Canterbury
The churches within the city and suburbs

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Edward Hasted

Year published

1800

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209-288

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'Canterbury: The churches within the city and suburbs', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 11 (1800), pp. 209-288. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63667+ Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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The churches within the city and suburbs

There are, within the walls of this city, twelve parish churches now remaining, and there were five more, which have been long since demolished; and there are three churches now situated in the suburbs of it, and there has been one demolished—Of those now remaining, there were only two, viz. St. Martin's without, and St. Alphage's within the walls, which were not of the patronage of some religious house or abbey, in or in the near neighbourhood of the city, and these two were in the patronage of the archbishop. (fn. 1)

It may be thought strange, that the number of churches in this city has decreased so much, and that so many of them have been united to others, and yet together, even at this time, make but a very moderate income to the incumbents; this has been supposed, in general, to have been occasioned by the great failure of their former profits, which they enjoyed before the reformation, of private masses, obits, processions, consessions, or the like; all which then fell to the ground, and lessened the income of most of them to a very small pittance. However, as will be seen hereafter, some of these churches were become desecrated and in ruins, and others were united long before the above time; which seems to have been owing, in great measure, to many of them having been built by the bounty of well disposed persons, in hopes of a future support and endowment, which failing, and the repairs and support of the fabric lying too heavy on the parishioners, they suffered them to run to ruin; and there being no susficient maintenance for the priests, they became desecrated, or were united to some other neighbouring churches. Indeed it appears plain, that poverty was the sole cause of their decay; for in their most flourishing state, the benefice of each of these churches was so low and poor, that they were for that very reason excused in all taxations, being of less value than the stipends of poor vicars, which had been advanced above five marcs a year. (fn. 2)

The decrease of the value of church benefices was equally felt in other cities and towns, as well as this, which occasioned an act of parliament to be passed at Oxford, in the 17th of king Charles II. for uniting churches in cities and towns corporate; in conformity to which, in 1681, a petition was made to the archbishop, under the names and seals of the major part of the mayor and aldermen, and justices of the peace, of this city, who being informed of the archbishop's intentions of uniting the parish churches of it, according to the above act, they did thereby give their free consent, that those within the city should be united, viz.

ST. PAUL'S and ST. MARTIN'S,
ST. MARY BREDMAN'S and ST. ANDREW'S,
HOLY CROSS WESTGATE, and ST. PETER'S,
ST. ALPHAGE'S and ST. MARY'S NORTHGATE,

leaving all things necessary to the perfecting of this union, according to the tenor of the above act; which instrument was dated March 6th, that year, and signed by Jacob Wraight, mayor, and P. Barrett, recorder, &c. To this was added a petition of the dean and chapter of Canterbury to the archbishop, as being perpetual patrons of the parish churches of St. George, St. Mary Magdalen, St. Paul, St. Mary Bredman, and St. Peter, within the city and liberties, for the uniting of those churches with each other and with others adjoining, in manner as above-mentioned in the former petition, which was given under their common seal, dated March 13th the same year. Upon the receipt of these, the archbishop issued his decree, reciting the two petitions for uniting the several above-mentioned churches, the particulars of which will be found under the description of each of them; which decree was dated at Lambeth, on March 24, 1681. To which the inhabitants of each parish signed their consents, by their several instruments, dated December 19th, 20th, and 21st, the same year. After which, by a decree of the archbishop's in 1684, with the consent of the mayor, aldermen and justices of the peace of this city, and of the king, under his great seal as patron, he united the church of All Saints with St. Mary de Castro, already united to it, to the parish church of St. Mildred; further particulars of which will be found under the latter parish. It should seem the decree of the archbishop in 1681, for the uniting of the churches of Holy Cross Westgate, and St. Peter did not have its full effect, for on April 6, 1692, there were two petitions, one from the mayor and eight others, and another from the dean and chapter to the archbishop, similar to the former ones, for this purpose; and the archbishop's decree, dated at Lambeth, the 13th of that month, united these churches; and with the same particulars in every thing else as the former decree in 1681. (fn. 3)

THE CHURCHES at present within the walls of this city, are as follows:

ALL SAINTS church is situated on the north side of the High-street, almost adjoining to Kingsbridge. It is a building, which, notwithstanding the late repair of it, has no very sightly appearance, being built of rubble stone, and covered with plaister; seemingly of about king Edward III.'s reign. It consists of two isles and two chancels, having a turret at the west end of the south side, new built in 1769, (fn. 4) in which is a clock and only one bell.

The old steeple projected so far into the street, that when Kingsbridge adjoining was widened at the above time, for the accommodation of the public, it was found necessary to take down the steeple of this church, and to re-build it as at present.

This church has no monuments, and not many inscriptions in it. It is situated so very low, close to the river side, that it is exceeding damp.

It appears by the survey of the king's commissioners, taken anno 2 Edward VI. that there were lands given by Thomas Fryer, by his will for a yearly obit, to be kept within this church for ever, and that there was rent given by John Coleman, by his will, for another obit for the space of twenty years, from 1536. (fn. 5)

This church's cemetery or church-yard was acquired and laid to it but in modern times, as it were, says Somner, for in king Henry III.'s time, and afterwards in king Edward III.'s time too, it was in private hands, as appears by several deeds of those times, and did antiently belong, in part at least, to Eastbridge hospital. It is situated on the north side of the church, and being on higher ground, has many tomb and head stones remaining in it.

The patronage of this church, which is a rectory, was part of the possessions of the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, with which it continued till the general dissolution of monasteries in the reign of Henry VIII. in the 30th year of which, it was, with the rest of the possessions of it, surrendered into the king's hands, where it has remained ever since, the king being at this time patron of it. This church, with that of St. Mary de Castro, before united to it, was in the year 1684, united by archbishop Sancrost to that of St. Mildred, in this city, with the consent of the mayor and aldermen and justices of the peace of it, and of the king, patron of it.

In the antient taxation, in king Richard II.'s time, this church was valued at four pounds per annum, but on account of the slenderness of its income, was not charged to the tenth. (fn. 6) This rectory is valued in the king's books at seven pounds per annum. In 1588 here were one hundred and thirty-five communicants. In 1640 it was valued at thirty pounds, communicants one hundred and five.

There is a terrier of this rectory, but without date, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

John Coleman, of this parish, who lies buried in our Lady's chapel, in this church, by his will anno 1535, gave his garden, which lay opposite the parsonage of it, to the parsons of it and their successors for ever.

Church of All Saints.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Abbot and Convent of St. AugustineWilliam Byde, in 1467. (fn. 7)
Alanus Hydmarsh, in 1476. (fn. 7)
Richard Knepe, in 1535. (fn. 8)
William Blossom, obt. 1550. (fn. 9)
Roger Squyre, in 1550. (fn. 10)
The Queen.Henry Fisher, Sept. 26, 1579, hellip;resigned (fn. 11)
Richard Hayes, March 2, 1590, resigned 1608.
The King.Philemon Pownell, clerk, Feb. 10, 1608. (fn. 12)
William Watts, in 1634.
Richard Burney, clerk, Sept. 28, 1661. (fn. 13)
Humphry Bralesford, A. M. Sept. 3, 1684.

On the 29th of which month, this church was united to that of St. Mildred, in this city, to the list of the rectors of which, hereafter, the reader is referred for an account of the rectors of these united churches.

St. ALPHAGE church is situated in the north part of the city, on the west side of Palace-street; it is a large handsome building, consisting of two isles and two chancels, having a square tower steeple at the west end of the north isle, in which are three bells. (fn. 14)

Thomas Prowde, of this parish, died anno 1468, and by his will gave one pair of organs, to the use of this church.

By the return of the king's commissioners, anno 2 Edward VI. it appears, that there were lands given by Isabell Fowle, by her will, for a priest to celebrate masse within this church; also for one torch yearly to serve the high altar for ever. That there was lamp-rent likewise given by John Sellowe, for one lamp, to burn yearly before the image of St. John the Evangelist, within this church for ever. (fn. 15)

This church, which is a rectory, is exempted from the jurisdiction of the archdeacon. It has been from early times part of the possessions of the see of Canterbury, and still remains so, being at this time, with the vicarage or church of St. Mary Northgate, united to it in 1681, (fn. 16) of the patronage of his grace the archbishop.

The church of St. Alphage is valued in the king's books at 8l. 13s. 4d. and the yearly tenths at 17s. 4d. the church of Northgate having been united to it since, being valued separate from it. (fn. 17) In 1588 it was valued at 30l. Communicants 120. In 1640 it was valued at 40l. Communicants the like number.

The parsonage-house, which adjoins to the church and church-yard southward, has had two good benefactors, in Mr. Herbert Taylor, formerly rector of this church, and Mr. Hearn, the present rector.

There are two terriers of this rectory, the one dated anno 1637, the other April 27, 1747, in the registry of the consiltory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. Alphage.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Robert Islep, in 1405. (fn. 18)
John Lovelych, LL. B. obt. Sept. 6, 1438. (fn. 19)
John Piers, in 1461. (fn. 20)
John Elys, in 1467. (fn. 21)
The Archbishop.Robert Elys, in 1476.
Robert Proveste, obt. Jan. 22, 1487. (fn. 22)
John Cussham, in 1490.
John Parmenter, in 1501. (fn. 23)
Thomas Davyes, in 1518, obt. 1540. (fn. 24)
Umphrey Jordan, in 1540 and 1549. (fn. 25)
John Atkins, obt. Feb. 1580. (fn. 26)
John Alderston, inducted March 1580.
Joshua Hutton, in 1594, resigned 1596.
John Sheppard, inducted 1597, resigned 1599.
David Platt, A. M. inducted Oct. 1599, obt. Sept. 1642.
Richard Pickis, obt. January, 1660. (fn. 27)
Edward Fellow, A. M. inducted June 1661, obt. 1663.
John Stockar, A. M. inducted September 24, 1663, obit. 1709. (fn. 28)

During his time this church appears to have been united to that of St. Mary Northgate, so that he died rector of both churches, and his successors have since been rectors of this and vicars of Northgate.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Thomas Wise, S.T. P. inducted April, 1709, obt. July 24, 1726. (fn. 29)
Herbert Taylor, A. M. inducted August 1, 1726, resigned 1753. (fn. 30)
John Airson, A. M. 1753, resig. 1761. (fn. 31)
George Hearn, clerk, collated May 1, 1761, the present rector. (fn. 32)

ST. ANDREW'S church Stands in a small recess, about the middle of the High-street, on the south side. It was built in the room of the antient church of the same name, which stood at a small distance, in the centre of the street, the passage along which was through two narrow lanes on each side of it. This church was an antient structure of only one isle, and one chancel, having a spire steeple at the west end; in it were many monuments and inscriptions; the former of which, when this church was pulled down in 1764, an act of parliament having been obtained for this purpose, for the accommodation of the public, by laying open the street, were at first deposited in the undercroft of the cathedral; but when the new church was finished, they were placed in the vestibule of it; an account of them will be given below. Among these were the several monuments of the rectors of this parish, from Dr. Cox in 1544, to Mr. Paris, who died in 1709, both inclusive, and were for the most part buried in it. Among these it is observable, that there were two ancestors of the famous dean of St. Patrick's, viz. Thomas Swist, his great-grandfather, and William his son, who were successively rectors of this church from 1569 to 1624; the former of them having expressly desired by his will, that his bones should rest in that church, where his people so entirely loved him. (fn. 33)

This church being thus taken down, a new one was erected, though not till some years afterwards, on a spot of ground bought for the purpose, of sufficient size for a small cemetery likewise adjoining. (fn. 34) This church, which is a neat building of brick, with a steeple of the same materials, in which hangs one bell, was opened by licence from the archbishop, for the performance of divine service, on Dec. 26, 1773, and was consecrated, with the church-yard, on the 4th of July following. (fn. 35)

It appears by the return made by the king's commissioners, anno 2 Edward VI. that there were obit and lamp lands given by the wills of several persons for the keeping of their several obits yearly, and finding lamps within this parish church for ever. (fn. 36)

In a will anno 1534, I find mention of St. Ninian's light, in this church.

This church is a rectory, the patronage of which was part of the possessions of the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, with which it continued till the final dissolution of it in the 30th year of king Henry VIII. when it was, with the rest of the possessions of that monastery, surrendered into the king's hands; whence it was afterwards granted by the king, in his 34th year, in exchange, and with other premises, to the archbishop of Canterbury; (fn. 37) but upon its being unieted in 1681 to St. Mary Bredman's rectory, (fn. 38) (which was of the patronage of the priory of Christ-church, and on the dissolution of it had been given to the dean and chapter of Canterbury); that being the mother church to the smaller parish, the right of patronage of these united churches was decreed to the archbishop and the dean and chapter of Canterbury jointly; that is to say, two turns to the archbishop, and one turn of presentation to the dean and chapter. In which state the patronage of it continues at this time.

The church of St. Andrew was valued in the antient taxation, at 8l. per annum.

This rectory, with that of St. Mary Bredman united, is valued in the king's books at 22l. 6s. 8d. (fn. 39) and the yearly tenths at 2l. 4s. 8d. (fn. 40) In 1588 it was valued at sixty pounds. Communicants two hundred. In 1640 it was valued at eighty pounds, the like number of communicants.

There is a terrier of this rectory, dated anno 1630, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. Andrew.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
The Archbishop.John Cox, S. T. P obt. 1544. (fn. 41)
William Morphet, ind. Dec. 22, 1565.
Henry Morray, July 3, 1570.
Thomas Swift, A. M. March 18, 1572, obt June 12, 1592. (fn. 42)
William Swift, A. M. July 8, 1592, obt. Oct. 24, 1624. (fn. 42)
Edward Aldey, A. M. Nov. 6, 1624, obt. July 12, 1673. (fn. 43)
Arthur Kay, S. T. P. July 18, 1673, obt. — 1701. (fn. 44)

During his time, these two churches of St. Andrew and St. Mary Breadman appear to have been united; a list of the future rectors of which may be seen hereafter in the account of the latter, which is the mother church.

ST. GEORGE'S church is situated on the north side of the High-street, near the gate of the same name; it is a large handsome structure, consisting of two isles and two chancels, having a well built tower steeple, with, till lately, a pointed leaden turret at the northwest corner of it. (fn. 45) There are four bells in the tower, and one formerly in the turret. (fn. 46)

This church, which is a rectory, was part of the possessions of the priory of Christ-church, in Canterbury, and at the dissolution of it was granted by Henry VIII. to the dean and chapter of Canterbury, in the patronage of whom, together with that of St. Mary Magdalen, in Burgate, united to it in 1681, (fn. 47) it remains at this time.

It appears by the return of the king's commissioners, anno 2 Edward VI. that there were obit lands given by the wills of Edward Parlegate, Thomas Rayley, John Williamson, and Thomas Cadbury, as well for the observation of their obits, as for the maintenance of one lamp in this church for ever. (fn. 48)

This rectory is valued in the king's books at 7l. 17s. 11d. and the yearly tenths at 15s. 9½d. (fn. 49) In 1588 it was valued with St. Mary Burgate, at 80l. Communicants three hundred. In 1640 it was valued at only 50l. (fn. 50)

Thomas Petit, esq. of St. George's, Canterbury, by his will in 1626, gave 50l. to be disposed of to young married couples for ever, the poorest, as near as might be, of four parishes, one of which should be that wherein he should die, which by the register, appears to have been in this parish of St. George; a more particular account of which is given in the History of Kent, under Chilham.

A terrier of this rectory, dated in 1630, is in the consistory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. George.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Prior and Convent of Canterbury.John de Natyndon, about 1330. (fn. 51)
John Lovel, — obt. April 24. 1438. (fn. 52)
John Williamson, LL. B. in 1490 and 1519. (fn. 53)
Edward Broughton, in 1523. (fn. 54)
William Bassenden, — 1558. (fn. 55)
Dean and Chapter of Canterbury.Mark Saunders, November 12, 1574.
Thomas Wilson, A. M. July 21, 1586, obt. Jan. 1621. (fn. 56)
Thomas Jackson, A. M. presented April 1622, obt. 1661.
Blaze White, A. M. May 7, 1661, resigned 1666. (fn. 57)
Elisha Robinson, A. B. October 1, 1666, obt. January 30, 1670. (fn. 58)

In whose time, viz. 1681, the churches of St. George and St. Mary Magdalen appear to have been united, and the next incumbent and his successors have been presented to these united rectories.

PATRONS, &c.RECTORS.
Bean and Chapter of Canterbury.John Sargenson, —ob. 1684.
Francis Master, A. M. presented July 10, 1684, obt. 1686.
John Maximilian Delangle, S. T. P. July 3, 1686, resig. 1692. (fn. 59)
John Cooke, A. M. March 9, 1692, obt. 1726. (fn. 60)
William Ayerst, S. T. P. Dec. 10, 1726, resigned 1729. (fn. 61)
John Head, A. M. Feb. 10, 1730, resigned 1760. (fn. 62)
Thomas Forster, A. M. July 21, 1761, obt. Sept. 13, 1764. (fn. 63)
Francis Gregory, A. M. December 11, 1764, resigned May 1777. (fn. 64)
James Ford, A. B. 1777, the present rector. (fn. 65)

ST. MARGARET'S church stands on the west side of the street of the same name. It is a large building, consisting of three isles and three chancels, having a tower steeple at the west end of the south isle; there are three bells in it. (fn. 66)

It appears by the survey of the commissioners, anno 2 Edward VI. that there were lamp lands given by the will of John Wynter, and Joanehis wife, for the maintenance of a lamp within this church for ever, and there were obit lands given to this church by the will of James Ase, for one obit, to be kept in it for ever. (fn. 67)

In this church is held an ecclesiastical court, in which the archbishop once in four years visits the clergy in the neighbouring parts of his diocese; besides which, there are two other visitations annually held in it by the archdeacon, or his official, one for his clergy, the other for the church wardens only; the parishes exempt from his jurisdiction being visited by the commissary, at such time as he is pleased to appoint. In this church likewise, and in a court he has in the body of the cathedral, causes for fornication, defamation and other ecclesiastical matters, are tried before surrogates, appointed to that office. This church, which is a rectory, was part of the possessions of the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, and was in the year 1271, being the last of king Henry III. given by them at the instance of Hugh Mortimer, archdeacon of Canterbury, in pure and perpetual alms, to the hospital of Poor Priests, in this city, with which it remained till the suppression of it in the 17th year of queen Elizabeth's reign, (fn. 68) ; after which the patronage of this rectory became vested in the archdeacon of Canterbury and his successors, with whom it has continued ever since; the reverend the archdeacon being the present patron of it.

This rectory is now of the clear yearly certified value of 63l. 10s. (fn. 69)

In the register of this parish is entered a certificate of the birth of Raymond Thomas, eldest son of the hon. Henry Arundel, eldest son of the lord Arundel of Wardour, on Nov. 11, in the year 1619.

