Memorials
1309

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

H. T. Riley (editor)

Year published

1868

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Pages

67-71

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'Memorials: 1309', Memorials of London and London Life: In the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries (1868), pp. 67-71. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=57654 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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Proclamation as to cleansing the streets of the City.

2 Edward II. A.D. 1309. Letter-Book C. fol. xcvi. (Norman French.)

The proclamation under-written was made on the Sunday next before the Feast of St. George the Martyr [23 April], in the second year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward; in these words.—

"Seeing that the people in the town do cause the ordure that has been collected in their houses, to be carried and placed in the streets, and in the lanes of the City, whereas they ought to have it carried to the Thames, or elsewhere out of the town; and that thereby the streets and lanes are more encumbered than they used to be;—we do forbid, on the King's behalf, that from henceforth any person shall have the ordure that has been collected in his house, carried into the King's highways; but let them cause the same to be carried to the Thames, or elsewhere out of the City, whither it used to be carried. And if any one shall do so, he shall be amerced, the first time, in 40 pence, and afterwards, in half a mark each time; and nevertheless, he shall have the same removed at his own charges. And the same penalty shall be incurred by those before whose houses dung shall be found, if, after the dung has been placed there, they shall not immediately have their Alderman told by whom such dung has been so brought there. Also, no person shall have any dung raked or removed (fn. 1) to the front of the houses of others; but he must immediately have it carried from thence to within his house, [there to be kept] a day and a night, on pain beforementioned."

Disposition of property made (with power of attorney) by a Knight, before departing for the Holy Land.

2 Edward II. A.D. 1309. Letter-Book C. fol. cv. (Norman French.)

John de Lue, Knight, came before the Chamberlain on the Tuesday next after the Feast of the Apostles Peter and Paul [29 June], in the second year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, and acknowledged that the following writing was his; the tenor of which is as follows.—

"To all persons who these present letters shall see or hear, John de Lue, Knight, greeting in God. Whereas Sir Richard de Lue, (fn. 2) my brother, made me joint tenant, with Anneis, (fn. 3) my sister, as to his houses, and all his tenement that he had in the lane called Syuethenelane in London; (fn. 4) the which tenement the heirs of Messire Henry de Grey—to whom may God grant mercy—hold by feoffment and gift, which the said Sir Richard afterwards made to the aforesaid Sir Henry; such houses and tenement being held bound and obligated to me in a yearly rent of 40 shillings, (fn. 5) according as is contained in a writing obligatory of his, under the hand of the said Sir Richard, and sealed with his seal; and of which rent I have been seised under his hand, part of the same being still in arrear. And whereas I am not able now to wait to raise and get in the same, by reason of my journey, which I have undertaken to make to the Holy Land, in devoutness, and for the salvation of my soul;—know ye that I do assign and attorn in my stead Elizabeth, my dear partner, (fn. 6) to demand and receive the same rent of 40 shillings, with the arrears, and by distress the same to levy in my name from the tenement aforesaid, and all things to do as to the same matter, for her own profit, as well as ever I myself could have done in my own proper person: for I have left and given, for always, unto the same Elizabeth, my partner, in aid of her living and her sustenance, this same yearly rent of 40 shillings each year, and the arrears which are due unto me, with all my right and claim, which I have or may have, at any time, in the houses and tenement aforesaid. In witness of which matter, unto this writing I have set my seal. Given at London, on Wednesday the Feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle [11 June], in the second year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward."

Grant of the Small Beam for weighing Silk and Spiceries.

3 Edward II. A.D. 1309. Letter-Book C. fol. xcvii. (Latin.)

On Monday the Octave of St. Michael (fn. 7) [29 September], in the third year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, at the instance of Sir Hugh le Despenser and Sir John de Hastynges, and at their especial request, the small beam, by which silk and divers other spiceries (fn. 8) are weighed, and which beam belongs to the Chamber of the City, was let to Edmund le Lorimer, (fn. 9) for ten pounds sterling yearly, to be paid in equal parts at the four principal terms of the year. And as to the faithful payment of the same money in manner aforesaid, he found two sureties, namely, William Lefchild saddler, and Simon le Botener mercer, who became sureties for him as to the same.

And the aforesaid Edmund makes oath that he will give lawful weight to every one, and that he will faithfully do all other things which unto the said office pertain.

Request by King Edward, that a certain office may be granted to John Albon; and Answer thereto.

