Lincoln Wills
1271-1489

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

C.W. Foster (editor)

Year published

1914

Supporting documents

Pages

1-19

Citation Show another format:

'Lincoln Wills: 1271-1489', Lincoln Wills: volume 1: 1271-1526 (1914), pp. 1-19. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53656 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

1271-1489

A.D. 1271–1526

[Henry de Colebi of Lincoln, a.d. 1271.]

[D. & C., misc., no. 56. (fn. 1) Translated from the Latin.]

. . . . . Amen. This is the testament of Henry de Colebi (fn. 2) in Lincoln, who, though weak in body, is of good and sound mind, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . knowing and considering that nothing is more certain than death, nothing more uncertain than the hour of death, and not wishing to depart intestate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First, he gave and bequeathed his soul to God, and his body to be buried after the manner of the Church (ecclesiastice) in the churchyard of the church of the Blessed Mary of Wykeford, his parish church . . . . . . . . . . . of the same church for his mortuary his best garment. Also he willed and enjoined that his horses, cow (vacca), pigs and utensils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . should be discharged (acquietarentur), and the residue of that money, after the payment of his debts, he left to his wife and John his son. Also . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Also to Thomas makait one sword from Scotland (de scotia). Also to John nephew of Roger son of Benedict one sword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . his silver seal. Also he bequeathed to John his son all his books except the book of bucolics, which he bequeathed to John Bacheler. Also . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a red carpet which is pledged. Also to Maud Bacheler another red carpet. Also to Juliana his tunic (tunicam) of green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . all his houses, except that in which he lives, shall be sold, and what is received for them . . . . . for his soul as far as it can be made to extend according . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The rest of all and singular his moveable goods which are not contained in this schedule, nor bequeathed to any one . . . . . to pious uses . . . . . . . . . . . his beloved William de Coleby his brother, Thomas makait of Lincoln, and his wife executors of this his testament. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maud de Coleby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In the year m. cc. and seventy one . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . of the Blessed Mary, this will was made.

[Christiana, relict of John son of William de Bennington, a.d. 1283.]

[D. and C., misc., no. 53. Translated from the Latin.]

In the Name of the Father and the Son, etc. First I bequeath my soul to God, my Creator, and Blessed Mary, and my body to be buried in the churchyard of Bennington, with the best beast belonging to the house, that is, one horse. Also to the fabric of the mother church of Bennington half a mark. Also to the lamp before the cross xijd. Also to the lamp before the altar of St. Mary xijd. Also to the lamp of St. 'Nicholay' vjd. Also to the lamp of St. Leonard vjd. Also to the high altar iiijs. for oblations. Also to the work of the chapel of St. Mary vs. Also to the chalice of Bennington xijd. Also to the bridge of the marsh xijd. Also to the bridge of Haya iiijd. Also to the high altar of the mother church of Lincoln xijd. Also to the work of the same church xijd. Also to the Friars Minors of Lincoln half a mark so, nevertheless, that it may be at the disposition of friar Geoffrey Sampson. Also to the Friars Preachers xijd. Also to the Friars of the Sack xijd. Also to the Friars of Mount Carmel xijd. Also to the hospital for the sick (firmar' hosp') at Lincoln ijs. Also to the lepers vjd. Also to the poor children and orphans of the same hospital iijd. Also to the church of Foston xijd. Also to the lamp of the same church vjd. Also to the church of Colston vjd. Also to the lamp of the same church vjd. Also to the church of Westeburg vjd. Also to the lamp of the same church vjd. Also to the chapel of Dodinton iiijd. Also to the fabric of the church of Swelle iiijd. Also to the bridge of Graham iiijd. Also I bequeath x marks to be done in alms on the first day and the seventh day of my decease. Also I bequeath two stones of wax to make tapers [to burn] about my body. Also xxs. and ij quarters of malt and j quarter of wheat (frumenti) to be distributed to the poor on my year day. Also to Alice my sister iiij sheep and j napkin. Also to the children of Thomas the reeve (prepositi) iiij sheep. Also to the children of John Ryc' ij sheep. Also to the children of John the reeve v sheep. Also to Emma Albert j sheep. Also to the son of Mariora (Marior') at the bridge j sheep. Also to Alan Biscop j sheep. Also to Walter son of Walter Albert j sheep. Also to Hugh son of Geoffrey son of Robert ij sheep. Also to the children of William Sampsun xij sheep. Also to William de Hoyland and his wife and their children iij sheep. Also to Geoffrey son of Ralph the reeve iij sheep. Also to Ralph de Westburg and his wife j sheep. Also to Thomas son of Richard son of Ralph ij sheep. Also to Laurence and his wife and their children x sheep. Also to Ralph son of William and his children j sheep. Also to Richard Husband j sheep. Also to Henry Goseling j sheep. Also to the daughters of William Sampsun ij leaden vessels (plumba). Also to Alice his niece j leaden vessel. Also to Christiana wife of William de Hoyland j napkin and ij linen sheets. Also to Alice his niece j napkin, ij linen sheets, j counterpane (chalon'), two pillows and j towel. Also to Sir G. the chaplain xviijd. Also to Robert the clerk vjd. Also I grant out of mere good will to Laurence half the crop (vesturam). Also to Lecia my daughter j new towel and one carpet. Also to V. Sampsun one great brass pot (ollam) and a chaldron (cacabum) of metal. Also to Lecia his daughter one mantle (capam) of blue, j cloak of burnet, j supertunic of blue, furred. Also to William son of V. Sampsun j chest bound with iron. Also to Robert son of the lady of Binggam iiij sheep. Also to William Sampsun the best table. Also to Christiana wife of William de Hoyland j tunic (tunicam) of watchet (vachet'). Also j cart (fn. 3) (carctamen) bound with iron to be distributed to the poor. Also iiij marks and a half for one anniversary to be celebrated for a whole year, by the good will of the vicar, that is, once in the week at the chapel of the Blessed Mary. Also to the vicar of Bennington ij linen sheets new of the best. Also to the son of William ij linen sheets and j counterpane (chalon'). Also to Alice de Colston iiij sheets and one carpet. Also to Christiana de Hoyland j feather-bed (plumale). Also to the aforesaid Alice j counterpane (chalon'). Also to Lecia my daughter ij linen sheets. Also to Walter son of Hugh Hert j sheep. Also to Thomas of the Chamber v ells of linen cloth. Also to William son of William Sampsun iiij ells of linen cloth. Also to the daughters of Alice de Colston all the residue of the linen cloth, the cloth before bequeathed to Agnes and Ysabel [sic] excepted. Also to Lecia wife of William Sampsun and Alice de Colston all the utensils belonging to the house both of brass and of wood except those before bequeathed. Also to Christiana wife of William de Hoyland one robe of burnet (burneto), which has been in use (usitatam). Also to Emma de Dodington j bushel (bussell') of grain (bladi), half of barley (ordei), half of wheat (frumenti). Also to Huigg' (fn. 4) the carter j bushell of grain (bladi), half of wheat, half of barley. Also to Felix (Felic') Herle half a bushel of grain (bladi), half of wheat, half of barley. Also to the wife of V. de Hoyland and Agnes her [or his] sister one coverlet (tegmen). Also to Nicholas Raum j horse, ij oxen, j cow and xij sheep, but so that those animals may be at the disposition of Laurence until the end of x years. And if there be any residue it shall be distributed amongst the poor of Bennington.