Church of St. Margaret.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
John … in 1216.
Thomas Wyke, 1373.
Philip Taylor, in 1521. (fn. 70)
Nicholas Langdon..… obt. 1554.
Hugh Barret, inducted July 27, 1554.
The ArchdeaconBlaze Wynter, March 16, 1575.
The King, by lapse.Philemon Pownel, clerk, Sept. 21, 1626. (fn. 71)
Francis Rogers, S. T.P.…ob. July 23, 1638. (fn. 72)
Thomas Ventris, clerk, A. M. August 10, 1638, ejected 1662. (fn. 73)
William Hawkins, 1662, … obt. May, 1674. (fn. 74)
William Lovelace, 1674, … obt. August, 1683. (fn. 75)
Thomas Johnson, 1713,…obt. Nov. 6, 1727. (fn. 76)
Henry Shove, A. M. Dec. 15, 1727, resigned 1737.
Thomas Leigh, A. M. 1737,… obt. April 18, 1774. (fn. 77)
Gilman Wall, A. M. 1774, the present rector.

ST. MARY BREADMAN'S church, is so named to distinguish it from the others in this city, dedicated to St. Mary, which surname it had from the Bread Market, formerly kept beside it. (fn. 78)

This church stands on the south side of the Highstreet, near the centre of it. It is a very antient building, seemingly of the early part of the Norman times. It is rather small, consisting of two isles and two chancels, having a tower steeple at the west end of it, in which hangs one bell. (fn. 79)

This church, as well as those of St. George and St. Peter, were antiently of the patronage of the priory of Christ-church, as were likewise St. Michael Burgate, and St. Mary Queningate, both long since demolished; all which five churches, together with that of St. Sepulchre, were confirmed to the priory, by the bulls of several succeeding popes, and each of them paid to it an annual pension; this of St. Mary Breadman paid yearly sixpence.

After the dissolution the patronage of it was granted to the dean and chapter of Canterbury, who possessed the entire presentation to it till the year 1681; when the church of St. Andrew adjoining, of the patronage of the archbishop of Canterbury, being united to it, the future right of presentation to these united churches was decreed; two turns to the archbishop, and one turn to the dean and chapter; in which state it continues at this time. This church of St. Mary Breadman, though it has the smallest parish, yet is esteemed the mother church to the other. (fn. 80)

It is valued in the king's books at nine pounds per annum.

There is a terrier of this rectory, dated in 1630, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. Mary Breadman.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Prior and Convent of Christ-churchRichard Langdon, anno 25 Edward III. (fn. 81)
John Colley.
Thomas Alcock, obt. on Holy Cross day, 1500.
Robert Richmond, obt. July 18, 1524.
Dean and Chapter of Canterbury.William Mellrose.
John Fanting.
The Queen, by lapseJames Bisset, March 12, 1590.
Dean and Chapter.Nicholas Benart, in 1604.
Matthew Wariner, January 29, 1637.
The Archbishop.Arthur Kay, S. T. P. July 18, 1673.

At which time these two churches of St. Mary Breadman and St. Andrew appear to have been united, viz. in 1681; so that he was collated to both of them united, as were the succeeding rectors. Dr. Kay died in 1701, and was succeeded by

The Archbishop.John Paris, A. B. collated Nov. 7, 1701, obt. Nov. 5, 1709. (fn. 82)
Dean and ChapterRobert Cumberland, A. M. presented Jan. 19, 1709, obt. Nov. 6, 1734. (fn. 83)
The Archbishop.William Wood, A. M. collated Dec. 1734, obt. February 13, 1736. (fn. 84)
Isaac Terry, A. M. inducted Feb. 20, 1736, obt. Dec. 1744.
Dean and ChapterFrancis Walwyn, S. T. P. presented May 9, 1745, resigned 1757. (fn. 85)
The Archbishop.John Duncombe, A. M. collated Jan. 25, 1757, obt. 1786. (fn. 86)
William Gregory, A. M. collated 1786, the present rector. (fn. 87)

ST. MARY BREDIN, usually called Little Lady Dungeon (fn. 88) church, is situated at a small distance north westward from the Dungeon, whence it takes that name, and Watling-street. It is a very small building, seemingly antient, consisting of a nave, and small isle on the north side of it, and a chancel; at the north-west corner is a wooden pointed turret, in which hang three small bells. (fn. 89) You go down into it by several steps, which makes it very damp.

This church was built by William, surnamed Fithamon, being the son of Hamon, the son of Vitalis, one of those who came over from Normandy with William the Conqueror. This William was, no doubt, the patron of this church, which he had built, and most probably gave it to the neighbouring nunnery of St. Sepulchre, where it staid till the dissolution of that house in king Henry VIII.'s reign, when the patronage of it was granted anno 29th of it, when the nunnery and the rest of the possessions of it, to the archbishop of Canterbury, subject nevertheless to the payment of 3s. to the vicar of this church; all which were again reconveyed by the archbishop to the king in his 37th year, in exchange for other premises, (fn. 90) and he granted them the following year to the Hales's, lords of the manor of the Dungeon, whose burial place was within this church; since which the patronage of it has continued in the possession of the owners of that manor, down to Henry Lee Warner, of Walsingham abbey, in Norfolk, the present patron of it.

Upon the decline of the church of St. Edmund of Riding-gate, not far distant, of the patronage likewise of the same nunnery, it was in 1349 united to this of St. Mary Bredin, with the consent of the prioress and convent. (fn. 91)

This vicarage is valued in the king's books at 4l. 1s. 5½d. and the yearly tenths at 8s. 1¾d. (fn. 92) In 1588 it was valued at 20l. Communicants 82.–18l. 18s. (fn. 93)

It was held for a long time as a donative, that is, from about 1670 to 1732, and a curate was licenced to serve in it; but in the latter year the Rev. Curties Wightwick took out the seals for it, and was presented to it as a vicarage, by the lord chancellor; on his resignation in 1751, it was again held in sequestration, and continues so at this time.

There is a terrier of this rectory, dated Aug. 24, 1615, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. Mary Bredin.

PATRONS,VICARS.
Or by whom presented.
William Dobbynson, in 1556. (fn. 94)
Thomas Panton, in 1572. (fn. 95)
The Queen, hac vice.John Milner, A. B. March 27, 1596, resigned 1599.
Richard Hardres, esq. of HardresJohn Taylor, A. M. Feb. 24, 1599, resigned 1601.
Christopher Cage, Dec. 6, 1606, resigned 1610. (fn. 96)
John Shepherd, Sept. 8, 1610, and in 1636.
William Lovelace, in 1663.

After which this vicarage seems to have been considered as a donative, and a perpetual curate was appointed to it; however, in 1737 I find it held as a sequestration, for it was then committed as such to

Henry Shove, clerk, who was appointed to it on January 15, 1737.
Thomas Leigh, clerk, succeeded him on Oct. 1737.

and continued so till Curteis Wightwick, A. M. (fn. 97) was presented to it by the lord chancellor, on Nov. 23, and inducted the 26th, 1742; he resigned the vicarage in 1751, when it was again put in sequestration, and Thomas Leigh, clerk, was again appointed to it, after whose death Gilman Wall, A. M. was appointed on Jan. 20, 1775, and is the present sequestrator of it.

ST. MARY MAGDALEN'S Church, in Burgate, stands on the south side of the middle of Burgate-street, being rather a small building, consisting of two isles and a chancel, having a square tower at the north-west corner, in which are three bells. (fn. 98)

This church, which is a rectory, was part of the possessions of the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, and continued with it till the final dissolution of the monastery in the 30th year of king Henry VIII.'s reign, when it came into the King's hand, who granted it soon afterwards in his 33d year, to his new-founded dean and chapter of Canterbury, where the patronage of this church, since united in 1681, as mentioned before, to that of St. George's, remains at this time.

One Richard Wekys, butcher, of this parish, in 1471, was a great benefactor to this church. The steeple of it was new built in 1503; towards which one Sir Harry Ramsey, of St. George's, was a benefactor. (fn. 99) John Fremingham, esq. who was mayor in 1461, gave by his will, among other acts of piety, twenty nobles to this church. (fn. 100)

By the return of the king's commissioners, anno 2 Edward VI. it appears, that there were lands given by Edmund Brandon, by his will, for one priest to say the masse of Jesus weekly within this church for ever. That there was light-rent given by J. Brande, for a light, as well to burn nightly before the body of Christ, as also at the celebration of divine service within the church for ever. (fn. 101)

This rectory is valued in the king's books at 41. 10s. and the yearly tenths at 9s. (fn. 102) In 1588 it was valued at twenty pounds. Communicants ninety-three.

At a visitation holden anno 1560, it was presented that there belonged to the parsonage-house, a piece of ground called Maudelen crost, which had been wrongfully detained by Mr. Hyde, auditor of Christchurch, to the great impoverishment of the parsonage. (fn. 103)

There is a terrier of this rectory, dated April 27, 1630, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. Mary Magdalen.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Thomas Fysher, Oct. 10, 1553. (fn. 104)
The Queen.Thomas Panton, July 9, 1580. (fn. 105)
Dean and Chapter of Canterbury.Thomas Warriner, Dec. 15, 1585, obt. 1606.
George Marson, March 6, 1606, resigned 1631.
The King.John Marston, A. B. Oct. 28, 1631, obt… (fn. 106)
Dean and Chapter.William Lovelace, A. M. Sept. 26, 1660, obt. Aug. 1683. (fn. 107)

In whose time it seems, this rectory and that of St. George were united, and on his demise John Sargenson was presented the first to these united churches, and died possessed of these rectories in 1684; a list of whose successors may be sound above, under the account of St. George's church.

ST. MARY NORTHGATE church is built partly over the city gate, called Northgate, and partly on the west side of it, from which is a staircase to go up to that part over the gateway, in which divine service is performed. It consists of only a body and chancel, being remarkably long and narrow, having a square tower steeple at the west end, rebuilt of brick, in the room of the old one, which fell down a few years ago.

Under the choir, or chancel of this church, is a vault, with an open space or loop-hole in the wall, fashioned like a cross. It was sometime a hermitage, but is now belonging to the parsonage. (fn. 108)

There is a modern burying-ground belonging to this parish, on the north side of Broad-street, a little Westward of Ruttington lane.

This church, which is now a vicarage, was part of the antient possessions of the prior and convent of St. Gregory, in Canterbury, (fn. 109) with whose consent as Patrons of it, archbishop Stratford, in the year 1346, endowed the vicarage of it as follows: that the vicar and his successors, vicars in this church should have all and all manner of oblations in the church of Northgate, and in every other place within the bounds, limits or tithings of it, of whatsoever sort made, or to be made, or accruing to it, or in it, or liable to increase in future, the oblations or obventions of the hospital of Northgate alone excepted; and that the vicars should receive and have all tithes of wool, lambs, pigs, geese, apples, pears, hemp, flax, beans and other fruits and herbs, growing in orchards or gardens, and the tithes of mader (fn. 110) arising within the parish; and also all other small tithes of whatsoever sort belonging to this church, and all other profits, which the vicars of it had been used to take in former times, except all great tithes (estimated of the yearly value of four marcs) belonging to it, which the religious had reserved to themselves; and that the vicars should undergo at their own costs and expences, the burthern of performing divine offices in the church and the finding of the books and ornaments of it, of the processional tapers, and of one lamp which ought to burn in the chancel of it, and the administring of bread, wine, lights, and other things there necessary for the celebration of divine rights; and also the payment of tenths, and the imposition of any other matters which should happen to be imposed on the English church, for the moiety of the tax of this church; but that the religious should acknowledge for ever, and undergo the burthen of rebuilding and repairing the chancel of it, within and without, and the payment of the tenths of this sort and the imposition of whatsoever sort for the other moiety of the taxation of it, and all the other burthens, ordinary and extraordinary incumbent, or which ought to be incumbent on it, and which were not allotted above to the vicar of it. (fn. 111)

After this, both the appropriation and advowson of the vicarage continued with the prior and convent of St. Gregory, till the dissolution of it in the 27th year of king Henry VIII. when coming into the king's hands, both of them were granted, among the rest of the possessions of the priory, to the archbishop of Canterbury and his successors, where the appropriation still remains, his grace the archbishop being the present possessor of it.

The heirs of George Gipps, esq. late M. P. for this city, are the present lessees of this parsonage, worth, as estimated, only three pounds per annum.

The advowson of the vicarage likewife passed by the above grant to the archbishop and his successors, and this vicarage being in 1681, united to the adjoining rectory of St. Alphage, (fn. 112) as such, still continues in his grace's patronage, who has ever since collated to that rectory, with the vicarage of Northgate united to it.

This vicarage is valued in the king's books at 11l. 19s. 4½d. and the yearly tenths at 1l. 3s. 11¼d. (fn. 113)

Richard Mascall, of Christ-church, in Canterbury, in his will, proved 1703, (fn. 114) recites, that whereas he had by deed indented and inrolled in chancery, and dated in 1692, and by other conveyances purchased of Joseph Wells, yeoman, of Ash, one annuity or yearly rent charge of four pounds, issuing out of the manor of Mardall, in Hothfield and Ashford; he then gave one moiety of the same to the poor people of St. Mary Northgate for ever, to be distributed among the most indigent poor people of it, by the minister, church wardens and overseers of the poor of it, within ten days after they should receive the same; and the other moiety he gave to the parish of Chart next Sutton Valence, for the purposes therein mentioned, with power of distress, on non-payment, &c. and reimbursement of all costs and charges, from time to time, out of the said manor, lands and premises; and he directed a copy of the deed to be kept in the book of accounts of the parish officers of St. Mary Northgate for ever, and the original deed to be kept in the parish chest of Chart Sutton, there carefully to be preserved for ever.

Church of St. Mary Northgate.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Thomas Skeene, in 1346. (fn. 115)
Walter Garrarde, in 1476, obt. August 26, 1498. (fn. 116)
William Kempe, in 1520. (fn. 117)
William Page, in 1523.
The Archbishop.William Lovell, S. T. B. Dec. 3, 1572, obt. 1581. (fn. 118)
Thomas Webbe,… August 10, 1581.
John Stybbynge, jun. March II, 1583.
William Okell, resigned. (fn. 119)
Anthony Kirkbye, …June 15, 1597, resigned 1609.
Elias Meade, A. M. Nov. 30, 1609, obt. 1612. (fn. 120)
Thomas Tatnall, A. M. April 30, 1612.
Sampson Kennard, A. M. May 29, 1612, obt. 1635. (fn. 121)
Daniel Bollen, A. M. Dec. 2, 1635.
John Stockar, A. M. Sept. 24, 1663, obt. 1709.

During his time, viz. in 1681, this church and that of St. Alphage appear to have been united, so that he died rector of both churches, being the first that was so inducted to them; a list of whose successors may be found before, under the account of St. Alphage's church.

ST. MILDRED'S church is situated at the southwest extremity of the city, near the Old Castle and the river Stour, in the church-yard belonging to it. This church is a large handsome building, of three isles and three chancels, with a square tower steeple on the north side, in which are five bells. This church and a great part of the city, was, according to Stow, burnt in the year 1246, anno 30 Henry III. but as it should seem not entirely so, for at the west end of the south isle there is a very fair Roman arch, remaining over the window, and by all appearance the work of those times. (fn. 122)

This church is a rectory, the patronage of which was part of the possessions of the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, with whom it continued till the dissolution of that monastery, in the 30th year of king Henry VIII. when it came into the hands of the crown, where it has continued ever since, the king being the present patron of it.

The church of St. Mildered is valued in the antient taxation at eight marcs per annum.

This rectory, with that of the antient desecrated church of St. Mary de Castro, or of the Castle, is valued in the king's books, at 17l. 17s. 11d. and the yearly tenths at 1l. 15s. 9½d. (fn. 123) In 1588 it was valued at fifty pounds. Communicants three hundred and sixty. In 1640 it was valued at seventy pounds.— Communicants one hundred.

Archbishop Sancrost, by his decree, dated Sept. 29, 1684, united the rectory of All Saints, in this city, with St. Mary de Castro, of the king's patronage likewife, to this of St. Mildred, (fn. 124) in which state it continues at this time. It is now about the clear annual value of eight pounds. (fn. 125)

The neighbouring church of St. John, becoming desolated after the reformation, tacitly devolved to this church of St. Mildred, and it has ever since been esteemed as part of this parish. (fn. 126)

Church of St. Mildred.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
The CrownJohn Balbourne, in 1503. (fn. 127)
Humphry Garth, in 1540. (fn. 128)
John Hill, inducted Nov. 20, 1567, obt. 1601.
Richard Allen, S. T. B. May 16, 1601. (fn. 129)
—Man, in 1654.
Richard Burney, Sept, 8, 1661, resigned —. (fn. 130)
James Ardern, clerk, A. M. May 26, 1662, resigned 1666.
Simon Lowth, A.M. Oct. 8, 1666, obt. 1672. (fn. 131)
John Sargenson, A. M. Oct. 2, 1672, obt. 1684.
Humphry, Bralesford, A. M. September 3, 1684, resigned 1708.

on the 29th of which month, 1684, this church and that of All Saints, were united, so that his successors were presented to the rectories of All Saints and St. Mildred united.

John Andrews, A. M. April 5, 1708, obt. 1710 (fn. 132)
James Henstridge, A. M. Nov. 22, 1710, obt. December 4, 1745. (fn. 133)
Theodore Delasaye, February 4, 1746, obt. July 26, 1772. (fn. 134)
Anthony Lukyn, August, 1772, obt. Nov. 12, 1778. (fn. 135)
The Crown.William Theophilus Montjoy Webster, presented Dec. 24, 1778, obt, April 17, 1788. (fn. 136)
Edward William Whitaker, presented May, 1788. the present rector. (fn. 137)

HOLY CROSS WESTGATE church, so called both from its dedication and situation, stands just within the city gate, called Westgate, on the south side of the street, almost adjoining the city wall. It is a large church, but low, consisting of three isles and a chancel, having a square towar at the west, end in which are five bells.

On the north side of the church, eastward of the porch, are the ruins of the walls of a chantry, adjoining to the walls of the church, but shut out from it, open to the air.

