred to School Board in 1878 (see Chell C. Junior, Infants' Schools).
Goldenhill C.E. School, (fn. 102) High St., Goldenhill1841Opened as National School for B, G/I. Reorganized 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group B). Aided status from 1953, controlled status from April 1957.New infants' school built 1884. All buildings destroyed by fire 1895. New buildings erected 1895. Enlarged 1904.
Goldenhill C. Infants' School, (fn. 103) Heathside Lane, Goldenhill1881Formerly Goldenhill Wesleyan School. Opened as infants' school, B/G/I from 1884 until 1929 when reorganized (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group B).Used buildings of Wesleyan Sunday School until 1884 when new buildings erected.
Goldenhill C.S. School, (fn. 104) Heathside Lane, Goldenhill1929See Table XI, Tunstall, Group B.Used part of buildings of former Goldenhill all-age school.
Goldenhill R.C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 105) Brakespeare St., Goldenhill1870Opened as mixed all-age school. Aided status since July 1951.Erected 1871.
Goldenhill Wesleyan School, (fn. 106) High St., Goldenhill1872Transferred to School Board 1881 (see Goldenhill C. Infants' School).Used Sunday school buildings.
Highgate C. Junior And Infants' School (fn. 107) (formerly High Street School), High St.1890Formerly Tunstall Wesleyan Day School (q.v.). Reorganized 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group A).Used buildings of Wesleyan Sunday School, John St., until 1894 when High Street Schools built.
Highgate C.S. Boys' School, (fn. 108) High St.1929Reorganized as such 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group A).Using part of buildings of former Highgate all-age school (see Highgate C. Junior and Infants' School).
Holly Wall C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 109) Burnaby Rd., Sandyford1939
Line Houses C.E. Infants' School (fn. 110) 1850–4Supplementary to Goldenhill C.E. School (q.v.). Infants only. Closed c. 1870.
Lyndhurst Street Temporary School (fn. 111) By 1905Opened by Hulme Trustees as supplementary infants' and junior school to Tunstall C.E. School. Transferred to Education Committee in 1906. Closed on opening of Summerbank Council School.
Mill Hill C. Infants' School, (fn. 112) Sunnyside Ave., Little Chell1952
Mill Hill C. Junior School, (fn. 113) Sunnyside Ave., Little Chell1953
Pitts Hill Board School, (fn. 114) High St., Pitts Hill1875Formerly Pitts Hill Primitive Methodist School. Closed 1877 when pupils transferred to Chell Board School (see Chell C. Junior and Infants' Schools).Used buildings of Pitts Hill Primitive Methodist Sunday School.
Pitts Hill Primitive Methodist School, (fn. 115) High St., Pitts Hill1872–5Transferred to School Board 1875 (see Pitts Hill Board School).Used buildings of Pitts Hill Primitive Methodist Sunday School.
St. Mary's C.E. Infants' School, (fn. 116) Lascelles St.1860Opened as mixed and infants' school. Reorganized 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group A). Aided status since June 1953.The infants' school replaced by new building in 1911 on separate site. Former infants' school then added to boys' department.
St. Mary's C.E. Secondary School, (fn. 117) Harewood St.1929Reorganized as such 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group A).Occupying buildings of former mixed department of St. Mary's C.E. School (see St. Mary's C.E. Infants' School).
Sandyford C.E. School (fn. 118) 1874Mixed school. Closed 1884–92.
Summerbank C. Infants' School, (fn. 119) Summerbank Rd.1909See Summerbank C. Junior School.
Summerbank C. Junior School, (fn. 120) Summerbank Rd.1909Opened as all-age school. Reorganized 1929 (see Table XI, Tunstall, Group A).
Summerbank C.S. Girls' School, (fn. 121) Summerbank Rd.1929See Table XI, Tunstall, Group A.Occupying part of buildings of Summerbank C. School (see Summerbank C. Junior School).
Tunstall C.E. School, (fn. 122) King St.1839Controlled by Hulme Trustees. Opened as National School for B/G/I. By 1905 part of infants' school formed Lyndhurst Street Temporary School, Lyndhurst Street. Board of Education recognition withdrawn and school closed and replaced by Summerbank Council School (q.v.) 1909.Enlarged 1871 and 1898.
Tunstall Primitive Methodist Day School, (fn. 123) Wedgwood St.1872Opened as B/G/I. Succeeded a private school which was opened c. 1840. Closed 1880–4.
Tunstall R.C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 124) Oldcourt St.1853Opened as mixed all-age school. In 1874 infants made a separate department. Seniors transferred in 1957 to Blessed William Southerne C.S. School, Tunstall. Aided status since Jan. 1952.Original buildings erected in Plex St. in 1853. Infants' school erected 1874. Oldcourt St. schools built 1902–3.
Tunstall Wesleyan Day School, (fn. 125) John St.1838Mixed all-age school. Transferred to School Board in 1890 (see Highgate C. Junior and Infants' School).
BURSLEM
Burslem Wesleyan Day School, (fn. 126) Moorland Rd.1814School taken over by School Board 1902.In Sunday-school buildings erected 1789. New buildings 1850, enlarged in 1884.
Cobridge C.E. Infants' School, (fn. 127) Mawdesley St., Cobridge1857Opened as B/GI. B/G/I by 1884. Reorganized 1953. Controlled status since May 1948.
Cobridge Free School, (fn. 128) Sneyd St.1766Closed by c. 1850.Repaired 1821.
Cobridge R.C. Junior and Infant's School, (fn. 129) Waterloo Rd.1822B/GI by 1852. Also night school by then. Reorganized 1957, when seniors went to Blessed William Southerne C.S. School, Tunstall. Aided status from July 1951.Rebuilt 1905, new buildings opened 1906.
Granville C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 130) Granville St., Cobridge1854Opened by Earl Granville and the partners of Shelton Bar Iron Co. Transferred to the Burslem School Board 1890 by Shelton Iron, Steel, and Coal Co. B/G/I until 1899, then mixed and infants until 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).Rebuilt 1898.
Hamil Road Temporary Branch School, (fn. 131) Hamil Rd.1903Took juniors from Park Council School 1903–4.Occupying Primitive Methodist Sunday-school building.
Hill Top C. Junior School, (fn. 132) Greenhead St.1875Opened as B/G/I. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).Opened in buildings of Burslem Sunday School. New buildings 1878. Enlarged 1879, 1880, 1893.
Hill Top C. Infants' School, (fn. 133) Greenhead St.1875Reorganized as such 1931 (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).Opened in buildings of Burslem Sunday School. New buildings 1878.
Jackfield C. Infants' School, (fn. 134) Jackfield St.1904Took infants from Park Road School.
Longport C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 135) Longport Rd., Longport1875Girls and infants until 1893 when it became mixed and infants. Nursery department by 1895. Reorganized Sept. 1940 with Middleport C. Infants' School (q.v.).Opened in buildings of Wesleyan Sunday School, Longport. New buildings 1878. New school for mixed dept. 1893.
Middleport C. Infants' School, (fn. 136) Morton St., Middleport1877Opened as B/G/I. In 1883 made B/G/JM/I. By 1895 a nursery department. Reorganized with Longport C.J. School (q.v.) in Sept. 1940.Extended 1877–8; new infants' school 1878–9. Extended again 1883. Buildings altered 1893 and 1900.
Middleport C.S. School, (fn. 137) Morton St., Middleport1940Formed on reorganization of Middleport and Longport C.P. Schools (see Middleport C. Infants' School).Occupying part of former Middleport C. Infants' School.
Moorland C. Junior School, (fn. 138) Moorland Rd.1911Took children from Burslem Central (Wesleyan) Schools which then closed. B/G/I until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).
Moorland C.S. Boys' School, (fn. 139) Moorland Rd.1931Arose out of 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).In buildings of former Moorland C. Junior School.
Moorland C.S. Girls' School, (fn. 140) Moorland Rd.1931Arose out of 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).In buildings of former Moorland C. Junior School.
North C. Infants' School, (fn. 141) North Rd., Cobridge1876Reorganized as such 1931 (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).See North C. Junior School.
North C. Junior School, (fn. 142) North Rd., Cobridge1876Opened as B/G/I. Nursery class by 1895. Mixed and infants from 1903. Reorganized 1931.Extended 1903.