The inventory of the goods of Christiana, relict of John son of William de Bennington, on the day of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist in the year of the Lord m. cc. lxxx three. First, that is, j mare, value vjs. Also ij cows, value xs. Also j rouncy (runcilus), value xs. Also ij young oxen, value vjs. Also v pigs, value vs. Also vj score sheep. Also the straw in the yard, value j mark. Also ij quarters of malt, value viijs. Also half of my grain (bladi), as well of wheat (frumenti) as of barley (ordei) and peas; value of each quarter of wheat (frumenti) vs.; also value of each quarter of wheat (frumenti) [sic] of barley (ordei) and of peas iijs. viijd.; that is, xj quarters of wheat (frumenti), and xv quarters of barley and peas. Also in pennies vij pounds. Also iiij leaden vessels. Also ij napkins. Also ij towels. Also j cart bound with iron. Also j frock (rochetum), j shift (camiseam), j feather-bed, j 'wymple.' Also xiiij linen sheets. Also vj carpets. Also iij pillows. Also j chaldron (cacabum), j mantle (capam), j cloak (pallium). Also j super-tunic (supertunicam) of blue, furred. Also j chest bound with iron. Also j table. Also j tunic (tunicam) of watchet (wachet'). Also xij ells of linen cloth, j robe of burnet (burneto), which has been in use. Also j brass pot. Also ij small brass pots. Also ij posnets (pocenet'). Also ij pans (patellas). Also j basin (pelvim). Also j laver (lavaterium), etc., the utensils between the ij sisters and Alice de Colston and Lecia Sampson.

These are the debtors of the aforesaid Christiana: John Auertauer vs. Also Thomas Rik ijs. Also Ralph de Westeburg vijs. Also Richard Husband iijs. Also Richard Batun iiijs. Also Geoffrey son of Richard de Costal iijs. Also Dyfrig (D'fr') de Herdvike xs. Also John de Hoyland viis. vjd. Also Mariora (Marior') at the bridge xs. ixd. Also Lecia wife of Hugh son of G. daughter of Robert ijs. Also Maud de Scaldeford for a certain pot pledged ijs. Also Geoffrey son of Ralph the reeve iijs. for half a quarter of wheat (frumenti). Also Laurence de Sibethorp ijs.

Also iiij cartloads of hay, value viijs. Also iij bushels of wheat (frumenti), value iiijs. vjd. Also j quarter of barley, value iijs. and vjd. Also xl logs (ligna), value ijs. Also flesh in . . . . . . . . . . . . . (carn' in vent') value ijs. Also iij roods of meadow, value ijs. Also j sheepfold (oviale), value xijd.

The sum of all the goods in the inventoryxxijl. vs. ixd.
The sum of the expensesxxjl. xxjd. ob'quad'
And the sum [in the hands of] the executorsxxiijs. xjd. quad'

[Henry Baundeney, the Illuminator, of Lincoln, a.d. 1296.]

[D. & C., misc., no. 54. (fn. 5) Translated from the Latin.]

In the Name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost. On Thursday the morrow of St. Mark the Evangelist, in the year of the Lord m.cc. and ninety six, I Henry Illuminator make my testament in this manner. First I commend my soul into the hands of the Crucified who redeemed me with his precious blood, and my body to be buried in the churchyard of St. Rumwald in Butwerk, and with my body my best garment. Also I bequeath to my daughter Beatrice a certain chest; and to Osb[e]rt my son one ark. Also I bequeath to Beatrice my daughter all my land, with the buildings upon it, which I have and hold of the fee of Thomas de Faxflet for one pound of cummin in the parish of Bouon with all its appurtenances and the easement of the garden as it is contained in the charter of feoffment in length and breadth, saving the moiety of the aforesaid land to Cecily Baundeney my wife for her dower while she shall live. And I will that after the decease of the said Cecily it shall revert wholly to the aforesaid Beatrice my daughter by hereditary right, and by virtue of this testament, well and in peace; rendering to the lord of the fee one pound of cummin for all secular service. Also I bequeath to Beatrice my daughter one selion of land in the fields outside Lincoln towards the black monks, which I bought of Roger de Sutterton, which was formerly of John Fattimouth, rendering to Richard Fattimouth one halfpenny yearly, and saving the dower in respect of the moiety of the said selion to Cecily my wife. Also I bequeath to Henry Baundeny a certain plot (placeam) of land in the parish of St. Bouon in length and breadth as it is contained in a charter of feoffment which I have of Robert Oyler and Emma his wife, rendering yearly to the lord of the fee one halfpenny at Easter for all secular service. Also I appoint and grant all my principal messuage which I bought of . . . . . Hell' in the parish of St. Rumwald, which land was once of Maud Drincalhout, to Cecily [Baun]deney my wife for the whole . . . . . . . . . . after the death of the said Cecily the said messuage shall revert to the right heir. Also I bequeath to Osbert my son my five houses in . . . . . . . . . . with their appurtenances to him and his heirs and assigns, saving the dower of Cecily Baundeney my wife. Also I will and grant . . . . . . . . . . . . Beatrice my daughter die without an heir, that those lands which are bequeathed to her shall revert wholly to O . . . . . . . . . his heirs and assigns, so that Osbert shall be bound to maintain the aforesaid Beatrice if need shall press upon her . . . . . shall revert wholly to Nicol' son of Osbert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . de la Gild Sancti Roberti pro quinque solidis in quibus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . la Gild. Et ut hec mea donacio et dicti te . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . videlicet Osbertum filium meum et Ceciliam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ta ministrandi.

[On the dorse] This testament was exhibited and proved before the dean of the Christianity of Lincoln, on the Saturday next after the Ascension of the Lord, 1296. Adm. granted to the executors.

[Avice de Crosseby of Lincoln, widow, a.d. 1327.]

[D. & C., misc., no. 58. (fn. 6) Translated from the Latin.]

