General history
Sheriffs of Kent

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Edward Hasted

Year published

1797

Pages

177-213

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'General history: Sheriffs of Kent', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 1 (1797), pp. 177-213. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53762 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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SHERIFFS (fn. 1) OF THE COUNTY OF KENT.

OSWARD was the first of them that I can find, who held this office in the reign of king William the Confessor, as appears by the record of Domesday, and had then great possessions in this county.

Hamo de Crevequer was Sheriff of Kent in the reign of king William the Conqueror, and is frequently mentioned as such in the book of Domesday, under the denomination of Hamo vice comes, and in many deeds and writings of that time, under that of Hamo dapifer, i. e. the king's seneschal or steward. He continued sheriff, as was then not unusual, during life, which was prolonged beyond the middle of the reign of king Henry II. for in the year 1111, being the 12th of that reign, Hugh, abbot of St. Austin's, granted to him the lands of Bodesham and Smethetun. Quod ipse, as the deed says, si opus fuerit, ecclefiæ et mibi, vel successoribus meis de predictis in comitatu vel in curia regis contra aliquem baronem, consulat adjuvet, et succurrat. At the same time Hamo restored to that abbey the town of Fordwich in these words: Hamo Cantii vicecomes et Henrici regis Anglorum dapifer timore Dei ductus, reddo, etc.

William de Aynsford succeeded Hamo, and continued so during the remainder of king Henry I. His arms were, fretee ermine, as carved on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury.

Norman Fitz Dering was Sheriff under king Stephen, (fn. 2) as appears by a writ of queen Maud, directed to him. He was a descendant of that Dering, who, as the book of Domesday informs us, held Farningham- in the time of king Edward the Confessor. He bore for his arms, argent a fess azure; and having married Matilda, only sister and heir of William de Ipre, earl of Kent, was ancestor to the Derings of Surrenden.

Ruallon de Valoignes in the latter part of king Stephen's reign. He was possessed of Swerdling in Petham, Repton in Ashford, and Tremworth in Crundal, at which seats he alternately resided. He had this county in ferm from king Stephen, at the time when most, if not all, the counties were let to ferm, at the rent of two hundred and sixty pounds, ad pensam, and seventy-six pounds and twenty pence, de numero. He was likewise sheriff in the first year of king Henry II. anno 1154, as appears by the Pipeoffice, where the sheriff's accounts are inrolled.

Ralph Picot, from the 2d to the 7th year of the same reign inclusive. Adam Picot supplied part of this last year, and Hugh de Dover the rest.

Hugh de Dover, son of Fulbert de Dover, who held the castle of Chilham, and other Kentish fees for his support, in the defence of Dover castle, was sheriff from the 8th to the 11th of that reign inclusive. He dwelt sometimes at Chilham castle and sometimes at Kingston. (fn. 3)

Richard de Luci, in the 13th year of the same reign. (fn. 4)

Gervas de Cornhill, from the 16th to the 20th year of king Henry II. inclusive, his seat being at Lukedale, in Littlebourn. Reginald de Warren was joined with him in the 16th year. (fn. 5) In the year 1170, king Henry II. kept his Easter at Windsor, whence he came to London, and there put out of office most of the sheriffs of England, and put them to ransom (fn. 6) for misdemeanors. In the 21st year of this reign Robert Fitzbernard was joined with him in his office.

Robert Fitzbernard above-mentioned, exercised this office alone, from the end of the above year to the 30th of that reign. His capital mansion was at Kingsdown, near Wrotham.

William Fitznigel de Muneville in the 30th year of it; and William Fitz Philip was joined with him. This family of De Muneville were lords of Folkestone.

Allan de Valoignes (de Tremworth) from the 30th to the end of king Henry II. His residence, according to the custom of his ancestors, was sometimes at Tremworth, and sometimes at Repton and Swerdling.

Henry de Cornhill, son of Gervas above-mentioned, in the 1st, 2d, and 3d-years of king Richard I.'s reign. His seat was at Lukedale.

Reginald, son of Gervas de Cornhill, from the 4th to the 9th year of that reign inclusive, and in the last year of it.

Gervas de Cornhill, in the 4th year of king John. (fn. 7)

Reginald de Cornhill, from the 11th of that reign (fn. 8) during the remainder of it; in the 12th year of which John Fitz Vinon, of Haringe in Sellindge, was joined with him in the execution of this office. His seat was at Minster, in Thanet, which was, from his being so constantly sheriff, denominated Sheriff's Court, which name it retains at this day; nay, from this circumstance, his own name was discontinued, and he was called Reginald le Viscount, and his relict, in a grant of land to the chapel of Lukedale, is stiled in the deed, Vicecomitissa Cantii. He bore for his arms, Two lions passant, debruised with a bendlet, as may be seen on the roof of Canterbury cloisters.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING HENRY III.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1216.

Hubert de Burgh, that great subject, who was afterwards earl of Kent and constable of Dover castle, from the 1st to the 7th of it inclusive, during which time Hugh de Windlesore, of Warehorn, was joined with him as his assistant. Hubert had this county in ferm. He was justice itinerant at the time he was sheriff, notwithstanding it had been ordained otherwise in the 1st of Richard I. (fn. 9) In the 8th year Roger Grimstone was joined as an assistant with him, and continued so the two next years. In the 11th year of that reign William Brito was joined with him, and continued his assistant in that office till the 17th year of it. (fn. 10)

Bertram de Criol, lord of Oftenhanger, and constable of Dover-castle, from the 17th to the 22d, and so on till the end of the first half of the 23d year of it, whose grandson was usually stiled the Great Lord of Kent, on account of the great possessions in this county, which accrued to him in right of his wife. Alianore, one of the daughters, and at length coheir of Hamon de Crevequer, lord of Leeds castle, and of Maud his wife, daughter and heir of William de Averenches, lord of Folkestone.

Humpbry de Bobun, earl of Hereford and Essex, for the last half of the 23d of it, and for the two years following. He was at that time possessed of the manor of Bilsington.

Peter de Saubaudia (or of Savoy) being earl of Savoy, and uncle, by the mother's side, to Alianore, wife to king Henry III. was made earl of Richmond, in Yorkshire, and lord warden of the cinque ports. He dwelt in the Strand, in London, at the house since called, from him, the Savoy. He was sheriff of Kent in the 26th year of king Henry III. and Bertram de Criol was joined with him.

Bertram de Criol above mentioned, who had been sheriff before, in the former part of this reign, held this office in the 27th year of it, and John de Cobham was joined with him that year, and he held it alone from the 27th to the end of the 32d year of it.

Reginald de Cobham, son of Henry, from the beginning of the 33d to the end of the 40th year of it. In the 41st year Walter de Bersted (afterwards constable of Dover castle) was joined with him; in the 42d he executed it alone, in which year he died, and Roger de Northwood, and his other executors, answered for the profits due from him. (fn. 11) After which Hugh de Montford, the king's nephew, is said, by Pat. 48, memb. 12, to have had the custody of the county of Kent, and the hundred of Middleton, granted to him for the remainder of the year, after Reginald de Cobham's death, whose executors only answered for certain ferm and profits due from him to the king, on account of his late office.