Park Road School (fn. 143) 1896Infants' dept. opened 1895–6, and mixed dept. in Apr. 1896. In 1903 juniors transferred to Hamil Road School (q.v.). Infants transferred to Jackfield School in 1904 when juniors returned. Reorganized 1931 when school became a junior mixed school for one year, then made senior school only (see Park C.S. School).In 1904 juniors moved into former infants' school building.
Park C.S. School, (fn. 144) Park Rd.1931Formed on reorganization of 1931 (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).Using buildings of former Park Road Council School.
Portland House C. Technical School, (fn. 145) Newcastle St.1948
St. John's C.E. Infant's School, (fn. 146) Cross Hill1817Founded as an all-age school. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Burslem, Group A). Controlled status since April 1950.Rebuilt 1896 on the site of the nearby Churchyard Pottery.
St. John's C.E. Secondary School, (fn. 147) Cross Hill1931Arose out of recognization (see Table XI, Burslem, Group A). Controlled status since April 1950.Using buildings of former St. John's C.E. Primary School (see St. John's C.E. Infants' School).
St. Joseph's R.C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 148) Pack Horse Lane1898Opened as mixed and infants' school. Reorganized 1957, when seniors went to Blessed William Southerne C.S. School, Tunstall. Aided status from June 1951.School-church till 1927.
St. Paul's C.E. Junior School, (fn. 149) Sant St., Dale Hall1836Opened as mixed school. Closed 1849. Reopened 1857 or 1860. Branch school at the Sytch for infants c. 1876 until c. 1880. Mixed and infants by 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Burslem, Group C). Controlled status from May 1949.Extended 1879. In 1907 infants' school housed in Hope Mission, Shirley St.
Sneyd C.E. School (fn. 150) 1857, 1868Parochial School opened 1857. Apparently closed by 1860. Sneyd National School opened 1868 as B/GI. By 1892 mixed and infants. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Burslem, Group A). Controlled status from Nov. 1949. Closed 1957.Building of first school erected 1825. Building of Sneyd National School erected 1867.
Sneyd Green C. Junior School, (fn. 151) Sneyd St.1901Opened as mixed school. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Burslem, Group B).Erected 1899.
Sneyd Green C. Infants' School, (fn. 152) Sneyd St.1901
Stanfield C. Technical School, (fn. 153) Moorland Rd.1932Extended 1959.
HANLEY
Ashley Street National School (fn. 154) 1856Used first as an evening Ragged School. By 1860 in use as day allage run by C.E. clergy and committee of Shelton National School.
Bedford Street School (fn. 155) 1872Opened by School Board for girls and infants. Closed 1880 when children transferred to new Wharf Lane School (q.v.).Used Sunday School of Bedford Methodist New Connexion Chapel.
Blemont C. Infants' School, (fn. 156) Belmont Rd., Etruria1934Opened as infants' school to alleviate overcrowding in other schools.
Bethesda Board School, (fn. 157) Bethesda St.. .Formerly Bethesda School. Children transferred to Cannon Street School 1880 (see Lindsay C. Infants' School).Used Bethesda Sunday School.
Bethesda School, (fn. 158) Bethesda St.1860Run by trustees of Bethesda Methodist New Connexion Chapel. School transferred to School Board in 1872.Used Bethesda Sunday School.
Birches Head R.C. School, (fn. 159) Boulton St., Birches Head1915Opened with infants and young children only. After 1925 became complete school up to 14 years old. Still all-age mixed and infants' school. Aided status from June 1951.
British School, (fn. 160) Pall Mall1818Boys only. Still in use in 1860. Closed by 1868.Building now Hanley Ref. Libr.
Bryan Street Board School (fn. 161) 1872Opened as mixed all-age school in 1852 as Hanley Ragged School. Taken over by School Board in 1872. Children transferred in 1880 to York Street Schools (see Clarence C. Junior and Infants' School).Used building of Hanley Ragged School, which was sold in 1864, and present building erected in 1867–8.
Cauldon C. Infants' School, (fn. 162) Cauldon Rd., Shelton1891Formerly infants' department of Cauldon Road Council School (see Cauldon C. Junior School).See Cauldon C. Junior School.
Cauldon C. Junior School, (fn. 163) Cauldon Rd., Shelton1891Opened by School Board for B/G/I and continued as such until 1932 (see Table XI, Hanley, Group B).New boys' and girls' schools in 1896. Further additions 1902.
Cauldon C.S. Boys' School, (fn. 164) Cauldon Rd., Shelton1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Hanley, Group B).Using part of buildings of former Cauldon Road Council School (see Cauldon C. Junior School).
Clarence C. Junior and Infants' School (fn. 165) (formerly York Street Schools), York St.1880Opened by School Board as B/G/I taking children from Bryan Street Board School and continued as such until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Hanley, Group A).
Cliff Vale C. Infants' School, (fn. 166) Valley Rd., Cliff Vale1940Opened as infants' school.
Eastwood C. Junior School, (fn. 167) Franklyn St.1876National School transferred to School Board in 1876 as a girls' and infants' school. Boys' department opened in 1880. Continued as B/G/I until 1939 when reorganized (see Table XI, Hanley, Group C).Used buildings of National School. New buildings 1880.
Eastwood Vale National School, (fn. 168) 1861Opened as school for girls and infants. By 1871 also had boys. Transferred to School Board in 1876 (see Eastwood C. Junior School).
Etruria British School (fn. 169) 1851Opened for B/G. Closed on opening of Etruria Board School 1881 (see Etruria C. Junior School).Housed in building belonging to the Methodist Chapel. Infants' department, formerly Etruria Unsectarian School, in separate building.
Etruria C. Junior School, (fn. 170) Cavour St., Etruria1881Opened by School Board for B/G/I/ Babies. Took place of Etruria British School and Etruria Unsectarian School (q.v.). Continued as B/G/I until 1934 when senior boys sent to Cannon Street, Lindsay, and Cauldon Secondary Schools. Infants transferred in 1940 to Cliff Vale School (q.v.). Senior girls transferred 1940 to Wharf Lane Secondary School.
Etrutia National School (fn. 171) 1847In 1875 a mixed and infants' school. It was closed on or before the opening of Etruria Board School in 1881.
Etrutia Unsectarian School (fn. 172) 1847Opened as infants' school. Subsequently merged with Etruria British School (q.v.).Building belonged to Francis Wedgwood.
Glass Street Council School (fn. 173) (formerly Hanley Central Board School)1892Opened by School board for B/G/I. Took oldest boys from Broom Street, Grove, and Wellington Schools in 1906. Continued as B/G/I until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Hanley, Group A).
Glass Street C.S. Girls' School (fn. 174) 1931Arose out of 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Hanley, Group A).Used buildings of former Glass Street Council School.
Grove C. Infants' School, (fn. 175) Turner St., Northwood1891Opened as girls' and infants' school in succession to Northwood Board School (q.v.). In 1902 it became mixed and infants. Reorganized in 1932 (see Table XI, Hanley, Group E).Opened in buildings in Beaumont St. New buildings in 1902.
Grove C.S. School, (fn. 176) Turner St., Northwood1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Hanley, Group E).Using part of buildings of former Grove Council School (see Grove C. Infants' School).
Hamilton C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 177) Barthomley Rd., Birches Head1913Opened as all-age school to take overflow from various schools including Mount Street Temporary Council School. Reorganized in 1932 (see Table XI, Hanley, Group E).
Hanley C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 178) Lichfield St.1816Opened as a girls' school. By 1851 it was for B/G/I. Continued as such until 1952 when on the school's becoming controlled the seniors were dispersed to various secondary schools in the area.Infants' school erected 1862. Rehoused almost completely since 1952 in prefabricated buildings.
Hanley Ragged School, (fn. 179) Bryan St.1852School transferred to School Board in 1872 (see Bryan Street Board School).Used building known as the Workmen's Refuge. New building 1867–8.
Hanley Wesleyan School (fn. 180) 1863Date of closure unknown.Used Sunday-school buildings attached to Wesleyan Chapel.
Hanley C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 181) Broom St.1879Opened by School Board for B/G/I taking children from Mount Street Temporary Board School (q.v.). Took oldest girls from Grove, Wellington, and Central Schools from 1906. Continued as B/G/I until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Hanley, Group A).
Hope (or Trinity) National School, (fn. 182) Hope St.1858Mixed all-age school. Still open in 1876.Buildings erected 1858.
