Memorials
1320

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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H. T. Riley (editor)

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1868

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133-142

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'Memorials: 1320', Memorials of London and London Life: In the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries (1868), pp. 133-142. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=57665 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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Punishment for attempting to defraud with a false garland.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. xcvi. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on the Wednesday next before the Feast of Saints Fabianus and Sebastianus [20 January] in the 13 th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, one Richard le Forester was attached to make answer to a certain Richard de Dentone in a plea of trespass; and as to which he made plaint that on the Saturday preceding, as he was going through the street of Breggestrete for purposes of merchandize, the said Ralph le Forester met him, and made him go to a certain tavern, and there shewed him a garland, (fn. 1) which appeared to be a good one, and tried to deceive him with the same; saying that that same garland was worth one mark sterling and more, whereas he could have bought such a one for two pence; for the deceiving of him the same Richard, and of other persons to the City of London resorting, and therein abiding.

And the said Richard le Forester was brought before Hamon de Chiggwelle, the Mayor, Geoffrey de Hertpol, and Henry de Seccheford, Aldermen, and John de Prestone, Sheriff, and on being spoken to as to the premises, he said that he had attempted to do as was imputed to him. And the said Mayor and Aldermen further imputed to him that he was in the habit of so deceiving persons and asked him how he would acquit himself thereof. And the said Richard, making answer, said that he had never done so before and he put himself upon the country as to the same.

And the jury, by Ralph de Storteford, John ate More, Robert Abel, Simon le Cotiller, Peter de Wegenheie, John le Bregerdelere, (fn. 2) Bartholomew le Tableter, John Paterlyng, Robert le Cotiller, Aungerun le Bourser, Andrew le Bourser, and Thomas Spileman, say upon their oath, that he is in the habit of doing as charged, and that he has so deceived many persons. Therefore it was adjudged by the Mayor and Aldermen aforesaid, that he should have punish- ment of the pillory; there to stand from the hour of Tierce to that of Vespers; (fn. 3) and that this done, he should then forswear the City for a year and a day.

Lease of a piece of ground in the Seld of Roisia de Coventre, in West Chepe.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. xxiii. (Norman French.)

Be it remembered, that this writing was enrolled on Saturday, the morrow of the Conversion of St. Paul [25 January], in the 13th year of King Edward, son of King Edward.—

"To all those who this letter shall see or hear, John Sturmy of Dromundby, (fn. 4) greeting in God. Whereas I have let to Hamon Godchep, citizen and mercer of London, a place of ground in the great Seld which formerly belonged to the Lady Roisia de Coventre, (fn. 5) situate in the Westchepe of London, from the Feast of Christmas in the 11th year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, to the end of eight years next ensuing and fully ended, for 20 shillings sterling to me paid in each year; as in an indenture between us made is more fully contained; I, the said John, do acknowledge to have had and received beforehand from the said Hamon all the rent for the said place throughout the term aforesaid; of which rent I do acquit the said Hamon, his heirs, and his executors, for myself and for my heirs for ever. In witness of the truth whereof, to this letter I have set my seal. Given at London, on the Friday next after the Feast of St. Vincent [22 January], in the 13th year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward."

Kidels in the Thames, near Wolwiche, to the destruction of the small fish and salmon, ordered to be burnt.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. xcix. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on Saturday the Octave of the Purification of St. Mary [2 February] in the 13th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, Laurence Albyn, William Trigge, Master John le Fisshmongere, Thomas Sprott, and five others, produced at the Guildhall, before the Mayor and Aldermen, sixteen nets called "kidels," taken in the Thames, while under the charge of John de Pelham, fishmonger, of Wolwiche, and John Godgrom, (fn. 6) drynker, of Plomstede.

Who said that the same kidels belonged to certain men of Plumstede, Lesnes, Berkynge, and Erhethe, who were there named; and that the said kidels were placed in the water aforesaid to the destruction of the small fish and salmon, etc. It was therefore adjudged by the said Mayor and Aldermen, that the kidels should be burnt, and that the said fishmongers, on the peril which awaits them, should not commit the like offence again.

Hides and cruppers forfeited, for being badly tanned.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. ci. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on Wednesday, the Feast of St. Gregory the Pope [12 March] in the 13th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, 17 pieces of hide were taken from John de Portesmuthe, in the house of Robert de Gloucestre, by Richard Lussher and his fellows, sworn to supervise hides in the City. Who said that the said hides were not well tanned, nor fit for making shoes thereof; and that the said John brought them to the City, for making shoes thereof. And this they offered to prove. And the said John did not appear, nor did he say anything etc. Therefore there were sworn thirteen jurors forthwith, tanners by trade; who said upon their oath, that the said hides were false, and badly tanned. Therefore it was awarded by the Mayor and Aldermen that they should be forfeited to the Sheriffs.