In the Name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, Amen. I Auice, the relict of Adam de Crosseby, formerly citizen of Lincoln, etc., make my testament on Tuesday the morrow of St. Bartholomew the Apostle, in the year of the Lord one thousand, three hundred and twentyseven. First, I bequeath my soul to Almighty God and Blessed Mary and all Saints, and my body to be buried in the church of St. Cuthbert in Lincoln near the tomb of Adam de Crosseby, formerly my husband; and with my body I bequeath to the said church my best super-tunic (supertunicam) in the name of my mortuary. I bequeath to the fabric of the same church half a mark of silver. To the fabric of the mother church of Lincoln two shillings. To the friars of the order of St. Augustin of Lincoln half a mark. To the canons of St. Leonard of Torksey half a mark. To the canons and convent of Barlynges one mark. To the friars Minors, the friars Preachers and the friars Carmelites, Lincoln, xijd. each. To Sir William, parochial chaplain of the church of St. Cuthbert, xijd. To Robert de Mumby, clerk, of the same church, xijd. and one board (tabulam) suitable for making wax tapers. To Agnes my niece, wife, that is, of William de Thame in Lincoln, one better brass jar (ollam). To Alice wife of William de Hull in Lincoln one robe of cloth mixed of brown colour. To Alice wife of William le Verrour in Lincoln my slashed (pannet') robe, and one brass jar (ollam) containing two gallons (lagenas). To each of my godchildren in Lincoln vjd. I bequeath xs. to be distributed in bread to the poor of Lincoln on the first day of my burial. To brother Simonde Baumburgh, canon of the house of Barlinges, one pece or goblet (ciphum) of silver. To the church of St. Cuthbert aforesaid one carpet of 'Raynes' to cover the bodies of the dead. To Auice daughter of William de Hull aforesaid three ewes. To Alice my niece, wife of John de Broughton in Lincoln, ten shillings. To Alice daughter of Alice de Cotum twenty shillings, one carpet, one feather-bed, and two linen sheets. I bequeath forty shillings to make an assemblage of my friends and neighbours on the first day of my burial. To Sir Robert de Brunne in Lincoln, chaplain, ten shillings. I bequeath one mark to make an assemblage of my friends and neighbours on the seventh day of my burial, and half a mark to be distributed in bread amongst the poor in the city of Lincoln on the same day. To Auice daughter of Isabel de Glentham two carpets and two linen sheets. To Alice wife of William de Hull aforesaid one stuffed 'Materace.' I bequeath ten pounds of silver to celebrate three anniversaries in the church of St. Cuthbert, Lincoln, for my soul, and the souls of Adam de Crosseby, late my husband, and all the faithful dead. To Isoude my maid one courtepye and one hood of green cloth. To Isabel, mother of the same Isoude. my belt (cinctorium) without the appendages. To Magota my maid one blue super-tunic (supertunicam) with a hood of the same colour. To Sir Robert de Brunne, chaplain, aforenamed one goblet (ciphum) without a foot, which is called 'Nutte.' To Auice daughter of Maud le Verrour in Lincoln one chest without a lock. To Alice wife of Roger de Glentham, the reeve (prepositi), my scarlet hood. To Alice daughter of my sister Aubree one hood of green cloth furred, with one tunic of the same colour. To Aubree my sister my best mazer goblet (ciphum). To Aubree de Glentham, my niece, my best silver buckle with gems. To the wife of William de Northiby of Glentham, my niece, another middling silver buckle. To a certain widow of Glentham my old blue tunic. To Maud my laundress (lotrix) one carpet of a close texture (spissum). To Margaret my maid one carpet and one linen sheet. To Isoude my maid one 'Materace' on which she was wont to lie. To the high altar of St. Cuthbert aforesaid a towel of four ells. To the altar of the Blessed Mary in the same church a towel of three ells. To John de Essex, formerly my servant, one old carpet. I bequeath one very little leaden vessel (plumbum) to mend the eaves (stillicidium) or gutter of the church of St. Cuthbert. To William de Hull one leaden vessel for the hands containing two tubs (tynas). To each of the sons of William de Humberston the younger a silver spoon. To Sir John de Ouneby, chaplain, a silver spoon. To Walter my shepherd xijd. To Elen Crippe, formerly my servant, and to her son each a silver spoon. Also I give and bequeath all my tenement situate on the east side of the church of St. Cuthbert in Lincoln together with the garden adjoining and with the buildings and their appurtenances, which tenement lies between the highway on the south side and the tenement of John son of Richard de Burton on the north side, and abuts upon the land of John de Drax, rector of the church of Colyngham towards the east, and the churchyard of St. Cuthbert towards the west, and also two other tenements situate together on the south side of the said church, and lying between the highway towards the north, and the tenement of Gilbert de Humberston towards the south, and the tenement of William de Snartford the elder towards the east, and the tenement of William de Bliton and John de Dra[x] on the west side, with all their buildings, rights and appurtenances, to be sold for ever [sic] by my executors, after the custom and use of the city of Lincoln, to perform therewith divine offices for my soul and the soul of Adam my late husband and the souls of all the faithful dead. I will that the residue of my goods be at the disposition of my executors to do for my soul and the souls of all the faithful dead in the city of Lincoln as it shall seem expedient to them. I ordain as my executors of this my testament, Sir Robert de Brunne of Lincoln, chaplain, and Hugh le Bower in Lincoln. In witness whereof my seal with the seals of my executors is appended. Dated and signed in my house at Lincoln before witnesses called and specially asked for this purpose, the day and year above-written. And if it happen that any one of the executors aforenamed refuse to undertake the burden of execution, I ordain that Richard Gunne of Lincoln shall be added in his place.

[On the dorse] The present testament was proved before me, the dean of the Christianity of Lincoln, in the church of All Saints, Lincoln, iij Ides September, m.ccc, xxvij, and administration of the goods of the defunct was granted to Sir Robert de Brume [sic], chaplain, and Richard Gunne of Lincoln, the executors, Hugh Bower the co-executor refusing for certain and lawful reasons to undertake the burden of administration. In witness whereof I have to these presents appended the seal of my office.

[On the dorse] The present testament was lawfully proved in respect of the lay fee before William de Bliton, mayor of the city of Lincoln, Hugh de Belyngton and Robert de Bellafago, bailiffs of the said city, and other trusty persons, in full court of the same city, on the Monday next before the feast of the Apostles Simon and Jude, I Edward III, according to the custom of the said city; wherefore the said testament was accepted by the court as rightly proved, and the executors were directed to execute it according to the last will of the testatrix, and the custom of the city of Lincoln thus far preserved.

[Richard de Whitewell, canon of the cathedral church of Lincoln, and prebendary of Empingham in the same, a.d. 1359. (fn. 7) ]

