Later additions to the Chronicles

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

H. T. Riley (editor)

Year published

1863

Pages

208-228

Citation Show another format:

'Later additions to the Chronicles', Chronicles of the Mayors and Sheriffs of London: 1188-1274 (1863), pp. 208-228. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=64847 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Insertions in the "Liber de Antiquis Legibus," of a later date.

Be it remembered, that at Vespers on the morrow of Saint Luke [18 October], being a Thursday, there was an eclipse of the moon, which lasted throughout one quarter of the night,—it being the sixth year of the reign of King Edward of (fn. 1) Carnervan, son of King Edward, etc.

Be it remembered, that in the (fn. 2) tenth year of Edward, John de (fn. 3) Sandegrave was Mayor of London.

In this year died Gilbert de Segrave, Bishop of London.

In this year there was a hard frost during Christmas week; and throughout this year continued the dearth of corn, and great mortality among poor folk.

Be it remembered, that in the ninth year of Edward, son of King Edward, began the dearth of corn: wheat was at first one mark, then twenty shillings, and then thirty-two shillings, the quarter, and so continued until the arrival of a new year. There was great mortality of the people, and great dearth of all manner of victuals throughout the kingdom.

Also, in the eleventh year of Edward, John de Sandegrave was Mayor of London: John Priour and William Fourneys, Sheriffs.

Gilbert de Middletone, a knight of Northumberland, and his brother, were drawn and hanged for treason.

In this year, the Pope ordered the Feast of the Holy Sacrament to be held on the Thursday after the Trinity, as also grand pardon.

(fn. 4) Sheriffs of London in the twelfth year of Edward, John Poyntel and John de Dallinge. John de Sandegrave was Mayor for three years.

In the thirteenth year of Edward, John de Prestone and Simon d'Abindone, were Sheriffs of London. In this year, Hamo de (fn. 5) Gigewelle was Mayor of London.

Also, in the fourteenth year of Edward, Reginald de Conduit and William Prodomme, were Sheriffs. The (fn. 6) Iter was holden at the Tower of London.

Also, in the fifteenth year of Edward, Richard Costentein and Richard de Hakeneye, were Sheriffs. In this year was the war with Scotland; and the quarter of wheat was worth thirty shillings, at the beginning of the sixteenth year of Edward.

[In the sixteenth year of Edward], Hamo de (fn. 7) Jicevelle was Mayor. John de (fn. 8) Gantan, Grocer, and Roger d'Eli, Fishmonger, were Sheriffs.

In the seventeenth year, Nicholas de Farendone was made Mayor by the King. Adam de Sallesberi, Grocer, and John d'Oxenford, Vintner, were Sheriffs.

Hamo de (fn. 9) Gikewelle was Mayor for two years, being the eighteenth and the nineteenth years. The Sheriffs were Beneyt de (fn. 10) Fayleham, Grocer, and John de (fn. 11) Haustone, Mercer; and John Coton, Pelterer, and Gilbert de Mordone, Fishmonger.

[In the twentieth year of Edward] the Sheriffs of London were (fn. 12) Rosser Chintecler, and Richard de (fn. 13) Rokinge. Richard de (fn. 14) Beytteyne was Mayor of London. The King made prisoner in his own land.

Charter of Liberties of the Bishop of London.