Afterwards, on Friday the Feast of St. Benedict the Abbot [21 March], in the year aforesaid, the same Richard made attachment, by Joce, (fn. 7) serjeant of the Chamber, upon Richard le Coffrer, of three straps called "croupers" and upon John de Bickleswade of one piece of black hide. And the said jurors said that they were false, and badly tanned, to the deceiving of the people, etc. Therefore, they were adjudged to be forfeited, as above.

Shoes forfeited, for being made of unlawful materials.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. ci. (Latin.)

On the same day, there were taken by Richard le Cordewanere of Grascherch, and his fellows, who had been sworn to supervise shoes, the shoes of divers persons; namely, from William de Waltham, 3 pairs; from William de (fn. 8) Grobbelane, 3 pairs; from Adam de Ailesbiri, 2 pairs; from Robert de Stortford, 2 pairs; from Robert de Kent, 3 pairs; from Roger Bogeys, 5 pairs; from John de Bradele, 3 pairs; from Thomas de Horneby, 3 pairs; from Paul, 1 pair; from John Richeman, 2 pairs; from William de Derby, 6 pairs; from John ate Bataille, 3 pairs; from Ralph de Conventre, 5 pairs; from William de Norhamptone, 3 pairs; from William Vast, 2 pairs; from John de Shene, 1 pair; from John de Wynchestre, 4 pairs; from Thomas Wastel, 1 pair; from William Wastel, 1 pair; and from Roger Broun of Norwich, 31 pairs: which shoes the aforesaid Richard le Cordewanere of Grascherche, and his fellows, say are false; for that every such pair, they say, is a mixture of bazen (fn. 9) and cordwain. (fn. 10) And they ask that inquisition may be held thereon; and the others in like manner, etc.

And the jurors say that the said shoes are false, as is imputed to them. Therefore they are adjudged to be forfeited, etc.

Expulsion of an intruder from the Gate of Crepelgate.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. cii. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on the Wednesday next before the Feast of Saint Mark the Evangelist [25 April], in the 13th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, precept was given to the Chamberlain by the Mayor and Aldermen, to take into the hands of the City a small place of ground, enclosed with an earthen wall, on the Western side of Crepelgate, without the Gate there. And the said Chamberlain went there, and attempted to take the place into the hands of the City, as by the said Mayor and Aldermen he had been enjoined. Whereupon, one William de Waltham, who was then dwelling in the same Gate, came and molested the same Chamberlain, being unwilling to allow him to make entry on that place, or to view it.

Afterwards, on the Thursday following, the said Chamberlain came to the Mayor at the Guildhall, and informed the Mayor that by reason of the said William he could not fulfil and perform his precept. Therefore Joce, the serjeant of the Chamber, was told to summon the said William, to be before the Mayor and Aldermen on the Saturday following, to shew if he had aught to say for himself.

Afterwards, on Saturday the said William appeared, and asked of the Mayor and Aldermen that he might hold the same gate as he had previously held it; and in like manner the place adjoining that gate. And seeing that he had nothing to say for himself, why he should hold that place, and no mention of the place was made in the paper, nor had he any deed as to the said gate, the said Chamberlain was instructed by Hamon de Chigwelle, the Mayor, and Nicholas de Farndone and other Aldermen, to take possession of the said gate, and in like manner the said place, etc.

Regrators forbidden to sell ale on London Bridge.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. cviii. (Latin.)

At the Court of Hamon de Chigwelle, Mayor, holden on the Monday next after the Feast of our Lord's Ascension, in the 13th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, Robert de Amyas, Robert le Ceynturer, (fn. 11) Henry de Flete, Thomas ate Hide, and Anselm le Latoner, regrators of ale upon the Bridge, were forbidden by the said Mayor and Aldermen any longer to sell ale there, on the peril which pertains thereto.

Renunciation of his freedom by Michael Mynot, accused of attempting to subvert the liberties of the City.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. ciii. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on the Tuesday next after our Lord's Ascension, in the 13th year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward, there being assembled in the Guildhall, Hamon de Chigwelle, the Mayor, Nicholas de Farndone, John de Gisorz, and other Aldermen, and a great number of the commonalty, Michael Mynot, vintner, was questioned as to certain matters; namely, that he, contrary to his oath when he was admitted to the freedom of the City, since the Feast of the Purification of St. Mary [2 February] last past down to now, has been an adherent of Robert de Keleseie (fn. 12) and other enemies of the city aforesaid, doing his best to annul the liberties of the said city; and that he has convened evil meetings of persons for raising strifes between the citizens of the city aforesaid, to the injury of the liberties thereof, against his oath, as before stated, and to the no small peril of those dwelling therein.