Fulk Peyforer, in the 43d year of this reign. His seat was sometimes at North-court in Easling, and sometimes at Colebridge-castle in Boughton Malherbe. His arms, Argent six fleurs de lis azure, are still remaining on the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury.

John de Cobham, eldest son of John de Cobham before mentioned, by the daughter of Warine Fitz Benedict, his first wife, in the 44th year of it. He served the first part of the 45th, and Robert Walleran served the rest, and Walter de Redmaredg was under him.

John de Cobham was likewise sheriff in the 46th and 47th years of this reign, and Robert Walleran and Thomas Delaway were under him. His seat was at Monkton in Thanet. He bore for his arms, as all his descendants did, Gules on a chevron or, three lions rampant sable.

Roger de Leyborne, in the 48th year of it, and Fulk Peyforer had the custody of the county the latter part of that year, and three parts of the 49th year. Roger de Leyborne was sheriff again in the 50th year, and John de Bourne was joined with him, and so continued till the 52d year of it, and Fulk de Peyforer had the custody of the county again the last three parts of that year. His seat was at Leyborne castle.

Stephen de Penchester, the 53d and two following years, and Henry de Leeds was his assistant or shire clerk. He was constable of Dover castle and warden of the five ports. His seat was at Penshurst.

Henry Malmains, of Pluckly and Waldershare, in the 56th year of it, being the last of this reign.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING EDWARD I.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1272.

Henry Malmains above mentioned, continued sheriff part of the 1st year, when he died, and John his son answered for the profits of the county for the first half year, and William de Hever served the office the other half of the year. In this year the king sent his letters to the sheriffs of the several counties, to make provision for his coronation, to be delivered to his constable of his castle of Windsor by Easter-eve at farthest; among others, the Sheriff of this county was to furnish within his district, to be approved of by the bearer of these letters, forty oxen and cows, forty hogs, two boars, forty live and fat muttons, two thousand and one hundred capons and hens, and twenty-five bacons, the cost to be paid at the king's exchequer. Dated 10th of February 1274. (fn. 12) In the fame manner, as occasion required, writs were sent to the sheriffs for provisions for the king's household at the meeting of the parliament and other festivities. They were a kind of purveyors to the king for even cloaths, furniture, or whatever else he wanted. (fn. 13) The arms of Henry Malmains were, Gules three right hands couped argent, as may be learnt from the quarterings in the coat armour of the Derings of Surrenden.

William de Hever above mentioned, of Hever castle, continued on in the beginning of the 2d year of this reign, and William Haute of Petham served the remainder of it. (fn. 14)

William de Valoignes, of Swerdling and Repton, from the 3d to the 6th year of it inclusive, though part of the last year was supplied by Henry Perot, of Knowlton. (fn. 15)

Robert Scotton, from the 7th to the 10th of this reign inclusive, in which last year he died, and Robert his son accounted for the remainder of that year. He kept his shrievalty at Cheriton.

Peter de Huntingfield, of Huntingfield, a manor in Easling, so called from this family, in the 11th, 12th, and 13th years. His principal seats were, the above manor, and West Wickham, in this county. He bore for his arms, Or a fess gules between three torteauxes.

Hamon de Gatton, of Throwley, in the 14th year. His arms, as formerly in a window in the church of Selling, were, Chequy azure and argent.

William de Chellesfield, so named from the manor of Chellesfield, of which he and his ancestors had been many years possessed, in the 15th, 16th, and 17th years of this reign.

William de Bramshott, so named of a place in Hampshire, of which he and his ancestors were lords, in the 18th and 19th years.

Sir John de Northwood, son of sir Roger Northwood, of Northwood, in Milton, in the 20th year of this reign, for the latter part of which Richard de Cumbe, and Simon de Cumbe, his son and heir, served for him. In the 21st year he was sheriff again, and John de Bourne was joined with him.

John de Bourne, of Sharsted, in Doddington, had the custody of this county in the 22d, 23d, and 24th years of it.

William Trussell was sheriff in the 25th and 26th years.

Henry de Apulderfield, of Apulderfield, now called Apperfield, in Cowdham, served the latter part of the 26th year, but was sheriff alone in the 27th.

Sir John de Northwood above mentioned was again sheriff in the 28th year.

Henry de Cobham, of Roundal, in Shorne, younger brother of sir John de Cobham, lord of Cobham, in the 29th, 30th, and part of the 31st years of this reign, in which last year the barons of the Exchequer appointed Elias de Morton, of Doddingdale, in Canterbury, to serve in his stead. This Henry de Cobham is frequently written in old rolls, Henry Cobham le Uncle, because surviving his brother, he was uncle to Henry lord Cobham.

Waresius de Valoyns, as the name then began to be spelt, of Tremworth, the latter part of the 31st and in the 32d year of it.

Sir John Northwood was again sheriff in the 33d and 34th of it.

William de Cosenton, of Cosenton, in Aylesford, in the 35th year, whose arms are carved on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING EDWARD II.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1307.

Sir Henry de Cobham, of Roundal, in Shorne, was again sheriff in the 1st year.

John le Blund, of Sundridge place, in Bromley, in the 2d, 3d, and 4th years, and dying in the 5th, when he was likewise sheriff, Edward his son served out the remainder of the year for him, and continued in the office part of the year following.

William de Basing, of Kenardington, who is in the roll of those knights who accompanied king Edward I. in his victorious expedition into Scotland, was sheriff in the 7th year of this reign, and John de Handloe, the younger, of Courtopstreet, in Limne, was joined with him. This William was also sheriff the next year, during which he died, and Margaret, his widow, accounted for the profits of it, as the Piperolls inform us.

Sir Henry de Cobham again, in the 9th year.

John de Malmains, of Malmains, in Stoke, in the 10th and part of the 11th year, the year after which he was committed prisoner to the Fleet, quia absentavit se de compoto suo.

John Fremingham, of Fremingham, now Farningham, the last half of the 11th year, and for three parts of the 12th year, when Henry de Sarden was joined as an assistant with him. He bore for his arms, Argent a fess gules, between three Cornish choughs sable, as on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury.

William Septvans, son and heir of sir Robert Septvans, whose seat was at Milton, near Canterbury, part of the 13th and in the 14th year of this reign, and Henry de Sarden was his assistant. He continued in the 15th and part of the 16th, and Ralph Savage, of Milsted, was joined with him, whose arms are remaining on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury.

John de Shelving, son of Thomas de Shelving, of Wodensborough, part of the 16th and part of the 17th year, and John de Fremingham was his assistant in it. Which

John de Fremingham served the office alone the remainder of those years, as he did entirely the 18th and part of the 19th of the reign of this unfortunate prince, and Ralph de St. Laurence served out the residue for him. Thomas de Toniford accounted for the profits of his office for him.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING EDWARD III.

WHO BEGUN HIS REIGN IN 1326.

Ralph de St. Laurence was sheriff in the 1st year of this reign.

William de Orlanston, in the 2d year, as well as the next following, when John de Shelving above mention was joined with him. His arms were, Two chevrons on a canton a lion passant, in imitation of the Criols, his lords paramount.

John de Shelving above mentioned was sheriff alone in the 4th year, but died within it, as appears by the inquisition taken after his death, and John de Walmer supplied the rest of the year for him.