[1566 &c., 24. Translated from the Latin.]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [M]ary and all the Angels . . . . . . of God, [my] body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . in the church of Lincoln. Also I will have twenty-four tapers of wax around my body . . . . . . . . . . . . that is, to the high altar two, to the altar where the Mass of the Blessed Mary is celebrated two, and to the altar . . . . . . . . . . . . . ., to the other altars in the church one, and to the church of St. Mary Magdalene one, and to the church of St. Margaret one. . . . . . . . . . . . . my executors shall do [for] my burial according to the multitude and number of those who come together, so that . . . . . . . . . . . . . . wishing to come and all the ministers of the church and others outside . . . . . . may be received honestly according to their estate, and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . they may have abundance. And my executors shall make provision in the town in respect of victuals which . . . . . . . . . . . to be kept for us by any means beyond one night . . . . . . . . . . Also I bequeath xls. to be distributed among the poor of the parish of . . . . . . . . . . Also to the reparation of the houses and vestments x marks, provided that my successor shall not ask or demand more for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xls. to be distributed among the poor of the parish of Swalclyf, and for the repairing of the houses and vestments there . . . . . . . . . my successor shall not demand more for dilapidations (defectibus). Also I bequeath xxs. to be distributed among the poor of the parish of bryng[hurst] . . . . . . . . . . Also I bequeath xiijs. iiijd. to be distributed among the poor of the parish of Little [blank]. Also I bequeath xiijs. iiijd. to be distributed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . of Oudeby near Leicester. Also I bequeath to be distributed among the poor of the parish of Haynton xs. Also among the poor of the parish of . . . . . . . . . . . And among the poor of the parish of Scredyngton xs. And among the poor of the parishes of Hameldon and braunston xxs. Also I bequeath to the vicars [choral] of either form xxs. Also to the poor clerks xs. Also to the choristers vjs. Also to the canons' chaplains and others carrying (portantibus) [wands ? (cp. p. 13. 1. 7)] in the church xs. Also to the ringers of the peal of bells (classicum) xld. Also to every order of friars of Lincoln xxs. Also to the friars . . . . . . . . . . . . Minors xs. Also to the poor of the hospital of St. Katherine without Lincoln vjs. viijd. Also to every deacon (diaconit') of Lincoln xs. To the [prioress] and convent of Staynffeld xls. Also to the prioress and convent of Goukewell xxs. Also to the prioress and convent of . . . . . . . . . . xxs. Also to the prioress and convent of St. Michael without Stamford xxs. Also I bequeath to Gilbert Cullul and his wife cs. Also I bequeath to . . . . . Whitwell and his wife v marks. And to Ralph brys and his wife v marks. Also I bequeath to William son of Elias de Whitewell and his children . . . . . Also to the prior and convent of Markeby for the building of the belltower v marks. Also to the wife of John de Casterton xxs. Also I bequeath to John de . . . . . v marks. And to John of the Kitchen (Coquina) ij marks in which he is bound to me. Also to John of the Stable (Stabulo) xxs. Also to John de Merston xxs. Also to W . . . . Brys xls. And to Nicholas brys xls. To Sir William de Wyssendon ls. for his stipend. Also I bequeath to William de Scamelesby, late reeve (preposito) of Normanby, xls. Also to John Proche of Folkyngham xls. Also to John Epwell ij marks in which he is bound to me for one breviary. Also I remit to the rector of Rasen his bond. And to Walter Hardsische his judgement (statutum). To William Curteys his bond. To the heirs of Thomas Ally their judgement (statutum). Also I remit to the lady Margaret Comyn and to the executors of Sir Thomas Comyn all the bonds made to me, provided that they raise no dispute or contention against my executors. Also I bequeath to Sir John de Welburn the treasurer (fn. 8) , my little breviary of the use of Lincoln. Also I bequeath to the executors of Master William de Oxonia xls. to distribute for the soul of the said Master William. Also to each of my men-servants and women-servants in my manors one quarter of barley or of maslin (mixlilionis) beyond their wages. To Master John de Carlton, rector of the church of Sutton, my tapestry of 'Jesse' (aulam meam de Jesse), that is, one dossal (dosser') with costers (Costis). Also I bequeath to little Alan of Empyngham xs. Also I bequeath to Henry the brewer (braciatori) xs. And to Walter the cook (coco) xs. Also I bequeath to William the Chamberlain (Camerario) xxs.; also his stipend. Also I bequeath to John my brother and his wife cs. Also to Master Galfron' the Mason (Sementarius) for two white stones xxs. Also I bequeath to the fabric of Lincoln v marks. Also I bequeath to John de Seutho one bed, also I bequeath to William brys one bed, suitable to their estate in the opinion of my executors. Moreover, I will that the great altar in my Chapel, which I had borrowed (ex Mutuo) be delivered to the altar in the greater church where Mass of the Blessed Mary is celebrated. And I will that my chantry of Whitewell shall have my own great super-altar which lies in my little chapel. Also I bequeath to Richard son of the late Sir Richard de Waldegraue, knight, the whole of the money in which he is bound to me for his marriage. Also I bequeath to Reginald Curteys xls. for his labour. Also I bequeath to each of my executors who takes upon himself the administration of my testament, for his labour, vj marks, so nevertheless that every one who refuses or does not take up the burden of administration of the testament shall go without his legacy. Also I will that my executors shall pay to Agnes Parsonn v marks for the messuage and lands bought from her for my chantry in Whitewell. Also I bequeath cs. ad emendum oi'm lapidem [blank] pro terre [sic] of Master Henry de la Dale (fn. 9) formerly canon of Lincoln. Also to John de Wellyngham, reeve (preposito) of Normanby, xxs. Also I bequeath to William Erl xiijs. iiijd. And I will that my executors have my chest in the treasury hitherto locked with two keys of different patterns, of which the one shall be in the charge of Sir Hugh de betonia, rector of the church of Netilton, and the other in the charge of Sir Thomas palmer and John Baker; and in that chest shall be placed all the money to be raised in respect of my goods without abatement for the sake of exchange or otherwise, to be kept in order that, when opportunity offers, they may have it ready in the said chest for buying possessions for chantries and other works of piety to be done for my soul; and I will that in respect of the making of my chantries the one shall be a perpetual chantry of the Blessed Mary for my soul in the prebendal church of Empyngham, and the other a chantry of the Blessed Mary in my church of Swaltelyff, if it can conveniently be done. Also I bequeath to John Louereys xls. sterling to be received yearly of the rents of Normanby by the hands of my aforesaid executors for the term of the lady Margaret Comyn's life. Also I bequeath to William brys xiijs. iiijd. to be received yearly of the rents of Normanby of the hands of my executors as long as the lady Margaret and Sir William shall live. Also I bequeath to John de Southo xiijs. iiijd. to be received yearly of the farm of Normanby for the term of the life of the said lady Margaret and her [husband. (fn. 10) ] Also I bequeath to William de Salteletby [sic] xxvjs. viijd. to be received yearly of the farm of Normanby, until he come to the age of xxiiij years, in order that he may be able to be ordained to the priesthood, so that in the meantime he may stay at the schools. Also I bequeath to Richard Elys xxv[j]s. viijd. to be received yearly of the rents of Normanby, until he come to the age of xxiiij years, in the same way as William de Salfletby. Also I will that if Richard Elys or William de Salfletby [folio 24d.] absent themselves from the schools in any year, they shall go without the legacy for that year and for the whole time of their absence. Also I bequeath to the prioress and convent of Rothwell near pywell xxs. Also I bequeath to the prioress and convent of Heyning xxs. Also I bequeath to the prioress and convent of Lekeburn xxs. Also I bequeath to the prioress and convent of Grenefeld xxs. Also I bequeath to Agnes wife of William Geue xxs. Also to the wife of Richard Tredeley xiijs. iiijd. And then I will that with the whole residue of all my goods, together with xxl. sterling yearly of the rent of xl marks of Normanby, due to me from the dean and chapter of the church of Lincoln for the term of the life of the lady Margaret Comy [sic], new acquisitions of lands and rents be made by my executors as often as opportunity offers; and when the acquisitions shall have been made, I will that the whole sum of money together with the money remaining from my rents which have already been acquired for my chantries, beyond the yearly charges expressed in the ordination of the chantries for ever, shall be distributed on the day of my obit (obitus), or as soon as conveniently may be, among the poor of my family (de parentela mea), if any there be, and among poor nuns and other poor mendicants, according to the discretion of my Chaplains after the death of all my executors, for my soul and the souls of my parents, friends and benefactors, by the oversight of the clerk of the commons; this being always excepted, that if perchance the rents assigned in the first foundation of my chantries in the church of Lincoln for the maintenance of all things contained in the ordination of those two chantries shall in any respect decrease so that they cannot fully support the charges, then I will that the amount of the decrease of the first rents shall be taken out of the rents acquired by me and my executors, as is premised, or to be acquired, in order to fulfil the charges, until the aforesaid old rents shall have recovered (respiraverint). And I will that if any one or more of my executors shall be of a contrary opinion to his or their co-executors in making distributions or in acquiring possessions or in any other matter touching the said testament and not expressed in the same, then the advice of my lord John de Welburn the Treasurer shall be obtained. And for the execution and performance of this testament I make, ordain and constitute as my executors Sir Hugh de betonia aforesaid, Master John braunspache, Sir Thomas Palmere, rector of Blaunkneye, Sir John Staple, rector of the church of St. Mary Magdalene, and John baker. In witness whereof my seal is affixed to the presents. And because to many people my seal is unknown, I have arranged that the seal of the venerable chapter of the church of Lincoln shall be affixed. And we the aforesaid chapter at the request of the said Sir Richard have caused our seal to be affixed to these presents. Dated at Lincoln, on the Wednesday (fn. 11) next before the feast of St. Lucy the Virgin, in the year of the Lord a thousand three hundred and fifty ix.

[No probate act.]

[Geoffrey le Scrope, canon of Lincoln, a.d. 1382.]

[D. & C., misc., no. 55. Translated from the Latin.]

[On the dorse] THE TESTAMENT OF GEOFFREY LE SCROPP, CANON OF THE CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF THE BLESSED MARY OF LINCOLN. (fn. 12)