3 Edward II. A.D. 1309. Letter-Book D. fol. xcvi. (Norman French.)

"Edward, by the grace of God, etc., to our well-beloved, the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, of London, greeting. Whereas we have heard that Thomas Juvenal has been taken unto God, we do especially and heartily pray you, that the appointment which the said Thomas held in the City of London you will grant unto our well-beloved John Albon, the bearer of these letters, for love of ourselves, to hold in the same manner that the said Thomas held the same. And for this our request, do so much herein, that the said John Albon may perceive that it has had its good effect, and that we may have reason to thank you for the same. And by your letter, and by the said John, let us know without delay what you will do herein. Given under our Privy Seal, at Knaresburghe, in the third year of our reign."

Answer sent to the letter above-written.—

"To their most noble Lord, if so it please him, Sir Edward, by the grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine, his lieges, the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, of his city of London, all manner of honour and of reverence. Most dear Lord, forasmuch as we have received your letters, in the which is contained your desire that we shall grant unto John Albon the appointment which Thomas Juvenal held in your said city, to hold in the same manner that the said Thomas held the same; we do let your great highness and your most dear lordship, if so it please you, know, that the said Thomas was taken unto God in the week next before the Feast of Saint Edward (fn. 10) the King, last past; and forthwith after his death, at the request of the Earl of Lincoln, who was then present, and also by common assent of the good folks of your said city, the said appointment was given to a vadlet, (fn. 11) Thomas de Kent by name, who for a long time theretofore had served in your said city in the office of Serjeant-at-mace, and unto him delivered, to hold in the same manner that the said Thomas Juvenal held the same, that so your said city might not be left unserved. And it was after the office had been delivered to him, that your letters came to us, that is to say, on the Saturday next before the Feast of St. Martin [11 November] last past. Wherefore, most dear Lord, of your most noble lordship we do humbly pray, if so it please you, that you will not take it amiss that unto the said John Albon we have not granted the said office. Written at London, the 9th day of November, in the 3rd year of your reign."

Similar request made by Piers de Gavastone, Earl of Cornwall; and Answer thereto.

3 Edward II. A.D. 1309. Letter-Book D. fol. xcvi. (Norman French.)

"Unto his most dear friends, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and the Sheriffs, of London, Piers de Gavastone, Earl of Cornwall, greeting and most dear friendship. Whereas we have understood that Thomas Juvenal has been taken unto God, we do especially and heartily pray you that the appointment which he held in London, you will grant unto our most dear and wellbeloved vadlet, (fn. 11) John Albon, bearer of these letters, unto whom we are especially bound; and that you will grant the same in the same manner that the said Thomas held it, as you do dearly love us, and also as you would wish that we should do at other times such things as of us you may request; for we have the said business greatly at heart. And that which you will do herein at this our request, which we do much impress upon you, you will let us know by your letters, and by the bearer hereof. May our Lord have you in his keeping. Given at York, the 21st day of October."

Answer sent to the letter above-written.—

"To the most noble lord, Messire Piers de Gavastone, Earl of Cornwall, his in all things, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the Sheriffs, of the City of London, if so it please him, greeting, with all manner of honour and of reverence. Most dear Sir, as you have prayed us by your letters, that the appointment which Thomas Juvenal held we would grant unto John Albon, your vadlet, that so he might hold the same in the same manner that the said Thomas held it; we do let you know, that immediately after the death of the said Thomas, at the request of the Earl of Lincoln, and also by the common assent of the Aldermen and of the good folks of the City, the said appointment was given to a vadlet, Thomas de Kent by name, who for a long time theretofore had served the said city in the office of Serjeant-at-mace, and unto him delivered, to hold in the same manner that the said Thomas Juvenal held the same, that so the said city might not be left unserved. And know, most dear Sir, that if we had before in any manner understood your will hereon, we would very willingly have received the same, upon your prayer, which unto us is, and always will be, a command. Wherefore, dear Sir, we do pray you, if so it please you, with all our heart, that in this matter you will hold us excused, and, most dear Sir, you will understand that in all things that we can do, we are ready, and will be, at your commands. May our Lord have you in his keeping, body and soul."

Footnotes

1 From before his own house.
2 A person of this name was Chamberlain of the Exchequer, 25 Edward I.
3 Or Agnes.
4 Probably the present "Seething Lane."
5 This rent-charge was apparently secured to Sir John de Lue, in consideration of his surrendering his previously existing rights, under his brother's feoffment.
6 compaigne.
7 See page 54 ante, Note 1
8 So in the MS.; fine wares, sold by the pound, are meant.
9 This office seems to have soon again become vacant. See page 72 post.
10 Perhaps the Translation of Edward the King, 13th of October, is meant.
11 A superior servant.


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