Roger de Raynham served part of the 5th year of this reign, and John de Bourn served the remainder.

Thomas de Brockhull, of Brockhull, in Saltwood, in the 6th year, and Laurence de St. Laurence served as his assistant for part of the year, but in the 7th year Thomas de Brockhull served the office alone, whose arms are on the cloisters at Canterbury, and in several churches in this county.

Stephen de Cobham, of Roundal, in Shorne, son and heir of Henry de Cobham le Uncle above mentioned, in the 8th, 9th, and 10th of this reign.

Thomas de Brockhull above mentioned sheriff again in the 11th year.

William Morant of Morant's court, in Chevening, in the 12th and 13th years of this reign. During his shrievalty the king issued a mandate to him, to take care that but one bell should be rung in any steeple towards the sea coast in this county.

Henry de Valoyns of Repton, in Ashford, in the 14th year.

John de Mereworth of Mereworth castle, in the 15th year, as he was in the 16th, when John de Vielston, now Filson, in Shoreham, was joined with him.

John de Vielston beforementioned, from the 16th to the 20th year inclusive.

William de Langley, of Knolton, in the 21st year. His arms are on the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury, and the windows of several churches in this county.

John de Fremingham before mentioned, again in the 22d year, and Richard Stone was his deputy.

William de Langley, of Knolton, again from the 23d to the 25th inclusive, and part of the 26th, and Arnold Savage of Bobbing, served part of that year for him.

James de la Pine part of the 26th and part of the 27th year, which Stephen Brode kept for him. He was possessed of Helburgh, in Reculver, and Easthall, in Murston, in which last he kept his shrievalty.

William Apulderfield of Bedmancore, in Linsted, descended from those of Cowdham, part of the 27th, and entirely the 28th year. He bore the same arms as those of Cowdham.

Reginald de Dike, of Sheldwich, in the 29th year. He married Lora, widow of Sampson At-leeze, and by having the guardianship of his children, much improved his own estate, and purchased lands in Shepey and Sheldwich in this county, and in Rutlandshire. He lies buried in Sheldwich church.

Gilbert de Hells, of Hells'-court, in Ash, and of St. Margaret Hells, in Darent, in the 30th year. He was son of Betram de Hells, lieutenant of Dover castle, under Reginald de Cobham. His arms, sable a bend argent, are carved on the roof of Canterbury cloisters.

William de Apulderfield again, in the 31st year.

Ralph de Fremingham, of Fremingham, in the 32d year.

William Makenade of Makenade house, in Preston, near Faversham, in the 33d year, at the end of which he died. He kept his shrievalty at Makenade.

William de Apulderfield again, in the 34th, and two next years.

William Pimpe of Pimpe's court, in Nettlested, in the 37th year.

William de Apulderfield again, in the 38th year.

Jeffery Colepeper of Bayhall, in Pembury, and Preston, in Aylesford, part of the 39th year. His arms are still remaining in the windows of many of the churches in this county, and on the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury.

John Colepeper of Bayhall, the other part of the 39th and the whole of the 40th year.

Sir Richard At-leeze of Leeze-court, in Sheldwich, in the 41st year. His arms were placed in Sheldwich church.

John Brockhull of Brockhull, in Saltwood, in the 42d year.

John Colepeper of Bayhall, again, in the 43d year.

William Pimpe of Pimpe's-court, again, in the 45th year.

John Barrey of the Moat, in Sevington, in the 46th year. His arms are on the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury.

Jeffrey Colepeper of Preston, in Aylesford, in the 47th year.

Robert Nottingham of Bayford, in Sittingbourn, in the 48th year, and kept his shrievalty at the above place, in which year he died; Richard de Southwell served the remainder of it for him. His arms were, Paly wavy of four pieces, gules and argent.

William Pimpe again served the office in the 49th year, but died before the end of it, and Reginald his son served the remainder of it for him.

Nicholas at Crouch, of Great Chart, so named from his habitation near the Cross, in the 50th year.

Henry de Apulderfield of Otterpley, in Challock, in the 51st year, in which year this victorious prince died.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING RICHARD II.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1377.

Thomas de Cobham of Roundal, in Shorne, in the 1st year, and William de Modyngham was his deputy.

John de Fremingham, of Fremingham, or Farningham, as it is now called, in the 2d year.

James de Peckham of Yaldham, in Wrotham, in the 3d year.

William Septvans of Milton Septvans, near Canterbury, in the 4th year, and kept his shrievalty there.

Arnold Savage of Bobbing-court, near Sittingbourn, where he had a castellated house, in the 5th year, and was a man of great note in his time. His arms are on the roof of Canterbury cloisters, and in several churches in this county.

Thomas Brockhull of Calehill, in Little Chart, in the 6th and 7th years.

Robert Corbie of Boughton Malherbe, in the 8th year.

Arnold Savage of Bobbing, again in the 9th year.

Ralph St. Leger of Ulcombe, in the 10th year, whose arms are on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury, and painted in the windows of several churches in this county.

William Guldeford of Hemsted, in Benenden, in the 11th year. His arms are carved on the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury.

James de Peckham of Yaldham above mentioned, again in the 12th year.

William Burceston of Burston, in Hunton, descended out of the county of Southampton, in the 13th year.

Richard de Berham, son of Henry de Berham, of Berham-court, in Teston, in the 14th year.

Thomas Chiche of the Dungeon, near Canterbury, whose arms may be seen carved in stone in the church of St. Mary Bredin, in Canterbury, and on a brass plate in Milton church, near Sittingbourn.

William Barrey, son of John above mentioned, and likewise of the Moat, in Sevington, in the 16th year.

John de Fremingham above mentioned was again theriff part of the 17th year, and Thomas Colepeper of Pembury, served the remainder of it.

Thomas Colepeper above mentioned continued all the 18th year.

Nicholas Haut of Wadenhall, in Stelling, in the 19th year, and kept his shrievalty there. His arms were, Or, a cross engrailed gules, as on the roof of the cloisters of Canterbury, and in many of the neighbouring churches.

Thomas St. Leger of Otterden, in the 20th year.

Nicholas Potin, who resided at Queen-court, in Ospringe, and kept his shrievalty there, was sheriff in the 21st year.

John Boteler of Gravenny, in the 22d year, being the last of king Richard's reign. His arms were, Sable, three cups covered or, a bordure of the second, as may be seen in Milton, by Sittingbourn, and Graveny churches.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING HENRY IV.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1399.

Robert Clifford of Bobbing, in the 1st year.

Thomas Lodelow, descended out of Wiltshire, in the 2d year, but died before the end of it, and John Digg, of Digg's-court, in Barham, discharged the office for the remainder of the year, whose arms may be seen in the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury, as well as in many churches in this county.

Thomas Chiche of the Dungeon, in St. Mary Bredin's parish, Canterbury, in the 3d year.

Richard Clitherow of Goldstanton, in Ash, near Sandwich, who was constituted admiral of the seas, from the Thames mouth westward, was sheriff in the 4th year and most part of the 5th.

Thomas Swinbourne, owner of several estates in the county of Essex, in the 6th year, and kept his shrievalty at Thevegate, in Smeeth,

Michael Horn of Horn's-place, in Appledore, in the 7th year, and kept his shrievalty there.