In the name of God, Amen. I Geoffrey lescropp', canon of the cathedral church of the Blessed Mary of Lincoln, on the viijth of the kalends of February, namely, the day of the Conversion of Paul the Apostle, in my lodging within the close of the church of Lincoln, in the year of the Lord one thousand ccc and eighty-two, make my testament in this manner: First, I bequeath my soul to God and Blessed Mary and all His saints, and my body to be buried in the church of Lincoln, near my sister, under the bell-tower, but so that my body may not by any means be kept above ground beyond the space of three days, in which I leave the matter of food to the judgement of my executors. I do not wish them, however, to exceed the measure. Also I will that two tapers of xx pounds weight of wax shall then be burnt about my body and, at the end of mass, shall be placed on the right and left of the high altar to be burnt according to the disposition of the warden of the said altar. Also xx torches of the length of xij feet by the ell, of which ij shall remain to the high altar, and ij to the altar where mass of the Blessed Mary is celebrated in honour of Corpus Christi, and j to every altar in the church. Also five marks for distribution amongst the poor lying in houses and other inferior (mediocrum) and feeble persons, and to other poor people as shall seem good to the executors. Also to every canon residing and present at my funeral vjs. viijd., and ijs. beyond this to every one celebrating mass. Also to the warden of the altar of St. Peter vjs. viijd. Also to every vicar iijs. iiijd. Also to every chaplain wearing a habit ijs. Also to every poor clerk ijs. Also to every chorister xijd. Also to every one present carrying a wand xijd. Also to the ringers ministering with the same vjs. viijd. Also I will that one silver-gilt image of the most high Trinity be wrought at my expense and placed in the midst of the high altar in the top-most niche. Also to the fabric of the cathedral church of Lincoln five marks. Also to the same church my white silk cope with an 'orfray' of blue velvet with the likenesses of the apostles inwoven in gold. Also I bequeath to the altar where mass of the Blessed Mary is celebrated one red chasuble with a great 'orfray' of gold, with two tunicles and dalmatics to the same chasuble belonging. Also I will that there be placed in the custody of the vice-chancellor and succentor L marks, and therewith my obit be done as long as it shall last, as it is done in the obit of Master John Stretlay, dean of the same church. Also I bequeath to the vicars dwelling in Boungarth (fn. 13) xx marks, to be placed with the money given to them by Sir Henry de Edenstowe and Master William de Burton, and to be expended and kept in the same way. Also I give to the vicars of the second form living together x marks in order that there may be done therewith in all things as it has been ordained above for the superior vicars in respect of the money given to them by Sir Henry de Edenstowe and Master William de Burton; and they shall be brought to the vice-chancellor and the succentor, and shall be kept by them as a provision for the future. Also I bequeath to my two chaplains, that is, Sir Hugh Bussy and Sir John Vaux of Quadryng, cs. each every year to celebrate for v years for my soul and the souls of all my benefactors, and especially of John de Fandon and Sir Lambert de Irnham. Also I bequeath to the church of Boudon to the use of the high altar my greater chalice with leaves on its foot. Also my best corporas. Also to the church of the Blessed Mary in Little Boudon in the fields my white vestment with all its equipment (apparatu). Also I bequeath to the chapel of Herbergh one orphray [of cloth] of Cologne (de colonia) for one cope because they say that they have a vestment (pannum) of silk. Also I bequeath to the church of the Blessed Mary of Oxford my best whole vestment of gold with 'orphrays' of red velvet embroidered with golden lilies with all its equipment. Also one amice of red velvet embroidered with three [M]'s in entire letters (fn. 14) to put on with the cope of the vestment aforesaid (unam amitam de rubeo velueto broudatam cum tribus [M] literis integris ad induendam cum capa vestimenti supradicti). Also I bequeath to the hall of Balliol xxl. of good money in order that necessary books for the said house may be bought therewith and applied to the perpetual uses of the fellows living there. Also I bequeath to the abbot and convent of Chouerham (fn. 15) x marks. Also I bequeath to the house of Beauvale (Bellivallo) my best chalice with great silver cruets (fiolis) and xls. for a pittance on the day on which they shall cause a commemoration for my soul to be celebrated among them. Also I bequeath to the house of Haynton of the same order (fn. 16) xls. Also to the house of Witham of the same order xls. Also to the house of London of the same order xls. Also to the house of Hull of the same order xls. Also I bequeath to every order of mendicant friars dwelling in the city of Lincoln xxs. Also I bequeath to four houses of nuns, that is, to Irford, Gaukewell, Heynenges, and Fosse, to each house v marks. Also I bequeath to brother William de Hebden xls. Also I bequeath to Sir William, parish chaplain of Boudon, xls. Also I bequeath for distribution among the poor of that parish of Little Boudon and Herbergh according to the appointment of Sir William aforesaid xls. Also I bequeath to my church of Frampton my cross of silver-gilt set with stones, to be kept as shall seem best to the chaplains governing the church. Also I bequeath to the church of Haydour my everyday chalice. Also I bequeath to the church of St. Margaret within the close of Lincoln my embroidered (stragulatum) vestment of gold and velvet with the whole equipment. Also to the church of Apulthorpp an alb and an amice with apparels (paruris) with a stole and maniple (fanone) stitched together (consutas) of silk with divers arms, and that there may be bought one chasuble, as I have appointed for my own chapel, and handed over to the same church of Apulthorpp. Also I bequeath to my brother Sir Henry (fn. 17) my best silver cup (cupam) with an ewer gilt of the same set. To the lady Joan his consort my second best cup. To Sir Stephen le Scropp (fn. 18) my third best cup inwrought (incertam) with roses, and gilt. Also I bequeath to the same and to Maud his consort twelve silver dishes which I bought of the executors of the lord de Huntyngfeld. Also I bequeath to Sir John le Scropp (fn. 19) vj godets (goddetis) inclosed within a seventh with a cover. Also I bequeath to Sir Richard le Scropp (fn. 20) my breviary according to the use of York which he has at his house. Also I bequeath to the gild of Corpus Christi my girdle (certum) of velvet with 'perles,' and xxs. Also I bequeath to John Petre one goblet (ciphum) called 'nut' with a cover and foot gilt. Also I bequeath to Sir Robert de Plumton and the lady Isabel (fn. 21) his consort two peces with covers inclosed in one boiled skin. To Sir Henry Fitz Hugh (fn. 22) one pair of enamelled (aimelitarum) tablets which I had from the archdeacon (fn. 23) . Also I bequeath to Master Richard le Scropp (fn. 24) ostiensem in lectura which he has in his possession, and my book of Berenger (Beringarium). Also I bequeath to Master Henry Gategang my great ring with a great peridot (peridod'), and my great goblet called 'Boll' with the arms of the lord my brother (fn. 25) on the top of the cover. Also I bequeath to Peter de Halton, rector of the church of Claypole, a round pece with a cover, which belonged to Master John de Kellesey. Also I bequeath to John de Apulthorp x marks and my best horse, the one which he likes to choose. Also I remit to William his brother the whole sum (solidum) due to me. Also I bequeath to William de Plumpton one pair of 'plates' covered with red velvet, and the best helmet (cassem) with the best aventail (eventali). Also to John Bawtre a small book which begins with the rubric, 'Cum cubas dicas, etc.', (fn. 26) and v marks. Also to Walter Warner xxs. Also to Sir John Burgh, chaplain, my breviary of the use of Sarum with notation (notatum), so that after his death it may remain to the prior and convent of the house of Kirkeby for the souls of my sisters of Luterell and Hotham (fn. 27) and my soul for ever. Also to Sir Robert a black mazer goblet from which I am accustomed to drink. Also to the same one pece with a cover with three acorns. To Sir Robert de Preston two books which he has in his possession, namely, Sextus and Clement, with several glosses. Also to Sir John de Feli[s]kirk one goblet (goddet') of silver with a cover having the word [Y] written [on it]. Also to the same a little book called Forma fratris monardi de casib[us]. (fn. 28) Also to John Harpham my belt of green silk, one quarter of corn, two quarters of malt, half a salted ox and one young pig, or he shall choose two little ones salted. Also I bequeath to the poor clerks, as is bequeathed above to John Harpham except the girdle. Also I bequeath to the choristers after the same manner, and a good jar with a certain sufficient pan as shall seem good to my executors. Also I bequeath to Alice de Spridlynton one gold buckle, with j pair of 'aue[s] of 'corall' with white 'gaude[s].' Also I remit to Thomas her husband and herself v marks of their debt, while the residue of the debt shall be faithfully paid to my executors. Also I bequeath to Sir John Vaux, chaplain, xxs. Also I bequeath to Thomas my chamberlain my Norfolk bed [worked] with birds, with carpets and 'banquers,' and a blue coverlet with birds without a carpet, with a cillour, curtains, and j pair of sheets, 'blanket[s],' 'canua[s],' and other daily necessaries lying in the chamber, and v marks of silver, and one horse as my executors shall see fit, with ix 'cussyne[s].' Also I bequeath to William the cook the great pot which Harpham gave me, and one jar according to the disposition of the executors, and viij marks of silver. Also to William the miller xls. Also to Maurice of the kitchen and Robert Balme of the bakery xxs. each if they are in office with me at the time of my death. Also I bequeath to Thomas of the stable xiijs. iiijd. Also to Thomas Lillyng xiijs. iiijd. Also I bequeath to John the page (garcioni) (fn. 29) of the kitchen vjs. viijd. Also to little William of the kitchen vjs. viijd. Also to little John Broune and John son of Robert the carter iijs. iiijd. each. And I will that all my servants, both greater and lesser, shall receive a full fee at the day of payment next after my death however long before it I may happen to die. Also I bequeath to the anchorite of Hampole xxs. Also I bequeath to the anchorite at the church of the Holy Trinity of Lincoln, xxs., with a tunic (tunica) of russet furred with calaber with a double hood and a cloak (armilausa) of the same suit furred with 'grice.' Also I bequeath to the anchorite of Kirkbey Wysk xiijs. iiijd. Also I bequeath to the anchorite at the church of St. Paul of Staunford xiijs. iiijd. Also to the anchorite of Doncaster vjs. viijd. Also to Beatrice de Estlyngton xls. Also I bequeath to Cecily Whatlous xiijs. iiijd. Also I bequeath to Robert the carter and Walter Mathewe vjs. viijd. each. Also I bequeath to the sister of Henry Warde, a nun of Irford, xiijs. iiijd. Also I bequeath to William son of Thomas Barbor xiijs. iiijd. Moreover, I ordain, make and appoint Master Henry Gategang, rector of the church of Welton beyond Humber, Sir John, sacrist in the cathedral church of Lincoln, Sir William de Fiskerton, vicar in the choir of the same church, Sir John Ingham, chaplain and fellow in the Burghersh chantry, and John de Apulthorp, my esquire, the executors of this testament, to whom I bequeath the residue of my goods to dispose of them as before God shall seem to them most expedient. And I bequeath to my executors, that is Master Henry Gategang, Sir John the sacrist, John de Fiskerton and John de Ingham, chaplains, and John de Apulthorp, v marks apiece for their labour. And I desire and ask my reverend lords of the chapter that when an account of this testament has been rendered, all and singular the aforenamed executors who well and laudably take the administration upon themselves may, if any residue remain, be rewarded by them beyond the legacies before [bequeathed] to them.