"Know all those who are and who shall be in time to come, that between Sir (fn. 15) Eustace, the Bishop of London, and the Chapter of Saint Paul in London, and the citizens of London, it is thus agreed, in love, as to the limits of the franchises which, as the said Bishop said, do pertain unto his Church, the citizens affirming the contrary. That is to say, that the aforesaid citizens have granted, that no Sheriff or bailiff of London shall from henceforth enter the (fn. 16) Soke of the Bishop in Cornhulle, to make attachment therein, if the plaint have not sooner been shown unto the Sheriff or unto a bailiff of London than unto the bailiffs of the Bishop. Also, that there be no thief found in that Soke, but that he shall be attached by the bailiff of the Bishop; not even in a case where the bailiff of the Bishop has not been called: and upon the coming of him, the attachment is to be made. And if nevertheless the bailiff shall not come [to make such attachment], the attachment is to be made by the bailiffs of the City. Also be it, that if the thief is attached by the bailiffs of the City, he shall be delivered unto the bailiffs of the Bishop for judgment, in the Court of the Bishop within the same Soke. And [in such case], when the thief shall be judged, one half of his chattels is to be delivered unto the Bishop, and the other half unto the bailiff of the City. And if the thief shall be taken or attached by the bailiffs of the Bishop, no one of the bailiffs of the City shall intermeddle with him or with his chattels, if he be found in such Soke. And if so be, that a baker of the tenants of the Bishop's Soke shall be found with bread of false weight in such Soke by the Sheriff, he is to be attached upon view of the bailiffs of the Bishop called thereunto, and the baker is to be judged in the Guildhall in presence of the bailiff, if he shall wish it to be; and nevertheless he is not to be compelled by mandate. And if he be taken out of that Soke, he shall be judged in the Guildhall, whether the bailiff of the Bishop comes there or not, for that he has been taken with false bread. And if he be taken within the Soke or without, three times or more, with bread of false weight, and be attainted thereof, he shall be punished according to the custom of the City, that is to say, whether he be taken and attached within the Soke by the bailiffs of the Bishop, or taken and attached without the Soke by the bailiffs of the City. By the bailiffs of the Bishop he is to be (fn. 17) summoned, if he will appear. It is provided above all, that the bakers of the Soke of the King of Scotland are bound to aid the bakers of the Bishop's Soke in paying unto the Sheriff 28 shillings of silver yearly, in manner as they were wont to do. All men upon lands of the Bishop's fee, or of the fee of Saint Paul, [and] of their successors, of which fees the Bishop and the Church of Saint Paul in London were seised upon the day that this agreement was made, shall be free and acquitted of all customs in (fn. 18) Smethfeud or elsewhere, as to all that which they shall buy for their own men, (fn. 19) with all that is born thereof and feeds; but on all that which they shall buy for sale, the Sheriff of London shall receive the customs due, wherever they may then buy the same; and all the carts which are the property of the Bishop or the property of Saint Paul's, [carrying] the things of the Bishop, or of the Canons, or of the men of the fee of Saint Paul's, shall so far be free without custom paid. If so be that it is not the property of the Bishop or the property of Saint Paul's, no cart is to be hired to (fn. 20) carry the wares of any one to London. And if any one shall bring the wares of any person, who by reason of his franchise ought to go acquitted, then for his cart he shall give the custom that is due and customary. The same as to the Bishop and his successors, as to the citizens aforesaid. And if they shall bring the wares of any one who by reason of his franchise ought not to go acquitted, then such wares shall pay the custom due, as aforesaid, and the cart shall go acquitted. No Sheriff or bailiff of London ought to enter any manor of the Bishop, or any manor of Saint Paul's, to ask or to take custom; but they are to take the same in the customary and established places, that is to say, in Smethefeud or elsewhere, out of their manors or out of their fee. And be it also known, that it shall be fully lawful for the bailiffs of the City, without the bailiffs of the Bishop, to enter the Soke of the Bishop, to collect the King's dues or to distrain for his debts, saving all assizes unto the citizens of London, to secure thereby the common good of the City, that are not [in contravention of] the articles aforesaid. And to the end that this loving agreement may be sure and established for ever, and not broken, the aforesaid Bishop and Chapter have appended their seals, and the citizens of London their seal of the commonalty, with the seals of Sir Roger le Due, the Mayor of London, and of Sir Richard Feuker, to this present writing, in manner of a chirograph in four parts made. Of which parts, the two parts sealed with the seal of the commonalty and with the seals of the aforesaid Roger and Richard, are to remain unto the Bishop and the Chapter; and the two parts sealed with the seals of the Bishop and the Chapter, are to remain with the citizens of London. This was made in the year of Grace 1228, the (fn. 21) twentieth of the Ides of May."

The fifth year of (fn. 22) Edward. Memorandum,—that Peter de (fn. 23) Blaceneye, Sheriff of London, died eight weeks before Saint Michael, and John de (fn. 24) Grantebrigge, Mercer, was sworn (fn. 25) Warden for the aforesaid Peter in the bailiwick until the Saint Michael next ensuing, in presence of the commonalty, upon the mainprise of the executors of Peter aforesaid.

Memorandum as to the Sheriffs of London in the fifth year of Edward:—Simon de (fn. 26) Manewourhe, (fn. 27) Bureller, Richard de Welleforde.

Memorandum,—that upon the Day of Saint Simon and Saint Jude, John de Gissors was chosen Mayor of London.

Memorandum,—that Sir Piers de Gavastone, Earl of (fn. 28) Cornewayle, was in the Castle of (fn. 29) Scardebourk, and the Earl of Warenne [and] the Earl of (fn. 30) Penebrok laid siege thereto; to whom Sir Piers surrendered himself, and they took him to the village of (fn. 31) Dadintone, and thither came the Earl of Warewik, and took the said Piers, and carried him with him and his people to the Castle of Warewik. And on the Monday before Saint John [24 June], the aforesaid Sir Piers was beheaded in a field between Warewik and (fn. 32) Cenilleworth, in presence of the Earl of (fn. 33) Launkattre [and] the Earl of Hereford.

Memorandum,—that on the Monday next before the (fn. 34) Maudeleyne [22 July], came the King, the Earl of Warenne, the Earl of Penebrok, Sir (fn. 35) Henry de Beumond, [and] Sir Simon de Maule, Seneschal of the Bishop of London, unto the Cross in Saint Paul's Churchyard, and many of the City of London, to the meeting of the Folkmote; and there made oath, as well to hold their lordship in all rightfulness, as to maintain his crown and to preserve the City to his heirs, as their inheritances.

Memorandum,—that on the Vigil of Saint (fn. 36) Colas, and on the next day as well, there was a great tempest of thunder and lightning.

Memorandum as to the Sheriffs of London:—James le Boteyller, Draper, [and] William de Basinges, Woolstapler: Nicholas de Farendone, Mayor of London. [A.D. 1308.]

James de Saint Edmund's, Bureller, and Roger le Paumer, (fn. 37) Blader, Sheriffs: Thomas Romeyn, Mayor of London.

Memorandum,—that on the Sunday next before Our Lord's Nativity it began to freeze; and the frost lasted seven-and-twenty days, so that for nineteen days people went upon the ice over the Thames to the land [on the other side]. King Edward went into Scotland, to war against Robert de Brus.

Simon de Corp, Pepperer, and Peter de Blaceneye, Woolmonger, were Sheriffs: Richer de Refham, Mayor of London.

Memorandum,—that for one month before Saint Michael, and six weeks after, there was a mortality among the people, in towns and in (fn. 38) upland, to great excess, from the malady of flux, by reason of the fruit of that year being too much taken.