Edward Haut of Haut's place, in Petham, and of Bourne, in the 8th year.

William Snaith of Addington, in the 9th year.

Reginald Pimp of Pimp's court, in East Farleigh, son of William Pimp of Nettlested, in the 10th year.

John Darell of Calehill, in Little Chart, a younger branch of those at Sesay, in Yorkshire, who was steward to archbishop Chicheley, and elder brother to sir William Darell, under treasurer of England, was sheriff in the 11th year.

William Notbeame, descended out of Suffolk, where his family was of gentility, but whose residence was at Ash, near Sandwich, in the 12th year, and in the 7th year of king Henry V. was returned among those who were said, portare arma antiqua.

William Cheney of Shurland, in Shepey, in the 13th year, being the last of king Henry IV. He bore for his arms, Argent, on a bend sable, three mullets or, being his own paternal arms, and also the additional coat of Shurland, being Azure, six lioncels rampart argent, three, two, and one, a canton ermine, which last coat is carved on the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING HENRY V.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1412.

William Cheney above mentioned continued the 1st year.

Robert. Clifford beforementioned, again in the 2d and 3d years.

William Langley of Knolton, in the 4th year.

John Darell of Calehill before mentioned, again in the 5th year.

Richard Clitherowof Ash, again in the 6th year.

John Burgh of Etonbridge, in the 7th year. During whose shrievalty there came a special writ to him from the king, commanding him to elect out of the most fit and able knights and esquires of the county, that bore arms from antiquity, twelve of the most sufficient, to serve as lances for the defence of the kingdom.

William Haut of Hautsborne, some part of the 8th and all the 9th year.

John Darell of Calehill, in the 10th year, being the last in king Henry V.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING HENRY VI.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1422.

John Darell of Calehill was continued the 1st year.

William Cheney of Shurland, in the 2d year.

John Rykeld of Eslingham, in Friendsbury, in the 3d year, and kept his shrievalty there.

William Clifford of Bobbing, again in the 4th year.

William Colepeper of Preston, in Aylesford, son of sir John Colepeper, in the 5th year.

Thomas Ellis of Burton, in Kenington, in the 6th year.

William Scott of Scott's-hall, in Smeeth, in the 7th year.

John Peche of Lullingstone, in the 8th year.

John St. Leger of Ulcombe, in the 9th year.

John Guldeford of Halden, alias Lambin, in Rolvenden, in the 10th year.

William Bures of Halsted, in the 11th year.

Richard Woodvile of the Moat, near Maidstone, in the 12th year.

William Clifford of Bobbing and Shorne, of whom mention is made before, again in the 13th year.

William Manston of Manston, in Thanet, in the 14th year, and kept his shrievalty there. His arms are carved on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury, and in Ashford church.

James Fienes, second son of sir William Fienes, of Kempsing and Seal, in the 15th year. Two years after which he was sheriff of Surry and Sussex, and in the 25th of this reign he was summoned to parliament as lord Say and Seale, and was afterwards constituted lord treasurer of England.

Richard Waller of Groombridge, in Speldhurst, who took the duke of Orleans prisoner at Agincourt, was sheriff in the 16th year.

Edward Guldeford of Halden, in Rolvenden, in the 17th year.

Gervas Clifton, who married Isabel, widow of William Scott, and lived upon her estate at Braborn, where he lies buried, in the 18th year. His arms were, Sable seme of cinquefoils and a lion rampant argent.

John Yerde of Denton, near Eleham, in the 19th year.

John Warner of Foot's Cray, in the 20th year.

William Maries, who lived at Ufton, in Tunstall, in the 21st year. He was esquire to Henry V. and lies interred in Preston church, near Faversham.

Sir Thomas Brown, treasurer of the household to king Henry VI. and ancestor to the late viscount Montague, in the 22d year.

William Cromer of Tunstall, in the 23d year. He married Elizh, daughter of James lord Say and Seale, lord treasurer, and was barbarously murdered by Jack Cade, and his rebellious route, as he was opposing their entrance into London.

John Thornbury of Faversham, in the 24th year. His arms were, Argent, on a bend engrailed sable three plates ermine.

William Isley of Sundridge, in the 25th year.

William Kene, who resided at Welhall, in Eltham, in right of Agnes his wife, widow of John Tattersall, in the 26th year.

Stephen Slegge of Wouldham, in the 27th year. He was a good benefactor to the above mentioned church.

Henry Cromer, second son of William Cromer above mentioned, in the 28th year.

Gervas Clifton before mentioned, again in the 29th year.

Robert Horne of Horne's-place, in Apledore, in the 30th year.

Thomas Ballardof Horton Parva, near Canterbury, in the 31st year.

John Fogge of Repton, in Ashford, in the 32d year. His arms were, Argent, on a fess between three amulets sable, three mullets of the first pierced, as they are carved and painted in several churches in this county, and on the roof of the cloisters at Canterbury.

Sir John Cheney of Shurland, in the 33d year.

Philip Belknap of the Moat, near Canterbury, in the 34th year.

Alexander Iden of Westwell, who slew Jack Cade, and married the widow of William Cromer, slain before by that rebel, was sheriff in the 35th year.

John Guldeford of Halden, in Rolvenden, in the 36th year. He was afterwards Comptroller of the household to king Edward IV. and was knighted by king Richard III. at his coronation, and was admitted by king Henry VII. of his privy council.

Sir Gervas Clifton before mentioned, again in the 37th year.

Sir Thomas Brown of Beechworth castle, in Surry, again in the 38th year.

John Scott of Scott's-hall, in the 39th, and last year of the reign of king Henry VI. He was afterwards knighted by king Edward IV. and made a privycounsellor, deputy of Calais, and comptroller of his household.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING EDWARD IV.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1460.

John Isaac, esq. of Howlets, in Bekesbourne, in the 1st year.

Sir William Peche of Lullingstone, in the 2d and 3d years, when he had likewise the custody of the castle of Canterbury annexed to his office, as the following record informs us — Rex concessit Willielmo Peche militi totum comit. Cantii una cum castro Cantuar. ac constituit eum vice-comitem Cantii, ac ei concessit 40 libras annuas quousque ei dederit 40 libras annuas in speciali tallio & heredibus masculis. Pat. 2 Edw. 4ta. parte 2da.

John Diggs, esq. of Digg's-court, in Barham, in the 4th year.

Alexander Clifford, esq. of Bobbing-court, son of Lewis Clifford, esq. in the 5th year.

Sir William Haut of Hautsbourn, son of William Haut and Elizh his wife, sister to Richard Woodvile earl Rivers, and aunt to Elizh, queen to king Edward IV. in the 6th year.

Sir John Colepeper of Pembury and Goudhurst, in the 7th year.

Ralph St. Leger, esq. of Ulcombe, in the 8th year.

Sir Henry Ferrers of East Peckham, descended out of Warwickshire, in the 9th year. He married Margaret, one of the daughters and coheirs of William Hextal of Hextal-place, in that parish.

John Brumpton, esq. of Preston, near Faversham, in the 10th year. He bore, Barry of six pieces, a chief vaire, and lies buried in Faversham church.

