St. Mary Colechurch 105/31

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'St. Mary Colechurch 105/31', Historical gazetteer of London before the Great Fire: Cheapside; parishes of All Hallows Honey Lane, St Martin Pomary, St Mary le Bow, St Mary Colechurch and St Pancras Soper Lane (1987), pp. 593-594. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=5947 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Introduction

This was a shop on the S. side of the street known as Poultry, between 30 to the W. and 32A to the E. It backed on to 26, of which it and its neighbours originally formed part.

In 1858 part of the site of the property was within that of no. 4 Poultry.

Thirteenth and fourteenth centuries

31 probably represents the westernmost of the row of 8 shops granted by Matthew Blund to Clerkenwell Priory between 1220 and 1222. It measured 3 ells 2 in. (9 ft. 2 in.; 2.79 m.) in width and 4 1/4 ells 1 in. in depth (12 ft. 10 in.; 3.91 m.) and 2 3/4 ells (8 ft. 3 in.; 2.51 m.) wide at the inner end. The solar above measured the same. By the 17th, and probably by the mid 15th century the identity of the shop had been lost, and some land to the S. had apparently been taken in. The priory evidently granted out all these shops again after 1222, reserving quit-rents of one mark from each, but only the grant relating to 33 has survived. By his will enrolled in 1274 John Hervy left to his daughter Joan his shop in the parish of Colechurch, between 30 to the W. and 32A to the E. In 1278 John le Feroun left a quit-rent of 10s. from the shop which John Hervy holds (sic), together with rents from 27-30, to a chantry in St. Stephen Walbrook. In 1284-5 the shop of Sawalus the fishmonger, sometime of John Hervy, lay to the E. of 30. Sawallus the fishmonger (piscator, piscenarius) otherwise Sewale le Peissoner, who married Juliana, daughter of John Hervy, held the same shop in 1289 and 1291. The property descended to his daughter Isabel, who in 1296-7 with her husband John Somer of London granted to John Dode, ironmonger of London, and his wife Alice, their shop, with abutments as above, with solar and appurtenances in the parish of St. Mary Colechurch. John Dode gave £13. 6s. 8d. (20 marks) as a gersum and was to pay 10s. p.a. to the chief lords of the fee (presumably the church of St. Stephen Walbrook). Richer Momeray, mercer (mercenarius) and his wife Juliana, daughter (rectius widow) of Sewalus, confirmed and quitclaimed in the same in 1298. 31, the shop of John Dode, lay to the W. of 32A in 1306 and to the E. of 30 c. 1317. By his will enrolled in 1318 John Dode left his shop with solar above in Ferronia in the parish of St. Mary Colechurch to his wife Alice for life, with remainder to his son John. (fn. 1)

In 1322 Alice and John Dode the son demised the same shop, in Ismongerowe in the parish of St. Mary Colechurch, to Iterus de Caumpes, citizen and ironmonger, for 30 years from Christmas 1323, for a certain sum paid in advance for the whole term. It is not clear whether this grant was superseded by Alice's quitclaim, in 1323, to Sir Robert Ostage, clerk, to whom she had granted a term of 3 1/2 years in the same shop in Hysmongeresrowe, of all right in the same for life. The shop was granted, probably by John Dode the younger, to John de Newebury, before 1331, and he granted it to Roger Deynes, who also held 30. In 1346 William Dode son of John Dode (the elder) quitclaimed to Margaret Deynes, widow of Roger Deynes, late citizen and ironmonger, in the shop and solar his father had had in Ferronia in the parish of St. Mary Colechurch, which John de Newbury, junior, citizen and corder, had granted to Roger, but which should have come to the grantor on his brother John's death, according to the terms of their father's will. The later history of this shop is given under 30, q.v. (fn. 2)

Footnotes

1 Clerkenwell Cart, nos. 222, 340; HR 6(2), 9(16); GL, MS 6695(1); HR 16(102), 18(77), 22(30), 27(5-6), 34(20), 45(202), 47(58). See 145/12.
2 Merchant Taylors' Company, Miscellaneous Documents B2a; HR 52(1), 59(3), 75(22); cf. 105/30.