Lindsay C. Infants' School, (fn. 183) (formerly Cannon Street Schools), Cannon St., Shelton1881Took children formerly at Bethesda Board School (q.v.). Opened by School Board for B/G/I. In 1904 took oldest girls from York Street, Wharf Lane, Eastwood, Cauldon, and Etruria Schools and oldest boys from Etruria, Cauldon, York Street, and Eastwood Schools. Continued as B/G/I until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Hanley, Group A).
Lindsay C.S. Boys' School, (fn. 184) Cannon St., Shelton1932Arose out of 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Hanley, Group A).Using buildings of former girls' and boys' departments of Cannon Street Schools (see Lindsay C. Infants' School).
Mount Street Temporary Board School, (fn. 185) Northwood1873All-age mixed school. Children transferred to Broom Street Schools in 1880 (see Hanley C. Junior and Infants' School).Used buildings belonging to Primitive Methodist Chapel.
Mount Street Temporary Board School, (fn. 186) Northwood1898Opened as a temporary infants' school.Used buildings belonging to Primitive Methodist Chapel.
Mount Street Temporary Council School, (fn. 187) Northwood1904Opened by Education Committee to provide temporary accommodation for children attending Hanley Northwood Junior School. Condemned and closed in 1904. Mount Street School closed in 1907.Used buildings belonging to Primitive Methodist Chapel.
Mount Street Temporary Council School, (fn. 188) Northwood1910Opened as temporary infants' school to alleviate position in Northwood area. Closed 1932–3.Used buildings belonging to Primitive Methodist Chapel.
Northwood Board School, (fn. 189) Keelings Lane, Northwood1874Mixed all-age school. Closed in 1891 on opening of Grove School (q.v.), which took girls and infants.Housed in building belonging to Wesleyan Chapel.
Northwood C. Junior School, (fn. 190) Keelings Lane, Northwood1932Opened in 1932 as part of reorganization scheme.
Northwood C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 191) Keelings Lane, Northwood1858–9Opened 1858–9 but closed between 1860 and 1868. Reopened by 1876 and reconstituted in 1882 when more buildings were erected. Then continued from this date as B/G/I until reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Hanley, Group E). Controlled status from Aug. 1949.New infants' school erected 1882.
Sacred Heart R.C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 192) Downey St.1861Opened as mixed all-age school. In 1891 became B/G/I. In 1900 infants and juniors separated from seniors. Continued as such until 1932, when reorganized (see also Sacred Heart R.C. Secondary School). Aided status from June 1951.Original school part of church of St. Mary and St. Patrick, Lower Foundry St. In 1868 new buildings erected, part of same range as church. New buildings in Downey St. erected 1893. Extended 1897 and 1958.
Sacred Heart R.C. Secondary School, (fn. 193) Downey St.1932Arose out of reorganization. Aided status from Oct. 1952.Using part of buildings of former Sacred Heart all-age School (see Sacred Heart R.C. Junior and Infants' School).
Shelton C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 194) Wood Terrace, Shelton1838National School. Mixed all-age until 1932 when reorganized (see Table XI, Hanley, Group B). Aided status from Oct. 1953.Buildings erected 1838.
Shelton C.S. Girls' School, (fn. 195) Wharf Lane, Shelton1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Hanley, Group B).Used buildings of former Wharf Lane Council School (q.v.).
Trent (formerly Leek Road) C. Infants' School, (fn. 196) Leek Rd.1913Opened as infants' school. Took junior boys from Wellington School in 1932 and ceased to be infants' school. Became infants' school again in 1940.
Wellington C. Infants' School, (fn. 197) Wellington Rd. (formerly Cobalt St.)1891Formerly Wellington National School (q.v.), transferred to School Board in 1891. Continued as B/G/I until 1932 when reorganized (see Table XI, Group C).Housed in former National School buildings in Mulberry St. until 1893 when new buildings in Cobalt St. erected.
Wellington C.S. School, (fn. 198) Wellington Rd.1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Hanley, Group C).Used buildings of former boys' and girls' departments of Wellington Council School (see Wellington C. Infants' School).
Wellington National School, (fn. 199) Mulberry St.1862Opened as a mixed school; by 1872 for B/G/I. School transferred to School Board in 1891 (see Wellington C. Infants' School).Opened in buildings belonging to a Mr. Sawyer. School erected later in 1862. Used also as a Sunday School attached to St. Luke's Church, Hanley.
Wharf Lane Council School (fn. 200) 1880Formerly Bedford Street School (q.v.). Opened by School Board for G/I. Continued as such until 1932 when buildings were transferred to the new Shelton Senior School (see Table XI, Hanley, Group B).
STOKE-UPON-TRENT
Boothen C.E. Infants' School, (fn. 201) London Rd.1859Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A). Controlled status from Sept. 1955.Occupied the shell of three cottages. In 1870 replaced by new school-church. A new wing added 1875. In 1877 it ceased to be used as a church. Further additions in 1878. New infants' school 1902.
Boothen C.E. Junior School, (fn. 202) London Rd.1859Formerly part of Boothen National Schools. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A). Controlled status from March 1956.See Boothen C.E. Infants' School.
Cliff Vale C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 203) North St., Cliff Vale1857Opened as a mixed branch school for young children. Gradually became all-age. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A). Closed soon after 1941.Opened in a cottage at Cliff Vale, then in two cottages which were turned into a school-church. Iron schoolchurch built. Burnt down 1865. New building erected 1865. Became school only in 1906. Building still (1960) stands and is used as a builder's yard.
Close C. Junior School, (fn. 204) Quarry Rd., Hartshill1933Opened as new school in 1933 as part of reorganization.Old house converted into a school.
Garner Street Council School, (fn. 205) Garner St., Cliff Vale1898Infants' school only. Closed c. 1934.Used the C. of E. mission room.
Harpfield C. Infants' School, (fn. 206) Hartshill Rd., Hartshill1872Infants' dept. of former Harpfield Council School (see Harpfield C. Junior School). Separate school after reorganization of 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group C).Using part of 1875 buildings of former infants' department of Harpfield Council School.
Harpfield C. Junior School, (fn. 207) Hartshill Rd., Hartshill1872Opened as Kingscroft Board School. Mixed and infants' until 1902, when it became B/G/I. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group C).Temporary iron buildings on lease at first. New school 1875. School remodelled 1892–5. New boys' school 1902. Now using part of 1875 building.
Harpfield C.S. School, (fn. 208) Hartshill Rd., Hartshill1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Stoke, Group C).Using former buildings of boys' dept. of Harpfield Council School (see Harpfield C. Junior School).
Hartshill C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 209) Vicarage Rd., Hartshill1836Founded by Herbert Minton. Mixed school until 1932 when reorganized (see Table XI, Stoke, Group C). Controlled status from April 1948.New buildings 1851.
Honeywall C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 210) Cross St. (formerly Epworth St.)1872Opened as B/GI. In 1881 juniors formed into separate dept. using Wesleyan Sunday School. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group C). Closed 1960.Opened in buildings of Wesleyan Sunday School, Cross St. New buildings 1876. In 1881 used Wesleyan Sunday School as annexe for junior school. New junior school building 1884.
Oak Hill C. Infants' School, (fn. 211) Rookery Lane, Oak Hill1932All infants transferred to this from Oak Hill Council School (see Oak Hill C. Junior School) on reorganization of 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group D).Wooden buildings erected 1932.
Oak Hill C. Junior School, (fn. 212) Rookery Lanc, Oak Hill1924Junior mixed only until Nov. 1925. Then all-age. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group D).Now using 1938 buildings.
Oak Hill C.S. School, (fn. 213) Rookery Lane, Oak Hill1932Arose from reorganization of 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group D). Received seniors of Hanford C.E. School in 1938.Using 1932 buildings; extended in 1938.
Penkhull C. Infants' School, (fn. 214) Trent Valley Rd., Penkhull1876Formerly Penkhull National School (q.v.). Mixed and infants' till 1932 when reorganized (see Table XI, Stoke, Group D).Enlarged 1889, 1897, and 1914.
Penkhull C.S. School, (fn. 215) Prince's Rd., Penkhull1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Stoke, Group D).Occupying part of buildings of Penkhull Council School.
Penkhull National School, (fn. 216) Trent Valley Rd., Penkhull1844Opened as boys' and girls' school. Transferred to School Board in 1876 (see Penkhull C. Infants' School).
Roman Catholic School, (fn. 217) Back Glebe St.1850Closed probably by 1859.Used church.