Richard Colepeper, esq. of Oxenhoath, in Little Peckham, in the 11th year.

James Peckbam, esq. of Yaldham, in Wrotham, in the 12th year.

Sir John Fogge of Repton, in Ashford, in the 13th year, who was sometime comptroller of the household.

John Isley, esq. of Sundridge, cousin and heir-general of William Isley, who was sheriff in the reign of king Henry VI. served this office in the 14th year.

Sir William Haut of Hautsbourne, formerly mentioned, again in the 15th year.

John Green, esq. who resided at Scadbury, in Chiselhurst, in right of his wife Constance, widow of sir Thomas Walsingham, in the 16th year. His arms were, Gules, a cross-croslet ermine, within a bordure gobony argent and sable

William Cheney, esq. of Shurland, in the 17th year.

Richard Haut, esq. of the Moat, in Ightham, a younger brother of sir William Haut above mentioned, in the 18th year.

Richard Lee of Great Delce, near Rochester, in 19th year.

Sir John Fogge of Repton, before mentioned, again in the 20th year.

Sir George Brown of Beechworth castle, son of sir Thomas, in the 21st year.

Richard Haut, esq. of the Moat, in Ightham, again in the 22d and last year of his reign, after he had been three years from the office, as the ftatute directs.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING EDWARD V.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1483.

Sir William Haut of Hautsbourne, who had been twice before in the former reign, was now sheriff again; that is, from Michaelmas, in the last year of king Edward IV. to the 9th of April, the day on which king Edward V. began his reign, and from thence to the 22d of June, the day of king Richard's being proclaimed; a few days after which sir Henry Ferrers was placed in this office, and continued in it till the Michaelmas following.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING RICHARD III.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1483.

John Bamme, esq. of the Grange, in Gillingham, descended from Adam Bamme, lord-mayor of London, in the 2d year.

Sir Robert Brackenbury of the Moat, in Ightham, in the 3d year.

William Cheney, esq. of Shurland, the next year, in which king Richard died.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING HENRY VII.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1485.

William Cheney, esq. above mentioned, continued in this office the remaining part of the year.

John Pimpe, esq. of Pimpe's court, in East Farleigh, in the 2d year.

Sir Henry Ferrers, of East Peckham, before mentioned, again in the 3d year.

Walter Roberts, esq. of Glassenbury, in Cranbrook, in the 4th year.

Sir William Boleyne of Hever-castle, son of sir Geoffrey Boleyne, lord-mayor of London, in the 5th year.

Sir William Scott of Scott's-hall, which he new built, son and heir of sir John Scott, in the 6th year.

John Darell, esq. of Cale-hill, in the 7th year. He was esquire of the body to king Henry VII. and captain of the launciers in that part of the county. His estate had been seized on by king Richard, for holding- a correspondence with that prince, by whom, on his coming to the crown, it was again restored, with several other manors.

Thomas Kempe, esq. of Ollantigh, near Wye, in the 8th year.

Sir Richard Guldeford of Halden, in Rolvenden, in the 9th year, who was knighted at Milton-haven, and made a banneret at Blackheath.

John Peche, esq. of Lullingstone, in the 10th year, who was afterwards knighted.

John Digg, esq. of Digg's-court, in Barham, in the 11th year.

Sir James Walsingham of Scadbury, in Chiselhurst, in the 12th year.

Lewis Clifford, esq. of Bobbing-court, in the 13th year.

Robert Wotton, esq. of Boughton Malherbe, in the 14th year, afterwards knighted, and made comptroller of Calais.

Alexander Colepeper, esq. of Bedgbury, in the 15th year, afterwards knighted.

Thomas Iden, esq. of Westwell, in the 16th year.

Sir William Scott of Scott's-hall, above-mentioned, again in the 17th year.

Ralph St. Leger, esq. of Ulcombe, and heir of Ralph St. Ledger, esq. in the 18th year.

William Cromer, esq. of Tunstall, in the 19th year, afterwards knighted.

John Langley, esq. of Knolton, in the 20th year.

Sir Thomas Kempe, K. B. of Ollantigh, in the 21st year.

Sir Alexander Colepeper of Bedgbury, before mentioned, again in the 22d year.

Henry Vane, esq. of Tunbridge, second son of John Vane of that place, in the 23d year.

Reginald Peckham, esq. of Yaldham, in the 24th, being the last year of king Henry VII.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING HENRY VIII.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1509.

Sir William Cromer of Tunstall, in the 1st year.

James Digge, esq. of Digge's-court, in Barham, in the 2d year.

Sir Thomas Boleyne of Hever-castle, in the 3d year. He was afterwards, in the 15th of this reign, made knight of the Garter, and treasurer of the king's household; two years after which he was created viscount Rochford, and in the 21st, earl of Wiltshire and Ormond.

Sir Thomas Kempe, K. B. above mentioned, again in the 4th year.

Sir John Norton of Northwood, in Milton, in the 5th year.

Sir Alexander Colepeper of Bedgbury, in the 6th year.

Thomas Cheney, esq. of Shurland, in the 7th year, afterwards made knight of the Garter.

Sir William Scott, K. B. before mentioned, again in the 8th year.

Sir Thomas Boleyne of Hever-castle, in the 9th year.

John Crispe, esq. of Quekes, in Birchington, in Thanet, in the 10th year.

Sir John Wiltshire of Stone, near Dartford, in the 11th year, comptroller of Calais.

John Roper, esq. of St. Dunstan's and Wellhall, in the 12th year.

Robert Sondes, esq. of Town-place, in Throwley, and of Darking, in Surry, in the 13th year.

Sir John Fogge of Repton, in Ashford, in the 14th year.

George Gulderfield, esq. of Hempsted, in Benenden, in the 15th year.

Sir William Haut of Hautsborne, son and heir of sir Thomas, in the 16th year.

Henry Vane, esq. of Tunbridge, before mentioned, again in the 17th year.

William Wbettenball, esq. of Hextal-place, in East Peckham, in the 18th year.

Sir John Scott of Scott's-hall, in the 19th year.

William Kempe, esq. of Ollantigh, in the 20th year, afterwards knighted.

Sir Edward Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, in the 21st year.

William Waller, esq. of Grombridge, in Speldhurst, in the 22d year.

Sir Richard Clement of the Moat, in Ightham, in the 23d year.

Sir William Finch of the Moat, in St. Martin's, near Canterbury, in the 24th year.

Thomas Roberts, esq. of Glassenbury, in Cranbrook, in the 25th year.

Sir Thomas Poynings of Oftenhanger, in the 26th year, afterwards lord Poynings. He bore for his arms, Barry of six or and vert, a bend gules, as in many churches, and on the roof of the cloisters in Canterbury.

Sir Edward Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, again in the 27th year.

Sir Thomas Wyatt of Allington-castle, in the 28th year.

Sir William Haut of Hautsbourne, again in the 29th year.

Sir William Sidney, banneret, of Penshurst, in the 30th year.

Sir Anthony St. Leger of Ulcombe, in the 31st year.

Anthony Sondes, esq. of Throwley, in the 32d year.

Reginald Scott of Scott's-hall, in the 33d year.

Sir Henry Isley of Sundridge, in the 34th year.