To which the said Michael making answer, in a certain degree excusing himself, would not confess that he was guilty thereof; but knowing no way of making the defence that was needed, he entirely renounced the freedom of the city aforesaid, and surrendered it to the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty, though in no way compelled thereto.

Wherefore, it was ordained and agreed by the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty, that in future the said Michael should not be admitted to the freedom without the assent of the Mayor and Aldermen, and that of the Commonalty, that is to say, twelve men of each Ward. And in case he should be admitted to the freedom contrary to such form, then such freedom was to be held as null and void, etc.

Payment made for paving the court of the Leaden Hall.

13 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. ci. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on Monday, the Eve of St. John the Baptist [24 June], in the 13th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, Robert Pany and John de Salesbire came to the Guildhall, and, by precept of Hamon de Chigwelle, the Mayor, delivered to Andrew Horn, the Chamberlain, one silver mark, arising from a certain small garden annexed to Leaden Hall, (fn. 13) and opposite to the choir of the Church of St. Peter on Cornhulle: which mark was taken from the said Robert and John for completing the pavement belonging to the court of the said Leaden Hall.

Afterwards, on the Wednesday following, came Bartholomew, the clerk of the said Mayor, by precept of the Mayor, and received the said mark from the Chamberlain before-mentioned, for completing the pavement aforesaid. And be it known, that the said Robert and John are acquitted of payment of rent for the said garden from the Feast of our Lord's Nativity in the second year (fn. 14) until the same Feast at the end of two years now next ensuing.

Punishment of the Pillory, for selling 'putrid meat.

14 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. cv. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that in full Husting of Common Pleas, holden on the Monday next after the Feast of St. James the Apostle [25 July], in the 14th year etc., William le Clerk, of Hegham Ferrers, was brought before Hamon de Chiggwelle, Mayor, Nicholas de Farndone, and other Aldermen, with certain putrid and poisonous flesh-meat, unfit for human food. And because such flesh was putrid, and the body had died of disease, it was awarded by the aforesaid Mayor and Aldermen, that the said William le Clerk, in whose possession the said dead body was found, should be put upon the pillory, and the body burnt beneath him.

Punishment of the Pillory, for making a false charge of intending to sell putrid meat.

14 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. cv. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on the Tuesday next before the Feast of St. Laurence [10 August], in the 14th year, Thomas the Smythe, (fn. 15) of Stebenhethe, was brought before Hamon de Chigwelle, the Mayor, Geoffrey de Hertpol, Hugh de Gartone, and other Aldermen, and John de Prestone, Sheriff; for that it was imputed to him by one Nicholas Schyngal that he had bought putrid fleshmeat, and a dead carcass, from Alice la Coureors, to bring into the City for sale.

And the said Thomas says that he never bought such flesh-meat, and as to this he puts himself upon the country, etc.; but he says that the before-named Nicholas Schyngal bought that meat for sale in the City. And the said Nicholas says that he never bought the said meat, nor has he any knowledge of it, and as to this he puts himself upon the country.

And the jurors, by William de Wrotham, brewer, and the others in the panel named, say upon their oath, that the aforesaid Thomas le Smythe (fn. 16) is not guilty of the things imputed to him. They further say, that the said Nicholas Schyngal did buy the said meat, and that he intended selling the same in the City, in deceit of the people. Therefore it was adjudged by the said Mayor and Aldermen, that the said Nicholas should be put upon the pillory, and the meat aforesaid be burnt beneath him. And the said Thomas was to go acquitted thereof.

A Chaplain put into the Tun, for being a night-walker.

14 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. foil. cvii. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that John de Sloghtre, Chaplain, was put into the Tun, for being found wandering about in the City, against the peace, on the night of the Friday next before the Feast of St. Matthew [29 September] in the 14th year.

Afterwards, on the Saturday following, he was taken before the Mayor, and because he was carrying arms, against the peace, and against the cry before made in the City, he was committed to the Gaol of Neugate, etc.

Committal to the Tun, for night-walking.

14 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. cxiv. (Latin.)

Emma, daughter of William (fn. 17) le Wirdrawere, of York, was taken by William le Official, serjeant of the Ward of Chepe, and put into the Tun, on the night of the Sunday next before the Feast of St. Martin [11 November], in the 14th year of King Edward, because she was found wandering about after curfew rung at the place assigned, namely, at St. Martin's le Grand, together with a certain fardel of cloths.

Afterwards, on Tuesday the Feast of St. Martin, she was brought to the Guildhall before the Mayor, and was told that she must find security as to keeping the peace; and she was accordingly delivered to the said William le Official, that he might take pledge of her for so doing.