In allusion to the church's name of Holy Cross, there was formerly over the porch, or entrance into it, a crucusix, or representation of our Saviour's crucisixion, as may be learnt from the will of Richard Marley, dated 1521, who appointed to be buried in the church-yard, before the crucifix, as nigh the coming in of the north door there as conveniently might be, and ordered his executors to see gilt well and workmanly the crucisix of our Lord, with the Mary and John, standing upon the porch of the said north door; (fn. 138) but this crucisix has been many years since removed, and the king's arms placed in its room. (fn. 139)

There was antiently in this church a chantry, to which belonged a priest, called Thesus masse priest, who had been accustomed to say masse, and to help to maintain divine service in this church, and was removeable at the pleasure of the inhabitants. It was not known by whom it was founded, but by tradition, with the help and devotion of the parishioners, who bought several lands and tenements to maintain this chantry; the valuation of which, as appears by the return of the commissioners for the visiting of chantries, and such like foundations, in the 2d year of Edward VI.'s reign, was found worth 11l. 9s. 8d.

To this masse there belonged a fraternity, called from thence the fra ternity of thesus masse, or Jesus brotherbed, founded by whom was not known, within this church. There were divers men and women, who, through devotion, gave to this brotherhood, some four-pence, some eight-pence yearly; for which they were named brothers and sisters; which money was bestowed upon lights in the church; and upon one masse and dirige, for the brothers and sisters departed, who were recommended to our Saviour's mercy, by the priest at masse. The names of this fraternity were entered on a bead-roll kept for the purpose. Both chantry and fraternity were suppressed, with all others of the like kind, in the 2d year of Edward VI. though it appears to have been without a priest for some time before. (fn. 140)

The present church was built in king Richard II.'s reign, in the room of one of the same name, which stood over the antient gateway of Westgate, and was of course demolished, when archbishop Sudbury, in that reign, pulled down that gate, which was become ruinated, and built the present one. The king's licence for the purchase of the ground, for the scite of the present church, and the cemetery, being dated March 10, anno 3 Richard II. (fn. 141)

This church was part of the antient possessions of the priory of St. Gregory, in Canterbury, (fn. 142) to which it was appropriated, but no vicarage seems to have been endowed in it, till archbishop Startford, by his instrument under his seal, dated at Saltwood in the year 1347, and of this translation the 14th, endowed the vicarage of this church as follows: John Sorges being then vicar of it, THAT it being affirmed on the part of the religious, that they had in time past acknowledge the burthens of the payments of the tenths, and other impositions whatever, for the taxation of this church, and also all ordinary burthens incumbent on it, and that they had received nothing of the fruits, rents, profits, or obventions of it, during the time of the above-mentioned vicar, although in the times of the other vicars of it, they were accustomed to have, and take from it a certain pension of money; the vicar likewise asserting, that all the commodities of the church were scarce adequate, in those times, for his sufficient maintenance, and the burthens incumbent on this vicarage; wherefore the archbishop, having duly considered the premises, and examined into the same, in the presence of the parties, and with their consent, decreed and ordained, that the above-mentioned religious and their successors should receive and have in future, the tithes of all and singular the gardens within the bounds and limits of the parish of this church, wheresoever situated; and also the tithes of a certain mill, commonly called Shefsote's mill, situated within the parish of this church; but that the said vicar and his successors, vicars there, should have and possess two small houses below the church, situated on both sides of the same, of antient time belonging to the vicarage of it; and that the vicars of the church should likewise receive, possess and have for ever, in the name of their vicarage, the rest of the tithes, as well large as small; and also the oblations, and fruits, rents, issues and profits, all and singular, belonging to the said church, or which should belong to it in future, by any cause or occasion whatsoever, the same not being allotted to the religious, as above-mentioned. And that the vicars of the church should acknowledge and undergo at their own costs and expences, the burthen of serving the church in divine services, and the providing and finding of bread, wine, lights, and other things, which should be necessary for the celebration of divine rites in the same, such as were to be sound and provided, either by right or by custom used in the diocese, by the rectors and vicars of places; and likewise the washing of the vestments and ornaments of the church, and the finding or producing of straw, with which the church should be strewed in such manner, and as often as should be necessary; but the burthen of rebuilding and repairing of the chancel of the church, and the finding or producing and repairing of books, vestments, and ornaments of the same, which ought or were used to be found, produced, or repaired of right or custom, by the rectors of churches, and moreover the burthen of the payment of tenths and other impositions whatsoever, which should or ought in future to belong to the said church, according to the taxation of it, or otherwise; and also the rest of the burthens, ordinary and extraordinary of it, of whatsoever sort incumbent, or which ought to be incumbent on the vicar, for the time being, and not allotted above, the religious should undergo for ever and acknowledge; reserving, nevertheless, to himself and his successors, archbishops of Canterbury, the full power of augmenting and diminishing the vicarage, if at any time it should seem expedient to him or them. (fn. 143)

After this, both the appropriation and advowson of the vicarage of the church, continued with the prior and convent of St. Gregory, till the dissolution of it in the 27th year of king Henry VIII. when coming into the king's hands, both of them were granted, among the rest of the possessions of the priory, to the archbishop and his successors, where the appropriation still remains; his grace being the present possessor of it.

This church, or parsonage appropriate, in the antient taxation, was valued at 100s. (fn. 144)

The heirs of George Gipps, esq. have the present interest of this lease, under the archbishop, of this parsonage, which is worth, according to estimation, only, 14s. per annum.

The advowson of the vicarage likewise passed by the above grant, to the archbishop and his successors; but in the time of archbishop Sancrost, anno 1681, by the mutual consent of the archbishop and of the dean and chapter of Canterbury, patrons of St. Peter's church, being that of the adjoining parish, the latter has been united to this of Holy Cross Westgate, (fn. 145) so that the patronage is now become vested in the archbishop and dean and chapter alternately; in which state it continues at this time.

There was an inquisition, ad quod damnum, taken at Canterbury, anno 16 Richard II. to enquire, if it would be to the king's prejudice to grant to Simon Tanner, and others, a licence, to give and assign one messuage, and one garden, with appurtenances, in the parish of the Holy Cross Westgate, to Robert Raynhull, vicar of this church and his successors. (fn. 146)

The vicarage of Holy Cross Westgate, is valued in the antient taxation at four pounds per annum, but on account of the slenderness of the income was not charged to the tenth. It is valued in the king's books at 13l. ob. and the yearly tenths at 1l. 6s. 0¼ d. (fn. 147) In 1588 it was valued at 30l. Communicants two hundred and eighty.

There is a terrier of this vicarage, dated anno 1630, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

Charities

ABRAHAM COLFE, by his will proved in 1657, gave six penny loaves, to be distributed every Lord's day, to five poor godly men or women of this parish, and one man or woman of the French congregation, inhabitants here, who attend the whole time at their respective churches, one penny loaf each, of good wheaten bread; the poor persons to be changed every Sunday; charged on the stock of the Leathersellers company, in London, amounting in money to 1l. 7s. And 6s. 8d. yearly, to be equally divieded to the prisoners of Westgate, St. Dunstan's, and Maidstone gaols, in money; and for want of such, to those in the house of correction, in bread, charged on a house and orchard in Broadstreet. Which charities were by his will vested in trust, with respect to the former five, and to the prisoners in the dis ferent gaols, in the vicar and churchwardens of Westgate, and with respect to the latter one, in the minister and elders of the French congregation.

THOMAS MANERINGE gave by will in 1592, 6s. 8d. to be yearly distributed to twenty poor men, at Easter, in money, charged on a house and orchard in Broad-street.

JOHN SMITH, clerk, parson of Wickhambreaux, that help and means might not be wanting to such persons who were prisoners, either in the custody of the gaoler of the gaol of the city and county of Canterbury, or in the custody of the gaoler of the gaol of the county of Kent, kept in the parish of St. Dunstan, at such time as such prisoners were to suffer punishment for their offences, to bring them to repentance, and to induce them, after their trials, to lead a better life; therefore, for the instruction of such as should be in either of the said gaols, he had taken order, for the reading of divine service, and preaching of sermons to them, in manner as hereafter mentioned, with reasonable allowance for the preacher's pains, granted and confirmed, by indenture dated July 25th, in the 19th year of king Charles I. anno 1638, for the performance and accomplishment of it, to Hamon Lewknor, esq. of Acrise, and seven other seoffees and trustees and their heirs, one annuity or yearly rent of five pounds, issuing out of two pieces of marsh land, containing ten acres, called Shereives Marsh, in the parish of Wickhambreaux, to have and to hold unto the said trustees, their heirs and assigns; the annuity to be payable four times a year, at the sessions-house, in the Castle, at Canterbury, with power of distress on non-payment. The said annuity to be paid to and received by the said Hamon Lewknor and the others, upon the special trust and considence, that they should therewith provide and procure the usual divine service of the church of England, to be read four times in the year, and a sermon to be preached at each of those times, by a licensed preacher, unto the prisoners who should from time to time be in the gaol of the city of Canterbury, as near before the several quarter-sessions in and for the city as conveniently might be; the service and sermons to be read and preached in the church of Holy Cross Westgate, if consent could be had; if not, then in some convenient chamber in the house, wherein the gaoler or keeper dwelt, and that the feossees should likewise procure and provide the like services; and sermons should be read and preached at the like times unto such prisioners, as should from time to time be in the aforesaid gaol for the county of Kent, then kept in the parish of St. Dunstan, at the like times: the same to be read and preached in some convenient chamber of the house, where the said gaol was, for the better instruction of such prisoners; and that the feoffees should pay to such preacher, each time for his pains ten shillings, and should further deliver to him 2s. 6d. to be thus bestowed by him; six-pence to the gaoler for preparing the room, and two shillings among the prisoners so instructed; which money so to be paid to the preachers, should be paid unto them on demand, at the Register's office, for the archdeaconry of Canterbury, where it should be before-hand left for the that purpose; and that after his death the sole nomination of all such services, and preach such sermons, should be vested in the archbishop, his commissary, or the archdeacon of Canterbury, or such of them as should be living and abiding in or about the city of Canterbury, so that such readers and preachers so nominated to read and preach in the gaol of the city of Canterbury, should be living and abiding within the deanry of Canterbury, that so they might attend the same with the least trouble; and those to read and preach in the gaol of the county of Kent, in St. Dunstan's; to be living and abiding either in the deanries of Bridge, Westbere, or Eleham, or any of them; and that every such licensed preacher should have a month's notice thereof, at the least, and better to provide himself for the purpose.

And the survivors of the said feoffees, their heirs or assigns, when they should be decreased to the number of four only, that then they so surviving, or the heirs of the survivors of them, should convey the said annuity to four others of worth and quality, living in or near the city of Canterbury, and to their heirs and assigns for ever, for the like trust, intent, and purposes, and not otherwise. And for the better preservation of this deed, that one part of it should be with the consent of the archdeacon, deposited in the registry of the archdeaconry, to remain there among the writings in the custody of the register, by which it might be kept in memory, from what deanries the preachers were from time to time to be chosen, and that they might, in convenient time, be provided; and the register or his clerk might shew the same to such persons as should require it, or make such copies as should be desired, on payment of the usual fees, &c. for the same.

In the year 1680, all the feoffees were deceased, excepting Henry Oxinden, then Sir Henry Oxinden, knt. and bart. of Wingham, who was then become the only grantee and trustee. He, by indenture, in the above year, and intended to be inrolled in chancery, assigned it over to Sir James Oxinden, of Dean, and eight others, (fn. 148) and their heirs and assigns, in trust only, for the continuing and preserving the above trust, and for no other intent or purpose whatsoever.

Church of Holy Cross Westgate.

PATRONS,VICARS.
Or by whom presented.
John Sorges, . . . in 1347. (fn. 149)
Nicholas Chilton, … .obt. 1400. (fn. 150)
Robert Raynhull, … . obt. 1416. (fn. 151)
Patrick Gerrard, … . obt. 1458. (fn. 152)
John Rotley, resigned in 1460. (fn. 153)
Clement Hardinge, L L. B. … . . (fn. 154)
Thomas Pedecocq, . . obt. May, 1501. (fn. 155)
Dunstan Petle, in 1527. (fn. 156)
Thomas Wellys,... 1522. (fn. 157)
The Archbishop.John Sweeting, Dec. 13, 1582, and in 1586. (fn. 158)
The King, Sede vac.John Bungay, A. M. April 2, 1611, obt. 1617. (fn. 159)
The Archbishop.James Lambe, A. M. Nov. 1, 1617, obt. 1662. (fn. 160)
John Ardern, A. M. May 26, 1662, resigned 1666. (fn. 161)
Simon Lowth, A. M. Sept. 20, 1666, resigned 1679. (fn. 162)
Christopher Hargrave, A. B. August 19, 1679, resigned the same year.
Charles Kilburne, A. M. ind. Oct. 9, 1679, obt. Jan. 14, 1737. (fn. 163)

On the resignation of Christopher Hargrave, in 1679, this rectory and that of St. Peter, being the church of the adjoining parish, appear to have been united, and Charles Kilburne was inducted to both these united churches, as were his successors following.

Thomas Buttonshaw, 1737, … resigned 1741. (fn. 164)
William Miles, A. M. October 1741, obt. Oct. 16, 1746. (fn. 165)
Robert Ayerst, A. M. Jan. 19, 1747, resigned 1786. (fn. 166)
John Gostling, A. M. 1786, the present rector. (fn. 167)

ST. PETER'S church is situated at a small distance from the north side of the street of that name; the church, which is not large, consists of three narrow isles and a chancel, with a square tower at the west end of the south isle, in which are three bells. (fn. 168)

By the survey of the king's commissioners, anno 2 Edward VI. it appears, that there were lands given by William Bigge, mentioned before, for one obit, and a lamp to be maintained within this church for ever. And that there were light-lands given by Thomas Ikham, likewise mentioned before, for the maintenance of two tapers before the sacrament in this church, and other works of charity for ever. (fn. 169)

The parsonage-house was given to Thomas, then rector of it, by one Richard de Langdon, of Canterbury, with the king's licence, anno 25 Edward III. (fn. 170)

In the register are frequent entries of the Nethersoles, Spraklyns and Hales, &c.

This church, which is a rectory, was part of the possessions of the priory of Christ-church, in Canterbury, and at the dissolution of it, in the 30th year of king Henry VIII. came into the king's hands, who granted it in his 33d year, by his dotation charter, to his new-founded dean and chapter of Canterbury; since which, in 1681, archibishop Sancroft, with the mutual consent of the dean and chapter, and of the archbishop of Canterbury, patron of the adjoining rectory and church of Holy Cross Westgate, (fn. 171) this church of St. Peter has been united to it, so that the patronage of these united churches is now become alternate in the archbishop and dean and chapter; in which state it continues at this time.

This church, in the antient taxation, is valued at four pounds per annum, but on account of the slenderness of its income, was not taxed to the tenth. (fn. 172)

This rectory is valued in the king's books at 3l. 10s. 10d. and the yearly tenths at 7s. 1d. (fn. 173) In 1588 it was valued at twenty pounds. Communicants one hundred and fifty-three. In 1640 it was valued at forty pounds. Communicants one hundred and twenty.

There is a terrier of this rectory, dated anno 1630, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. Peter.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Thomas.… in 1321. (fn. 174)
Thomas.… in 1351. (fn. 175)
John Syre, . . obt. 1436. (fn. 176)
Thomas Sterlyng, in 1504 and 1519. (fn. 177)
William Grene, in 1524. (fn. 178)
John Colley, obt. February 22, 15—. (fn. 179)
Robert Thompson, in 1546. (fn. 180)
The Crown.Nicholas Patyfere, Feb. 5, 1582, resigned 1605.
Pean and Chapter of Canterbury.Rufus Rogers, A. M. 1605, obt. Feb. 1651. (fn. 181)
The King.Duell Read, clerk, September 7, 1672.
Dean and Chapter.Richard Burney, inducted 1673, resigned 1679. (fn. 182)
Charles Kilburne, A. M. ind. Oct. 9, 1679.

On this church and that of Holy Cross Westgate being united, in 1681, he was inducted the first to both of them so united, and he died in 1737, rector of both churches; a list of whose successors may be found above, under the account of Holy Cross church.

THE ALMS HOUSES.

HENRY SWORDER, of this parish, by his will in 1504, ordered, that his three messuages, next to one of his, situated next the corner, beside the shell in St. Peter's-lane, be founded for ever for three poor people to dwell in, they keeping sufficient reparations; these have been for a long time vested in the parishioners, to place in them such poor people of their parish as they should in their discretion think proper; and in 1599, anno 41 Elizabeth, it was agreed on, at a meeting of them, that whoever should be placed in any of these houses, should pay at their entrance 6s. 8d. towards the reparations of the house they were to enter into; and also should pay yearly to the churchwardens six-pence every quarter, for so long time as they should continue therein, and that the churchwardens should have power to distrain for the same.

At the same time a legacy of thirty shillings, given by Leon. Bonner, late of this parish, deceased, towards the reparation of these houses, was paid into the hands of the churchwarden.

BESIDES the above-mentioned churches at present remaining within the walls of this city, there were five others, which have been long since demolished, and their districts united to the present churches and parishes above described. These churches were

ST. EDMUND'S church, being dedicated to St. Edmund, king and martyr, and usually called St. Edmund of Ridingate, from its situation near adjoining to that gate; was built by Hamo, the son of Vitalis, who was one of those who came over from Normandy with William the Conqueror, and gave it to the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, whence it was granted in the year 1184, to the prioress and convent of St. Sepulchre's, just by, to hold in frank almoign, they offering as an acknowledgment of the abbot and convent's former right to it, 12d. yearly, upon the altar of St. Augustine, on the same saint's day, as a rent towards the repair of their organs. (fn. 183)

This church, upon the declining of it in the year 1349, was united to that of St. Mary Bredin, not far distant from it, (fn. 184) by the then commissary of Canterbury, especially authorized for that purpose, by the ordinary, that is, the prior and convent of Christchurch, in the vacancy of the see, on archbishop Bradwardine's death, with the consent of the prioress and convent of St. Sepulchre's then patrons of it. (fn. 185)

The remains of this church have been wholly removed a long time since, insomuch that there have not been the least traces of the scite of it to be found for many years past. (fn. 186)

ST. MARY DE CASTRO church, so called from its situation near the castle, and to distinguish it from the other St. Mary churches in this city, has long been desolated, the chancel only of it being left standing, to the repair of which one Roger Ridley, by his will anno 1470, gave four pounds. (fn. 187) Time was, when it was as absolute a parish church as any about this city, (fn. 188) and though before the reformation it seems not to have been in a very flourishing condition, (fn. 189) yet that change in religious ceremonies was very probably the cause of this church's still further decay and desolation; for offerings, altarages, and such profits, of which this benefice chiefly consisted, and from which the maintenance of the incumbent was in great measure drawn, being by this change abolished, there was not from other matters a sufficient competency left for him, so that it became soon afterwards deserted, and was united to St. Mildred's, (fn. 190) and has been ever since esteemed as part of that parish. (fn. 191) To this church was united, in 1449, the neighbouring small church of St. John, long since likewise desolated, a further account of which will be given hereafter.