Sir Humphrey Stile of Langley-park, in Beckenham, in the 35th year.

Sir John Fogge of Repton, in the 36th year.

Sir Percival Hart of Lullingstone, in the 37th year.

Henry Crispe, esq. of Quekes, in Birchington, in the 38th, and last year of king Henry VIII. who was afterwards knighted.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING EDWARD VI.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1546.

William Sidley, esq. of Scadbury, in Southfleet, in the 1st year.

Sir George Harpur of Sutton Valence, in the 2d year.

Thomas Colepeper, esq. of Bedgbury, son and heir of sir Alexander Colepeper, in the 3d year.

Sir Thomas Wyatt of Allington castle, in the 4th year.

Sir Henry Isley of Sundridge, in the 5th year.

Sir John Guldeford of Hemsted, in Benenden, in the 6th year, in which king Edward VI. died.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF QUEEN MARY,

WHO BEGAN HER REIGN IN 1553.

Sir Robert Southwell of Mereworth, in the 1st year, afterwards master of the rolls.

William Roper, esq. of Well-hall, in the 1st and 2d of Philip and Mary.

Sir Thomas Kempe of Ollantigh, part of the 2d and 3d year, and the remaining part of it was supplied by Thomas Moile, esq.

George Vane, esq. of Badsel, in the 3d and 4th year.

Thomas Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, in the 4th and 5th, in which year queen Mary died.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF QUEEN ELIZABETH,

WHO BEGAN HER REIGN IN 1558.

Thomas Wotton, esq. before mentioned, continued in office part of the first year, and the remaining part of it was supplied by Nicholas Crispe, esq. who kept his shrievalty at Grimgill, in Whistable.

Warbam St. Leger, esq. of Ulcombe, in the 2d year, afterwards knighted.

John Tufton, esq. of Hothfield, son and heir of Nicholas Tuston, esq. of Nordiam, in Suffex, in the 3d year. He bore for his arms, Argent on a pale sable, an eagle displayed of the first.

Richard Baker, esq, of Sisinghurst, in the 4th year, son and heir of sir John Baker, chancellor of the exchequer, and one of queen Mary's privy council.

Sir Thomas Walsingham of Scadbury, in Chiselhurst, in the 5th year.

Sir Thomas Kempe of Ollantigh, before mentioned, again in the 6th year.

John Mayney of Biddenden, esq. in the 7th year; he died before the year was out, and the remainder of it was supplied by William Isley, esq. of Sundridge.

John Sidley, esq. of Southfleet, in the 8th year.

William Cromer, esq. of Tunstal, in the 9th year, son and heir of James Cromer, esq.

John Brown, of Reynolds, alias Brown's-place, in Horton Kirby, in the 10th year.

Edward Isaac, esq. of Patricksbourn, in the 11th year.

John Lennard, esq. of Chevening, in the 12th year, son and heir of John Lennard, of the same place.

Walter Mayney, esq. of Spilfill, in Staplehurst, in the 13th year.

Sir Thomas Vane of Badsell, in the 14th year.

Thomas Willoughby, esq. of Bore-place, in Chidingstone, in the 15th year. He was grandson of sir Thomas Willoughby, of the same place, chief justice of the common pleas.

Sir James Hales of the Dungeon, near Canterbury, in the 16th year.

John Tufton, esq. of Hothfield, in the 17th year.

Sir Thomas Scott of Scott's-hall, in the 18th year.

Edward Boys, esq. of Fredvile, in Nonington, in the 19th year.

Thomas Wotton, esq. of Boughton Malherbe, in the 20th year.

Thomas Vane, esq. of Badsell, in Tudely, in the 21st year.

Thomas Sondes of Throwley, in the 22d year.

Sir George Hart of Lullingstone, in the 23d year.

Sir Richard Baker of Sisinghurst, in the 24th year.

Justinian Champneis, esq. of Hall-place, in Bexley, in the 25th year, son of sir John Champneis, lordmayor of London.

Michael Sondes, esq. of Throwley, in the 26th year.

William Cromer, esq. of Tunstall, in the 27th year.

Sir James Hales of the Dungeon, near Canterbury, in the 28th year.

John Fineux of Haw-house, in Hearn, esq. in the 29th year.

Richard Hardres, esq. of Hardres, in the 30th year.

William Sidley, esq. of Southfleet, in the 31ft year.

Thomas Willoughby, esq. of Bore-place, in Chidingstone, in the 32d year.

Sampson Lennard, esq. of Chevening, in the 33d year.

Robert Bing, esq. of Wrotham, in the 34th year.

Michael Sondes, esq. of Throwley, in the 35th year.

Sir Edward Wotton of Boughton Malherbe, in the 36th year.

Thomas Palmer, esq. of Wingham, in the 37th year.

Sir Moile Finch of East Well, in the 38th year.

Thomas Kempe, esq. of Ollantigh, in Wye, in the 39th year.

Martin Barnham, esq. in the 40th year.

Roger Twysden, esq. of Royden-hall, in East Peckham, in the 41st year.

John Smith, esq. of Oftenhanger, in Stanford, in the 42d year.

Thomas Scott, esq. of Scott's-hall, in the 43d year.

Sir Peter Manwood, K. B. of St. Stephen's, near Canterbury, in the 44th, being the last of this queen's reign.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING JAMES I.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1602.

Sir Peter Manwood, of St. Stephen's above mentioned, continued in the 1st year.

Sir James Cromer of Tunstal, in the 2d year.

Sir Thomas Baker, second son of sir Richard Baker, of Sisinghurst, in the 3d year, and kept his shrievalty at Sisinghurst.

Sir Moile Finch of Eastwell, in the 4th year.

Sir Norton Knatchbull of Mersham, in the 5th year.

Sir Robert Edolph of Hinxhill, in the 6th year.

Sir Edward Hales of Woodchurch, in the 7th year.

Sir William Withens of Southend, in Eltham, in the 8th year.

Sir Nicholas Gilbourne of Charing, in the 9th year.

Sir Maximilian Dallison of Halling, near Rochester, in the 10th year.

Sir William Steed of Steed-hill, in Harrietsham, in the 11th year.

Sir Anthony Aucher of Hautsbourne, in the 12th year.

Sir Edward Filmer of East Sutton, in the 13th year.

Sir Edwin Sandys of Norbourn, in the 14th year.

William Beswick, esq. of Spelmonden, in Horsmonden, in the 15th year.

Gabriel Livesey, esq. of Hollingbourn, in the 16th year.

Sir Thomas Norton of Bobbing and Northwood, in Milton, in the 17th year.

Edward Scott, esq. of Scott's-hall, in the 18th year. He was afterwards made a knight of the Bath, at the coronation of king Charles.

Sir John Sidley of the Friars, in Aylesford, in the 19th year.

Sir Thomas Roberts of Glassenbury, in Cranbrook, in the 20th year.

Sir George Fane of Burston, in Hunton, in the 21st year.

Sir John Hayward of Hollingbourn, in the 22d, being the last year of the reign of king James.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING CHARLES I.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1625.

Sir Thomas Hamon of Brasted, in the 1st year, son of William Hamon, of Acris, esq. He bore for his arms, Azure, three demi lions passant guardant or.