Be it remembered, that on the Sunday next after the beginning of Lent, Henry de (fn. 39) Lasi, Earl of Lincoln, was brought from his house, with Earls and Barons, and two knights armed, upon caparisoned steeds, and four mounted valets carrying four banners with the arms of Earl Henry, on the road unto the Church of Saint Paul; and on the Sunday after, he was buried on the right hand side of the altar of Our Lady, in the (fn. 40) New Work there, a great multitude being present.

The sixth year of Edward. Memorandum,—that Sir Louis, brother of the King of France, the Cardinal Blaunk, the Bishop of (fn. 41) Peyters, Chamberlain of the Pope, came to the King at London, a fortnight before Saint Michael, to treat of peace between the King and his Earls.

Memorandum, that on the Day of Saint Brice the Bishop [13 November], was born Edward, son of King Edward of Carnerwan, in the Castle of Windelsore, in the presence of the Cardinal Blaunc, Monsire Louis of France, [and] the Lady (fn. 42) Margaret, Queen of England; by reason of which good news, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and the Commons of London, made feasts, and (fn. 43) carols of people in costume, for a fortnight after, the Conduit running with wine; and on this side of the Cross of the Earl of (fn. 44) Glousettre in Chepe, one tun of wine in a pavilion to be drunk. And on the Vigil of Christmas next ensuing, Queen Isabel rose from childbed in the Castle aforesaid, purified, with great feasting, both upon the Vigil, and upon Christmas day, and on the following day.

Memorandum as to the Sheriffs of London the year aforesaid:—John Lambin, Fishmonger, and Richard de Weleford, elected to aid the other by reason of the default of Richard de Horsam previously elected, who absented himself at the election and at the presentation.

And the aforesaid Richard de Weleford died in the first quarter of the year; and Adam Lodekin was Sheriff until the ensuing Saint Michael, in his place sworn and presented.

Memorandum,—that on the Vigil of the Ascension, King Edward, and Isabel, Queen of England, crossed the sea and landed at (fn. 45) Wissant, and went to Paris, where the King of France made his son a Knight, and King of Navarre, with a great number of festivities, on the Day of Pentecost.

In the following year, the Sheriffs of London were Robert Bordeyn [and] Hugh de (fn. 46) Sarton.

Memorandum,—that in the eighth year of King Edward, the cross with the (fn. 47) ball, all gilt, was raised upon the belfry of Saint Paul's; and the Bishop of London, Gilbert de Segrave, deposited many precious things in the said cross on the belfry, on the Friday next after Saint Michael in the following year.

John de Peccam (fn. 48) elected Archbishop by the Pope.

Robert de (fn. 49) Wincilse elected Archbishop of Canterberi.

Memorandum,—that the aforesaid Robert lies buried at Canterberi, by the Cross of Robert de Michaelchurch.

Immediately after his (fn. 50) death, Thomas de Cobeham was elected Archbishop of Canterberi, and rejected by the Pope; and Walter Reinald, Bishop of (fn. 51) Wilsettre, was confirmed Archbishop of Canterbeyri by the said Pope.

Richard de Graveshende, (fn. 52) Bishop of London.

(fn. 53) Robert de Baudok, Bishop of London; and lies buried in Saint Paul's.

Gilbert de Segrave, elected (fn. 54) Bishop of London.

Richard de Neueport, elected (fn. 55) Bishop of London.

Memorandum,—that on the Day of Saint Brice the Bishop, [13 November,] in the year of King Edward, son of Edward, at daybreak, there was an earthquake in London.

(fn. 56) This year John de (fn. 57) Sandegrave was Mayor of London, by the King's letters, [having been Mayor] the year before, and against the entreaties of the community.

Also, in the 13th year of Edward, Hamo de (fn. 58) Gicewelle, Mayor.

Also, in the 14th year, Nicholas de Farendone was Mayor until the 20th day of February; and from that day Sir Robert de (fn. 59) Cendale was Warden, until the 20th day of May. And then Hamo de Grikewell was Mayor by command of the King, in contravention of the franchise, holding from time to time by writ of the King.

In the 15th year of Edward. The Sheriffs, Richard Costentin, Draper, and Richard de (fn. 60) Haceneye, Woolstapler. This year, in Lent, (fn. 61) Thomas, Earl of five Counties, was beheaded; the (fn. 62) Earl of Hereford died in battle; and barons and knights were slain, or died, by judgment imprisoned in the Castles.

Memorandum,—that the gallon of Conduit water weighs ten pounds four (fn. 63) shillings, by the ordinary weight.

Also, the gallon of Thames water weighs ten pounds sixteen pence, by the same weight.

Also, the grocers' pound of wax and of fruit is to weigh 25 shillings, the ounce 25 pence, and the quarter 6 shillings and 3 pence.

Be it remembered, that the (fn. 64) sterling must weigh 32 grains of corn in number, from the middle of the ear; and to the quarter of an ounce go 160 grains in number; and to the half ounce go 320 grains; and to the whole ounce go 640 grains, the ounce, that is to say, of twenty sterlings: and to the quarter of the pound go 1920 grains in number; and to the half pound go 3840 grains; and to the pound of 20 shillings sterling go 7680 grains in number, divided into 12 ounces. And the weight of two pounds, which amounts in number to 15360 grains, makes the quart of liquor. And the weight of four pounds, which amounts in number to 30720 grains, makes the pottle. And the weight of eight pounds, which amounts in number to (fn. 65) 60440 grains, makes the gallon. And the weight of thirty-two pounds, which amounts in number to 245760 grains, makes the old half bushel. And the weight of sixty-four pounds, which amounts in number to 491520 grains, makes the bushel of wheat, of the ancient standard. And the weight of (fn. 66) 366 pounds, which amounts in number to (fn. 67) 19266180 grains of wheat, makes the half quarter. And the weight of 512 pounds sterling, which amounts in number of grains of wheat to 3932160, makes the measure of one quarter of eight bushels.