The abbot and convent of St. Augustine were patrons of this church of St. Mary, before the dissolution of that monastery, (fn. 192) since which the patronage of it has of right become vested in the crown, and continues so at this time, the crown having presented to it so late as the year 1637. The following is a list of such rectors of it as I have met with.

      Richard —, in 1231. (fn. 193)
Thomas Pycard, anno 27 king Edward I. (fn. 194)
Simon —, anno 1321 (fn. 195)
Richard Allen. S. T. P. July 26, 1637. (fn. 196)

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST'S church, called from the slenderness of its income, St. John the Poor, had a parish called St. John's belonging to it. It stood much about the upper end of that lane leading from Castlestreet, called St. John's-lane.

This church coming to ruin, was, with the consent of the patrons, the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, united in 1349, by the prior and convent of Christ-church, ordinaries during a vacancy of the see, to the church of St. Mary de Castro before mentioned; (fn. 197) the profits of the former then amounting to forty shillings, and the latter to five marcs; (fn. 198) the church of St. Mary being made the mother church. by virtue of which union, John Skippe, clerk, was admitted to both churches, on Nov. 11, 1349.

After which, I find no further mention of this parish church of St. John; (fn. 199) but it seems to have been included in that of St. Mary de Castro, and as such united with it to the church of All Saints, as has been already mentioned before. The remains of it were for a long time used as a malthouse, or in tenements, and continue so at present.

The book of St. Laurence's hospital makes mention of some portions of tithes, belonging to this church, by the following entry, viz. That the hospital received all the tithes of four acres of land in Market field, and the rector of St. John, in Canterbury, received of two acres, eight sheass; and of two other acres, seven sheass, in all one copp. And the hospital received two parts of the tithes of six acres of land lying at Stone street, towards the south, and a narrow way toward the north. And the rector of St. John, in Canterbury, received a third part of the tithes. (fn. 200)

ST. MARY OF QUENINGATE, was a church so called from its situation near that antient gate, in a lane called Queningate-lane, within the city wall. I find it in old records called both a church and a chapel.

That such there was, is most certain, as may be traced in the records of Christ-church, now of more than 580 years old, which priory had the patronage of this church given to it, by Hugh Magminot (together with eleven mansions in Canterbury) (fn. 201) and which was, among others, confirmed to it by a bull of pope Alexander III. and by many bulls of the like sort afterwards. By the above records, it appears likewise, that the rector of this church in 1381, made an exchange of it, and St. Michael church in Burgate, to which it was an annexed chapel for Portpool chantry, in St. Paul's; the profits of this church and chapel amounting to no more than four pounds yearly; further than which, I find no further mention of it, nor any trace of the scite of it. (fn. 202)

ST. MICHAEL BURGATE, was another church, situated, as appears by its name, in Burgate-street, and probably on the north side of it near the gate itself, and within the city walls. Upon its dissolution, the parish of it was united to the church of St. Mary Magdalen, in Burgate. (fn. 203) The patronage of it belonged to the priory of Christ-church, to which it paid an annual pension of two shillings, and it appears to have been confirmed, among others, to that priory, by the bull of pope Alexander III. and of divers succeeding popes. (fn. 204) When it was desecrated, is not known, (fn. 205) but probably it was long before the reformation; the scite of it, as well as that of St. Mary of Queningate, having been seemingly afterwards included within the bounds of the precincts of the priory, now of the dean and chapter. (fn. 206)

BESIDES THE CHURCHES before described within the walls of this city, there are three at this time without them, viz. St. Dunstan's, St. Paul's, and St. Martin's, each in their respective suburbs; and there was another, viz. that of St. Sepulchre, adjoining to that nunnery, which has been long since desecrated; the former of these, St. Dunstan's, being in the county at large, has already been taken notice of under the hundred of Westgate, in which it lies, in the History of Kent, I shall therefore proceed to describe the others.

ST. PAUL'S church stands on the south side of the street of that name, within the city liberty, at a small distance without Burgate, in the high road to Deal and Sandwich. It is a small mean building, consisting of two isles and two chancels, having a square tower at the west end, in which hang three bells. (fn. 207)

This church, like others in this city, of the patronage of the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, had no particular cemetery or church-yard of its own, but in like manner buried in the common cemetery within the precincts of that abbey; after the dissolution of which, being deprived of that privilege, the parish was obliged to resort for this purpose to the church-yards of other churches in the neighbourhood, until the year 1591, when having purchased a piece of ground on the south side of Longport-street, a saculty was that year obtained for confirming it as the burial place of this parish; as it remains at present.

This church was part of the antient possessions of the abbot and convent of St. Augustine, to which it was appropriated, and a vicarage erected and endowed in it in the year 1268, anno 52 Henry III. by Hugh Mortimer, the archbishop's official, with the consent of the patrons, and of Hamo Doge, then rector of it, who presented, with their consent likewise, Virgil de Alcham, chaplain, to the vicarage of it, who was by the said official instituted canonically to the same; saving nevertheless to Master Hamo, rector of it, and his successors, eight marcs of silver yearly, from the fruits of the vicarage, at the four principal feasts of the year, in equal portions; and that the vicar should pay the procurations of the archdeacon, and should sustain all other ordinary burthens; but that he should have and receive in the name of his vicarage, all obventions, oblations, chance payments, and all other rights to this church, in any manner belonging or appertaining (except grain and beans in the field) according to which, at that time the vicarage was taxed; sealed with the seal of the official's office, anno 1268. (fn. 208)

After which, the appropriation and advowson of the vicarage of this church continued with the abbot and convent, till the dissolution of the monastery in the 30th year of king Henry VIII.'s reign, (fn. 209) when they came into the king's hands, who soon afterwards, in his 33d year, settled them by his dotation charter, on his new-founded dean and chapter of Canterbury, who are the present possessors of this appropriation. But since the above time, by the mutual consent of the dean and chapter, and of the archbishop, patron of the adjoining rectory and church of St. Martin, this vicarage of St. Paul was in 1681 united to it; so that the patronage of these united churches is now become alternate in the archbishop, and the dean and chapter, (fn. 210) in which state it continues at present.

On the abolition of deans and chapters, at the latter end of king Charles I.'s reign, this rectory appropriate came into the hands of the state, and was surveyed by their order in 1650, when it was returned, that it consisted of the tithes of corn and hay, and other profits belonging to it, estimated to be worth 100l. per annum, being then let by the late dean and chapter, anno 1641, to George Best, gent. for twentyone years, at the yearly rent of five pounds, but that the premises were worth over and above the said rent 97l. and 7d. per annum. (fn. 211) On the restoration in 1660, this parsonage returned again to the dean and chapter, and in 1678 there was a terrier taken of it, (fn. 212) by which it appears, that it consisted of the tithes of the farm, then belonging to the earl of Winchelsea, in the occupation of John Sutton, containing by estimation, 120 acres, except the Hoath, which was bought heretosore of Mr. Smith, and was parcel of the manor of Barton; the tithes of twenty acres of wood-land; the tithes of twenty acres of land lying in Moate park, then in the occupation of William Ginder; the tithes of sixteen acres of land, lying within the park, late lord Camden's, and then of Edward Hales, esq. in the occupation of Wm. Holmes; the tithes of the farm called the Old Park, containing by estimation sixty acres of land, in the occupation of John Sutton; all the residue of the lands within the parish, were parcels of and belonging to the tithery of St. Laurence.

In the year 1594, Andrew Peerson, clerk, prebendary of Canterbury, died possessed of the interest in the lease of the parsonage barn of St. Paul's, commonly called Caldcott barn, with three acres of land about it. George Best, gent. was lessee of this parsonage, as above-mentioned, in 1650. He was owner of the house and estate of St. Laurence adjoining to it, in whose successors, owners of it, the lease of this parsonage continued down to the late lord viscount Dudley and Ward, whose tithery in this parish will be mentioned hereafter, in whose heirs the interest of it remains at this time.

This vicarage was antiently valued at 66s. 8d. only, but on account of the slenderness of its income, was not taxed to the tenth. (fn. 213)

It is valued in the king's books at 9l. 18s. 9d. and the yearly tenths at 19s. 10½d. (fn. 214) In 1588 here were one hundred and ninety-six communicants. In 1640 it was valued at forty pounds, the like number of communicants. There is paid to the vicar, by the dean and chapter of Canterbury, in lieu of tithes of land in St. Laurence, 5l. per annum, and another 5l. as an augmentation of the vicarage.

There is a terrier of the vicarage, dated in 1630, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

OF THE FOUNDATION of the hospital of St. Laurence, near this parish, in the year 1137, by Hugh, abbot of St. Augustine's, he granted to it, in alms, inter alia, as part of its endowment, THE WHOLE TITHE of wheat and peas of all the land, which adjoined to Langeport, of their demesne on the left side of the highway which led from Canterbury to Dover, which land was within this parish of St. Paul. These tithes, which consisted of those of the lands that were parcel of the manor of Barton, after the suppression of the hospital, came, with the rest of the revenues of it, into the hands of the several grantees and possessors of it, (fn. 215) as are mentioned hereafter, in the account of that hospital, who in succession became possessed of them down to John, viscount Dudley and Ward, and are usually known by the name of St. Laurence tithery; who, though he alienated the mansion of the hospital, with the lands contiguous to it, yet he retained the possession of this tithery, of which he died possessed in 1788, and his heirs are now entitled to it.

In the year 1348, in the visitation of Thomas Bradwardin, archbishop of Canterbury, on a complaint made by Thomas Carlton, vicar of St. Paul's before the archbishop's commissary; that all the small tithes of the manor belonging to the abbot, &c. of St. Augustine, vulgarly called Langeport, alias Barton, in St. Paul's, howsoever arising, to the said Thomas, as vicar, had belonged from old time, and ought then to belong, as well of right as custom; and that Tho mas Wardrobe, farmer of that manor had, to his great detriment, unjustly withdrawn, and held all manner of tithes of this kind. He therefore sitting to determine the same, and all parties having been summoned and appearing in Christ-church, on Sept. 27, anno 1349, and Richard Scholdon, monk of St. Augustine, and the master of St. Laurence's hospital, having then there produced to him certain muniments, which being diligently inspected and read over, it sufficiently appeared to him, that these tithes wholly belonged to the hospital, and ought in future so to do; he therefore proceeding lawfully in the said matter, at the instance and prayer of the said vicar, dismissed the said Thomas Wardrobe, farmer, as asoresaid, so far as related to the premises. In testimony of which, he had put his seal at Canterbury, on Dec. 10, in the year asoresaid. (fn. 216)

Charities

SIR HENRY PALMER, of Bekesborne, by his will in the Prerogative-office, Canterbury, anno 1611, gave 10s to be yearly paid out of his manor of Well-court, to the minister and churchwardens of this parish, towards the relief of the poor of it.

SIR EDWARD MASTER, of Canterbury, by his will in 1690, gave 5l. towards the purchasing of a piece of ground for the enlargement of the church-yard, lying in the Borough of Longport, belonging to this parish of St. Paul; to be paid to the churchwardens of it, when they should have procured such piece of ground, adjoining to the church-yard, for that purpose.

Church of St. Paul

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
Abbot and Convent of St. AugustineHamo Doge, the last rector, resigned 1668. (fn. 217)
VICARS.
Virgil de Alkham, the first vicar, in 1268. (fn. 218)
Thomas Charlton, in 1349. (fn. 219)
Edmund Ovynde, in 1490.
Robert Spersall, in 1511. (fn. 220)
Roger Downvyle, in 1523. (fn. 221)
John Clarke, in 1523 and 1554. (fn. 222)
William Walsall, in 1562, obt. Sept. 18, 1621. (fn. 223)
Dean and Chapter of Canterbury.William Frye, Dec. 19, 1621, obt. Feb. 1626.
William Fordan, in 1637.
William Lovelace, in 1659.
William Jordan occurs again after the restiration in 1661, obt. 1681. (fn. 224)
Owen Evans, A. B. January 9, 1681.

On the uniting of this church, in 1681, to that of St. Martin, he was inducted the first to these united rectories. He died in 1743, rector of both. A list of whose successors may be found hereafter, under the account of St. Martin's church.

There having been at different times, several altercations between the city's franchise of liberty, thouching the extent of the city's franchise or liberty, in this parish and hereabouts; to clear up all doubts relating to it, a composition was entered into between them, with the king's consent, in the year 1268, being the 42d year of king Henry III.'s reign, at Westminister, before the king there. (fn. 225)

The parishes of St. Andrew, St. Mary Magdalen, and for some time St. Paul, which before the dissolution of St. Augustine's abbey, buried in the cemetery of it, being all churches of that abbey's patronage, had the church-yard of St. Mary de Castro's church (of that abbey's patronage likewise) assigned to them in lieu of that cemetery, for the burial of their dead there; a privilege in which St. Mary Bredman's parish did and does now, but by what right is unknown; that church being of the patronage of Christ-church, partake of, with the others, but all, or some part at least of the burials there, was received by the poor of Maynard's spittal, who in return for it antiently kept it in repair, and for default, anno 1560, were presented by St. Andrew's; since which the case is altered, each parish jointly keeping in repair the inclosure. (fn. 226)

ST. MARTIN'S church is situated at the eastern extremity of the suburb of its own name, standing on the side of the hill, a little distance from the north side of the high road leading to Deal and Sandwich, and within the city's liberty.


St Martin's church

St Martin's church

This church seems indeed very antient, being built, the chancel especially, which appears to be of the workmanship of the time, mostly of Roman or British bricks; the noted reliques and tokens of old age in any kind of building, whether sacred or prosane. (fn. 227)

It consists at present of a nave or body and a chancel, (fn. 228) having a square tower at the west end of it, in which hang three bells. The chancel appears to have been the whole of the original building of this church, or oratory, and was probably built about the year 200, that is about the middle space of time when the Christians, both Britons and Romans, lived in this island, free from all persecutions. The walls of this chancel are built almost wholly of British or Roman bricks, laid and placed in a regular state, in like manner as is observed in other buildings of the Romans in this island, of which those in Dover castle are an instance.

This, as Mr. Somner observes, is an infallible token of an old British or Roman building; but he continues, when these materials are put into a wall (however plentiful they may be) here and there promiscuously, without rule or order, they seem to be only a sign of the materials having been taken from the ruins of some other building, and were used as they came to hand by the workmen of some later time; (fn. 229) which observation may, without doubt, be applied to the body of this church.

In the midst of the nave or body, there is an antient circular stone font, much enriched with ornamental sculpture. It consists of a cylindrical stone of near two feet six inches high, and as much in diameter; it is but a shell, so that the bason is sufficiently large to dip a child. The outside is embellished with four series of ornaments; the lower one is a simple scroll; the next a kind of hieroglyphical true-lover's knot; the third small Saxon arches, which shew the architecture, intersecting each other; the upper one a kind of lacing in semicircles inverted, intersecting one another. All the ornaments are very small and much enriched. (fn. 230)

This church, so much celebrated for the great antiquity of it, is supposed by some to have been the resort of St. Augustine and his fellow labourers for their devotions at their first arrival, and by licence of king Ethelbert, granted to them, in favor of queen Bertha his wife, who had this church, built long before, as Bede says, (fn. 231) by the believing Romans, and dedicated to St. Martin, allotted for the place of her public devotions. Others suppose that the chapel where St. Augustine first celebrated masse, was that of St. Pancrace, within the precincts of the adjoining monastery. (fn. 232) However this may be, it is in general admitted, that this church having been in early times a Christian oratory made use of by the believing Romans, was repaired and re-consecrated by Luidhard, bishop of Soissons, who had attended queen Bertha from France, when she married king Ethelbert, and was dedicated by him to St. Martin. Whom it was dedicated to before, is not known, but most probably it was to the Virgin Mary; for St. Martin was not born till some time afterwards. (fn. 233)

This church, which is a rectory, is exempt from the jurisdiction of the archdeacon; it was part of the antient possessions of the see of Canterbury, (fn. 234) and the patronage of it continued solely in the archbishop, till the church was united in 1681 to the neighbouring church of St. Paul, by the mutual consent of the archbishop, and of the dean and chapter of Canterbury, the patrons of the latter; (fn. 235) from which time it has continued in the alternate presentation of the archbishop and the dean and chapter, the present patrons of it.

This church is valued in the antient taxation at ten pounds. It is valued in the king's books at 6l. 5s. 2½d. and the yearly tenths at 12s. 6¼d. (fn. 236) In 1588 it was valued at only twenty pounds. Communicants seventy one In 1640 it was valued at forty pounds. Communicants seventy.

It appears by the survey of the king's commissioners, anno 2 king Edward VI. that there were lands within this parish given for obits, to be kept in this church for ever, by divers persons. (fn. 237)

Charities.

SIR HENRY PALMER, of Bekesborne, by his will in 1611, gave 10s. to be yearly paid out of his manor of Well-court, to the minister and church wardens of this parish, towards the relief of the poor of it. (fn. 238)

DAME MABELLA FINCH, baroness of Fordwich, by her will proved in 1669, gave to Mr. Osborne, minister of this parish, in which she then dwelt, and to his successors for ever, during the time he and they should continue as such, but no longer, for his and their better maintenance, one annuity or yearly rent charge of 10l. yearly issuing, and to be received out of her manor or farm called Ridgeway, in Chislet, and Reculver, containing 340 acres, and her lease of Ozengell grange, in St. Laurence, held under the dean and chapter of Canterbury; and she ordered the sum of 100l. to be paid into the hands of Mr. Bingham and three such other of the ablest inhabitants of this parish, to be by them and the churchwardens and overseers of it, and their successors for ever, employed for the use and benefit of the poor of this parish; they giving security to her executors, as they or the major part of them should approve of, for the keeping and employing the said money, and for the due payment of the profits of it. (fn. 239)

There is a terrier of this rectory, dated in 1630, in the registry of the consistory court of Canterbury.

Church of St. Martin.

PATRONS,RECTORS.
Or by whom presented.
The Archbishop of Canterbury.John de Henney, in 1321. (fn. 240)
John Bourn, in 1330. (fn. 241)
John Brown, in 1492. (fn. 242)
Giles Talbot, in 1509, obt. May 1524. (fn. 243)
John Hitchcock, in 1539. (fn. 244)
Frencham, resigned 1578.
John Mug, March, 1578, obt. 1587.
John Stubbs, A. B. May 1587.
Richard Genveye, inducted 1592, obt. 1612.
William Osborne, jun. in 1665. (fn. 245)
William Osborne, A. M. induct. 1693, obt. August 1693.
Owen Evans, A. M. 1693, obt. March, 1742. (fn. 246)

On the uniting of this church to that of St. Paul in 1681, he was inducted the first to both churches so united. He died in 1742, rector of both.