Sir Isaac Sidley, knt. and bart. of Great Chart, in the 2d year.

Basil Dixwell, esq. of Folkestone, in the 3d year.

Sir Edward Engham of Goodneston, in the 4th year; and had a dispensation, under the king's hand and signet, to inhabit within the county and city of Canterbury during his year of shrievalty, and to find a proper person to attend at the assises in his stead, in regard to his indisposition of body.

Sir William Campion of Combwell, in Goudhurst, in the 5th year.

John Brown, esq. of Singleton, in Great Chart, in the 6th year; he was descended from those of Beechworth castle, and bore the same arms.

Sir Robert Lewknor of Acris, in the 7th year.

Nicholas Miller, esq. of Horsnells Crouch, in Wrotham, in the 8th year.

Sir Thomas Style, knt. and bart. of Watringbury, in the 9th year.

Sir John Baker of Sisinghurst, in Cranbrook, bart. in the 10th year.

Edward Chout, esq. of Bethersden and Hinxhill, in the 11th year, and kept his shrievalty at the latter.

Sir William Colepeper, bart. of Preston, in Aylesford, in the 12th year.

Sir George Sondes, K. B. of Lees-court, in Sheldwhich, in the 13th year.

Sir Thomas Hendley of Coursehorne, in Cranbrook, in the 14th year.

Sir Edward Master of East Langdon, in the 15th year.

David Polhill, esq. of Otford, in the 16th year. His arms were, Argent, on a bend gules, three crosscroslets or.

James Hugessen, esq. of Linsted, in the 17th year.

Sir William Brockman of Bytchborough, in Newington, near Hyth, in the 18th year, being appointed by the king, then in arms at Oxford; but being a person of known loyalty to king Charles, he was soon superceded in his office by the authority of the parliament then sitting, and sir John Honeywood of Evington was appointed by them to serve the remainder of the year.

Sir John Honywood before mentioned, continued in office in the 19th and 20th years.

Sir John Rayney, bart. in the 21st year; in which sir Edward Monins, of Waldeshare, bart. was also sheriff.

Sir John Henden of Biddenden, in the 22d year. His arms were, Azure, a lion passant between three escallops or.

Sir Stephen Scott of Hayes, in the 23d year.

George Selby, esq. of the Moat, in Ightham, in the 24th year; in which year the king was put to death, on January 30, 1648. His arms were, Barry of eight pieces or and sable.

SHERIFFS DURING THE USURPATION,

AFTER THE DEATH OF KING CHARLES I.

1650Henry Crispe of Quekes, in Birchington; but in respect of his age and infirmities, his place was supplied by sir Nicholas Crispe, his son and heir.
1651George Curtis, esq. of Chart Sutton, was chosen to serve the office in the room of William Draper, esq. of Crayford, who died soon after his nomination to this office. By reason of his age and infirmities his son Norton Curtis, was suffered to discharge the office for him. His arms were, Argent, a cheveron between three bulls heads, caboshed sable.
1652Thomas Floyd, esq. of Gore-court, in Otham.
1653Bernard Hyde of Bore-place, in Chidingstone.
1654The Rt. Hon. Sir John Tufton, earl of Thanet. He bore for his arms, Sable, within a bordure argent, an eagle displayed ermine.
1655Sir Humphry Tufton of the Moat, near Maidstone, uncle to the above mentioned earl.
1656 Sir Michael Livesey, bart. of Eastchurch, in Shepey.
1657
1658Charles Bolles, esq. of Rochester.
1659Plumer, esq.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING CHARLES II.

FROM HIS RESTORATION IN 1660.

1660 Sir Robert Austen, bart. of Hall-place, in Bexley. He continued in office till the end of the next year.
1661
1662David Polhill, esq. of Chipsted.
1663Nicholas Toke, esq. of Goddington, in Great Chart.
1664Thomas Biggs, esq.
1665Sir John Beal, bart. of Farningham.
1666Sir Humphry Miller, bart. of Oxenhoath, in West Peckham.
1667Sir William Leach of Squirries, in Westram.
1668Sir John Williams of Eleham-court, afterwards created a baronet. He bore for his arms, Argent, a wivern's head erased vert, holding in his mouth a man's hand couped at the wrist and erect gules.
1669Robert Jacques, esq. of Elmestone.
1670Sir John Darell of Calehill, in Little Chart.
1671Sir William Hugessen of Provender, in Norton.
1672John Twisleton, esq. of Horseman's-place, in Dartford.
1673Sir Bernard Hyde of Sundridge.
1674William Gomeldon, esq. of Somerfield-court, in Sellindge.
1675Francis Vanacker, esq. of Erith.
1676Sir John Cutler, knt. and bart. of Deptford. His arms were, Azure, three dragons heads erased or, a chief argent.
1677Thomas Cadwell, esq. of Rolvenden.
1678 Sir Richard Betenson, knt. and bart. of Scadbury, in Chisilhurst, and continued in office the next year, at the end of which he died.
1679
1680Ralph Petley. esq. of Riverhead.
1681George Etkins, esq. of Gravesend.
1682Archibald Clenkerd, esq. of Sutton Valence, as he was likewise in the two following years.
1683
1684
1685William Rooke, esq. of Canterbury; afterwards knighted, being the last year of the reign of king Charles II.

SHERIFFS IN THE REIGN OF KING JAMES II.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1685.

1687In the 1st year of king James II. no sheriff is found in the recognisance book in the exchequer; but in the 2d and 3d, Sir William Rooke above mentioned served this office.
1688
1689Sir Robert Filmer, bart. of East Sutton, in the 4th, and last year of king James's reign.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING WILLIAM III.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1689.

1690Thomas Adrian, esq. of Bifrons, in Patriksbourn.
1691Sir Henry Palmer, bart. of Wingham.
1692Sir John Marsham, bart. of the Moat, near Maidstone.
1693Sir Nicholas Toke of Goddington, in Great Chart.
1694Edmund Davenport, esq. of Greensted-green, in Darent.
1695William Cage, esq. of Milgate, in Bersted.
1696Saloman Hougham, esq. of St. Paul's, in Canterbury.
1697Richard Goodhugh, esq. of Tunbridge.
1698George Children, esq. of Tunbridge.
1699John Amherst, esq. of East Farleigh.
1700William Woodgate, esq. of Chiddingstone.
1701Isaac Loader, esq. of Deptford.
1702Bowyer Hendley, esq. of Gore-court, in Otham, in which year king William died.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF QUEEN ANNE,

WHO BEGAN HER REIGN IN 1702.

1703Thomas Golding, esq. of Leybourn-castle.
1704Sir Thomas Colepepyr, bart. of Preston-hall, in Aylesford.
1705Sir Edward Betenson, of Scadbury, in Chesilhurst.
1706Snelling Thomas, esq. of Deptford.
1707Percyval Hart, esq. of Lullingstone.
1708James Codd, esq. of Watringbury; he died whilst in office, and Stephen Stringer, esq. of Goudhurst was sheriff for the remaining part of the year.
1709Sir Comport Fytch, bart. of Eltham.
1710Sir Thomas Style, bart. of Watringbury.
1711Humphrey Style, esq. of Langley, in Beckenham.
1712John Hooker, esq. of Little Peckham.
1713Leonard Bartholomew, esq. of Rochester.
1714John Lynch, esq. of Grove, in Staple, in the last year of queen Anne.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING GEORGE I.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1714.