[Continuation of the List of Mayors of London, subsequent to the period of time comprised in the Chronicle.]

Gregory de (fn. 68) Rocele, elected Mayor of London the day of Saint Simon and Saint Jude [28 October].

Henry le Waleys, elected (fn. 69) Mayor of London.

Gregory de Rokele, elected (fn. 70) Mayor of London.

(fn. 71) Warden of London, John le Breton.

Warden of London, Ralph de (fn. 72) Sandwy.

(fn. 73) Warden of London, John le Breton.

(fn. 74) Henry le Waleys, elected Mayor of London the Day of Saint Simon and Saint Jude [28 October].

(fn. 75) Ellis Rossel, elected Mayor, the day before-named. Presented to the Constable of the Tower for two years.

Also, John le Blount, elected (fn. 76) Mayor of London the day beforenamed, and presented to Sir John de (fn. 77) Blacebrok, Under-Constable of the Tower, by writ of the King, and received at the Outer Gate of the Tower of London.

Also, John le Blount elected Mayor of London, the Day of Saint Simon and Saint Jude [28 October], and presented to the Earl of Warenne, the King's Lieutenant, in the Chamber of the Archbishop of York.

Also, John le Blound elected Mayor of London, the Day of Saint Simon and Saint Jude, and presented at the Exchequer.

Also, John le Blound elected Mayor, and presented to the King at Westminster.

Also, John le Blound elected Mayor the two following years, and presented to King Edward.

William Coumbemartin elected Mayor, and so continued two days, and died.

Also, John le Blond elected Mayor of London, the third day after Saint Simon and Saint Jude, and presented at the Exchequer at Westminster; and on the Wednesday next before Saint Martin [11 November] presented at the Court of King (fn. 78) Edward, not as yet crowned, at the hostel of the Archbishop of York.

John le Blond elected Mayor, and presented at the Exchequer on the morrow of Saint Simon and Saint Jude, in the first year of King Edward.

Nicholas de Farendone elected (fn. 79) Mayor of London, and received by King Edward at Westminster on the morrow of Saint Simon and Saint Jude, in the second year of his reign.

[ (fn. 80) Continuation of the List of Sheriffs of London.]

John Horn, Ralph le Blond. Pleas at the Tower.

Robert d'Arras, Ralph le Fevre. This year the Mayoralty was (fn. 81) sold and bought, to be held by him of the preceding year.

John Adrian, Walter (fn. 82) Leggleys.

William le Maserner, Robert de Basinges.

Ralph de la More, Thomas Box.

William de Farendone, Nicholas de (fn. 83) Winsettre.

William le Maserner, Richard de Chigewelle. This year there was a great frost.

(fn. 84) Hauncetin de Bettevile, Walter le Blound.

Jourdan (fn. 85) Godsep, Martin Box.

Steven de (fn. 86) Cornulle, Robert de (fn. 87) Rocele.

Walter le Blound, John Wade.

Thomas Cros, Walter Hauteyn.

Thomas de Stanes, William de Hereford.

William de Bettoyne, John de Caunteberi.

Fulk de Saint Edmund, Salaman le Cotiller.

Thomas Romeyn, William de Leyre.

Ralph le Blound, Hamo Box.

(fn. 88) Helis Rossel, Henry le Bole.

Robert de (fn. 89) Rocele, Martin de Aumesberi.

Henry Box, Richard de (fn. 90) Glousettre.

(fn. 91) Hadam de Halingberi, John de Donestaple.

Thomas de (fn. 92) Seuvouf, Hadam de (fn. 93) Foulam.

John de (fn. 94) Sterteford, William de Stertefourd.

Thomas Seli, Pelterer, Richer (fn. 95) le Mercer.

Memorandum,—that on Monday, the Vigil of the (fn. 96) Tiffany [6 January], in the beginning of the seven-and-twentieth year of King Edward [I.], at daybreak, there was an earthquake, with loud noise, for a short time, in London, Gloucester, [and] elsewhere, throughout the kingdom.

Memorandum,—that on the day of the Nativity of Our Lady [8 September], being a Tuesday, in the seven-and-twentieth year of the (fn. 97) King, arrived at Dover the Lady Margaret, daughter of Philip, King of France, and on the morrow came to Canterbury; and on the Thursday after, came Edward, King of England, to the Church of the Trinity at Canterbury, and espoused the aforesaid Margaret, Queen of England, she being of the age of twenty years.

Memorandum,—that on the Sunday next before Saint (fn. 98) Edward, Queen Margaret came from the Tower through London to Westminster; and the Earl of Bretagne, and the Count of Savoy, and the Mayor of London, with his Aldermen, arrayed in suit, as also three hundred burgesses of the City in suit. There were two (fn. 99) bretasches in the road of Chepe, from which there were eight outlets discharging wine from above; and the road was covered with cloths of gold, against her first coming.

(fn. 100) Sheriffs, Henry de Fingrie, Fishmonger, and John d'Armenters, Draper.

Memorandum,—that on the Sunday next before the Day of the Annunciation of Our Lady [25 March], the bones of Sir (fn. 101) Edmund, the King's brother, were brought to Saint Paul's from the new Abbey of the Minoresses without (fn. 102) Alegate, and from Saint Paul's to Westminster; and the King accompanied his bones through the City on foot, as also Earls, and Barons, and Bishops; and on the next day, the bones were interred at Westminster, on the left hand side of the altar of Saint Peter there; it being the eight-and-twentieth year of the King's reign.