St. Peter's C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 218) Wharf St.1815Opened as B/G/I. Endowment of £3,000 by Dean Woodhouse 1830, shared by this school, St. Mark's School, Shelton, and St. John's School, Hanley. Reorganized in 1905 as SB, SG, JM, I. SB in new Boothen Rd. buildings. Reorganized again in 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A). Aided status from April 1952.New boys' school in Boothen Old Rd. in 1904 (see Stoke Central National School).
St. Peters' C.E. Secondary Boys' School, (fn. 219) Boothen Old Rd.1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A). Aided status from April 1952.Using buildings of former Central National School.
St. Peter's C.E. Secondary Girls' School, (fn. 220) Wharf St.1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A). Aided status from April 1952.Using part of buildings of former St. Peter's National School (see St. Peter's C.E. Junior and Infants' School).
St. Peter's R.C. Girls' School, (fn. 221) Knowl St.1859Opened for girls and infants. Run by the Dominican Sisters. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group B).Rebuilt 1877. Extended 1924.
St. Thomas's R.C. Boys' School, (fn. 222) Knowl St.1876Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group B).Original buildings in Lonsdale St. Knowl St. buildings opened 1915.
St. Thomas's R.C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 223) Knowl St.1931Arose out of 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Stoke, Group B). Aided status from June 1951.Occupying buildings of former St. Peter's R.C. Girls' School (q.v.).
St. Thomas's R.C. Secondary School, (fn. 224) Knowl St.1931Arose out of 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Stoke, Group B). Aided status from Dec. 1951.Occupying buildings of former St. Thomas's R.C. Boys' School (q.v.) and part of former buildings of St. Dominic's High School.
St. Teresa's R.C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 225) Stone Rd., Trent Vale1937Aided status from Jan. 1952.
Springfield C. Infants' School, (fn. 226) Springfields Rd., Oak Hill1953
Springfield C. Junior School, (fn. 227) Springfields Rd., Oak Hill1953
Stoke Central National (fn. 228) School, Boothen Old Rd.1905Took senior boys from St. Peter's C.E. School and Boothen C.E. School (q.v.). Reorganized 1932 as St. Peter's C.E. Boys' Secondary School (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A).Enlarged 1894.
Trent Vale C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 229) Newcastle Rd., Trent Vale1845Mixed and infants' until 1932 when reorganized (see Table XI, Stoke, Group D). Aided status from June 1953.
Trent Vale Temporary Council School, (fn. 230) London Rd., Trent Vale1909Infants' school only, now closed.
FENTON
Fenton C.E. Junior School, (fn. 231) Christchurch St.1839Opened as Fenton National School for B/G/I. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Fenton). Aided status from Dec. 1952.Original school built in churchyard. New infants' school erected 1864. In 1867 boys using the Athenaeum.
Fenton C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 232) Brocksford St.1897Formerly Queen Street Board School. Opened as mixed and infants' school. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Fenton).
Fenton C.S. Boys' School, (fn. 233) Brocksford St.1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Fenton).Erected 1897 using part of former Fenton Council School (see Fenton C. Junior and Infants' School).
Fenton Low C.E. Infants' School (fn. 234) 1876Infants only. Replaced by Manor Street Council School in 1910.Mission church.
Fenton R.C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 235) Masterson St.1885Opened as infants' school. Expanded to all-age school later, possibly in 1895–6. Aided status from June 1956.Extended 1895–6, 1916, 1927.
Fenton Wesleyan Day School, (fn. 236) Raglan St.1871Taken over by School Board as Raglan St. Board School in 1894.Building completed 1867.
Glebe C. Infants' School, (fn. 237) King St.1872See Glebe C. Junior School.See Glebe C. Junior School.
Glebe C. Junior School, (fn. 238) King St.1872Formerly Market Street Board School. Opened as mixed and infants' school. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Fenton).Used Methodist New Connexion, Mount Tabor Sunday School. New buildings 1878.
Heron Cross C. Junior School, (fn. 239) Grove Rd., Heron Crossc. 1894Formerly Wesleyan Day School. Mixed and infants' school until 1932 when reorganized (see Table XI, Fenton).Opened in Wesleyan School building. New buildings erected 1894. New infants' school erected 1911.
Heron Cross C.S. School, (fn. 240) Grove Rd., Heron Cross1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Fenton).Erected 1894, part of buildings of former Heron Cross Council School (see Heron Cross C. Junior School).
Manor C. Infants' School, (fn. 241) William St.1910Took children from Fenton Low C.E. Infants' School (q.v.).
Manor C.S. Girls' School, (fn. 242) Manor St.1932Arose out of 1932 reorganization (see Table XI, Fenton).Erected 1932.
Mount Pleasant C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 243) Smithpool Rd., Mount Pleasant1858Opened as branch school of St. Peter's C.E. School. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Stoke, Group A). Aided status from April 1952.Opened in carpenter's shop in Bridge St. In 1859 moved to a former dissenting meeting house. Iron school-church erected 1861. New school church built, twice enlarged, 1867–77.
Turner Memorial C.E. Infants' School, (fn. 244) Fenpark Rd.1865Formerly China Street National School. Managed by Trustees of Allen's Charity. Young children, under 10 years old, and infants only. Reorganized 1932 (see Table XI, Fenton). Aided status from Dec. 1952.Building erected 1840. New building 1896.
St. John's Branch National School, (fn. 245) Pool DoleBy 1872Closed by 1876.
LONGTON
Alexandra C. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 246) Uttoxeter Rd.1886Formerly called Normacot Board School and Uttoxeter Road County Junior School. Opened as B/G/I. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton).
Cooke Street C.S. Girls' School, (fn. 247) Edensor1931Senior mixed from 1931 to 1935, when boys transferred to Queensberry Senior School for Boys.Occupied buildings of former Cooke St. Council School until c. 1938 when moved to new buildings in Edensor Rd. (see Edensor C.S. School).
Dresden C.E. Infants' School, (fn. 248) Belgrave Rd., Dresden1853See Dresden C.E. Junior School.See Dresden C.E. Junior School.
Dresden C.E. Junior School, (fn. 249) Belgrave Rd., Dresden1853Started as mixed all-age school. Infants made separate department in 1865. Benefited under Betton's Charity. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton). Controlled status from Jan. 1953.New infants' school 1865. Another new infants' school 1914 when previous infants' building taken over as mixed dept.
East Vale C.E. School, (fn. 250) Palmer St., East Vale1870Mixed all-age school. Closed 1904.School-church.
Edensor C.E. Infants' School, (fn. 251) Edward St., Edensor1868Former mixed school became infants' only in 1868. Moved 1949 on buildings' being condemned, forming an infants' department of Edensor C.E. Junior School (q.v.) for a time. Had ceased by 1959.Housed in old part of Edward St. building. Building enlarged 1877. Condemned as school 1949.
Edensor C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 252) Cooke St., EdensorBy 1851Opened as mixed all-age school by 1851. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton). In 1948 became a controlled school and moved into buildings in Cooke St. formerly used by the Electricity Board. Infants' school formed department of this school for a time after 1949.New buildings erected 1868 in Edward St. Condemned in 1949 when moved to buildings in Cooke St. (formerly Cooke St. Council School).
Edensor C.S. School, (fn. 253) Edensor Rd.1932Boys' school till c. 1938 when became mixed.Extended c. 1938 to accommodate girls from Cooke St. C. Secondary (q.v.).
Florence C. Infants' School, (fn. 254) Lilleshall St., Florence1886See Florence C. Junior School.See Florence C. Junior School.
Florence C. Junior School, (fn. 255) Lilleshall St., Florence1886Founded as B/G/I. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton).
Free School (fn. 256) c. 1763Founded by John Bourne with endowment of Golden Lion Inn and 2 cottages. Amalgamated with St. John's National School.
Grafton C. Infants' School, (fn. 257) Marlborough St.1892See Grafton C. Junior School.See Grafton C. Junior School.
Grafton C. Junior School, (fn. 258) Marlborough St.1872Opened as boys' school. Small attendance; therefore arrangement to take 137 boys from private school of Josiah Ball (at St. John's Church), all half-timers, as latter school overcrowed. Ball subsidized by Board to make up loss of fees. Girls' and infants' depts. opened Dec. 1892. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton).Opened in Sunday-school buildings of Zion Chapel. In Dec. 1873 St. John's schoolrooms taken over, Ball's lease of them having fallen in. New buildings erected 1892.
Heathcote C. Infants' School (fn. 259) (formerly Cooke Street School), Cooke St., Edensor1891Replaced Longton Wesleyan Day School, taken over by Board Sept. 1891. M/I until 1931 reorganization (see Table XI, Longton).Held in Wesleyan Day School buildings until 1893 when Cooke St. School erected.