On the Saturday after the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, that is the last day of the month of January, in the year of the Lord one thousand ccc. and eighty-two, this testament was exhibited, proved, approved and published before the subdean and chapter of the church of Lincoln, in their chapter house there; and administration of the goods of the deceased above-written was granted by us then and there to the executors above-written, who were sworn in all and singular things in form of law. In witness whereof we have caused our seal to be set to these [presents].

The present testament was exhibited and published before us the official of the lord the archdeacon of Lincoln, and by us lawfully approved, and we have granted administration of the goods of the deceased being in the archdeaconry of Lincoln to the executors named in the said will, who have been sworn in form of law. In witness whereof we have to these presents appended the seal of our office. Dated at Frampton, the xvth day of the month of February, in the year of the Lord above-mentioned.

On Friday, that is the tenth day of the month of April, in the year of the Lord one thousand ccc. and eighty-three, the present testament was exhibited before us the chapter of the cathedral church of St. Peter, York, the dean of the same being engaged in distant parts, in our chapter house there, and was by us approved and published; and administration of the goods of the said Master Geoffrey lescropp, deceased, being within our jurisdiction, was by us then and there granted to John de Apulthorp, an executor named in the said testament, according to the form of the constitution of the legate in this behalf provided. In witness whereof we have to the presents appended our common seal. Dated at York in our chapter house, the day and year above-said. We have, however, reserved power to grant like administration to the other executors named in the said testament in case they wish in the future to take it up. Dated by us the place, day and year above-recited (fn. 30) .

The present testament was exhibited before us the vicar general of the reverend lord the archdeacon of Richmond, and was by us approved; and administration of the goods of the deceased being within the jurisdiction of the said lord archdeacon of Richmond was committed to the aforesaid John de Apulthorp, an executor named in the said testament, in the form of the constitution of the legate in this behalf provided, reserving power to ourselves to grant like administration to the other executors named in the said testament, if in the future they wish to receive it. In witness whereof we have to the presents appended the seal of our office. Dated at York, the xjth day of the month of April, in the year of the Lord one thousand ccc. lxxx three.

[Roger Leget of Holborn, London, a.d. 1388.]

[D. & C., misc., no. 59. Translated from the Latin.]

Memorandum that on the twenty-seventh day of February, 12 Richard II., John Bykenet, dwelling in Holburn, in his own person confessed and acknowledged that the last will of Roger leget, late dwelling in Holburn, was and is in all respects as it is contained in that testament which is enrolled at 'le Gildhalle' in London, and that it was reputed false and suspect because those twenty pounds sterling which in that testament are assigned to a certain chaplain late dwelling with the said Roger Leget were assigned to another use and not to that use. And this confession was made in the presence of Robert de Plesyngton, knight, Robert Stansted, and Nicholas de Plesyngton. In Witness whereof the said Robert, Robert and Nicholas, being present, have affixed their seals. Dated at London, the day and year aforesaid.

[John Barone of Leicester, a.d. 1489.]

[Var. 13. Translated from the Latin.]

In the name of god, Amen. The penultimate day of April mcccclxxxix, I John Barone, of sound mind, but sick in body, make my testament in this manner: First, I bequeath my soul to the Father Almighty, Blessed Mary, and All Saints; and my body to be buried in the church of All Saints, Leicester, viz., in the chapel of the Blessed Mary of the same church. I bequeath my best garment (indumentum) in the name of my mortuary (principalium). I bequeath to Elizabeth and Agnes the daughters of William Barone, viz., to each of them ten pounds. To Agnes the daughter of John Warde ten pounds. The residue of my goods moveable and immoveable, and especially my lands and tenements in the town and fields of Leicester and Markireby, I give and bequeath to Elizabeth my wife, whome I ordain my executrix that she may ordain and dispose for the health of my soul and the souls of all my ancestors as shall seem best to her. These being witnesses, (fn. 31) Sir John Wilcher perpetual vicar of the church of All Saints, Leicester (fn. 31) , Sir William Glen of the same, chaplain, William Golde 'gentilman,' Thomas Grysby, with others.

[No probate act.]