Memorandum,—that on the Day of Saint Stephen [26 December], at the beginning of the eight-and-twentieth year, the (fn. 103) crocards and pollards were proclaimed. They were cried down throughout England, and continued current only until the Vigil of Easter Day next ensuing: upon which Vigil it was forbidden that they should pass current. This money came from Flanders, and was current in England throughout the land for six years, to the great damage of all the realm.

Lucas de (fn. 104) Awerhinge, Richard de Campes, (fn. 105) Sheriffs.

Robert de Callere, Peter de (fn. 106) Bossam: being so made upon election by Elis Rossel, Mayor, and the Aldermen, and presented to the Constable of the Tower, at the Outer Gate.

As to the above Robert, there was a great dispute between the Commons and the Aldermen in reference to his election; so that they would not pay (fn. 107) the aforesaid Robert, and wished to annul the said election; but they did pay.

Memorandum,—that on the Day of Saint Simon and Saint Jude [28 October] John le Blond was elected Mayor of London, and presented to John de Blacebrok, Under-Constable of the Tower of London, assigned by the King's writ, without the Outer Gate of the Tower aforesaid.

Memorandum,—that John Botetourte and William Jige, Justiciars, with John le Blount, Mayor of London, and their people, came to sit in the Guildhall of London on the Tuesday next before Saint Dunstan [19 May], to hear and determine in an action of trespass between John le (fn. 108) Jauser, Elis Rossel, and John de (fn. 109) Geudeford and others, by reason of the acting of the aforesaid John le Jauser in breach of the franchise of the City, as was alleged by the Aldermen: and on the morrow the said Justiciars, in the hall aforesaid, adjourned the parties until the Saturday next, at the Leaden Hall. Upon which day, their oaths were (fn. 110) proffered in discharge of the accusation; which [the judges] did not allow, but held the aforesaid Elis and John, and several of the accused, as undefended, and to pay damages to the aforesaid John le Jauser of 1000 pounds; because that the aforesaid Elis and the others would only acquit themselves by (fn. 111) making their law, in a matter where the franchise did not lie out of the (fn. 112) Iter. And the aforesaid John le Jauser died within a fortnight after this, through an accident, at his own house.

Simon de Paris, Mercer, and Hugh Pourte, Fishmonger, (fn. 113) Sheriffs of London.

Memorandum,—that John le Blount was chosen Mayor of London on the Day of Saint Simon and Saint Jude [28 October], and presented to the Earl of Warenne, the King's Lieutenant, in the Chamber of the Archbishop of York, before the King's Council.

William (fn. 114) Comartin, John de Boureford, Sheriffs of London.

John le Blound this year Mayor of London, and presented to the Constable of the Tower of London on the morrow of Saint Simon and Saint Jude, without the Outer Gate of the Tower aforesaid.

John de Lincoln, Vintner, Roger de Paris, Mercer, Sheriffs of London.

John le Blount elected Mayor of London, and presented to the Under-Constable of the Tower of London.

William Cosin, Reginald de (fn. 115) Sounderle, Sheriffs. The year of (fn. 116) Trailbaston.

Memorandum,—that on Monday the Vigil of Saint Bartholomew [24 August], in the three-and-thirtieth year of King Edward, William le (fn. 117) Wales, a knight of Scotland, was adjudged in the King's Hall at (fn. 118) Neuwouttel, to be drawn, hanged, and beheaded, his bowels burnt, his body divided into four parts, and his head cut off and exposed on a lance on London Bridge, for treason committed against the aforesaid Edward, King of England and Scotland.

Memorandum,—that Robert le Brus, Earl of (fn. 119) Karrik, had himself crowned King of Scotland, on the Day of the Annunciation of Our Lady [25 March], in the four-and-thirtieth year of King Edward; and levied war in Scotland against England.

Simon (fn. 120) Frisel, a Baron of Scotland, drawn, and hanged, and beheaded, his body taken down and (fn. 121) burnt, at London, for treason.

The five-and-thirtieth year of Edward. [I.] Memorandum, —that on the Day of (fn. 122) Pentecost, Edward, Prince of Wales, received his arms from King Edward, his father, he making one of three hundred knights, and on the same day was dubbed at Westminster with great display; and on the morrow, Monsire Edward held his feast at the New Temple, with eight hundred knights.

Geoffrey du Conduit, Simon Bollete, Sheriffs of London.

Memorandum,—that John, Earl of (fn. 123) Asseles in Scotland, was hanged, and his body (fn. 124) taken down beneath the gallows, and his head cut off and carried on a lance to London Bridge, and his body burnt beneath the gallows.

Memorandum,—that Edward, King of England, died on the Day of the Translation of Saint Thomas of Canterbury [7 July], three leagues from (fn. 125) Kardeul. Upon the Vigil of the Assumption of Our Lady [15 August], the body arrived at the Abbey of Waltham, and remained there until the Tuesday next before Saint Simon and Saint Jude [28 October]; upon which day, it was brought to the (fn. 126) Trinity of London, and on the morrow was conveyed thence by King Edward, his son, with the Earls and Barons, and with six knights, mounted and covered with his arms, two hundred lighted torches being borne before him, unto the Church of Saint Paul; and on the morrow he was carried to Westminster in form aforesaid, by Archbishops, Bishops, Abbots, and Priors; and on the Friday after, was interred the noble King Edward on the left of the altar of Saint Peter, at the head of King Henry his father, and by the side of Saint Edward, towards the North.