High Street Schools, (fn. 260) Uttoxeter Rd.1879Opened as B/G/I. Reorganized 1931 as infants' school only (see Table XI, Longton). Infants' school transferred to part of Alexandra Road School premises in 1949 on the High St. premises' being condemned. School closed 1956.
Independent School, (fn. 261) Caroline St.By 1854Still open 1860. Closed by 1868.
Independent Chapel Board School, (fn. 262) Caroline St.1873Temporary school for boys. Open for short period only.Using Congregational Sundayschool buildings.
Longton C.E. School, (fn. 263) Webberley Lane1836Benefited under will of Dr. J. C. Woodhouse. Opened as B/G/I. After 1868, B/G/I until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Longton). Became controlled Oct. 1952.In 1868 boys' department housed in Methodist New Connexion Sunday School, Commerce St.
Methodist New Connexion School, (fn. 264) Commerce St.1851, 1872Opened in 1851 but closed by 1854. Reopened by 1872. Moved to New St. by 1876. Closed by early 1880's.
Mount Pleasant National School, (fn. 265) Mount Pleasant (now Lawley St.)1866Opened as mixed school. Closed 1873.School-church.
Normacot C.E. Infants' School, (fn. 266) Meir Rd., Normacot1853Opened as mixed all-age school, boys' and girls' depts. forming a separate school by at least 1895. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton). Controlled status from July 1951. Junior school closed c. 1954.New buildings 1876 (enlarged 1886) for boys and girls. New infants' school 1895. The 1876 buildings and enlargements of 1886 demolished c. 1954.
Queensberry Road Central School, (fn. 267) Normacot Rd.1901/2In 1901 boys' department of Queensberry Road Board School was recognized as a Higher Elementary School and girls' department as a Higher Standard School. In 1902 both recognized as a Higher Elementary School. In 1921 these departments of Queensberry Road Schools were recognized as a Central School. Reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton). See also Queensberry Road Council School.Using part of buildings of Queensberry Road Board School.
Queensberry Road Council School, (fn. 268) Normacot Rd.1898Opened by School Board as an allage boys', girls', and infants' school. Reorganized 1901–2 when part of school was recognized as a Higher Grade School. The rest remained an all-age Elementary School until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Longton). See also Queensberry Road Central School.
Queensberry C.S. Schools, (fn. 269) Normacot Rd.1931Opened as a senior school in 1931 upon reorganization (see Table XI, Longton) and became separate secondary schools for boys and girls after 1945.Used buildings of former Queensberry Road Council School and Queensberry Road Central School.
Roman Catholic School, (fn. 270) Gregory St.By 1834Closed by 1852 and reconstituted as St. Gregory's R.C. School (see below).Building enlarged in 1841.
St. Gregory's R.C. School, (fn. 271) Spring Garden Rd.1852Opened as boys' school only. Infants' department added in 1853. Girl's department opened in 1857. Reorganized 1937, when seniors were transferred to St. Gregory's R.C. Secondary School. Aided status from March 1953.Opened in buildings of former R.C. school, Gregory St. Infants' school built in 1853. New buildings erected in 1893 in Cemetery Rd. (now Spring Garden Rd.).
St. Gregory's R.C. Secondry School, (fn. 272) Spring Garden Rd.1937Took seniors from all R.C. schools in the area. Aided status from July 1953.
St. John's Branch School, (fn. 273) Park Hall St.By 1868Mixed school. Closed by 1876.
St. John's National School, (fn. 274) St. John's Churchyardc. 1825Old Free School amalgamated with St. John's National School after Charity Commissioners' Rep. of 1825. School then opened. Closed at some date between 1859 and 1872. Building occupied by a private school run by Josiah Ball by 1872 (see Grafton C.J. School).Buildings erected 1822, but school could not open for lack of funds. Land given by the Marquess of Stafford.
Wesleyan Day School, (fn. 275) Stafford St.1855Mixed school. Taken over by School Board in 1881 (see Heathcote C. Infants' School).Used Wesleyan Sunday School buildings.
Woodhouse C. Infants' School, (fn. 276) Anchor Rd., Sandford Hill1876Opened as B/G/I, and continued as such until 1931 when reorganized (see Table XI, Longton). See also Woodhouse C. Secondary School.Extended 1896.
Woodhouse C.S. School, (fn. 277) Anchor Rd., Sandford Hill1931Arose out of reorganization in 1931 (see Table XI, Longton).Using 1876 part of buildings of former Woodhouse Council School.

Table X - Schools in Area Added to County Borough in 1922 (fn. 278)

For abbreviations see Table IX

SchoolDate of openingChanges in organizationBuildings
Abbey Hulton C. Infants' School, School Rd., Abbey Hulton1936
Abbey Hulton C. Junior School, School Rd., Abbey Hulton1900
Abbey Hulton R.C. Junior and Infants' School, Abbey Lane, Abbey Hulton1938Aided status from June 1951.
Adderley Green C. Junior and Infants' School, Anchor Rd., Adderley Green1884Opened by Caverswall School Board for B/G/I. Continued as such until reorganized 1931 (see Table XI, Longton).Extended 1893.
Ball Green C. Infants' School, Whitfield Rd., Ball Green1930Opened in first instance as a temporary school.
Bentilee C. Infants' School, Beverley Drive, Ubberley1956
Bentilee C. Junior School, Beverley Drive, Ubberley1957
Berry Hill C. Infants' School, Arbourfield Drive, Bucknall1958
Blurton C.E. School1872Opened for B/G/I. Closed 1959 when only infants there. Aided status from March, 1953.Building erected 1834.
Blurton C. Infants' School, Poplar Drive, Blurton1948
Blurton C. Junior School, Poplar Drive, Blurton1948
Blurton C.S. School, Beaconsfield Drive, Blurton1956
Bradeley C. Infants' School, Chell Heath Rd., Bradeley1900Opened as mixed and infants' school. In 1936 reorganized as senior and infants' school. Juniors went to Smallthorne (see Bradeley C.S. School and Smallthorne C. Junior School).
Bradeley C.S. School, Chell Heath Rd., Bradeley1936Arose out of reorganization (see Bradeley C. Infants' School).Using part of buildings of former Bradeley Council School.
Brindley C. Mixed and Infants' School, Outclough Rd., Brindley Ford1863Opened as a Wesleyan school. Transferred to School Board by 1885.Originally used Methodist Sunday-school buildings. New buildings 1885.
Brookhouse Green C. Infants' School, Wellfield Rd., Ubberley1954
Brookhouse Green C. Junior School, Dawlish Drive, Ubberley1955
Bucknall C.E. Junior and Infants' School, (fn. 279) Guy St., Bucknallc. 1721Founded under the will of William Shallcross of Uttoxeter (proved 25 May 1721). School reconstituted in 1868. By 1871 the school was for B/G/I. It was reorganized in 1932, the seniors being transferred to Bucknall Senior School, now Bucknall C.S. School. Controlled status from June 1953.First schoolhouse built c. 1721. In bad condition by 1868 when new school was built on site 150 yards away. New girls' and infants' school completed in 1871.
Bucknall C. Infants' School, Malthouse Rd., Bucknall1877Opened by School Board for B/G/I. Reorganized as an infants' school after 1932.
Bucknall C.S. School, Malthouse Rd., BucknallAfter 1932Arose from reorganization of Bucknall Council School.Uses part of buildings of former Bucknall Council School (see Bucknall C. Infants' School).
Burnwood C.S. School, Chell Heath Rd., Chell Heath1958
Carmountside C. Infants' School, Woodhead Rd., Abbey Hulton1938
Carmountside C. Junior School, Woodhead Rd., Abbey Hulton1935
Carmountside C.S. School, Beard Grove, Abbey Hulton1939
Chapel Street Temporary School, (fn. 280) Chapel St., Bucknall1940Used premises belonging to chapel.
Chell Heath C. Infants' School, Sprink Bank Rd., Chell Heath1949
Chell Heath C. Junior School, Sprink Bank Rd., Chell Heath1950
Fegg Hayes C. Infants' School, Oxford Rd., Fegg Hayes1956
Grange C. Infants' School, Harrowby Rd., Meir1939
Grange C. Junior School, Harrowby Rd., Meir1939
Hanford C.E. School, Church Lane, Hanford1952Opened as a mixed all-age National School. Seniors sent to Oak Hill C.S. School in 1938. Controlled status from Jan. 1951.