Footnotes

1 A considerable part of this document has perished.
2 The testator probably came from Coleby near Lincoln. William de Coleby held a free tenement there in 1257 (Feet of Fines, case 131, file 40, no. 45).
3 'Carctamen' is an unusual form, and it is difficult to suggest a more likely rendering than that of the text. The article was evidently intended to be sold and its price distributed. See 7th line from the foot of the page.
4 or 'Hingg'.
5 The will has been badly damaged by damp, and the last part has perished.
6 The document is a copy of the testament, and there is one tag, but the seal has disappeared.
7 The top of the leaf on which the will is written has crumbled away, but the old index at the end of the volume shows that the testator is Richard de Whitewell, a fact which is amply confirmed by the internal evidence. Robert de Whitewell held the manor of Ketton, co. Rutland, in 38 Edward III [a.d. 1364–5] (Inquisition ad quod Damnum, file 351, no. 4), and the family probably took its name from Whitwell in the same county, a few miles distant from Empingham. Richard de Whitewell was instituted, when an acolyte, to the rectory of Little Bowden in the archdeaconry of Northampton, 5th January, 1324–5, on the presentation of Laund, a priory of Augustinian canons (Reg., vol. iv, folio 173); this he exchanged for the rectory of Oadby, co. Leicester, a benefice in the same patronage, to which he was admitted 10th April, 1329, being then a priest (Ibid., folio 125d.); he exchanged Oadby for the rectory of Bringhurst in the same county, being instituted 17 July, 1329 (Ibid., folio 126); and Bringhurst he exchanged for the rectory of Swalcliffe, co. Oxford, to which he was instituted 5th June, 1333 (Ibid., folio 266), and which he held until his death (Reg., vol. ix, folio 225d.). On 20th December, 1340, he received a grant of the prebend of Empingham in the church of St. Mary, Lincoln, which was in the king's gift by reason of the voidance of the see of Lincoln, and a mandate was issued in pursuance to the dean and chapter there. In this grant he is described as king's clerk (Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1340–1343, page 82). On 20th February, 1344–5, Richard de Whitewell paid a fine of five marks for a licence to alienate in mortmain two messuages and two virgates and a half of land in Great Hameldon, Little Hameldon, and Whitewell, co. Rutland, to a chaplain to celebrate divine service daily in the church of Whitewell for the good estate of Richard himself, and for his soul when he died, and for the souls of his father and mother (Ibid., 1343–1345, page 431). On 1st July, 1348, Master Simon de Islep, king's clerk, canon of Lincoln, William de Sculthorp, parson of the church of Westerkele, and Richard de Whitewell, after an inquisition ad quod damnum, obtained a licence in mortmain to assign to the dean and chapter of Lincoln 20s. of rent in Navenby, not held in chief, towards the sustenance of two chaplains to celebrate divine service daily in the cathedral church of Lincoln for the good estate of the grantors in life and when they were dead, and for the soul of Master Hugh de Walmesford (Ibid., 1348– 1350, page 112). Walmesford, who was prebendary of Buckden, died about 1344, and Islip and Whitewell, and William de Kele, who is, no doubt, identical with William de Sculthorp, were the executors of his will. Islep and Whitewell were among the beneficiaries of the prayers of two chantry priests whom Walmesford endowed to celebrate divine service in Lincoln cathedral (Ibid., 1345–1348, page 24). In 1347, on 13th June, Whitewell, on the request of Henry earl of Lancaster and other magnates attending him and bearing witness and laudable testimony concerning him, received the king's pardon for an alleged offence in carrying a suit to a foreign court (Ibid., pages 541, 542). On 1st August, 1350, he received from the king a grant of protection and safe conduct on going beyond the seas with some members of his household and four horses (Ibid., 1348–1350, page 560).
8 He was treasurer of the cathedral church of Lincoln 1351–81 (Le Neve, Fasti, ed. Hardy, vol. ii, page 88).
9 Prebendary of Dunholme circa 1342. (Le Neve, op. cit., vol. ii, page 144).
10 This word seems to have been omitted.
11 i.e., 11th December.
12 The testator, 'cunctis cognomine notus,' belonged to the famous Yorkshire family of Scrope, being the fifth son of Sir Geoffrey le Scrope (died 1340) of Masham in Richmondshire, chief justice of the king's bench, by his first wife Ivetta, probably daughter of Sir William de Ros of Ingmanthorpe, near Wetherby, co. York. Geoffrey, the testator, was a lawyer and ecclesiastic, and is said to have been ll.b., probably of Oxford (Dict. Nat. Biog., art. Sir Geoffrey le Scrope). He held many ecclesiastical preferments. On 6th February, 1334–5, at York, Geoffrey, son of Sir Geoffrey Lescrop', knight, was collated to a canonry in Lincoln cathedral, and to the prebend of Haydor cum Walton in the same (mandate to induct, 11th February), on the death of Geoffrey called Godhyue of Marlebergh (Reg. iv, folio 410d.), who had previously, on 2nd October, 1334, exchanged the wardenship of the free chapel in the castle at Marlborough for this prebend with Pigellus de Manetti (Ibid., folio 409d.–410). Le Neve (Fasti, ed. Hardy, vol. ii, page 155), seems to be mistaken in saying that Godhyue exchanged the prebend for the wardenship. On 24th February, 1334–5, it was ordered that the next vacant stall at York should be conferred on Geoffrey le Scrope, clerk (Reg. Melton at York, folio 112d.). On 9th January, 1337–8, he was collated to the prebend of Portpool in St. Paul's cathedral, London (Hennessy, Novum Repertorium, page 45). On 7th April, 1340, he was presented to the church of Bolton Percy in the diocese of York, which was in the king's gift by reason of the voidance of the archbishopric of York, and on the same day a like presentation was granted to John Pulhore, chaplain (Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1338–40, page 447). Pulhore held the benefice from 1340 to 1345, and Geoffrey was never instituted to it.
On the 2nd of August following, Master Geoffrey Lescrope, king's clerk, received a grant of the prebend of 'Apelthorpe' in the church of St. Peter, York, which was also in the king's gift for the same reason (Ibid., 1340–43, page 19). Le Neve (op. cit., vol. iii, page 166) says that he was collated to the prebend 3rd November, 1346, but this is probably a mistake, for the collation does not appear in Archbishop Zouche's Register.
On 28th September, 1340, Mr. Geoffrey le Scrope, prebendary at Auckland, and William de Hoo, canon in the church of St. Martin-le-Grand, London, were meditating an exchange, and the bishop of Durham ordered the matter to be enquired into (Reg. Bury at Durham, folio 326). On 23rd September, 1346, Scrope was ordained deacon by the bishop of Durham, on letters dimissory from the bishop of Lichfield, his church of Solihull giving him a title (Reg. Hatfield at Durham, folio 94). For the particulars from the York and Durham Registers I am indebted to Testamenta Eboracensia, ed. Raine (Surtees Society), vol. iii, page 34n. He also held the chapel of West Witton, about ten miles distant from Masham (Scrope and Grosvenor Roll, vol. ii, page 110). On 7th April, 1365, on the presentation of the attorney of his brother, Sir Henry le Scrope, he was instituted to the rectory of Great Bowden, co. Leicester, in the person of Lambert de Irnham, his proctor (Reg., vol. x. folio 234d.), in which, 20th December, 1378, he was succeeded by his nephew, Master Richard le Scrop', the future archbishop of York (Ibid., folio 270d.). Finally, on 8th January, 1378–9, he was instituted to the rectory of Frampton, co. Lincoln, on the presentation of Sir Stephen le Scrop', knight (Ibid., folio 93), and held it until his death (Ibid., folio 123d.)