Thomas Lamprey, A. M. June, 1743, obt. Sept. 2, 1760. (fn. 247)
John Airson, A. M. Dec. 1760, obt. Dec. 13, 1787. (fn. 248)
Thomas Freeman, A. M. 1788, the present rector. (fn. 249)

Footnotes

1 Battely's Somner, p. 163.
2 See Battely, pt, ii. p. 177.
3 Copies of all these instruments are in the Register's office, Canterbury.
4 Somner mentions some grave stones in it remaining in his time, of persons of good account buried in it; among others, of Roger Brent, an alderman, and thrice mayor of this city, who died in 1486, and was buried in St. Mary's chapel, in this church, and as appears by his will, was a good benefactor to the city. On his gravestone were the arms of Brent, impaling Lee; on another gravestone were the arms of Apulderfield, impaling Evering; and on another, two chewons, impaling three chevronels; and in one of the windows were the arms of archbishop Morton. All which have been long since obliterated.
The following inscriptions on gravestones are among others remaining in it: In the south isle, one for Margaret, wife of Daniel Lister, obt. 1621. In the north isle, a memorial for Shadrack Tyler, B. A. son of Robert Tyler, vicar of St. Laurence; and grandson of Shadrack Cooke, vicar of Faversham, obt. 1756. Another for Joseph Royle, alderman, obt. 1788. John Fuller, alderman, obt. 1569. In the register of this parish, which begins in 1559, are several entries among the burials of the Bridges's, Denne's, Six's, and Sawkins's.
5 This survey is printed at the end of Somner, by Battely.
6 Thorn, col. 2169.
7 They are mentioned in different wills in the Prerog. off. Cant.
8 He is mentioned in a will in Prerogative off. Cant.
9 His will is in Prerog. off. Cant.
10 He is mentioned as parson of Alhaldwyn, in Canterbury, in a will in Prerog off.
11 He was also vicar of St. Dunstan's.
12 A dispensation passed in 1626, for his holding this rectory, with the hospital of poor priests, and the parish church of St. Margaret annexed to it, Rym. Fœd. vol. xviii. p. 878.
13 In 1673 presented to the rectory of St. Peter's. See Wood's Ath. vol. ii. col. 886.
14 Somner mentions the following burial inscriptions, on brass, in old English letters, in this church, all long since destroyed: viz. one in the chancel for John Piers, rector. For John Parmenter, rector, commissary of Canterbury likewise, and rector of Adisham, obt. 1501. For Robert Provest, rector, obl. 1487. For John Lovelych, B. L. rector and likewise register of the archbishop's consistory at Canterbury, obt. 1438. For Richard Stuppeny, B. L. L. proctor, obt. 1596. In the south chancel, for Henry Gosborne, gent. of St. Alphage, alderman, and four times mayor of this city, in the chapel of our Lady, obt. 1522. He had two wives, by whom he had 25 children; he by his will gave 20 marcs, (a large legacy in those days) towards repairing the city walls. On his stone these two shields, Sable, a fess, gules, between three swans, argent; and Vert, as saltier, argent, a chief, ermine. Robert Gosborne, rector of Penshurst, his brother, obt. 1523. For Richard Engham, of Great Chart, obt. 1568. In the middle isle, for John Caxton, and Joane and Isabel his wives; he was a benefactor to this church, and died in 1485. On the second pillar from the west end, on a brass plate, the only one now remaining of those mentioned by Somner, Gaude Prude Thoma, per quem fit ista Columpna, with his coat of arms. He lived in king Edward IVth.'s days, and by his will appointed to be buried by Christ-church porch, and gave by it as much as would build a pillar in this church, and five marcs to the works of Christ-church, anno 1468, In the west window, the figures of Edmund Staplegate and Eleanor at Pytte, his wife, in coloured glass, and underneath, Orate p. aibus, Edmdi Staplegate, & Elenora at Pytte, uxoris ejus. This man, who took his name from his habitation at Staplegate, adjoining to this parish, was in king Edward III.'s days, several times one of the bailiffs of this city. There were formerly many coats of arms in the windows of the church, most of which have been long since destroyed.— The following monuments and gravestones are among others in this church at this time: A memorial near the altar-rails for Thomas Wife, S. T. P. descended of a genteel family in Oxfordshire, incumbent of this parish and of Beakesborne, a six preacher of this cathedral, and a prebendary of that of Lincoln; he died in 1726; arms, Three chevronels. Another next the last, for Brodnax Brandon, gent. eldest son of William Brandon, late of Portsmouth, by Anne his wife, daughter of Sir William Broadnax, of Godmersham, obt. 1733; arms, Barry of ten, over all a lion rampant, ducally crowned; impaling a cross fleure. An inscription on a brass plate for John Mainwaring, esq. of an antient and noble family of that name, of Pyvor, in Cheshire, ob. 1621. An inscription on the same stone, inscribed the reverse way, for Elizabeth, daughter of William Maundy, M. D. formerly of this city, obt. 1776. In the north isle are memorials for several of the Knowlers. A mural tablet for Samuel Vassal, esq. son of Colonel John Vassal, obt. 1714; arms, Azure, a sun in chief, a vase in base, or. A memorial for Peter Peters, of the dislolved Dominican monastery, near this parish, M. D. the eldest son of John Peters, M. D. of the same place, obt. 1697. Under the same stone lies buried Elizabeth his wife, obt. 1722; arms, Peters, or, three roses, gules; on an escutcheon of pretence, Stoning, argent, on a chevron, gules, three martlets, between three hurts, each charged with a fleur de lis, or. Another for Anne, eldest daughter of Peter Peters, M. D. obt. 1712. One for Michael Peters, gent. obt. 1754. On a hatchment at the north-east corner, an inscription for John Stockar, rector almost 46 years, obt. 1708. On another at the south side of the north isle, arms, Bix, on an escutcheon of pretence, Gules, a chevron, or; and an inscription for Mr. Thomas Bix, of Bishopsgate, London, buried here near his grandfather and grandmother, obt. 1697. On another against the north wall, arms, Simpson, impaling vert, a chevron, between three rams passant, or, for Roger Simpson, gent. obt. 1656. Mary his wife, obt. 1648. A memorial for William Crayford, esq. formerly recorder, obt. 1733. For Susanna, widow of William Crayford, esq. obt. 1775. Several other memorial for the family of Crayford, both on gravestones and hatchments. A memorial for George Hammond, gent. obt. 1761; also Mary his widow, obt. 1782; likewise Mary their daughter, obt. 1788; and for Thomas Hammond, gent. (attorney and several years chamberlain of this city) their son, obt. 1791. A memorial in the north isle, for the Rev. Mr. Le Suer, minister to a French episcopal chapel in this city, obt. 1746; also for Margaret his wife, obt. 1749. Several memorials for the Knotts and Foutrells. A memorial for Algerina Dashwood, eldest daughter of Geo. Dashwood, esq. obt. 1713; arms in a lozenge, On a fess, three griffins heads, erased. In the south isle, a small mural monument for Matthew Hadde, eldest son of Henry Hadde, of Frinsted, both alike esqrs. He was of the society of Lincoln's-Inn, and for twentyseven years performed the office of justice of the peace within this city. He was steward of four courts; 1st, of the chancery of the cinque ports at Dover; 2d, of the royal manor of Wye; 3d, of the dissolved monastery of St. Augustine; and lastly, of the town and port of Faversham; and practised as a barrister at law to the county at large, obt. 1617; arms at top, Gules, three stags heads caboshed; or, between the horns of each a cross croslet, fitchee, argent, a crescent for difference. Several memorials on monuments, hatchments, and gravestones, for the family of Roberts; arms, Per pale, gules and azure, three pheons heads, argent. On a hatchment opposite the south door, for Mary, wife of John Coppin, gent. and daughter of Sir John Roberts, obt. 1585.–A memorial for Mrs. Deborah Timewell, only daughter of John Bridges, esq. late of this city, and wife of Edward Timewell, esq. of Chigwell, in Essex, obt. 1752; also for the said Edward Timewell, esq. obt. 1762. He was the eldest son of Benjamin Timewell, esq. one of the commissioners of the navy in the reign of queen Ann; arms, Or, on a chief, crenelle, three lions heads, erased, impaling, on a cross, a leopard's face. A mural tablet on the north side for John Hayward, gent. obt. Dec. 26, 1794; another mural tablet on the south side for William Bennet, obt. June 26, 1782, and for Sarah his mother, obt. 1780. There are some good remains of painted glass yet left; among which are the following coats of arms, Sable, a fess, gules, between three swans, argent; the same coat impaling Vert, on a chevron, argent, five horse shoes; the same impaling Vert, a saltier, or, a chief ermine; a chevron, between three birds heads, erased, and Gules, a saltier, or.
Among the wills in the Prerog. off Cant. I find that William Prowde, of St. Elphe, was buried in 1596 in this church, before the altar of St. James and St. Erasmus. He gave by his will 3l. towards the making of a new pair of organs, to be set up on the north side of the choir, before the image of St. Elphe; also 40s. to a clerk to be provided to play on the same at high feasts. Serlys Prude, alias Proude, gent. of St. Alphage, in 1584. Christopher Turner, gent. of this parish, in 1591. Thomas Maneringe, gent. in 1593. Christopher Nevinson, gent. of this parish, in 1617. In the chancel, Henry Hales, gent. of the precincts of Christ-church, in 1679, near his grandchild Mary, daughter of his son John Hales; Mary Hales, of the precincts of the Archbishop's palace, widow, in 1687. Anne Herault, spinster, of Canterbury, near her mother and sisters, in 1720. Besides the above burials in this church, there is frequent mention in the parish register of it, which begins in 1558, of the Lovelaces, Masters, Juxons, Hadde, Denews, Dennes, Foches, Primroses, &c. &c.
15 The return of the commissioners is printed at the end of Somner, by Battely.
16 See the account of petitions having been presented for the uniting of these churches, and the archbishop's decree thereon, before, p. 211; by which this church of St. Alphage and St. Mary Northgate were united, both belonging to the same patron; and that the former should for ever be the church presentative, and that the parishioners of each should resort to the same, as to their proper church.
17 Bacon's Liber Regis, p. 26.
18 He is mentioned as a feossee of Amabilia Gobion, in a deed in the Surrenden library.
19 Register of the archbishop's consistory court, and lies buried in the chancel.
20 His gravestone, in the chancel, is very antient, but without date; but he is mentioned in a will in the Prerog. off. in 1461.
21 He and his successors, including Jordan, are mentioned in different wills in the Prerog. off. Cant.
22 He lies buried in this church in the choir of it, as ordered by his will, and devised by it to his pytt making, 3s. 4d.
23 He was commissary of Canterbury, and rector of Adisham, and lies buried in the chancel here.
24 He was buried in this church, before the image of St. Elphe, in the choir. His will is in Prerog. office, Cant.
25 See Strype's Life of Cranmer, p. Ioc.
26 Buried in the chancel.
27 He was, as well as his successor, buried in the chancel of this church. His will is in Prerogative court, Canterbury.
28 He was a native of Switzerland.
29 He was vicar likewise of Bekesborne, and one of the six preachers of Canterbury cathedral, and a prebendary of Lichfield. He was buried in this church.
30 He resigned these churches on being inducted to the vicarage of Bridge, with Patrixborne, in 1753, of which he was patron.
31 One of the minor canons of Canterbury cathedral. He resigned these churches for thoase of St. Martin and St. Paul.
32 One of the six preachers of Canterbury cathedral.
33 In the old church there were, in Mr. Somner's time, several brass plates and inscriptions for Stephen White, citizen and the first ironmonger that ever was dwelling in this city, obt. 1592; and in the windows, the figure and an inscription on the glass, Orate paia Dni Wilmi Mellrose Rectoris Eccle Scœ Mariœ de Bredman. And in another the figure and an inscription, Orate p aia patris Johis Fanting Rectoris Scœ Mariœ de Bredyn—Det Mater Xti Fanting John Gaudia Cœli. These, perhaps, were benefactors to the church about the time that John Petyt of this parish was; who by his will in 1498, gave five mares to the making a new steeple and a new roof to it. And one John Swan, a parishioner and an alderman, and sometime mayor, gave in like manner 66s. 8d. towards the work of a new roof and steeple here, when it should happen to be new made. In this church was a chantry for one William Butler. In Gostling's Canterbury, there is a neatly engraved view of this old church.
34 The ground was purchased and the church built, partly by the parish rates and partly by the collection of private contributions; the expence of the ground and building amounted in the whole to 1900l.
35 In the vestibule of the new church, as has been already mentioned, are placed the monuments, formerly in the old church; to commemorate which, against the west wall there is put up a tablet of white marble, and monuments, for Katherine Gibbon, obt. 1633; for Dorothy Sprakelyng, wife of Robert Sprakelyng, gent. of Bocton Aluph, and eldest daughter of Giles Master, esq. obt. 1749. Another for Mr. Tho. Swift, rector here 22 years, obt. 1592; and for Mr. William Swift his son, who succeeded him in this church 33 years. He was rector of Harbaldowne 22 years, obt. 1624. Margaret, wife of Mr. Thomas Swift, lies in the cathedral church-yard, against the south door, with nine of her children. Mary, wife of Mr. William Swift, lies buried with him, obt. 1626. They left one son, Mr. Thomas Swift, preacher in Herefordshire, (who died in 1658, leaving ten sons; one of the younger of whom was Jonathan, the father of the famous dean of St. Patrick's) and two daughters, one the wife of Thomas Witreide, gent. and Margaret, wife of Henry Atkinson, apothecary and citizen of London; arms, Sable, an anchor, or, enwreathed with a dolphin, azure. A small tablet framed and glazed, for Thomas Swift, once rector of this church, obt. 1592. A tablet for Giles Master, esq. late of the parish of St. Paul. He died in 1644. He lived to see issue of his loins, children and grandchildren, 46; arms, Gules, a lion rampant, holding a rose branch, impaling his two wives, Hales and Petit. A tablet for Edward Aldey, rector 49 years, and prebendary of Christ-church, Canterbury. He died in 1673; arms, Ermine, on a chief, sable, two griffins combatant, argent. Another for Arthur Kay, D. D. rector and six preachre of the cathedral 30 years, obt. 1701. A small tablet for Elizabeth, wife of Dr. Kay, obt. 1720; arms, Argent, an eagle's head erased, gules, between three torteauxes, impaling or, a griffin segreant, vert; on a chief, gules, three spears heads, argent, for Southland. A tablet for John Paris, A. M. late rector of the united parishes of St. Mary Bredman and St. Andrew, vicar of Beakesborne, and master of the hospitals of Eastbridge, St. John, and St. Nicholas, Harbledown, obt. 1709. A flat stone for Thomas Noble, obt. 1716. Another for Nathaniel Holse, gent, and Anne his wife, many years inhabitants of this parish. He died in 1746; she died in 1749; arms, Hulse, an eseulshcon of pretence, a fess between three eloiles. In the upper ves tibule, on an hatchment, the arms of Hulse and in scription, for Nathaniel Hulse, gent. of Horton, near Chartham, but an inhabitant and citizen of Canterbury, obt. 1746.
36 One of them was William Benet, son of Robert Benet, of Stour-street, in this parish, who lived in king Henry VI. and king Edward IV.'s reigns. By his will, which is dated anno 1463, he appears to have been a man of much note and wealth; and the several charitable donations in his will were very considerable; by it he ordered to be buried in the church of St. Augustine, by Alys his wife. He gave 4s. 4d. yearly quit-rent, out of a tenement in Clement's-lane to his seoffees, the parson and two churchwardens of St. Andrew's, to sustain and keep the clock of this church; and as they had no goods in hand, as other churches had, he gave them five marcs in money, to be put to the use and welfare of it; and likewise 10s. yearly to be paid to the parson of this parish or his deputy, and the two churchwardens; from his tenements in St. Mary Bredman, devised by him to the city.
37 Augmentation-office, deeds of purchase and exchange, box Kent, C. 50
38 See these instruments, and decree of the archbishop before, p. 211. and under St. Mary Bredman hereaster.
39 Of this sum St. Andrew's was 13l. 6s. 8d.
40 Bacon's Lib. Regis, p. 26.
41 I find his name spelt in a manuscript Cockys. All the rectors here mentioned down to Dr. Kay inclusive, were buried in the old church, under the scite where it once stood, their remains still rest.
42 Both likewise rectors of St. Michael, Harbledown. See more of them in Biog. Brit. index Swift. The will of Thomas Swift is in Prerog. office, Cant.
43 A prebendary of Canterbury.
44 A six preacher of the cathedral.
45 An arch for the convenience of foot passengers, was cut through the circular, or stair case, part of this tower a few years since, when the city was new paved; but from the many cracks discernable above, it appearing to have done the tower much injury, and that it was becoming dangerous, the commissioners of the pavement of the city, in 1794, ordered it to be taken down and the square tower to be made good, with a pointed spire of wood on the top, at their expence.
46 Among other monuments and memorials in this church are the following, viz. a monument on the south wall near the altar, for Anne, daughter of John Polley, alias Polhill, gent. of Otford, thrice married; first, to Thomas Gilman; secondly, to William Nutt, of Canterbury, councellor at law; and thirdly, to Thomas Milles, of Davington, obt. 1624; arms, Ermine, a fer de moline, sable, on a chief of the last, two wings conjoined, or, impaling 1st and 4th, argent, on a bend, gules, three crosses potent, or; 2d, argent, an eagle displayed, sable; 3d, sable, a fess between three garbs, or. A mural monument for Thomas Forster, A. M. rector of this parish and of Chartham, and one of the six preachers of the cathedral, obt. 1764. A mural monument for Nicholas Knight, gent. late of this parish, obt. 1667; arms, Gules, two bars, ermine, in chief, three griffins heads erased, argent. A mural monument near the altar, for Edward Randolph, M. D. He had ten sons and five daughters, by Deborah his wife, fourth daughter of Giles Master, esq. of Canterbury, obt. 1681. Another for John Hobday, gent. and Elizabeth his wife, only daughter of Avery Hilles, esq. a magistrate of this city. They had a numerous issue who are buried here; he died in 1713; she deid in 1732; arms, Gules, a fess fusille, argent and azure, between three mullets, pierced of the second; over all an escutcheon of pretence, azure, a chevron between three fleurs de lis, argent. On a hatchment for Hills, an inscription for John Hills, gent. obt. 1687. A mural tablet in the south isle for the Rev. Weyman Bouchery, late rector of Little Blakenham, in Suffolk, obt. 1712; and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Gilbert Knowler, esq. of Hearne, ob. 1751; and for their daughter Sarah Bouchery, obt. 1783. A mural tablet for George Bryant, obt. 1787. In the north isle, on a hatchment, an inscription for John Cotes, gent. of Canterbury, obt. 1655. On another over the second pillar, an inscription for Thomas Durant, gent. of New Romney, obt. 1688; and for his eldest son Thomas Durant, gent. of Canterbury, obt. 1702. On the pavement under the gallery, a gravestone for Mrs. Field, obt. 1799.
At the east end, on a pannel of wood, in a frame, a painting representing Guy Faux, entering the parliament-house; and underneath, IN PERPETUAM PAPISTARUM INFAMIAM. On a small shield; arms, Argent, a chevron between two trefoils, in chief, and a laurel leaf in base, impaling gules, three arrows, or; under the pediment
Caroli Annott
1632.
English Fleete88.Spanish Fleete