Hem Heath C. Infants' School, Magdalen Rd., Blurton1958
Hem Heath C. Junior School, Magdalen Rd., Blurton1959
Holden Lane C. Infants' School, Ralph Drive, Sneyd Green1958
Meir C. Infants' School, Uttoxeter Rd., Meir1877Occupying buildings of former Meir Council School (see Meir C. Junior School).
Meir C. Junior School, Colclough Rd., Meir1877Opened as mixed and infants' Board school. Continued as such until 1931 when school reorganized (see Table XI, Longton).New buildings in 1931.
Meir C.S. School, Colclough Rd., Meir1931Erected as part of 1931 reorganization (see Meir C. Junior School).
Meir St. Augustine's R.C. Junior and Infants' School, Sandon Rd., Meir1937Aided status from June 1951.
Milton C. Infants' School, Leek Rd., Milton1874Housed in Bagnall Road Sunday School until 1912.
Milton C. Junior School, Leek Rd., Milton1874Opened as a girls' and infants' school. Became boys' school also 1890–6. Reorganized in 1932.Housed in buildings of Wesleyan Sunday School.
Milton C.S. School, (fn. 281) Leek Rd., Milton1932School formed on reorganization of Milton Council School in 1932.Using 1912 part of former Milton Council School buildings (see Milton C. Junior and Milton C. Infants' Schools).
Newstead C. Infants' School, Waterside Drive, Blurton1954
Newstead C. Junior School, Waterside Drive, Blurton1954
Newstead R.C. School, Springside Place, Blurton1954
Norton C. Junior and Infants' School, Norton Lane, Norton-in-the-Moors1848Succeeded school established in 1797. Opened as a parochial and National school. Had endowments from Hugh Ford (d. 1730) and Charlotte Sparrow (endowment given in 1851). School was for B/G/I until 1936 when reorganized as junior and infants' school, seniors going to Smallthorne Senior School. New county school succeeded church school in 1953.Original boys' and girls' school erected 1848, and infants' school 1849. In 1953 the school was closed and a new county school erected.
Packmoor C. Junior and Infants' School, Samuel St., Packmoor1949
Pinewood C. Junior and Infants' School, Pinewood Crescent, Meir1953
Rough Close C.E. Junior and Infants' School, Lightwood Rd., Rough Close1850Mixed all-age school until 1931 when reorganized, seniors going to various senior schools in Longton. Aided status from June 1953.Opened in mission church erected in 1850. New buildings, 1896.
St. Maria Goretti's R.C. Infants' School, (fn. 282) Aylesbury Rd., Bentilee1958
Smallthorne C. Infants' School, Regina St., Smallthorne1876Opened as B/G/I school. Continued as such until 1936 when reorganized as infants' and junior schools.Opened in Sunday-school buildings of Salem Chapel. New buildings erected in 1878.
Smallthorne C. Junior School, Regina St., Smallthorne1876See Smallthorne C. Infants' School.See Smallthorne C. Infants' School.
Smallthorne National School (fn. 283) 1855Opened as mixed all-age school. Became infants only by 1927. Closed shortly after.
Smallthorne R.C. Junior and Infants' School, Brierley St., Smallthorne1871Opened as all-age school. Aided status from July 1951.Original buildings in Queen St. (now Brierley St.). New buildings in 1904, extended 1934.
Sutherland C. Infants' School, Beaconsfield Drive, Blurton1954
Sutherland C. Junior School, Beaconsfield Drive, Blurton1954
Townsend C. Infants' School, Werrington Rd., Bucknall1949
Townsend C. Junior School, Werrington Rd., Bucknall1950
Trentham C.E. School, (fn. 284) Stone Rd., Trenthamc. 1674Boys' school opened under will of Lady Katherine Leveson (d. 1674). Girls' school opened as a private school, c 1856. By 1876 also an infants' school, all three run as Trentham Church schools. School reconstituted in 1877–8. Seniors sent to Oak Hill Secondary School in 1938. Controlled status from Jan. 1953. School due to be closed in 1960.Buildings in 1876 belonged to Duke of Sutherland. Boys' school erected c. 1674. Girls' school erected c. 1856. New buildings in 1877.
Willfield C.S. School, Lauder Place North, Ubberley1956

Table XI - Reorganization of Schools, 1929–1932

For abbreviations see Table IX

Tunstall
Group A (1929)
Forster Street (B/G/I)Tunstall High Street (J/I)
High Street (M/I)Highgate Senior (SB)
St. Mary's C.E. (B/G/I)St. Mary's C.E. (I)
St. Mary's C.E. Senior (SM)
Summerbank Council (BG/I)Summerbank C.J. (J/I)
Summerbank Senior (SG)
Group B (1929)
Goldenhill C.E. (M/I)Goldenhill C.E. (J/I)
Goldenhill Council (B/G/I)Goldenhill C.I. (I)
Goldenhill Senior (SM)
Burslem
Group A (1931)
St. John's C.E.(B/G/I)St. John's C.E. (I)
St. John's C.E. Senior (SM)
Sneyd C.E. (M/I)Sneyd C.E. (JM)
Group B (1931)
Granville Council (M, I)Granville C.J. (J, I)
Hill Top Council (B/G/I)Hill Top C.J. (J, I)
Moorland Road (B/G/I)Moorland Road C.J. (J/I)
Moorland Road Senior (B/G)
North Road Council (B/G/I)North Road C.J. (J/I)
Park Road Council (SM/JM)Park Road C.J. (J/I)
[Changed in 1932 to Jackfield C.I. and Park Road Senior (SM)]
Sneyd Green Council (M, I)Sneyd Green C.J. (J/I)
Group C (1931)
Longport Council (M, I)Longport C.J. (J/I)
Middleport Council (SB/SG/JM, I)Middleport C.J. (I)
Middleport Senior (SM)
St. Paul's C.E. (M, I)St. Paul's C.E. (J/I)
Hanley
Group A (1931)
Broom Street Council (B/G/I)Hanley C.J. and I (JM/I)
Cannon Street Council (B/G/I)Cannon Street C.I. [now Lindsay C.I.] (I)
Cannon Street Senior [now Lindsay C.S.] (SB)
Glass Street Council (B/G/I)Glass Street Senior (SG)
York Street Council (B/G/I)York Street C.J. [now Clarence C.J. and I] (JM/I)
Group B (1932)
Cauldon Road Council (B/G/I)Cauldon C.I. (I)
Cauldon C.J. (JM)
Cauldon Senior (SB)
Shelton C.E. (M, I)Shelton C.E. (JM, I)
Wharf Lane Council (B/G/I)Shelton Senior (SG)
Group C (1932)
Eastwood Vale Council (B/G/I)Eastwood Vale C.J. [all-age until 1939 when seniors transferred to Wellington Senior]
Leek Road (now Trent) Council (I)Leek Road C.I. (I)
Wellington Council (B/G/I)Wellington C.I. (I)
Wellington Senior (SM)
Group D (1932)
Grove Council (M/I)Grove C.I. (I)
Grove Senior (SM)
Hamilton Road Council (M, I)Hamilton C.J. (JM, I)
Northwood C.E. (B/G/I)Northwood C.E. (JM, I)
Northwood C.J. (JM)
Stoke
Group A (1932)
Boothen C.E. (M, I)Boothen C.E. (I)
Boothen C.E. (JM)
Cliff Vale C.E. (M, I)Cliff Vale C.E. (JM, I)
St. Peter's C.E. (SB/SG/JM, I)St. Peter's C.E. (JM, I)
St. Peter's Secondary Boys (SB)
St. Peter's Secondary Girls (SG)
Mount Pleasant [Fenton] C.E. (M, I)Mount Pleasant C.E. (JM, I)
Group B (1931)
St. Peter's R.C. (G, I)St. Thomas's R.C. (JM, I)
St. Thomas's R.C. (B)St. Thomas's R.C. Secondary (SM)
Group C (1932)
Hartshill C.E. (M, I)Hartshill C.E. (JM, I)
Harpfield Council (B/G/I)Harpfield C.J. (JM, I)
Harpfield C.S. (SM)
Honeywall Council (B/G/I)Honeywall Council (JM, I)
Group D (1932)
Oak Hill Council (M, I)Oak Hill C.I. (I)
Oak Hill C.J. (JM)
Oak Hill C.S. (SM)
Penkhull Council (M, I)Penkhull C.I. (I)
Penkhull C.S. (SM)
Trent Vale C.E. (M, I)Trent Vale C.E. (JM, I)
Fenton
(1932)
Fenton C.E. (B/G/I)Fenton C.E. (JM)
Heron Cross Council (M/I)Heron Cross C.J. (M/I)
Heron Cross C.S. (SM)
Market Square (now Glebe) Council (M/I)Glebe C.I. (I)
Glebe C.J. (JM)
Queen Street Council (M/I)Fenton C.J. and I (JM/I)
Fenton C.S. (SB) to which all senior boys transferred except those from Heron Cross.