1715David Polhill, esq. of Chipsted-place, in Chevening.
1716Richard Gee, esq. of Orpington.
1717Richard Sheldon, esq. of Aldington, in Thurnham.
1718John Stevens, esq. His arms were, On a chevron three cross-croslets, between three demi lions rampant.
1719John Hamilton, esq. of Chilston, in Boughton Malherbe.
1720Sir Charles Farnaby of Kippington, in Sevenoke.
1721Jonathan Smith, esq. of Ingres, in Swanscombe.
1722Peter Burrell, esq. of Beckenham.
1723William Glanville, esq. of St. Cleres, in Ightham.
1724Sir Robert Austen, bart. of Hall-place, in Bexley.
1725James Master, esq. of Yotes, in Mereworth. He bore for his arms, Azure, a sess embattled, between three griffins heads erased.
1726John Savage, esq. of Boughton Monchelsea; and on his death, in April 1726, Richard Lewin, esq. of Lee, was sheriff for the remaining part of the year. He bore for his arms, A chevron between three escallops.
1727Samuel Pugh, esq. of Beckenham.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING GEORGE II.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1727.

1728Robert Weller, esq. of Tunbridge.
1729Thomas May, esq. of Godmersham. His arms were, Gules, a fess between eight billets or, being the arms of May. He was the son of William Broadnax, of Godmersham, esq. and by act, (13 George I.) took the sirname of May, as he did afterwards, in 1738, the name of Knight.
1730Mawdistly Best, esq. of Boxley.
1731James Brookes, esq. of Lewisham.
1732William James, esq. of Ightham.
1733Sir Brook Bridges, bart. of Goodneston; who dying May 23, sir Windham Knatchbull, bart. was sheriff for the remaining part of the year.
1734Sir Henry Dicks of Deptford, knighted during his shrievalty. His arms were, A fess wavy between three fleurs de lis.
1735Baldwin Duppa, junior, esq. of Hollingbourn.
1736Abraham Spencer, esq. of Penhurst.
1737Thomas Maylin, esq. of Chesilhurst.
1738Jones Raymond, esq. of Langley, in Beckenham, who died soon after his appointment, and Christopher Milles, esq. of Nackington served the remainder of the year.
1739Robert Lacey, esq. of Elmes, in Hougham.
1740John Smith, esq. and on his death, in June that year, John Douglas, esq. was appointed for the remainder of the year.
1741John Lidgbird, esq. of Plumsted.
1742John Mason, esq. of Greenwich.
1743Thomas Whitaker, esq. of Trottescliffe.
1744Thomas Hodson, esq. of Bromley.
1745John Cooke, esq. of Cranbrook.
1746Arthur Harris, esq. of Barming.
1747William Quilter, esq. of Orpington.
1748Samuel Collett, esq. of Greenwich. His arms were, Sable, on a chevron argent three annulets of the first, between three binds of the second.
1749Richard Hornsby, esq. of Horton Kirkby.
1750Richard Merry, esq. of Eltham.
1751James Best, esq. of Boxley.
1752Sir John Honywood, bart.
1753Sir John Shaw, bart. of Eltham.
1754Sir Thomas Rider of Boughton Monchelsea.
1755George Sayer, esq. of Charing.
1756John Cocking Sole, esq. of Bobbing-place.
1757William Glanvil Evelyn, esq. of St. Clere's, in Ightham.
1758Thomas Whitaker, esq. of Trottescliffe.
1759Pyke Burfar, esq. of Greenwich.
1760Sir Thomas Wilson of West Wickham, who was knighted during his shrievalty, served this ofin the last year of king George II.

SHERIFFS IN THE TIME OF KING GEORGE III.

WHO BEGAN HIS REIGN IN 1760.

1761William Jumper, esq. of Leed's-abbey.
1762Sir George Kelly of Speldhurst, who was knighted during his shrievalty.
1763William Gorden, esq. of Rochester.
1764Henry Goodwin, esq. of Deptford.
1765Sir Richard Betenson, bart. of Bradbourn, in Sevenoke.
1766William Wilson, esq.
1767James Whatman, esq. of Boxley.
1768Richard Hulse, esq. of Baldwin's, near Dartford, second son of sir Edward Hulse.
1769William Wheatley, esq. of Erith.
1770John Toke, esq. of Goddington, in Great Chart.
1771William Daniel Master, esq. of Yotes, in Mereworth.
1772James Flint, esq. of Judde-house, in Ospringe.
1773Josiah Fuller Farrer, esq. of Cleve-court, in Thanet.
1774Willshire Emmett, esq. of Wiarton, in Boughton Monchelsea.
1775Granville Wheeler, esq. of Otterden-place.
1776William Perrin, esq. of Smith's-hall, in West Farleigh.
1777Benjamin Harenc, esq. of Footscray-place.
1778John Ward, esq. of Westerham.
1779William Slade, esq. of Lewisham.
1780Robert Burrow, esq. of Holwood-hill.
1781John Cator, esq. of Beckenham-place.
1782Samuel Boys, esq. of Hawkhurst.
1783Henry Hawley, esq. of the Grange, in Leyborne. since created a baronet.
1784Charles Booth, esq. of Harrietsham-place, who was knighted during his shrievalty.
1785Edward Knatchbull, esq. of Provenders, in Norton, eldest son of sir Edward Knatchbull, baronet.
1786Thomas Hallet Hodges, esq. of Hemsted, in Benenden.
1787John Cottin, esq. of Hill-park, in Westerham.
1788James Bond, esq. of Hayes, and part of 1789.
1789John Cartier, esq. of Bedgbury, in Goudhurst, was sheriff in the latter part of the year.
1790Leonard Bartholemew, esq. of Addington-place.
1791William James Drake Brockman, esq. of Bitchborough, in Newington, near Hythe.
1792Henry Streatfield, esq. of Highstreet-house, in Chiddingstone.
1793George Norman, esq. of Bromley.
1794Richard Carew, esq. of Orpington.
1795Gabriel Harpur, esq. of Gore-court, in Tunstall; Samuel Chambers, esq. of that parish was appointed his deputy, and executed this office for him.
1796John Mumford, esq. of Sutton at Hone.

Footnotes

1 The arms of the several sheriffs, not described here, may be found under the several parishes in which they resided.
2 Madox's Excheq. p. 224.
3 Dugd. Bar. vol. i. p. 461.
4 Madox's Excheq. p. 136.
5 Dugd. Bar. vol. i. p. 83.
6 Madox's Excheq. p. 12.
7 Madox's Excheq. p. 194.
8 Ibid. p. 225.
9 Madox's Excheq. p. 225 and 640.
10 Philipott, p. 20.
11 Dugd. Bar. vol. ii. p. 65.
12 Claus. 2 Ed. I. h. 13. Rym. Fæd. vol. ii. p. 21.
13 Madox's Hist. Excheq. p. 234 et seq.
14 Kilburne, p. 390. Dugd. Bar. vol. ii. p. 14.
15 Philipott, p. 21.