under which was a representation of the two fleets, which is now obliterated.
In the middle isle, are several memorials for the Plummers; arms, A chevron, between three griffins heads, erased. A memorial for Elizabeth, relict of Richard Comyns, esq. sergeant at law, late of Writtle lodge, in Essex, daughter of Tho. Chiffinch. esq. of Northfleet, obt. 1764, leaving one daughter; arms, On a lozenge, a chevron, ermine, between three garbs, impaling on a fess embattled, three leopards faces. In the south isle, on a small white stone in the shape of a heart, Joseph Hasted died an infant, 1769. — On a brass plate with the figure of a priest, an inscription for John Lovelle, rector, obt. 1438. Memorials for the Boucherys, Greenhills, Caisters, and Banks's. A memorial for Stephen Hobday, A. M. rector of Lower Hardres, and vicar of St. Dunstan's, ob. 1743, and for others of that name. A memorial for Wm. Coppin, obt. 1633. Another for Jacob Sharp, obt. 1774; and for the Rev. John Sharp, D. D. rector of St. Mary Abchurch, London, late fellow of C. C. C. C. obt. 1772; and for his mother Elizabeth Sharp, obt. 1780. A memorial for Thomas Cuntry, late of Ash, obt. 1641; arms, A pile issuing from the chief, between four fleurs de lis, over all a fess. A memorial for Algerina Dashwood, obt. 1748.
Besides the above there are entries in the register of the burials of the Thornhersts, Masters, and Petyts. The lady Mills in 1634, Courthopes, Sakers, Wraiths, Hasteds, Barrets, Foches, Hardres's, Sir Peter Gleane, bart. Who died an immature death in 1719, and Peters's.
The register begins in the 30th year of king Henry VIII. anno 1538, being at first only a copy taken from the old register, as is mentioned in the title of the book. The register itself begins anno 1574.
Richard Pargate, a wealthy citizen of Canterbury, who died in 1457, was buried in this church, in the Lady chapel, before the altar, and gave towards the paving the isle of the church, where his father lay, 20s. William Tenham, esq. of this parish, in 1500, was buried in the same chapel, at the head of Edward Pargate there. John Rose, alderman, in this church in 1591.
47 See the petitions and instruments, for the uniting of these churches, before.
48 See this return of the commissioners, printed at the end of Battely's Somner.
49 Rent to the churchwardens 3s. 4d. pension to the priory of Christ-church 5s. Bacon's Lib. Regis, p. 26.
50 Without the church of Burgate.
51 Battely's Somner, p. 68.
52 He lies buried in this church.
53 Wills, Prerog. off.
54 He was likewise the archbishop's commissary.
55 Strype's Annals, p. 43, 46.
56 See parish register of Lewisham. He was buried in this church-yard, at the end of the chancel. His will is in Prerog. off. Canterbury, in which he stiles himself minister of God's word, in St. George's, Canterbury. See Granger, vol. i. p. 254.
57 Likewise rector of Stonar.
58 Buried in the body of St. George's church.
59 Afterwards rector of Chartham.
60 Likewise rector of Mersham, and one of the six preachers.
61 Prebendary of Canterbury, and afterwards rector of North Cray and of St. Swithin's, Londonstone.
62 He held the rectory of Pluckley with these churches, both which he resigned for that of Ickham. He was afterwards a prebendary of Canterbury, and archdeacon of the diocese, and on his elder brother's death succeeded to the title of baronet.
63 And rector of Chartham, by dispensation. He lies buried in this church.
64 He had been rector of Brook, and vicar of Milton by Sittingbourne; he resigned these churches of St. George and St. Mary Magdalen on being inducted to the vicarage of Stone, in Oxney, and is one of the minor canons of this cathedral.
65 One of the minor canons of the cathedral.
66 Mr. Somner mentions several antient memorials on brasses in this church, all which are long since destroyed; one of them was for Leonard Cotton, gent. mayor of this city in 1579, obt. 1605, of whom mention has been made before, in the account of his charitable benefaction to Maynard's spital. And perhaps among those obliterated was one for John Broker, of this parish, an alderman, and twice mayor of this city, who by his will in 1521, appointed to be buried before St. John's altar, in this church, the south chancel being dedicated to that saint, and the other to our Lady, each of which had its proper altar, the official's court, standing in the place of the latter. This John Broker was a good benefactor to this city and left a sum of money to be bestowed on the reparation of the way between the castle gate and the Yren cross, in the ward of Worgate. In the windows of this church were formerly these arms, Clifford, impaling Savage Browne, impaling Glover; and a coat; Argent, a bend, sable, on a canton, azure, a fleur de lis, argent, impaling or, on a fess, vert, a hind passant of the field. Among others, there are in this church the following monuments and gravestones. On the north side of the altar, a handsome monument, for Sir George Newman, LL. D. commissary to the archbishops Whitgift, Bancrost, and Abbott, and judge of the cinque ports almost for thirty years; he was thrice married, first to Elizabeth Wycliff; secondly to Mary Gough; and thirdly, to Sybilla Wenland, who survived him. He died in 1627, and his eldest son the same year; arms, Or, a fess dancette, gules, between three eagles, displayed, sable. A mural monument for Geo. Barrett, esq. eldest son of Sir Paul Barrett, obt. 1709; and also for Susan, his wife, daughter of Thomas Green, gent. obt. 1711; arms, Or, on a chevron, between three mullets, sable three lions rampant of the field, impaling azure, three stags tripping, or. An antient mural monument, with the half-length effigies of a man, and inscription for John Watson, who had been mayor, chamberlain, and sheriff of this city, and was a good benefactor to the poor of it, obt. 1633; and also for Leonard Cotton, once mayor, and sheriff of it, a benefactor likewise to it. (See their gifts to this city before, among the benefactions given to it). In the middle isle, a mural tablet for Mary Burnby, the daughter of Thomas Woolley Pickering, by Mary his wife; she died in 1786; also for Thomas Woolley Pickering, obt. 1792. In the north isle, a mural monument for Paul Lukin, gent. proctor in the two ecclesiastical courts of the archbishop and archdeacon, and twenty years auditor to the dean and chapter of Canterbury, and for his wife, daughter of Martin Hirst, gent. He died in 1716; arms, Sable, three mullets, argent, on a chief of the last, a demi lion rampant, vert, impaling azure, a sun in its glory, or. A mural monument near the last, for Anthony Oughton, gent. descended from an antient family of that name at Fillongley, in Warwickshire; and for Anne his wife, daughter of Sir James Bunce, of Kemsing. He died 1750; she died 1732; arms, Paly gules aud azure, a lion rampant, or, impaling azure, on a fess, argent, three eagles displayed of the sield, between three bears of the second. Near the pulpit is a mural tablet, in a frame carved and gilt, for Francis Aldrich, S. T. P. principal of Sidney college, Cambridge, obt. 1609; arms, Argent, on a bend engrailed, on a canton, or, a pheon azure, impaling or, on a fess, azure, an ass proper. A brass plate, with effigies, and inscription for John wynter, mayor of Canterbury, obt. 1520; who by his will founded a lamp to burn before the high altar of this church, in perpetual memory of the most holy body of our Lord Jesus Christ, for which purpose he gave two tenements at the Yrencrosse, in this parish, and to free the church-yard of this church from the yearly rent of 3s. to the prior and convent of Christchurch, arising from the same. A mural monument for Wm. Somner, that industrious antiquary, author of the History of Canterbury, and several other learned books and curious tracts of antiquity. He was born March 30, 1606, obt. 1669; arms at the top, Ermine, two chevrons, gules. In the middle isle are flat stones, and memorials for Jane, wife of the Rev. Tho. Leigh, rector of this parish, obt. 1767; and for the said Rev. Thomas Leigh, obt. 1774, rector of this church and of Murston forty years. For the Jekens's, Biggs's, Pilchers, Lane, Read, Beaumonts, Obrien, Broxup, Wilson, Carters, White, and Watmer. For Paul Lukin, and Grace his wife; Thomas their son, and Anne their daughter, both in 1715. In the north isle, for the Railtons, Hatchers, and Bottings. For John Darken, M. D. obt. 1784. For Anne Brandon, widow of William Brandon, esq. of Portsmouth, obt. 1762. For Lancelot Lovelace, recorder of this city; and Marcy… 1640. Leonard Browne, gent. and alderman of Canterbury, was buried in 1671 in the north isle. Frances Newman, widow, of Canterbury, in 1686, in this church, near her husband George Newman, esq. Barbara Hennington, widow, of the Archbishop's palace, in 1706, in the grave of Mr. Somner, her husband. Judith Lovelace, widow, of this parish, in 1712, in the chancel near her sons. John Somner, gent. of the Archbishop's palace, in 1679, in this church. Besides these there are in the register, frequent burials of the Somners, Lovelaces, Lukins, Barretts, and Primroses. The register begins so late as the year 1654.
67 The survey of the commissioners is printed at the end of Battely's Somner.
68 See an account of this hospital before.
69 Bacon's Lib. Regis, p. 28. See Comp. among the Cotton MSS. Claudius D. X.—
70 He is mentioned in a will in the Prerog. off. Cant.
71 A dispensation passed, dated Sept. 14, 1626, for his holding the rectory of All Saints, with the hospital of Poor Priests, and the parish church of St. Margaret annexed to it. Rymer's Fæd. vol. xviii. p. 878. It is observable, that he had a separate induction to St. Margaret's and the above hospital, and to both on Sept. 21.
72 He was rector of Denton and vicar of Alkham, and son of Dr. Rogers, dean of Canterbury, and bishop sussragan of Dover. See Wood's Ath. v. i. p. 587.
73 He was presented to the hospital of Poor Priests, with the church of St. Margaret annexed to it, and in the patronage of the crown by lapse. Rym. Foæd. vol. xx. p. 313.
74 Buried in this church.
75 He had been rector of St. Mary Bredin, and held the rectory of St. Mary Magdalen Burgate, with this rectory by dispensation. He lies buried in St. Margaret's church, with many more of his family.
76 Also vicar of Brookland, and a minor canon of the cathedral.
77 Rector likewise of Murston, and curate of Iwade.
78 It was antiently called in Latin, Ecclesia S. Mariæ Piscatorum, i. e. St. Mary Fishman's church, from a fish market held by it; and in yet earlier times, Ecclesia S. Mariæ de Andresgate, from that place hard by it, where the four ways met at the old St. Andrew's church, once called Andresgate, that is, Andrew's gate. Batt. Somn. p. 164.
79 In the chancel was formerly a brass plate and inscription for Thomas Alcock, rector, anno 1500. And another in the body for William Megg, some time alderman, obt. 1519.
The following monuments and gravestones are, among others, remaining in it, a mural monument near the altar, for Joseph Colf, esq. alderman, and sometime mayor, obt. 1620; arms, Colfe, or, a fess between three colts current. A memorial for Sir Paul Barrett, sergeant at law, obt. 1685. Another adjoining, for Mary, wife of Paul Barrett, esq. of this city, only daughter and heir of Thomas Stanley, gent. late of this city, obt. 1672. A memorial for John Lee, gent. of this city, obt. 1722. He left one daughter Mary, who married Mr. John Warly, surgeon, of this city. On a stone adjoining, on a brass plate, for Matthew Gibbon, of London, obt. 1657. Below the above, is a stone, having on brass the small figure of a priest, and inscription for Robart Richmond, rector, obt. July 8, 1524. A memorial for the Rev. John Duncombe, rector of this parish and St. Andrew's united, vicar of Herne, and one of the six preachers of the cathedral, obt. Jan. 19, 1786. In the cross space, a memorial for Mr. William Powell, obt. 1694. A memorial within the north door, shewing that in a vault underneath lies George Knowler, son of George knolwer, of this parish, alderman of this city, obt. 1778. A mural tablet for Edward Agar, obt. 1795.
80 See the account of the petitions for uniting these churches, and the archbishop's decree thereon, before; by which this church and St. Andrew's were united, and the former declared to be the church presentative, and that the parishioners of both should resort to the same, as their proper church, and that the patron of St. Andrew's should have the right of presentation upon the then vacancy, and upon the next avoidance that should after happen; and the patron of St. Mary Breadman the next after that, and so in the same proportion and order of turns for ever.
81 He lies buried in this church, as do his successors down to Fanting inclusive.
82 He was likewise vicar of Bekesborne, and master of Eastbridge hospital, St. John and St. Nicholas, Harbledown, and was buried in St. Andrew's church.
83 He held the rectory of Hastingleigh with these churches, and was a minor canon of the cathedral.
84 He resigned the rectory of Westbere for these churches, and was perpetual curate of Goodnestone, by Sandwich.
85 He had been rector of East Peckham and Great Mongeham, and was afterwards rector of Adisham, and a prebendary of Canterbury.
86 Late fellow of Bennet college, in Cambridge; in 1763 he had a dispensation to hold West Thurrock, in Essex, with these churches; he was afterwards vicar of Herne, and a six preacher. He was the author of several learned publications of various forts.
87 Vicar likewise of Cosmus Bleane, and master of Eastbridge hospital, and lately one of the six preachers of the cathedral.
88 It has the name of Little Lady, from its being the least church in this city, dedicated to our Lady, and its near situation to the Dungeon, or Dunjill, as it is called by the common people, occasioned the latter name.
89 Among the monuments and inscriptions are the following: A mural tablet over the altar for James Ley, an accomplished youth, who after having studied the law for five years at Lincoln's Inn, intending to travel, and waiting at Dover for a fair wind, was taken ill of a fever, and returning to Canterbury in hopes of recovery, died here in 1618. Sir James Ley, (afterwards earl of Marlborough) master of the court of wards, the father, erected this monument to his second son; arms below, Ley, argent, a chevron between three seals heads couped, sable, a crescent for difference. A mural tablet and inscription, shewing, that in a vanlt near it, lies Thomas Francis, obt. 1785–Another, on the west side of the last, for William Slodden, ob. 1788. Another adjoining, for Mrs. Sarah Graydon, ob. 1795; Gregory Graydon, esq. obt. 1790. Also Mrs. H. R. Hougham, Mrs. S. Shrubsole, and Henry Hougham, esq. of Barton-court. A plain altar tomb on the south side of the altar rails, and round the verge an inscription for Humphry Hales, esq. son of Sir James Hales, deceased 1555. The same father Sir James Hales. A mural tablet over the above, for George Sheldon, third son of William Sheldon, esq. of Beoly, in Wotcestershire, who first married Frances, daughter of Thomas More, esq. of Gobbins, in Hertfordshire, and afterwards Elizabeth, only daughter and heir of Sir James Hales, of the Dungeon, the widow of Sir Stephen Hales, K. B. of Sniterfield, in Warwickshire, which George died without issue in 1679, and lies buried here, as does Elizabeth his second wife, who died afterwards that same year; arms, Sheldon, a fess, between three martlets. About the middle of the north side is a handsome mural monument, on which are the figures of a man and woman kneeling before a desk, and inscription for William Mann, esq. erected by Frances Blenerhasset, his latter wife. He died in 1615; arms, Mann, or a chemon ermines, between three lions rampant, sable. A mural tablet near the above, for Sir Christopher Man, buried near to his brother here, obt. 1638. A mural tablet for lady Elizabeth Man, daughter of Richard Willys, esq. of Baals, in Hertfordshire, late wife of Sir William Man, of this city. She died in 1642. A brass plate near the step, close to the altar rails, for Christopher Bachelor, late of this parish, and Katherine, his wife, daughter of Harbert Finch, gent. they both died in 1604; arms, On a bend, three fleurs de lis, between three wings. A brass plate, with the arms of Finch; the figure and inscription lost. In the north isle, on a flat stone, under the belsry, a memorial for Capt. James Harris, of Major-General Willis's regiment of marines, obt. 1705; arms, Three crescents, two and one. A flat stone and memorial for Mrs. Abigail, widow of Mr. Robert Dannald, and grand-daughter of Sir Thomas Hayes, sometime lord-mayor, and daughter of Edward Colimore, esq. of Brandford, in Suffolk, obt. 1707; arms, In a lozenge, ermine, a canton crmines, impaling a chevron, between three bugle horns. In the chancel are memorials for Nathaniel Denew, who married Dorothy, daughter of Abraham Jacob, of Dover, obt. 1720. Do doubt, the patron of this church, which he had built, and most probably gave it to the neighbouring nunnery of St. Sepulchre, where it staid till the dissolution of that house in king Henry VIII.'s reign, when the patronage of it was granted anno 29th of it, when the nunnery and the rest of the possessions of it, to the archbishop of Canterbury, subject nevertheless to the payment of 3s. to the vicar of this church; all which were again reconveyed by the archbishop to the king in his 37th year, in exchange for other premises,iand he granted them the following year to the Hales's, lords of the manor of the Dungeon, whose burial place was within this church; since which the patronage of it has continued in the possession of the owners of that manor, rothy, wife of the above Nathaniel Denew, obt. 1743; arms, Denew, or. five chevronels, azure, impaling or, on a canton, gules, an eagle displnyed of the field. A memorial for Edward Master, obt. 1638. Another for George Master, obt. 1652. At the west end of the south isle, a memorial for Titus Rufford. obt. 1696. Another for Sir Christopher Man, &c. and for Sir Wm. Man, only son of the same, by his second wife Frances, daughter of Sir Edward Master. A memorial for Katherine, eldest daughter of John Shirley, of Lewes, in Sussex; first married to Whittingham Wood, esq. of Bromley, but died the widow of Sir Christopher Man, obt. 1641. Another for Joshua Webster, sometime a merchant in London, but at his death an inhabitant of this parish, obt. 1696. He was by his will a good benefactor to the school sounded and endowed by his father, at Whittington, in Derbyshire.
Somner says, that several of the Hales's lie buried in this church, and that the essigies and coat armour of John Chiche, who lived in king Henry III.'s reign, and was owner of the Dungeon manor adjoining, whose coat was, Argent, three lions rampant, azure, were painted in the west window of it; and that the latter was carved on stone in one corner of the chancel.
Besides the above, there are frequent entries in the register, which begins in 1552, of the burials of the Berrys; of Silas Johnson, gent. in 1635; of the Mans, Spencers, the lady Coventry, in 1710, the Denews, Houghams, and Lees. James Dunkin, alderman, was buried in this church in 1624.