Turner Memorial C.E. (J/I)Turner Memorial C.E. (I)
Manor C.S. (SG) to which all senior girls transferred except those from Heron Cross.
Longton
(1931)
Adderley Green Council (B/G/I)Adderley Green C.J. and I. (JM/I)
Alexandra Road Council (B/G/I)Alexandra Road C. (JM/I)
Cooke Street Council (M/I)Cooke Street [now Heathcote] C. (I)
Cooke Street Senior (SM)
Dresden C.E. (M, I)Dresden C.E. (JM/I)
Edensor C.E. (B/G/I)Edensor C.E. (JM/I)
Florence Council (B/G/I)Florence Council (JM/I)
Grafton Road Council (B/G/I)Grafton C.I. (I)
Grafton C.J. (JM)
High Street Council (B/G/I)High Street C. (I)
Longton C.E. (B/G/I)Longton C.E. (JM/I)
Meir Council (M/I)Meir C.I. (I)
Meir C.J. (JM)
Meir C.S. (SM)
Normacot C.E. (B/G/I)Normacot C.E.I. (I)
Queensberry Road Central (SB/SG)Queensberry Senior for Boys (SB)
Queensberry Road Council (B/G/I)Queensberry Senior for Girls (SG)
Woodhouse Council (B/G/I)Woodhouse C.I. (I)
Woodhouse C.S. (SM)

Footnotes

1 This article and the accompanying tables covers those schools, except nursery and grammar schools, supported by charitable endowments or out of public funds within the area of the present city.
2 Ward, Stoke, 488–9.
3 Lich. Dioc. Regy., Subscription Bk. 1730–8. Money was spent on the Stoke school in 1633: Stoke Churchwardens' Accts. (T.N.S.F.C. lxxiv), 68, 69, 70, 73.
4 S. W. Hutchinson, Archdeaconry of Stoke-on-Trent, 120.
5 Ward, Stoke, 489; 13th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 349, pp. 310–11 (1825), xi.
6 13th Rep. Com. Char. 319.
7 Educ. Enq. Abstract, H.C. 62, pp. 886–7 (1835), xlii.
8 Ward, Stoke, 567.
9 H.R.L., Fenton Commrs.' Mins. 6 Dec. 1870.
10 See pp. 154, 233.
11 13th Rep. Com. Char. 311–14.
12 Ibid.
13 Ibid. 312.
14 See p. 324.
15 White, Dir. Staffs. (1851).
16 See Table IX.
17 Staffs. End. Char. (Elem. Educ.) [Cd. 2729], pp. 49– 50, H.C. (1906), xc.
18 Staffs. End. Char. (Elem. Educ.) [Cd. 2729], pp. 49– 50, H.C. (1906), xc.
19 G. George, Educ. Organisation in Longton, an experiment in co-ordination and correlation (copy in H.R.L.).
20 Ibid.
21 Ibid.
22 Ibid.
23 Longton Educ. Cttee., High Sch. and Institute SubCttee. Mins. 6 June 1905.
24 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
25 Lich. Dioc. Regy., Subscription Bk. 1692–9.
26 13th Rep. Com. Char. 317–18.
27 There is, however, record of a school master in Burslem in the early 17th cent.: Wedgwood, Wedgwood Family, 260; T.N.S.F.C. lxxiv, pp. A68, 69, 70, 74.
28 13th Rep. Com. Char. 259–60.
29 White, Dir. Staffs. (1851).
30 G. Griffith, Free Schs. and Endowments of Staffs. 510.
31 Harrison, Harrod & Co.'s Dir. and Gaz. Staffs. (1861), 421.
32 P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1868).
33 Griffith, Free Schs. of Staffs. 511; Warrillow, Stoke, 274–5.
34 13th Rep. Com. Char. 326–8.
35 Ibid. 326.
36 P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1876); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1880).
37 Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1884, 1892).
38 See p. 259.
39 13th Rep. Com. Char. 316.
40 Ibid.
41 See Table XI.
42 Ed. 21/510; date-stone on building; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
43 Ed. 21/510.
44 Ibid.
45 Ibid.; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
46 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
47 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
48 M. Greenslade, A Brief Hist. of the Cath. Ch. in Stoke-on-Trent, 35.
49 Ibid.
50 Ibid.
51 Ibid. 37.
52 Ed. 7/112; see Table IX.
53 See Table IX; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Ward, Stoke, 481.
54 Warrillow, Stoke, 280–1.
55 Ibid. 281; see Table IX.
56 Warrillow, Stoke, 281.
57 Ibid. 282.
58 Ibid.
59 See Table IX.
60 See Table IX.
61 Stoke Sch. Bd. Triennial Rep. 1871–4; F. E. J. Wright, Schs. of the parish of St. Peter ad Vincula, Stoke.
62 Wright, op. cit.
63 Stoke Sch. Bd. Triennial Rep. 1871–4, introd.
64 Ibid.; Wright, op. cit.
65 See Table IX.
66 Stoke Sch. Bd. Triennial Rep. 1876.
67 Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1908).
68 Rep. on Sch. Bd. District of Longton, 1871–92; see Table IX.
69 See Table IX.
70 See p. 308.
71 Hanley Sch. Bd. Rep. of Proc. 1894–7.
72 Ibid.; see Table IX.
73 Hanley Sch. Bd. Rep. 1894–7.
74 Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1908).
75 See Table IX.
76 See p. 309.
77 Hanley Sch. Bd. Mins. passim.
78 Ibid. 27 Aug. 1894.
79 Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1896).
80 Burslem Sch. Bd. Mins. passim.
81 Burslem Sch. Bd. Mins. of Evening Classes Cttee. passim.
82 Burslem Educ. Cttee. Mins. passim.
83 See p. 68.
84 See Table IX, Tunstall.
85 See p. 104.
86 See p. 197.
87 Educ. (Provision of Meals) Act, 6 Edw. VII, c. 57.
88 Mins. of the various Educ. Cttees.
89 Tunstall Educ. Cttee. Mins. 24 Mar. 1909, 9 Mar. 1910.
90 Copy in City Educ. Offices.
91 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
92 See Tables IX, XI.
93 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
94 The list includes all schools, except nursery and grammar schools, existing in 1960; it also includes schools that had closed before 1960.
95 Birmingham Arch. Dioc. Dir. (1959), 234–5.
96 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; ex inf. head mistress (1959); 1959 List of Schs.; tablet in situ.
97 Ibid.
98 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
99 Ed. 7/112; 1959 List of Schs.; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
100 Ed. 7/112; 1959 List of Schs.; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
101 Ed. 7/112.
102 J. Jack, The Church on the Hill (1944), 41, 43; Ed. 7/112; Kelly Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
103 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. (City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916).
104 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
105 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
106 Ed. 7/112.
107 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
108 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
109 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
110 Jack, Ch. on the Hill, 15, 41.
111 Tunstall Educ. Cttee. Mins., 22 Nov. 1905; 31 Dec. 1906.
112 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
113 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
114 Ed. 7/112; Log Bk., Chell C. Infants' Sch., 19 July 1877.
115 Ed. 7/112.
116 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
117 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
118 Ed. 7/113; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1876); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1880, 1884, 1892).
119 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
120 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
121 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
122 Ed. 7/113; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1900); White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Tunstall Educ. Cttee. Mins., 22 Nov. 1905; 21 Mar., 31 Dec. 1906; 1909 passim.
123 Ed. 7/113; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1876); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1880, 1884).