The first year of Edward. [II.]

Sheriffs, (fn. 127) Nicholas Hauteyn, Mercer, . . . . Draper.

Memorandum,—that on the Day of the Conversion of Saint Paul [25 January], being Thursday, Edward, King of England, espoused Isabel, daughter of the King of France, at (fn. 128) Boloyne, with great array; and came to London on the Day of Saint Peter's Chair [28 January]; and on the Saturday next ensuing, came the King and Queen, and Sir Charles the Duke of Brebaunt, Sir Louys de Cleremound, the Count de Breme, with one hundred knights of France, through the City of London to the King's Palace at Westminster. And on the morrow, which was Sunday, Edward, King of England, received the crown from the hand of the Bishop of Winchester, substitute of the Archbishop of Canterbury, with grand array upon that day; and the citizens of London served that day at the feast, with the Earl of Arundel and the Mayor of London, in the Butlership before the King, with two hundred cups; four hundred men being arrayed in divers costumes upon that day.

The second year of Edward. [II.]

Memorandum,—that on the Day of Saint Michael, being Sunday, the Earl of Gloucester married the daughter of the Earl of (fn. 129) Wuollestre, in Ireland, in the Abbey Church of Waltham, in presence of King Edward, and the Earls and Barons; and on the next day, the Earl's son married the sister of the Earl of Gloucester in the same place, and received his arms of King Edward.

Memorandum,—that on Sunday in the beginning of Lent, in the second year of King Edward, a whale was taken in the Thames near (fn. 130) Grenewis, being twelve toises in length and five toises in girth; and it was brought to the Tower of London, and there cut up by the Constable, Sir John de Cromwelle, acting for the King.

Parliament of his Lordship King Edward at the Friars (fn. 131) Preachers in the City of London.

The Monday next after the Assumption of Our Lady [15 August], in the fifth year of our Lord King Edward, son of King Edward, in presence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and many Bishops of the land, Earls, and Barons. At which Parliament were sworn all the aforesaid Lords, and the Chancellor and Treasurer, and the Justiciars, and the Barons of the Exchequer, and the Knights of all the Counties: and the Mayor and Aldermen of London, with all the better folks of the City, were sworn to keep and maintain all the Statutes ordained in the aforesaid Parliament, to the profit of the King and his people.

The which Parliament lasted fifteen days; and at the next return of our Lord the King to the House of the Friars Preachers in London, the aforesaid Statutes were published by the Bishop of Salisbury, substitute of the Archbishop of Canterbury, in Saint Paul's Churchyard, in presence of many Bishops, and the Earls of Lancaster, of Lincoln, and of Leicester, of (fn. 132) Ferys, of Salesbyri, Sir (fn. 133) Emeir de Valence, Earl of (fn. 134) Penebrok, and the Earl of Warwyck, and the Earl of Hereford, Sir Hugh de Ver, Earl of (fn. 135) Oxeneford, and the Earl of Arundel, and many Barons of the land, that is to say, on the Monday next before Saint Michael, in the year of our Lord the King aforesaid. And on the Tuesday next after Saint Michael, came the Earl of Gloucester, Monsire Henry de Percy, Sir Hugh Despencer, Sir Robert le Fitz-Payn, Sir Payn (fn. 136) Tipetout, the Chancellor, the Treasurer, and other Lords of the King's Council, and pronounced the aforesaid Statutes by the grant and the good will of our Lord the King to be maintained and confirmed throughout his realm, at the Cross in Saint Paul's Churchyard aforesaid, in presence of all the people. And on the Monday next before the Day of Saint Edward the King [13 October], the aforesaid Statutes, sealed with the King's Great Seal, were sent with his writs throughout the Counties, for publication and confirmation of the aforesaid Statutes; and on the same day, the King departed from London for his Castle of (fn. 137) Wyndelsore.

Memorandum,—that on the Day of Saint Agnes, the Virgin and Martyr [21 January], in the year aforesaid, was issued the King's writ, with his letters under his Privy Seal, throughout all the Counties of England; to publish thereby on behalf of Sir Piers de Gavastone, Earl of Cornwall, his return by the King's command into his own land, as being, as pure, good, and loyal, as before he was exiled by act of the King, and assent of the Archbishop, Bishops, Earls, and Barons. The which command came from York, and was published at London on the Saturday next after the Conversion of Saint Paul [25 January].

In the seventh year of the reign of King Edward, son of King Edward.

Be it remembered, that on the Sunday next before the Day of Saint Luke the Evangelist [18 October], came the Earl of Lancaster, the Earl of Warwyk, the Earl of Hereford, the Earl of Arundel, Sir Henry de Percy, Sir Robert de Clifford, Sir John Botetourte, and others not named, into the Hall of Westminster, before the King on the high dais there, kneeling to make obeisance unto their lord, and to ask pardon. And he of his own free will granted it unto them, and gave them his letter as to all offences up to that day committed; and on the morrow his general Parliament began.

Memorandum,—that on the Vigil of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist [24 June], being Sunday, there came, the King of England, the Earl of Gloucester, the Earl of Hereford, the Earl of (fn. 138) Penebrok, and many Barons of England, with banners displayed, unto near the Castle of (fn. 139) Estrivelyn in Scotland, and gave battle to Robert de Brus, and all his force, in the field. In which field, the discomfiture fell upon the people of England, it being the Day of Saint John thence next ensuing. And there died there the said Earl of Gloucester, Robert de Clifford, Baron, Giles de Argenteym, Payn Tipetoft, William le Mareschal, and other Barons and Knights, and the Earl of Hereford was taken prisoner, John de Sagrave taken, Ralph de Monhermer taken, and other Barons and Knights taken; and the King made his escape without receiving bodily harm, and returned to Berwyk.