Scrope appears several times in the patent rolls in conveyances of land for the benefit of Lincoln cathedral. Thus, on 16th October, 1363, he and others had a licence to alienate in mortmain to the dean and chapter certain premises in the city and suburb of Lincoln and in Burton by Lincoln, in aid of the sustenance of certain chantries (Calendar of Patent Rolls, 1361–4, page 397). Again, on 24th October, 1378, the dean and chapter received a licence for a similar alienation of property in the city and suburb of Lincoln by Master Geoffrey Lescrope and Agnes late wife of Thomas Caus, knight, for the performance by the dean and chapter of certain works of piety in accordance with the ordinance of the said Master Geoffrey and Agnes (Ibid., 1377–81, page 279); and, on 10th June, 1380, the dean and chapter obtained another licence for the alienation to them in mortmain by Scrope and another of 26s. 8d. rent due to Scrope and others from Robert Douce of Wolyngham for a messuage and land in Wolyngham, which he held for life, and the reversion of the premises after his death (Ibid., page 499). Once more, John de Welbourne, clerk, and Master Geoffrey Lescrope, on 20th February, 1379–80, had a licence to alienate in mortmain the advowson of the church of Irby by Braytoft, not held in chief, to John de Warsop, master of the choristers of St. Mary's cathedral, Lincoln, and the commonalty of those choristers, in aid of their maintenance (Ibid., page 438).
Scrope died between the 25th and the 31st of January, 1382–3, and was buried in Lincoln cathedral under the bell-tower, as he directed in his will. The word 'Stanfordie' in his epitaph is probably a copyist's mistake for 'Lincolnie.' Perhaps Beatrice Lutterell (see page 16, note 16), who was commemorated with him at Haydor, was the sister near whom he wished to be buried. In 1641, Bishop Sanderson found 'near the choir door [of the cathedral], under the lanthorn, on a marble, this circumscribed on brass'—
1. G. SCROPE LEGISTA JACET HIC SUB MARMORE CISTA,
2. QUEM, QUASI BALISTA, FERIIT MORS FLEBILIS ISTA. FELIX GALFRIDUS, FACTIS ET SEMINE FIDUS, SEX TIBI NUNC IDUS, DUM . . . . . . . .
3. CHRISTO DEVOTUS, CUNCTIS COGNOMINE NOTUS.
4. SI LEVITER MOTUS, FUIT IN LACHRYMIS HOMO TOTUS. POST C. TER MILLE SIMUL OCTOGIES RUIT ILLE; DORMIT TRANQUILLE, LOCUS EST STANFORDIE VILLE.
The inscription is reprinted from Peck, Desiderata Curiosa (page 308), in Lincoln Cathedral: an exact copy of all the ancient monumental inscriptions there, as they stood in 1641 (Simpkin, Marshall and Co., 1851, page 20). Browne Willis gives a copy of the epitaph in his Survey of Cathedrals (page 189), with 'femine' for 'semine,' 'Nidus' for 'Idus,' 'et leniter Matris' for 'Si leviter motus,' and 'Lincolnia' for 'Stanfordie.' For the end of the fourth line 'cassum'st lumine sidus' and 'fit tumulus tibi nidus' have been suggested by the Dean of Lincoln and the Archdeacon of Lincoln respectively.
In Gervase Holles' time (a.d. 1634–1642) there was the following inscription:— in one of the north windows of Haydor church—
ORATE PRO AnImA GALFRIDI LE SCROP, PREBENDARII HUJUS ECCLesIÆ, ET PRO AnImA BEATRICIS LEOUTHRELL SORORIS EJUS. HIC GALFRIDUS FUIT CANONICUS ECCLesIÆ BEatÆ MARIÆ LINColniensis. Anno 6° r.2.
(Lincoln Record Society, vol. i, page 209).
13 Boungarth, where the senior vicars choral lived, seems to have been the western part of the present Vicars' Court, next the bishop's palace at Lincoln. The vicars were divided into two classes, those who were in priest's orders, called vicars of the first form or senior vicars, and those who were deacons, sub-deacons or acolytes, called vicars of the second form or junior vicars.
14 'M' stands for 'Maria.' It seems that the amice was to be adorned with three embroidered M's, which were worked entire, and then sewn on to the red velvet ground.
15 The Premonstratensian abbey of Coverham, near Masham, in Richmondshire, was the burial-place of the testator's father.
16 I.e. the Carthusian order.
17 He was the first baron Scrope of Masham, and died 31st July, 1391. His wife's parentage is unknown.
18 He was nephew to the testator, being the third son of Henry first baron Scrope of Masham, and he succeeded as second baron in 1391. He was born circa 1345, and died 25th January, 1405–6. He married Margery daughter of John fourth baron Welles, and widow of John baron Huntingfield; and she survived him. Her name is given in the will as Maud, but this is probably a mistake, for the bequest of the twelve silver dishes with the Huntingfield arms is against the supposition that Maud is an earlier and hitherto unknown wife of Stephen. It is interesting to notice that Stephen, in his will, bequeaths to Margery his wife " xij silver dishes with the arms of Huntyngfeld, which Master Geoffrey, my paternal uncle, bequeathed to me; and, because they have been cracked while in my use, therefore I bequeath to the same [Margery] xij silver dishes with my own arms, with vj 'charjours' of one set, etc." (Testamenta Eboracensia (Surtees Society), ed. Raine, vol. iii, page 34).
19 He was the youngest son of the first baron Scrope of Masham, and nephew to the testator.
20 This may be the testator's first cousin, the first baron Scrope of Bolton, who died in 1403.
21 The testator's neice Isabel, daughter of the first baron Scrope of Masham, was the first wife of Sir Robert Plumpton of Plumpton, co. York. Their son, Sir William Plumpton, was executed with his uncle, archbishop Scrope (see below, page 16, note 13).
22 Joan, another daughter of the first baron Scrope of Masham, married Henry baron Fitz Hugh of Ravensworth. She was probably dead in 1382–3, since she is not mentioned in the will.
23 So far as can be ascertained, no member of the Scrope family was an archdeacon at or prior to the date of the will. Probably Richard de Ravenser, archdeacon of Lincoln 1368–1386, is intended, since Scrope was more closely connected with Lincoln than with any other diocese, and his will was dated at his lodging at Lincoln. Scrope and Ravenser had a common interest in that they were both Yorkshire men by family, and both canons of York. The tablets were probably plaques of Limoges enamel.
24 He was the fourth son of Henry first baron Scrope of Masham, and, therefore, nephew to the testator. In 1386 he became bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, and was translated to York in 1398. Taking up arms against king Henry IV, he was found guilty of treason and was executed, 8th June, 1405, together with his nephew, Sir William Plumpton, and Thomas de Mowbray, the earl marshal.
The first of the two books bequeathed to Richard is the Lectura in quinque Decretalium Gregorianorum Libros of Henry of Susa (de Segusia), cardinal bishop of Ostia, one of the greatest medieval canonists, who died in 1271. His best-known work was his Summa. It is not unlikely that the book bequeathed to Richard le Scrope may, on his death, have passed to his nephew, Stephen le Scrope, archdeacon of Richmond, who was very closely associated with him; for Stephen, in his will, dated 24th August, 1418, leaves to Master William Alnewyk [afterwards bishop of Norwich, and, later, bishop of Lincoln] Hostiensem in Lectura with other books for the term of his life. After Alnewyk's death the books were to remain to the church of St. Peter, York (Testamenta Eboracensia (Surtees Society), ed. Raine, vol. i, pages 388–9).
The second book is a work of Berenger of Tours, a famous theologian, who died in 1008. For the identification of these volumes I am indebted to Mr. G. G. Coulton.
25 Henry first baron Scrope of Masham.
26 I have been unable to identify this book. Dr. M. R. James, provost of King's College, Cambridge, thinks that it must have been a book of miscellaneous devotions, since he cannot find any treatise beginning with this incipit.
27 Beatrix, one of the sisters of the testator, married Sir Andrew Lutterell, of Irnham, co. Lincoln, and was commemorated in an inscription in Haydor church (see page 14, note 1). Another sister, Constance, married Sir Geoffery Lutterell; and the third sister, Ivetta, married Sir John de Hothum, le Fitz of Bonby, co. Lincoln, who died without issue, in 1351, in the life-time of his father, Sir John de, Hothum of Bonby. Kirkeby is the Augustinian priory of Kirby Belers in Leicestershire.
28 This is the Summa Casuum Conscientiæ of the Franciscan Monaldo, who was living in 1332, and is said to have been archbishop of Benevento. The book was popularly called Summa Monaldina or Summa Aurea. For this identification I am indebted to Mr. G. G. Coulton.
29 'Garcio' may be either a page of the kitchen or one of the menials termed 'children of the kechyn, tourne broaches' (Household Ordinances, 33 Henry VI, quoted in Memoirs of the County and City of Lincoln, page 314n).
30 Canon Raine was unable to find the will at York (Testamenta Eboracensia [Surtees Society], vol. iii, page 34n).
31 —1 Struck out in the original.


<--Previous:
Addenda