124 Ed. 7/112; 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. the Clergy, Sacred Heart Ch., Tunstall; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
125 Ed. 7/112.
126 Ed. 7/112; Burslem Sch. Bd., Clerk's Rep., 5 Feb. 1902.
127 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1884); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
128 G. Griffith, Free Schs. and Endowments of Staffs. 511; Warrillow, Stoke, 274.
129 Ed. 7/112; Burslem Educ. Cttee., Sch. Management Cttee. Mins., 7 Feb. 1906; tablet in situ; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
130 Ed. 7/112; Burslem Sch. Bd., Sch. Management Cttee. Mins., 26 Aug. 1890, 25 Sept. 1899; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
131 Burslem Educ. Cttee., Clerk's Rep., 14 Dec. 1903.
132 Ed. 7/112; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1876); Burslem Sch. Bd., Clerk's Rep., 5 Oct. 1897; 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
133 Ed. 7/112; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1876); Burslem Sch. Bd., Clerk's Rep., 5 Oct. 1897; 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
134 Ed. 7/112; Burslem Educ. Cttee. Mins., 15 Feb. 1904; 1959 List of Schs.
135 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1880, 1916); Burslem Sch. Bd., Clerk's Rep., 5 Oct. 1897; ibid., Sch. Management Cttee. Mins. 21 May 1895.
136 Ed. 7/112; Burslem Sch. Bd. Review since 1874 and suppl 1883–1886, 11; Burslem Sch. Bd., Sch. Management Cttee. Mins., 17 Sept. 1883; ibid., Clerk's Rep., 5 Oct. 1897; Burslem Educ. Cttee., Sch. Management Cttee. Mins., 31 May 1895, 26 Mar. 1900; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
137 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
138 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
139 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
140 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
141 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
142 Ed. 7/112; Burslem Sch. Bd. Sch. Management Cttee., 21 Mar. 1895; Burslem Educ. Cttee., Clerk's Rep., 4 Dec. 1903; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
143 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1900); Burslem Sch. Bd., Sch. Management Cttee. Mins., April 1896; Burslem Educ. Cttee., Clerk's Rep., 14 Dec. 1903; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
144 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
145 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; see p. 112.
146 White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1900); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.; O.S. Map 6" Staffs. xii SW. (1890, 1900); see p. 133.
147 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
148 Ed. 7/112; 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; see p. 275.
149 Ed. 7/112; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1860, 1868, 1876); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1880); Burslem Educ. Cttee. Mins., 4 and 5 June 1906, 2 Oct., 6 Nov., 4 Dec. 1907; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
150 Ed. 7/112; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1860); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1892); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
151 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1912); tablet in situ; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
152 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1912); 1959 List of Schs.
153 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
154 Warrillow, Stoke, 281.
155 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
156 Ed. 7/112; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1872).
157 Ed. 7/112.
158 Ed. 7/112; Ed. 7/113.
159 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. head master (1959); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
160 Ed. 7/113; Ward, Stoke, 395–6; A. Huntbach, Hanley, 78; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1860, 1868). For a description of the building see p. 149.
161 Ed. 7/112; Warrillow, Stoke, 81.
162 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
163 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
164 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
165 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
166 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
167 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
168 Ed. 7/112.
169 Ed. 7/112.
170 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. head master (1959).
171 Ed. 7/112.
172 Ed. 7/112; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1872) where only the Brit. and Nat. Schs. are given.
173 Ed. 7/112; Hanley Educ. Cttee. Mins., 16 Feb. 1906; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
174 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
175 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
176 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
177 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
178 Ed. 7/112; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
179 Ed. 7/112; Warrillow, Stoke, 281.
180 Ed. 7/113.
181 Ed. 7/112; Hanley Educ. Cttee. Mins., 16 Feb. 1906; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
182 Ed. 7/113; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1876).
183 Ed. 7/112; Hanley Educ. Cttee. Mins., 16 Feb. 1906; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
184 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
185 Ed. 7/11.
186 Ed. 7/112.
187 Ed. 7/112; Hanley Educ. Cttee., Gen. Purposes Cttee. Mins., 21 Feb. 1906; Hanley Educ. Cttee. Mins., 27 Feb. 1907.
188 Ed. 7/112; City of Stoke on Trent Educ. Yr. Bk. (1932. 1933).
189 Ed. 7/112.
190 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
191 Ed. 7/112; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1860, 1868, 1876); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
192 Ed. 7/112; Worship Reg. no. 14302; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs. A School had been opened on the Lower Foundry St. site in 1858: M. Greenslade, A Brief Hist. of the Cath. Ch. in Stoke-on-Trent, 26, 27.
193 Ex inf. the head master (1960); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
194 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
195 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
196 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
197 Ibid.
198 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
199 Ed. 7/112.
200 Ed. 7/112; 1959 List of Schs.; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
201 Ed. 7/112; Wright, Schs. of the Parish of St. Peter ad Vincula, 10–11, 17; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
202 Ibid.
203 Ed. 7/112; Wright, op. cit. 8–10, 20; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
204 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
205 Stoke Sch. Board Triennial Rep., 1898–1900; Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
206 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
207 Ed. 7/112; Stoke Sch. Board Triennial Rep., 1892–95; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
208 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
209 Ed. 7/112; Ward, Stoke, 497; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
210 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); Stoke Sch. Board Triennial Rep., 1883–6; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
211 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
212 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
213 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
214 Ed. 7/112; Stoke Sch. Board Triennial Rep., 1886–9; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1900); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
215 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
216 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
217 M. Greenslade, Brief Hist. of Cath. Ch. in Stoke-onTrent, 35 (copy in W.S.L.); see p. 273.
218 Ed. 7/112; Wright, Schs. of St. Peter ad Vincula, 6, 19–20; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs. For a descrip. of the buildings see p. 180.
219 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
220 Ibid.
221 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1880); 1959 List of Schs.
222 Ibid.
223 Ex inf. the head master; 1959 List of Schs.
224 Ex inf. the head master, St. Thomas's R.C. Junior and Infants' Sch.; 1959 List of Schs.
225 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
226 Ibid.
227 Ibid.
228 Ed. 7/112; Wright, Schs. of St. Peter ad Vincula, 19–20; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
229 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1912); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
230 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1912).
231 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
232 Ibid.
233 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
234 Ed. 7/112.
235 Ed. 7/112; Cath. Emanc. Centenary Celebrations, Hanley, 1929; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
236 Ed. 7/112.
237 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
238 Ibid.
239 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1896); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
240 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
241 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
242 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
243 Ed. 7/112; Wright, Schs. of St. Peter ad Vincula, 7–8; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
244 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
245 P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1872, 1876).
246 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
247 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
248 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
249 Ibid.
250 Ed. 7/112; Ed. 21/511; Longton Educ. Cttee., Subcttee. Mins., 29 June 1903.
251 Ed. 7/112 and 113; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
252 Ed. 7/112 and 113; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
253 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
254 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
255 Ibid.
256 13th Rep. Com. Char. 311–15; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Ward, Stoke, 567; see p. 307.
257 Ed. 7/112; Rep. on Sch. Bd. District of the Boro. of Longton, 1871–1892; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
258 Ibid.
259 Ed. 21/513; Ed. 7/112; Rep. on Sch. Bd. District, 1871–92; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
260 Ed. 7/112; Rep. on Sch. Bd. District, 1871–92; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
261 P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1854, 1860, 1868).
262 Ed. 7/112.
263 Ed. 7/112; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
264 White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1872); Keates's Potteries Dir. (1875–6, 1879). It is not mentioned in 1882: ibid. (1882).
265 Ed. 7/112.
266 Ed. 7/112; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1896); ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
267 Ed. 7/112; Ed. 20/126; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
268 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.
269 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
270 Ed. 7/112; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851).
271 White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); S.R.O., D. 593, Longton Boro. Extension Map; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
272 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
273 P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1868, 1876).
274 13th Rep. Com. Char. 311–15; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Ward, Stoke, 567; G. Griffith, Free Schs. and Endowments of Staffs. (1860), 522. For a description of the building see p. 229.
275 Ed. 7/112.
276 Ed. 7/112; ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
277 Ex inf. City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs.
278 For the basis on which this table has been compiled see p. 311, n. 94. Unless there is a note to the contrary, the information for the schools in this section is drawn from one or both of the following sources: the City Educ. Dept.; 1959 List of Schs. For the older schools early information is taken from Ed. 7/112.
279 Additional inf. from Staffs. End. Char. Elem. Educ. [Cd. 2729], pp. 114–15, H.C. (1906), xc.
280 Ex inf. Mr. McPhail, City Educ. Dept.
281 Additional inf. from the head master (1960).
282 Ex inf. the Parish Priest (1960).
283 Additional inf. supplied locally.
284 Additional inf. from Staffs. End. Char. 122–3.