[Notice given on the occasion of the (fn. 140) Robbery of the King's Treasury at Westminster, 31 Edward I.]

"We do command you, on behalf of our Lord the King, upon pain of forfeiture of life and of limb, and of lands, and of chattels, and whatsoever you may forfeit, that all those who have found aught of the treasure of our Lord the King, be it gold, or silver, or stone, or any other thing whatsoever, whether within the City or without, in whatsoever place it may be, coming from his Treasury at Westminster which has been broken open, shall come unto the Guildhall before the Mayor and Sheriffs, and restore what they shall have so found, between this and Sunday next ensuing, at the hour of Vespers. We do also command, on behalf of our Lord the King, under pain of forfeiture aforesaid, that all those who have sold or bought aught of the same treasure, or who know that any persons have sold or bought any of that same treasure, or who know that any persons have found any part thereof, or have the same in their keeping in any manner whatsoever, shall come unto the Guildhall before the Mayor and Sheriffs, and shall shew and acknowledge what they know thereof, between this and Sunday next ensuing, at the hour of Vespers, in manner as is before stated. And whosoever shall not do the same on or before such day, the King will hold them as felons against him."

The 13th year of Edward [II.], at the beginning.

Memorandum,—that the King, the Earl of (fn. 141) Langatre, the Earl Marshal, the Earl of (fn. 142) Risemond, the Earl of (fn. 143) Peneprok, the Earl of Hereford, the Earl of Warrenne, the Earl of Arundel, and many Barons, went into Scotland to wage war against Robert de Brus.

The 20th year of Edward [II.].

Memorandum,—that Queen Isabel and her son Edward, and John de (fn. 144) Henaud, Edmund de (fn. 145) Wodestoce, Earl of Kent, Roger de Mortimer, and the Knights of England who had been banished, and a great number of men-at-arms from Henaud, arrived in England and penetrated as far as (fn. 146) Bristoue, and there took the Earl of (fn. 147) Winsettre [and] the Earl of Arondel. and sentenced them to death. After this, they pursued the King, Hugh (fn. 148) le Despencer, [and] Robert de (fn. 149) Baudok, Chancellor of England; and took the King, and placed him in custody, while Hugh and Robert they sentenced to death as traitors. The King they deposed from the crown, and the same year lie died by a sudden death. Edward, his son, they had crowned at Westminster before his father's death, and he went against the Scots, who by force of arms had entered his territories ; but having made a treacherous alliance with certain of the English, they returned to their own country.

In (fn. 150) this leaf are set forth what Charters were in the Chest of the citizens in the year of Our Lord 1270; which Chest was at that time in the custody of Arnald Fitz-Thedmar, under the keys of Robert de Corenhelle, and Robert de Rokesle, and John Addrian, Draper.

The Charter of King William the First, (fn. 151) written in English.

The Charter of King Henry the Second as to the Liberties of the City, granted in the . . . year of his reign.

The Charter of King Richard as to the Liberties of the City, granted in the . . . year of his reign.

"Whereas the tenure of edifices in the City of London is such, that in many places where no (fn. 152) land has been sold, certain persons may chance to pierce the walls of their neighbours, in which they have no right of their own, nor ought to have, nor ought maliciously to enjoy the occupation thereof, as by putting in the said walls beams, or corbels, or arches, or aumbries. And such occupations as aforesaid do take place in cellars and in rooms in which no persons can approach the same or can know thereof, save only the household of the occupier. And such occupations as these do last for many years, and are not perceived, so that no complaint can at an early moment be made thereon. It is hereby provided, that at whatsoever time it shall be first perceived by a person, however long after such occupation shall have been made of his private wall, such person shall at the same time and hour be able to make his plaint thereon in the Hustings. And the Mayor shall give a day for the same; upon which day the occupier shall be summoned to come before the Mayor and the folks of the (fn. 153) Assize. And if the aforesaid occupier shall not forthwith shew his warranty, to the effect that he has rightfully wrought in that wall, then forthwith, at the cost of the aforesaid occupier, the said occupation is to be ousted, and the aforesaid wall restored to its proper state, as is before stated."