Letter of King Edward II. as to arrears of a pension granted to Robert de Foxtone, at his request.

14 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. cxiv. (Norman French.)

Be it remembered, that on Tuesday the Feast of St. Martin [11 November], in the 14th year of King Edward, son of King Edward, there was read a certain letter of our Lord the King, which had been sent to the Mayor, Aldermen, and reputable men of the City, in these words.—

"Edward, by the grace of God, King of England, etc., to the Mayor, and to the Aldermen, and good folks of the Commonalty of our city of London greeting. Whereas, at our request, you did lately grant unto our dear clerk, Robert de Foxtone, a pension of 100 shillings, the same to be received yearly from your Chamber, for the whole of his life; for the which we do thank you, and do hold ourselves indebted to you for the same; and whereas we have since heard that he has not yet received any letters as to the said pension, and that the same has been in arrear to him for a long time past; at the which we do marvel, seeing that you granted him the same at our request; we do especially and heartily pray you, that as to the same pension you will let him have letters patent in due form under your Common Seal, and will let him have satisfaction as to that which is in arrear to him, without delay, in beseeming and courteous manner; and from henceforth will let him have the same pension paid punctually at the fitting terms of the year; for love of ourselves, and so dearly as you do love us: and we will be unto you the more gracious lord as to such matters as you will have to do as regards ourselves. And by your letters and by our said clerk, you are to send us back word what you shall have done herein. Given under our Privy Seal, at Westminster, the 21st day of October, in the 14th year of our reign." (fn. 18)

Custom as to retailing meat by Butchers at the Stokkes.

14 Edward II. A.D. 1320. Letter-Book E. fol. cxv. (Latin.)

Be it remembered, that on the Monday next before the Feast of St. Katherine the Virgin [25 November], in the 14th year, the pork and beef of John Perer, John Esmar, and Reynald ate Watre, [alleged to be] foreign butchers, (fn. 19) were seized; because that they, against the custom of the City, had exposed the said meat for sale by candle-light at les Stokkes, (fn. 20) after curfew rung at St. Martin's le Grand: whereas it is enacted, that no foreign butcher, standing with his meat at the stalls aforesaid, shall cut any meat after None rung at St. Paul's; and that as to all the meat which he has cut before None rung, he is to expose the same for sale up to the hour of Vespers, and to sell it without keeping any back, or carrying any away.

And the said John le Perer appears; and he says that he is free of the City, and asks that his meat may be given back to him: and upon it being testified that he is free of the City, his meat is delivered up to him. And the said John Estmar, being solemnly called, does not appear; therefore his meat remains forfeited to the use of the Sheriffs. And the aforesaid Reynald ate Watre appears; and being asked whether he is a foreigner, or free of the City, he says, a foreigner; therefore his meat remains forfeited, as above.

Footnotes

1 A metal chaplet, or circlet, for the head. Some garlands, worn by the Masters of the City Companies, are still preserved.
2 The "Brace-girdler;" maker, or seller, of brael-girdles; belts for supplying the place of braels, or braces.
3 From 9 till about 4 in the afternoon.
4 In the County of York.
5 See page 22 ante. According to Letter-Book C. fol. liv. (28 Edw. I.) th Great Seld was situate in the "Mercery of Chepe, probably near the Hospital St. Thomas of Acon, the site of which now occupied by Mercers' Hall.
6 Probably the same as a "trinker," or "trinkerman;" a class of fishermen who used "trinks," nets attached to posts or anchors, for taking fish.
7 The old English form of the name "Joseph."
8 The "Grub Street" (now Milton Street) of more recent times. "Grobbestrete" is also named in the 35 th year of Edward I., Letter-Book B. fol. 80.
9 Or basil, inferior leather, made of sheepskin.
10 Tawed leather; an imitation of the more costly "Cordovan" leather.
11 The Girdler.
12 A person of this name is mentioned as one of the Sworn Pleaders, in page 58 ante. An Alderman of Billingsgate Ward was also thus named.
13 This is a very early mention of the Leaden Hall. At the begining of the 14th century, it was occasionally used as a Court of justice: see the MS.Liber de Antiq. Legibus, at Guildhall, fol. 61. In October 1326, after the flight of Edward II., the Commons of London met there, when making terms with the Constable of the Tower. See the French Chron. of London (transl.) p. 264.
14 Of the then reign.
15 So in the MS., in English.
16 So in the MS., in French.
17 The Wiredrawer.
18 From a lengthy account added, we learn that the pension was forthwith formally granted, on the recipient making oath that he would well and faithfully serve the City in every way.
19 Non-freemen.
20 The Stocks House, or Market. See page 133 ante, Note 1.


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