90 Augmentation-office, deeds of purchase and exchange, box Kent, D. 75.
91 The union of these churches, made by the prior and chapter of Canterbury, sede vacante, on Nov. 3, anno 1349, is in Reg. E. Eccles. Christi, Cant. fol. 46b, a. b. by which Register, fol. 46b, it appears, that the prioress and convent had only a few quarters of corn out of it for themselves, and the vicars had all the other profits.
92 Viz. endow. in decim. predial and personal, & al spiritual profic. per annum 1l. 3s. 4d. Pens recep. Fricriss Sci Sepulimi, 3s. prox,2s. Bacon's Lib. Regis, p. 27.
93 Bacon ibid.
94 Wills, Prerogative office.
95 And rector of St. Mary Magdalen Burgate.
96 Likewise vicar of Littleborne.
97 And rector of Bonnington.
98 Among the monuments and gravestones in this church are the following: —At the east end of the south isle a mural tablet for Mr. Edward Dering, late of Doddington, obt. 1786; arms, Or, on a saltier, sable, a crescent for difference; another, shewing that in a vault near, are deposited the remains of Richard Barham, esq. obt. 1784, his wife and daughter's obt. 1781; arms, Argent, on a fess, gules, a fleur de lis and two martlets, or, between three bears passant, sable. A mural monument for Henry Saunders, counsellor at law, of this parish, who married Jane, eldest daughter of Thomas Paramor, esq. of Fordwich, by whom he had an only daughter and heir Anne, married to John, son and heir of Thomas Marsh, gent. of Tapton, in Denton. He died in 1637; arms, Parted per chevron, sable and argent, three elephants heads counterchanged as the field. A mural monument near the pulpit, for the Paramores. In the south isle are several memorials for the Chandlers. In the north isle a memorial for Noah Bolain and Elizabeth his wife; he died 1751; she died 1764; Noah their son, obt. 1764. An elegant mural monument of rich sculpture, for John Whitfield, gent. who was buried with his grandfather and grandmother, John and Catherine, and his parents, Henry and Anne, under it. He married Rebecca, youngest daughter of Robert Jaques, formerly sheriff of this county. She died 1685; He was a liberal benefactor to this city, and the poor of it, by his will; he died in 1691. On a brass plate in the north isle, an inscription for margaret Rook, obt. 1494. A plain stone and memorials on it, for C. Packe, M. D. obt. 1749. Maria Packe, daughter of Herbert Randolph, obt. 1772. One for Susanna, wife of William Gray, obt. 1776; also for William Gray, obt. 1784, an inhabitant of this parish 66 years, and a member of the corporation 60; also for Martha. wife of Philip Castle, and daughter of William Gray, obt. 1788.
Mr. Somner says, there was in his time an inscription on a brass plate, for Sybell, widow of Libby Orchard, late of Monkton-court, in Thanet, obt. 1586.
In the windows of this church were formerly several shields of arms, long since destroyed. In this register, which begins so late as the year 1634, are many burials in this church, of the Lovelaces, Nethersoles, Dennes, and Whitfields, and of Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Lightfoot, of this parish, in 1614, in the chancel near her deceased husband.
99 Battely's Somner, p. 165.
100 Ibid. p. 181.
101 This returned is printed at the end of Batt. Somn.
102 Redd. Priori. Sti Gregorii 2s. 8d. To the hospital of St. James 4s. In undercroft. terr. voc. Maudelyn crost, 5 acres 10s. Bacon's Liber Regis, p. 27.
103 By records it appears, that this ground lies in the parish of St. Martin, and is bounded north by the street; southward by land of St. Augustine's; and that the parson of this church paid 4s. per annum to the hospital of St. Jacob. Batt. Somn. p. 165.
104 He had the queen's letters of presentation, anno 1553. Rym. Fæd. vol. xv. p. 347.
105 He was vicar of St. Mary Bredin.
106 See Wood't Ath. vol. ii. p. 1013.
107 Vicar likewise of St. Mary Bredin.
108 In Mr. Somner's time there were brass plates, which have been long since lost and destroyed, for Jeoffry Holman esq. obt. 1478; for Walter Garrade, late vicar, obt. 1498; for Ralf Browne, sometime alderman and mayor, in 1507 and 1510. In one of the windows were formerly the arms of Apulderfield, and a shield, containing six lions rampant. In the church is a memorial for the Macarees, but it is mostly hid by the pews. The parish register begins so late as 1640.
109 Dugd. Mon. vol. ii. p. 374.
110 Decimas Warenciæ, five Mador, vulgariter nuncupt. in orig.
111 Battely's Somner, appendix, No. lxviii. See the declaration made by Robert, prior, and the chapter of Canterbury, sede vacante, dated 1348, concerning the ordination of this vicarage, which was made on Nov. 4, 1346. Register E sol, 12a MSS. Cantuar. The execution, on account of the ordination of this vicarage, dated at Canterbury, 10 kal. November, 1348. Regist. P. sol. 54b. ibid. Ducarel Rep. p. 17.
112 See St. Alphage, before, p. 218.
113 Viz. endow. in decim. predial personal & al spiritual, profic per annum 11l. 8s. 8d. Bacon's Liber Regis, p. 27.
114 In Prerogative-office, Canterbury.
115 Somner, appendix, p. 73.
116 Wills, Prerog. off. He lies buried in this church.
117 He and his successor are both mentioned in a will, in Prerogative office.
118 His will is in Prerog. off.
119 He is mentioned in a will in Prerog. off. in 1604, as late minister of this parish.
120 His will is in Prerog. off. proved January 8, 1612.
121 See St. Dunstan's parish register.
122 Among other monuments and memorials in the middle chancel of this church, is a memorial, part obliterated, for William Glover, gent. obt. 16–. Margaret his wife died in 1654. Another for Richard Sandays, esq. grandson of Sir Richard Sandys, bart. of Northborne, obt. 1763; also Susan Crayford Sandys, relict of the same, obt. 1777. One for the Rev. and learned John Rigden, B. D. born in this parish, educated in the king's school, vicar of Ryegate, in Surrey, and fellow of St. John's college in Cambridge, obt. 1732. One for Mary, wife of Laurence Bridger, gent. obt. 1701. On two small tablets, the names, Winisred Bridger, Laurence Bridger. On a stone, a memorial for John Stanley, clerk, A. M. son of Mr. John Stanley, twice mayor of this city, obt. 1658; arms, Stanley, in chief a mullet, for difference. In the north chancel, a mural monument, for Thomasine Honywood, widow, late the wife of Anthony Honywood, of this parish, and before the wife of John Adye, gent. of Doddington, obt. 1626; arms, Addye, impaling parted per chevron, or, and azure, three mullets, pierced, counterchanged, Hatchments and memorials for the Bix's; arms, Vaire, argent and azure, on an escutcheon of pretence, gules, a chevron, or. A mural monument for William Smith, gent. late of this parish, and Dorothy his wife, daughter of Geo. Juxon, gent. late of Chart Sutton. He died 1699; she obt. 1711. In the north isle several memorials for the Bix's. A memorial for John Wear, gent. of this parish, obt. 1763. A memorial for Lydia, wife of William Eades, gent. of this parish, ob. 1755. A memorial for William Aslong, obt. 1780. One for William Brome, son of John Brome, esq. of Tuppendence, obt. 1749.
Another for Nathaniel Highmore, esq. obt. 1790. At the north west corner stands the font. It is of stone and leaded within, in form of an octagon; each side of which is adorned with a niche, in the pedestal part, and above with quaterfoils, each containing a small ornament on a lozenge. In the middle space are the following stones and memorials; for Henry Waddell, alderman and twice mayor of this city, obt. 1705, and others of that name. For Aphra, the only daughter of Robert Beak, gent. obt. 1716; arms, A cross molines, ermine. For Katherine Fust, wife of Mr. Richard Birkenhead, obt. 1625. A mural tablet for Robert Gilbert, obt. 1624. A memorial close within the west door, for alderman John Garlin, twice mayor of this city, obt. 1713. Another for the Flatmans. A memorial for Robert Beche, presbiter, obt. 1679. Two memorials for the Beakes. A mural tablet at the north side of the altar for Thomas Cranmer, esq. son of Edmund, archdeacon of Canterbury, nephew of the archbishop, by his brother. He was register of the archdeaconry, obt. 1604; arms. Cranmer, argent, on a chevron, azure, between three pelicans, sable, vulnerating themselves, as many cinquesoils, or. On the south side of the chancel, an altar tomb for Sir Francis Head, bart. who married Margaret, daughter of James Smithsbye, esq. obt. 1716; arms, Head, with the arms of Ulster, on a canton, impaling ermine, on a fess, gules, three roses, or. A cenotaph, in memory of Sir, William Cranmer, the second son, of William Cranmer, esq. descended from Edmond Cranmer, archdeacon, and brother to the archbishop, ob. 1697, unmarried; born in this parish, and buried in the church of St. Leonard, Bromley, in Middlesex. At the north side of the chancel is a mural monument, designed by the late Capt. Riou, and executed by Moore, for several of the family of Bridger; arms, Bridger in a lozenge, Argent, a chevron engrailed, sable, between three crabs, gules. Above the tomb of Sir Francis Head is a very beautiful mural monument of marble, in a pyrimidical form, with emblematical, sculptures. On the top is placed a small vase, on which are emblazoned the arms, viz. Argent, on a chevron, sable, three cinquesoils, pierced of the first, between, as many salcons leads erased, azure. On the tablet an inscription, to the memory of William Jackson, esq. of this city, obt. 1789. æt. 31, unmarried; (whose death was occasioned by a hurt he received a few days before, in riding an unruly horse). Underneath is a long epitaph, enumerating his excellent good qualities, all which he truly deserved. The elegance of it displays the skill of the sculptor Bacon. Under the altar is a slat stone, and memorial, telling that in a vault underneath lies Catharina, wife of the Rev. Richard Sandys, of this parish, who died in 1777; arms, Sandys, impaling Hougham.
The south chancel is now closed up from the church, but there is an access to it from the church-yard. It was formerly called the Wood's chancel, from its belonging to a family of that name; and in Somner's time there were in the windows the name of At-wood in several places, in very antient characters. It is now in a ruinous desolate state, and the pavement sunk into a hollow, towards the vault underneath.
Somner says, that a family of this name antiently dwelt in this parish, in Stour-street, where one Thomas At-Wood dwelt in king Henry VIII.'s time, being four several times mayor of this city. He built this chapel or chancel, for a peculia, place of sepulture for himself and his family, several of whom lie interred in it, under fair grave-stone, formerly inlaid with brass, all long since torn away. On the south side of it there remains a neat mural monument; arms, Argent, a chevron, between three bulls heads caboshed, sable, horned, or, impaling ermine, on a chevron, gules, three leopards faces jessant, sleurs de lis, or, to the memory of lady Margeret Hales, daughter and heir of oli ver Wood, esq. by Joane, daughter and heir of Henry, son and heir of Sir William Cantelop. She was married to three knights, viz. first, to Sir Walter Mantel; secondaly, to Sir William Hault; and lastly, to Sir James Hales. She died in 1577. At the bottom is a genealogical tree, bearing several shields of arms.
In the register of this parish, which begins anno 1559, are several entries of the burials of the Newmans, Handsields, Cranmers, Nethersoled, Drylands, Swists, Norwoods, Bix's, Johnsons, the lady Catherine Carter in 1678, Scotts and Firemoults.
One John Stulp was a good benefactor to the making of several new pew's as appears by his name on them. Geo. Stanley, esq. mayor, was buried in 1676, in the chapel in St. Mildred's church, near his father and mother there.
123 Viz. In un parcel tery. glen. per ann. 3sh. Bacon's Liber Regis, p. 27.
124 Register Sancrost, f. 252, a. b. MSS. Lambeth. In the Prerog. off. in Canterbury, is the instrument of William, archbishop of Canterbury, for uniting the churches of St. Mildred, St. Mary de Castro, and All Saints, having the consent of the mayor, aldermen and justices of the peace of the city of Canterbury, and of the king under his great seal, he being the patron of the same. The archbishop in it, decreed, that the church of All Saints and St. Mary de Castro already united, should remain so united and consolidated, with and to the parish church of St. Mildred aforesaid, and that the parishoners of each should belomg to the parish church of St. Mildred, as their own proper church, and that as often as the said church alone, out of the three before-named, should be and remain presentative, and as often as any vacancy of the same should happen, dated at Lambeth, Sept. 29, 1684.
The king's confirmation of the same, under his great seal, dated October 14, 1684.
125 Ibid.
126 See the next page.
127 Wills, Prerog. off.
128 He is mentioned in a will in Prerog. off. Cant.
129 He risigned this rectory and the king's presentation again, June 28, 1637. Rym. Fæd. vol. xx. p. 207.
130 Wood's Ath. vol. ii. p. 885. See St. Peter's.
131 And vicar of Holy Cross Westgate.
132 Likewise rector of Knolton. He was buried in this church.
133 He was rector of Brook, and a minor canon of this cathed al.
134 He had been sometime caurate of Queenborough.
135 He held the vicarage of Reculver by dispensation.
136 He was inducted to the rectory of St. Mildred, and St. Mary de Castro, with the united rectory of All Saints, on Jan. 1, 1779. He died suddenly at Reading, in Berkshire.
137 And rector of St. John's Clerkenwell. He was inducted to this church of St. Mildred on June 10.
138 This will is in the Prerog. off. Canterbury.
139 In the north wall at the west end, in a window now stopped up, is a figure of a man, holding a skull. Between the two columns, on the frieze, In Memoria Almundi Colph: arms, Colse
Or, a sess between three colts current, sable.
Mr. Somner has transcribed some of the antient epitaphs in this church, remaining in his time, but they have been long since all of them obliterated. Several of the vicars lie buried in the chancel; as Nicholas Chilton, obt. 1400. Robert Raynhull, obt. 1416, and Patricius Gerard, obt. 1458; and close by them lies one Clement Harding, B. L. but their inscriptions are long since gone. The following monuments and inscriptions are among others, at present remaining. At the south side of the chancel is an elegant mural cenotaph, for James Six, A. M. and fellow of Trinity college, Cambridge, who died at Rome in 1786, and was buried in that city; arms, Azure, in chief, two crescents, in base a mullet of six points, argent. Near the altar-rails, a memorial for John Seaman, son of the late Dutton Seaman, esq. and Elizabeth his wife, of Guildhall, London, obt. 1789. A memorial opposite the pulpit, for Leach, wife of Peter Boudry, obt. 1750; also for the said Peter Boudry, obt. 1753. A memorial near the west door, for the Rev. Francis-William Durand, 41 years minister of the French church, within the precincts of the cathedral, obt. 1789. In the north isle are memorials for several of the Turners. In several parts of the church are stones, which appears by the marks on them to have been robbed of their brasses, particularly in the chancel and middle isle.
Mr. James Six, of this parish, F. R. S. a gentleman well known to men of science, for his ingenious pursuits in astronomy and natural philosophy, was a good benesactor to this church; by whose gift principally, the late erected organ was placed in it, where he lies buried. He died in 1793.
140 The return of the king's commissioners, anno 2d king Edward VIth. is printed at the end of Somner; by which it appears likewise, that there were then 240 housing people within this parish, and that the salary and profits of the lands of the above chantry, had been for one year before, distributed to the poor, there not having been any priest nor any sale of the same. That there were obit lands for keeping obits; and there was lamp land given by the will of William Harnehill, for one lamp, to burn for ever, before the sacrament in this church.
141 See this licence in Batt. Somn. appendix. No. lxxii.
142 Dugd. Mon. vol. ii. p. 374.
143 Battely's Somner, appendix, No. lxix.
144 Thorn, col. 2166. A copy of a composition of this vicarage is extant, in MSS. marked A. 11. sol. 38b, in Archiv. Eccles. Cath. Cantuar.
145 See the account of the petitions for the uniting of these churches, and the archbishop's decree thereon, before; by which this parish church was united to that of St. Peter, and it was declared that the former should for ever be the church presentative; and that the parishioners of both should resort to the same, as to their proper church; and that the patron of St. Peter's should have the right of presentation upon the first avoidance which should happen, and the patron of Holy Cross, Westgate upon the next, and so on alternately for ever. It should leem as if this decree did not effectually take place at that time, for in 1692 there were two petitions, similar to the former ones. In 1681, one from the mayor, &c. and the other from the dean and chapter, which was followed by a decree of the archbishop, for the uniting of these churches, with the same regulations of presentation as before.
146 Thorne, col. 2169.
147 Redd. Prior Eccles. Christi 35. Endow pro mans. & parv ten & duo Gardin per ann. 1l. 1s. in decim. predial & personal, & al profic. per ann. 12l. 3s. 6d. redd. solut Archiep. Cantuar. 1s. 4d. Orig. endow. ut supra. See Bacon's Liber Regis, p. 27.
148 Viz. William Mann, esq. of Canterbury; Thomas Belk, D. D. prebendary of Canterbury; George Oxinden, esq. L. D. of the university of Cambridge; Henry Oxinden, esq. of Brook; Edward Nutt, esq. of Nackington; William Kingsley, jun. esq. of Christ-church, Canterbury; William Courthope, esq. of Stodmarsh, and Henry Marsh. esq. of Kingston, near Canterbury.
149 Somner, appendix, p. 74.
150 He lies buried in the chancel of this church, as does his successor Raynhull. By the writ ad quod damnum, above recited, it appears Raynhull was vicar in 1392.
151 Rector of St. Peter's likewise.— He lies buried in this church.
152 Buried in this church.
153 Wills, Prerogative-office, Canterbury.
154 Buried in the chancel.
155 Buried in the church-yard. His will is in Prerog. off. Cant.
156 He is mentioned in a will in Prerog. off. Cant.
157 Also suftragan bishop of Sidon, and rector of Woodchurch. Willis's Mitred Abbeys, vol. ii. p. 97.
158 Parish register.
159 Ibid.
160 Ibid.
161 He and his successor are mentioned as rectors, in the parish register.
162 Likewise rector of St. Mildred.
163 Buried in this church. He was a minor canon of the cathecoral.
164 He resigned this rectory on being presented to that of Addington, in the diocese of Ruchester.
165 He held the rectory of Oftham with this, by dispensation.
166 He was at the same time made a minor canon of the cathedral; after his resigning this rectory, he became a six preacher, and afterwards rector of Speldhurst.
167 He is also rector of Brook and of Milton, by Canterbury.