Footnotes

1 Caernarvon: meaning Edward II.
2 A.D. 1316-7.
3 'Wengrave' is the usual form of the name. The peculiar spelling of the surnames, which appear to have been entered by a person of foreign extraction, has been here retained throughout.
4 There is a line previous to this, giving Stephen de Abingdon as Mayor; but in reality his mayoralty was in the 9th Edward II.
5 Properly 'Chigwell.'
6 Or 'Eyre' of the Justiciars. For an account of it, see the Liber Custumarum, pp. 285—432.
7 Chigwell.
8 Properly 'Grantham.'
9 Chigwell.
10 Or 'Folsham.'
11 Properly 'Caustone.'
12 Given elsewhere as 'Roger Chaunceler.'
13 Properly 'Rothinge.'
14 Or 'Betoigne.'
15 Eustace de Fauconberge, High Treasurer of England.
16 Or place of independent, and exclusive, jurisdiction.
17 This passage is, to all appearance, imperfect.
18 Smithfield.
19 This is perhaps the meaning of'—ov ke lur nest et pest.'
20 From Smithfield.
21 This is evidently an error, there being no such date.
22 Edward the Second.
23 Blakency.
24 Cambridge.
25 Of the Sheriffwick.
26 Properly 'Mereworthe.'
27 Maker of burels, coarse russet cloths.
28 Cornwall.
29 Scarborough.
30 Pembroke.
31 Dedington, near Banbury.
32 Kenilworth.
33 Lancaster.
34 Feast of Saint Mary Magdalen.
35 Henry de Beaumont, a Peer of Parliament.
36 Probably for 'Scolace,' or 'Scholastica,' 13 February.
37 Or Corndealer.
38 Country places.
39 Or Lacy.
40 Or St. Faith's Church, at the East end of the Choir begun A.D. 1256 by Bishop Fulk Basset, and to which the Earl had been a liberal contributor.
41 Poitiers.
42 Step-mother of Edward II.
43 Dances probably, accompanied with songs.
44 Gloucester.
45 Witsand, near Boulogne.
46 Properly 'Garton.'
47 From other sources we learn that this pomel, or ball, was of sufficient capacity to hold 10 bushels of corn, the cross being 15 feet in height.
48 A.D. 1278.
49 Winchelsea, A.D. 1293.
50 A.D. 1313.
51 Worcester.
52 A.D. 1280.
53 Properly Ralph de Baldock, or Baudake: A.D. 1304.
54 A.D. 1313.
55 A.D. 1317.
56 I. e. 12th Edward II.
57 Or Wengrave.
58 Chigwell.
59 Properly, 'Sandale,' or 'Sendale.'
60 Commonly, 'Hakeney.'
61 Thomas Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster, cousin of Edward II.
62 Humphrey de Bohun.
63 The shilling of silver weighed three-fifths of an ounce.
64 Or silver penny.
65 Properly 61440.
66 Properly 256.
67 Properly 1966080.
68 Properly, Rokesley, Mayor A.D. 1274— 1280.
69 A.D. 1281—1283.
70 A.D. 1284.
71 A.D. 1286.
72 Or Sandwich, A.D. 1285, 1287—1292.
73 A.D. 1293—1296.
74 A.D. 1297, 8.
75 Or Elias Russel, A.D. 1299, 1300.
76 A.D. 1301—1307.
77 Or Blackbrook.
78 The Second.
79 A.D. 1308.
80 See page 191 ante.
81 In reference, apparently, to Gregory de Rokesley, who held the Mayoralty from A.D. 1274 to 1280.
82 Properly, 'Le Engleys.'
83 Winchester.
84 Properly, 'Anketin.'
85 Properly, 'Godchep.'
86 Cornhill.
87 Rokesley.
88 Properly 'Elias.'
89 Rokesley.
90 Gloucester.
91 For 'Adam.'
92 For 'Suthfolke,' or 'Suffolk.'
93 Fulham.
94 Stortford.
95 Generally known as 'Richer de Refham.
96 Or Epiphany.
97 Edward I.
98 It seems uncertain whether the 5th January or 13th October is here meant.
99 Wooden towers.
100 In the 28th of Edward I., A.D. 1300, 1.
101 Edmund Plantagenet, who died A.D. 1295.
102 Aldgate.
103 Crooked and polled, or clipped, coins of inferior value. They generally passed for one penny, but by proclamation their value was fixed at one halfpenny.
104 Properly, 'Haveringe,' in Essex.
105 In the 29th and 30th years of Edward I.
106 Or 'Bosenho.'
107 The dues received by him in the capacity of Sheriff.
108 Meaning 'le Chaucer,' the writing being evidently that of a foreigner.
109 Guilford.
110 In conformity with the alleged privileges of the citizens of London, who, in most cases, were allowed to discharge themselves by their own oath and that of jurors or compurgators. See Liber Albus, passim.
111 Trial by oath of compurgators was thus called.
112 Held by the Justiciars at the Tower. This it is surmised is the meaning of "en cheuse par la fransise en heyre dehors."
113 31 Edward I.
114 Properly Combe Martin, from the place in North Devon of that name.
115 Properly 'Thunderley,' the present Thundersley, in Essex.
116 See under the 30th of Edward I., in the following Chronicle.
117 Wallace.
118 Qy. Newbottle?
119 Carrick.
120 Or 'Fraser.'
121 In reality, it was hung in chains.
122 Or Whit-Sunday.
123 Properly, 'Athol.'
124 I.e. before he was dead.
125 Carlisle.
126 In Aldgate.
127 In reality, Nicholas Pycot and Nigel Drury were Sheriffs.
128 Boulogne, in France.
129 If this means Ulster, the statement seems incorrect; as Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, had that title; and his only daughter was married to Thomas Earl of Lancaster.
130 Greenwich.
131 Dominicans, or Black Friars.
132 Ferrers.
133 More commonly, 'Aymer.'
134 Pembroke.
135 Oxford.
136 Or Tibetoft, or Tiptoft.
137 Windsor.
138 Pembroke.
139 Stirling.
140 See the following Chronicle, s. a. 31 Edward I.
141 Lancaster.
142 Richmond.
143 Pembroke.
144 Hainault.
145 Woodstock.
146 Bristol.
147 Winchester; Hugh le Despenser received this title in the year 1322.
148 The Younger.
149 Or Baldock.
150 This entry, it will be observed, is of considerably earlier date than the greater part of the insertions.
151 'scripta in Anglicis.' 'Anglo-Saxon' is strictly the meaning.
152 This document is evidently copied most inaccurately, and, in some places, its meaning can only be guessed at.
153 Or Jury.