168 Somner has recorded the inscriptions on some of the gravestones, and the legands in some of the windows of this church, none of which have been for a long time since remaining, viz. in the windows, a legend forThos, Ikham, & Ione sa femme. 1400. A brass plate for William Ikham, once citizen and bailiff of the city, who died in 1424. A legend in another window for Wilhelmi Septvans militis & Elizabeth ux ejus. Another under a figure kneeling, in his surcoat of arms: being Per pale, ermine and... a lion passant-guardant, crowned, a bordure with cross. crislets, fitchee. For Johannis Bigg armigeri ac Aldermanmi hujus Civitatis & Constantie uxoris ejus anno domini 1473—et specialiter pro bono statu Willielmi Bygg, … . Civitatis Cant. & Johanae Confortis sue … . anno dom. 1468.
The above William Bigg, seems to be the same person who, with John Coppyn, of Whitstaple, built the market cross at the Bullstake, in this city, and gave 10l. towards the new building of St. George's gate. In the chancel was a brass plate for John Colley, obt. Feb. 22, 14–8. He built the chancel window over the altar. In the body a brass for John Syre, rector, obt. 1436.
There are considerable remains of painted glass, particularly at the east end of the north isle, in the upper part of which window there are the following shields of arms, viz. in the 1st range Valence, impaling Norwood; Bawde, impaling Rokesley; Apulderfield, impaling Averenches; Poynings, impaling Rokesly. In the 2d range, Criol, impaling Averenches; impaling Criol. In the lower range, Poynings, impaling Fitzpaine; Poynings, impaling Talbot. In the north window, Sable, six keys, or, three, two, and one, or. The arms of Christ-church, in Canterbury. And there were formerly these coats, among others: Or, an eagle displayed, or; gules, on a chevron, three keys, or. And the effigies of a woman, kneeling, on her mantle three crescents.
The following monuments and gravestones are now remaining, among others in this church. In the north isle are two mural monuments for the Lincells. At the east end a mural tablet for Ralph Bawdwyn and Marian his wife; he was alderman and twice mayor, and died in 1611. On a small stone an inscription, almost obliterated, but the name of Heyman is legible. Memorials for the Fowlers; for Dorothy, widow of Giles Hinton, D. D. 1730. In the south isle, a mural monument for Joseph Sawkins, gent. of this city, the second son of John Sawkins, gent. of the same; he married Hester, daughter of the late Rev. Mr. John Cooke, by whom he had eight children. He died suddenly in 1752; arms, Vert, a fret argent, an escutcheon of pretence, or, two lions passant-guardant, gules. In the middle chancel, a memorial for Lewis, son of Charles Kilburne, rector, ob. 1704. A memorial for Thomas Passett, gent. of Lincoln's-inn, date obliterated. In the middle isle are memorials for Leonard Spraklin, obt. 1629. For Harnet, Talbutts, Huffam, Cuckows. For Thomas Halke, obt. 1575. For Tomlins, Shorte, Bassett. For John Leed, mayor, obt. 1670. Bottings and Pilchers. Henry Swerder was buried in 1504, in the chapel of St. John Baptist, in this church. He gave by his will the three almshouses to this parish. Roger Clark, mayor, in 1542, between the church-gate and the church-door. Somner says, that one of the altar tombs here was erected for him. Thomas Halke, mayor of Canterbury, was buried in 1611, in this church.
In the register are frequent entries of the Nethersoles, Spraklyns and Hales, &c.
169 This survey is printed at the end of Battely's Somner.
170 Batt. Somn. p. 164. This grant is among the Chartæ Ant. of the dean and chapter, marked A. 209. The king's licence is among the same, marked R. 227.
In the register of Henry, prior of Canterbury, ab. an. 1285, ad 1327, among the MSS. in the public library at Cambridge, marked E. e. v. fol. 31, it is entered that the church of St. Peter is bound to pay 6s. 8d. to the treasurer of that priory.
An arbitration made by Sir Nath. Brent, LL. D. concerning 13s. 4d. yearly, to be paid to the rector of the church of St. Peter for tenths of a meadow near the scite of the house of the Friars Minors, dated anno 1636. Chartæ Antiq. A. 192, among the archives of the dean and chapter.
171 See Holy Cross Westgate, before.
172 Thorn, col. 2169.
173 Pens. solut. Prior Eccl. Cantuar. 6s. 8d. Prox. 2s. 8d. See Bacon's Liber Regis, p. 27.
174 Somner, appendix, p. 69.
175 Ibid.
176 He was buried in the body of this church.
177 Mentioned in a will in Prerog, office.
178 Ibid.
179 Buried in this church.
180 Wills, Prerogative office, Canterbury.
181 Buried in this church.
182 He had been rector of Old Romney, from which he was ousted by the puritans, about 1643, and after the restoration became rector of St. Mildred's and All Saints, in Canterbury. He died April 1, 1692. See an account of him in Wood's Ath. vol. ii. col. 835.
183 See Thorn, col. 1838.
184 The church of St. Edmund was a rectory, and valued in the antient taxation at 53s. 4d. but on account of the slenderness of its income, was not charged to the tenth. Thorn, col. 2169.
185 See before.
186 Battely's Somner, p. 11.
187 Ibid. p. 181.
188 There was in 1484 a cemetery belonging to this church, for Alice, wife of Michael a Wood, of Wincheap, by her will proved that year, ordered to be buried in it.
189 In the antient taxation, this church was valued at 66s. 8d. but on account of the slenderness of its income, was not charged to the tenth. Thorn, col. 2169.
190 See St. Mildred's before.
191 Mr. Somner says, a little before his time, this church was again divorced from St. Mildred's, by having a particular incumbent presented and inducted into it; but this seems to have been an only instance, as from that time no one has thought it worth their attention, and it has consequently remained united to St. Mildred's, the same as before.
192 Battely's Somner, p. 165.
193 Ibid. p. 77,
194 Prynne, p. 824.
195 Batt. Somn. append. p. 33.
196 He was presented to St. Mildred's rectory in 1601, to which he had a second presentation on June 28, 1637, after which as appears before, he had next month a presentation to this church. See Rymer's Fæd. vol. xz. p. 207.
197 The inquisition for the uniting of the churches of St. Mary de Castro and St. John, called the poor, is dated 5 kal. Julii, anno 1349, and in Regist. Eccles. Christi. Cant. fol. 46b.
198 In the antient valuation, the church of St. John was valued at 60s. 8d. but on account of the slenderness of its income, was not charged to the tenth. Thorn, col. 2169.
199 One Henry Plaire was killed by a fall from a ladder, anno 5 Edward III. as he was at work in tiling St. John's church, in Canterbury, as is recorded in the crown rolls of that year.
200 Battely's Somner. p. 166.
201 Somner's manuscript papers in the library of Christ-church.
202 It was valued in the antient taxation with the chapel of Queningate, at 4l. but on account of the slenderness of the income, was not charged to the tenth. Thorn, col. 2169.
203 Battely's Somner, p. 16.
204 Ibid. p. 146.
205 This church was in being in 1490; for Sir John Hopton, chaplain, by his will that year gave a legacy to the parishioners, when they should make new pews in the choir of St. Michael's church. William Byllynglye, curate of the parish church of St. Michael, in 1501, was buried in the chancel of this church.— Richard Smith was parish priest of it in 1516.
206 The remains of this church have long since been converted into a dwelling house, demised on lease by the dean and chapter, to a branch of the family of Lynch. The two physicians of that name, father and son, lately possessed and resided in it; some of the antient walls of the church are still remaining.
207 In this church, among others, are the following monuments and gravestones, viz. A mural monument, in the south isle, for Sir Edward Master; arms, Gules, a lion rampant, holding in its paws a rose branch, or. Another for lieutenant John Toker, obt. 1713; arms, Vert, on a bend argent, three hearts, gules. In the north isle, a mural monument for Sir William Rooke, of St. Laurence, in this parish, obt. 1690; arms, Argent, on a chevron engrailed, three chessrooks, between as many Cornish choughs, sable. A memorial against the wall, for George Fineux, gent. obt. 1653, second son of Thomas Fineux, esq. of Hougham, near Dover, obt. 1654; arms, Vert, a chevron, between three eagles, displayed, or. On a brass plate against the easternmost pillar, an inscription for Master Edmund Hovynden, once vicar, who died July 24, 1497. On tablets against the wall, inscriptions for the Daniels's and Nickols's. A brass plate for George Wyndbourn, gent. and Katherine his wife. He died 1531. A tablet for Mr. Nathaniel Price, obt. 1787, citizen and goldsmith, of London, and seventeen years an inhabitant of this parish. Also for Nath. Price, his son, obt. 1793. A memorial for Thomas Stoughton, gent. obt. 1611. A brass plate for John Twyne, esq. (the learned antiquary) obt. 1581, who was a schoolmaster, and taught the Latin tongue, and had been mayor of this city. In the south isle a memorial for Mrs. Anne Masters, obt. 1716. A memorial for Johnson Macaree, esq. obt. 1786; likewise for Johnson Macaree, esq. his son, obt. 1798. One for Edward Master, son of Sir Edward Master, obt. 1675. Hugh, son of the above. A memorial for Sir Edward Master, obt. 1690. His lady, obt. the same year. Besides which there are memorials for the Taddys, Waddells, Hollingberrys, Pembrokes, Tolputts, Worger, Hodson, Mantells, and several others.
Besides the above, there are entries in the parish register, which begins in 1562, of the burials of several of the Masters, Bests of St. Laurence; Randolphs, lady Dorcas Master in 1671; of Fynch Rooke, esq. in 1696, who was killed in a duel, on March 8th, that year, in the Northholmes, fought with Ensign Anthony Buckeridge; they both died in the field. Lady Mary Rooke, from St. Laurence. in 1699. Captain Thomas Rooke in 1701. The lady Rooke, jun. in 1702. Sir George Rooke in 1708.— Dame Jane Rooke, widow of Sir William Rooke, in 1711. Geo. Rooke, esq. the last heir male of this family, in 1739.
David Ferne, the short man, born in the shire of Ross, in the parish of Ferne, æt. 27. was buried here in 1737. He was 30 inches high, from head to foot, and 36 inches round, as appears by the entry made in the register.
At the bottom part of the chancel window, says Mr. Somner, there was in antient character or letter, Magister Hamo Doge, a man of note in king Henry III.'s reign, who was official to the archbishop, and the last rector of this church before the erecting a vicarage in it. He was founder of a chantry in this parish, and for some time held the aldermanry of Westgate ward. John Twyne, the antiquary, above mentioned, who was great greatgrandson of Sir Bryan Twyne, of Long Parish, in Hampshire, by Alice his wife, daughter of William Piper, of Canterbury.— See an account of him in Wood's Ath. vol. i. col. 202, 387
Richard Cram, of this parish, anno 1490, gave 6s. 8d. for a new pair of organs, to serve God, in this church.
208 Batt. Somn. p. 167, append, No. lxvii. Thorn, col. 2095.
209 Anno 31 Henry VIII. this parsonage was held in ferme, by Sir Christopher Hales, at the yearly rent of 100s. In the antient taxation it was valued at five marcs.
210 See the petitions, consent and decree of the archbishop thereupon, before; by which this church and St. Martin's were united; and it was decreed, that this church of St. Paul should be in future the church presentative; and that the parishioners of the parishes belonging to each of the said churches should resort to the church of St. Paul, as to their proper church, and that the patron of St. Martin's should have the right of presentation, upon the first avoidance which should happen, and the patron of St. Paul's the next, and so alternately for ever.
211 Parliamentary Surveys, Lambeth library, vol. xv.
212 It is now remaining among the archives of the dean and chapter.
213 See Thorn, col. 2169.
214 Decret. primit. dat. Nov. 1. Ed. vi. Lamb. Archiv. Endow. in pens. recept. de mon. Sti Augustini 13s. 4d. in dec. predial. & per. senal oblat. & al. spiritual. profic. per annum 9l. 13s. 2d. Prox. 5s. Bacon's Liber Regis, p. 26.
215 By the grant of this hospital and its possessions, anno 17 king James I. the king granted them to be holden in as ample a manner as he, or any master of the hospital had before held or ought to have held the same.
216 Ledger of St. Laurence hospital, cart. 18.
217 See before.
218 See ibid. In a charter to St. Radigund's, to which he is a witness, he signs his name Virgil de Chilton, perpetual vicar of St. Paul's.
219 Ledger of St. Laurence hospital.
220 Both mentioned in a will in Prerog. off. Cant.
221 Both mentioned in a will in Prerog. off. Cant.
222 Wills, Prerog. off. Cant.
223 He and his successor lie buried in this church.
224 He held the rectory of Orgarswike with this vicarage.
225 This composition is printed in Batt. Somn. append. p. 72.
226 Ibid. p. 166.
227 It is remarkable, that though this church is situated on an eminence, some way up the hill, yet that part of it on the north side of the alley, which leads through the midst of it, is flowed with water from the springs, almost as high up as the floors of the pews, whilst that part on the south side is remarkably dry for several feet deep.
228 In this church were formerly the images of St. Christopher and St. Erasmus.
229 Battely, pt. ii. p. 3.
230 In the church are the following monuments and inscriptions, An altar tomb on the south side of the chancel, within the altar rails, erected for the lord John Finch, baron of Fordwich, descended from the family of Eastwell. Above the tomb is a mural monument, with another long inscription to his memory. He died in 1660, æt. 77. It was erected by the lady Mabella Finch his wife; arms, Finch, quartering Herbert, and impaling Fotherbye. On the pavement of the space is a small cross on a white marble, which has been much noticed by the curious, as of great antiquity, it is about nine inches long and six wide. A memorial in the chancel, partly illegible, for Anne, daughter of John Whitfield, gent. of Canterbury, obt. 1697 … . Martin Lister, M. D… . Ardoeni Evans … 1742. A mural monument for James Hanson, gent. of Canterbury, a practitioner of the law, obt. 1756; and for Mary Hanson his widow, daughter of Thomas Conyers, gent. formerly of this parish, obt. 1762, æt. 98; arms, Argent, three susils, sable, pierced, on a chief of the last as many lions rampant of the first, impaling azure, a maunch, or. A plain stone, near the altar rails; arms, A chevron, between three palmers scripts, impaling on a pale, a sword erect, in chief, three annulets, for Sir Henry Palmer, late of Howlets, obt. 1659. A brass plate for Thomas Stourghton, gent. late of Ash, obt. 1591; arms, on a shield at each corner of the stone, a saltire, between four staples, anescallop in the middle, a crescent for difference. A brass plate for Michael Fraunces, gent. and Jane his wife, daughter of Wm. Quilter, esq. They both died on January 10, 1587; arms, Parted per bend, a lion rampant, counterchanged, quartering a bend, and impaling a chevron, between three choughs. Near the pulpit, on a mural black tablet, is a beautiful urn of white marble, and inscription for Anne, youngest daughter and coheir of Sir Richard Sandys, bart. of Northborne-court, and wife of Charles Pyott, esq. of this parish, obt. 1753. She lies in a vault underneath.— On the pedestal of the urn, a memorial for Charles Pyott, esq. above-mentioned, obt. 1789; arms, Azure, on a fess, or, a lion rampant, gules, in chief, three bezants, and a mullet for difference.— Below on the tablet a memorial for Elizabeth, second wife of Charles Pyott, esq. daughter of Sir Thomas Hales, bart. of Howlets, obt. 1778. At the west end of the isle, a mural monument for James Bulter, of St. Andrew's, Canterbury, obt. 1767; and for Martha his wife, obt. 1773. A mural tablet for Mrs. Anne Hulse, obt. 1780, daughter of Nathaniel and Anne Hulse, of St. Andrew's parish. A mural tablet for Mrs. Chandler, daughter of Mr. Austen, of this parish, and widow of Mr. Chandler, apothecary, of St. Mary Magdalen, obt. 1778; also for Mrs. Rebecca Austen, sister of the above, obt. 1784. A brass plate in the middle of the isle, for Stephen Falkes and Alys his wife, the which deceased 1406. On a plain stone, arms, within a bordure, a falcon, impaling Hulse. A memorial for Mary, wife of Edward Kitchell, gent. of the Society of New Inn, London, obt. 1656. A memorial for G. A. De Reck, 1775. In the church-yard are two monuments for the family of Austen, of this parish. John Hougham, of this parish, was buried anno 1482, in this church. Joane his widow, was buried anno 1503, in the church-yard, beside her second husband John Strete, whom she likewise survived. Stephen Fokys, of this parish, was buried in 1506, in this church. By his will he ordered that the yearly rents of his little messuage, with its appurtenances, in which Gregory Bradley then dwelt, should wholly remain to the churchwardens for ever, for the reparation of this church. Lady Mabella Finch, baroness Fordwich, was buried in this church, near her deceased lord, in 1669.—The parish register begins so late as 1662.
231 Bede Eccles. Hist. lib. 1, cap. 25. Brompton, col. 729.
232 See Gervas, col. 1630.
233 St. Martin was bishop of Tours, a saint then of great repute in France. He died in the year 395.
234 In the Cotton library, MSS. Augustus 11, 90, is a charter, endorsed Donatio unius Sedis in loco qui dicitur S Martini Ecclesia & Villulæ Modicæ ad eandem Sedem fideli suo amico Wighelmo per Regem Æthelredum anno 867, indict xv.
235 See the consent, petitions and decree of the archbishop thereupon, before, and the particulars for uniting these churches under St. Paul's before.
236 Viz. In Pens. rec. de Dom. Reg. 2l. 13s. 4d. In gardin. 3 rod terr. & decim gran. lan. agn. porc. lib. pasch. & omn. al profic. in toto 6l. 5s. 2½d. Bacon's Lib. Regis, p. 26.
By a decrte of the court of first fruits, the taxation of this parsonage of St. Martin, was reduced from nine pounds per annum, at which rate it was formerly charged with the payment of first fruits and tenths, to 6l. 5s. dated November 26, anno I king Edward VI. in which decree there is a particular of the tithes, &c. due to the rector of this church. An exemplification of this decree is among the archives of the dean and chapter.
237 The survey of the commissioners is printed at the end of Battely's Somner.
238 The will is in Prerog. off. Canterbury.
239 Ibid.
240 Somner, appendix, p. 33.
241 Stev Mon. vol. i. p. 328.
242 Wills, Preerogative-office, Canterbury.
243 Buried in the chancel of this church. His will is in the Prerog. off. Cant.
244 Mentioned in a will in Prerog. off. Cant.
245 Mentioned in the will of lady Mabella Finch, proved in 1669.
246 Also rector of Elmstone, and was buried here.
247 In 1752 he had a dispensation to hold these united rectories, with that of Stonar.
248 Likewise rector of Orgarswick, in Romney Marsh, and was a minor canon of the cathedral. He had been before rector of St. Alphage with Northgate.
249 He is a minor canon of the cathedral, and resigned the rectory of Old Romney on being inducted to these churches.