Inquisitions
Henry VIII (part 2 of 3)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

43-60

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: Henry VIII (part 2 of 3)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 43-60. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65868 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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John Raaffe.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 21 November, 1 Henry VII [1509], before Thomas Bradbury, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Raafe, by the oath of Robert Bardesey, John Condale, John Herdman, Philip Cowper, Alan Felyson, John Houshold, John Cokkes, Henry Nortrich, Thomas Pykyll, John Knarre, Thomas Gybbons, Robert Piersson, Robert a Legh, William Burton, William Gustard (?), Robert Harryson and Oliver Holynbrigge, who say that

John Raaffe was seised of 1 large messuage or brewhouse or hospice called the Whitebeer with 2 messuages to the said brewhouse adjoining, situate in Adrichgate Street in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichgate.

So seised, the said John Raaffe by his last will bequeathed the said premises after the death of Margaret, his wife, to Edward, his son: to hold to him and his heirs for ever. If the said Edward die without heirs of his body, then the said premises shall remain to William, son of the said John Raaffe: to hold to him and his heirs for ever: with remainder successively to Margery, daughter of the said John Raaffe, and to the Abbot and Monks of the monastery of St. Alban, the first Martyr of the English in England, for ever to the use of the exhibiton of scholars of the said Monastery for ever. The said John Raaffe also willed that when the said premises came into the actual possession of the said monastery each priest of that place should celebrate one Mass for the dead, and each of the inferiors of that order should say half a psalter beyond what they are held to of right. He also desired that they should have once in the year, as long as the said monastery lasted, the office for the dead, with a mass in the convent for himself, his consort, all his children, his parents, kinsmen and friends.

The said Edward, William, and Margery, died without heirs of their bodies.

The said Margaret, wife of the said John Raaffe, also died, whereupon all the title and interest of the premises remained to the said Abbot and Monks for ever.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth, per ann., clear, £6.

John Raaffe died 9 February, 1442.

John Knappe and William Bryan, citizens and brewers, of London, occupied the said premises, and took the profits of the same, but by what title, in what way, and how long, the jurors know not.

Inq. p. m. 1 Hen. VIII, No. 30.

John Nychills.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 24 May, 23 Henry VIII [1531], before John Pargetor, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Nychills, late citizen and merchant tailor, of London, by the oath of John Palmer, John Sparhawke, William Mosseman, Andrew Chessham, John Lewes, Humphrey Prowdeman, Thomas Lewes, Fulcon Cleyton, Robert Chamber, William Ormond, John Watson, John Vowmer, William Lytehed, Roger Taillor, William Wyld, Alan Holond, and Walter Thomas, who say that

John Nychills was seized of 3 shops with solars thereupon built, lying in the parish of St. Andrews, Cornhill, which were late of William Hyll, merchant, of the staple of the town of Calais. The said shops are held of the King in free burgage by the yearly rent of 1d., and are worth per ann., clear 40s. Long before the taking of this Inquisition William Stalworth and William Barnes, citizens and merchant tailors, of London, were seised of 3 messuages, 1 cottage and 2 gardens, lying in the parish of Andrew Underhast, in Lymstret, which late were of Richard Wentworth, son and heir of Henry Wentworth, Knight: which said 3 messanges are now united and made into 1 capital messuage with a garden.

They being so seised on the 6 November, 24 Henry VII [1508], enfeoffed thereof the said John Nychills and Katherine his wife, Stephen Jenyns, Knight, Thomas Michell, William Preston, Thomas Ellys, Stephen Hudson, and Thomas Nichills: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said John Nychills and Katherine his wife and the heirs of the said John for ever, Afterwards the said Katherine, Stephen Jenyns, Thomas Mychell, Thomas Ellys, Stephen Hudson, and Thomas Nychills died, and the said John Nychills and William Preston survived them.

After the death of the said John Nychills the use of the said premises descended to Joan Offeley, his daughter and heir.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage by the yearly rent of 1d., and are worth per ann., clear, £5 6s. 8d.

John Nychills died 16 December, 22 Henry VIII [1530]: Joan, wife of Thomas Offley, is his daughter and next heir, and is now aged 21 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 23 Henry VIII, No. 81.

Richard Smythe.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 July, 21 Henry VIII [1529], before John Rudston, Mayor, John Hales and John Scotte, Barons of the Exchequer, and John Baker, Recorder of the City of London, by the oath of William Hunynges, Thomas Knight, Richard Spar, Gerrard Hughes, Paul Alexander, William Uxley, Henry Sukley, Robert Harryson, John Baxter, Robert Kyrke, Stephen Ponshon, William Semper, Thomas Osmonde, Roger Hunynges, Anthony Ilderton, John Gren, and Richard Rede, who say that

Richard Smythe, late of London, merchant tailor, William Fytzwyllyam, Knight, John Bylsdon, Richard Conhille, William Skrynen, John Hall, and John Fulwode, were seised of 8 messuages, 2 tofts, and 1 garden lying in Fryday street and Watlyng street, in the parish of St. John the Evangelist, in the ward of Bredstrete, to the use of the said Richard Smyth and his heirs.

So seised, they enfeoffed William Wylford, senior, John Goone, Thomas Cole, Thomas Lee, Robert Pachett, Paul Wythixoll, John Wylford, James Mychell, and Robert Fell, of the premises: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Richard Smyth and his heirs, and for the fulfilment of his will.

So seised, the said Richard Smyth at divers times after declared to the said William Wylforde and his co-feoffees that it was his will that the Master and Wardens of the company of the Merchant Tailors of London and their successors should after his death have the said premises to the intent that they should find for ever 1 priest to celebrate in the said parish Church of St. John the Evangelist for the souls of the said Richard, and of all the faithful deceased, they paying yearly to the said priest for his stipend £7. The said Master and Wardens shall also distribute every year among the poor of the said parish and ward coals to the value of 40s. They shall also keep yearly one anniversary in the said Church for the soul of the said Richard, expending upon the same 52s. 5d. Also 13s. 4d. yearly for ever to find 2 wax candles to be burned on Sundays and festivals, and 1 light called a Trenell before the crucifix in the said Church for ever. Also 4s. yearly to be expended for ever for the Paschal light in the said Church; and 3s. 4d. to be paid to the Chamberlain of the said City if present at the said anniversary.

On the 22 March, 1524, the said Richard Smyth made his will, whereby he declared that John Smyth, his son and heir, should have all the said premises, and revoked all other wills by him made.

After the death of the said Richard Smyth, the said William Wilforde and his co-feoffees were seised of the said premises to the use of the said John Smyth.

So seised, the said Thomas Lee and Robert Fell died, and William Wilforde, John Gone, Thomas Cole, Robert Pachett, Paul Wythixoll, and John Wylford, survived them.

The said John Smyth being so seised enfeoffed thereof Thomas Crumwell, John Bylsdon, Richard Ryche, Guy Crafforde, William Gynkes, Richard Holte, John Bodnam, and John Stukley: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said John Smyth and Joan his wife, and the heirs of the said John Smyth for ever.

One of the said 8 messuages, in which Thomas Nixon now lives, is held of the Master of the Rolls of the Court of Chancery by fealty, and the yearly rent of 53s. 4d. The residue of the said premises are held of the Abbot of the Monastery of St. Peter's, Westminster, in right of the said monastery, by fealty, and the yearly rent of 12s. 6d.

All the said premises are worth per ann., clear, £29.

Richard Smyth died at London, 27 March, 18 Henry VIII [1527]: John Smyth is his son and heir, and was then aged 31 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 21 Henry VIII, No. 21.

Robert Thornbrogh.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 July, 16 Henry VIII [1524], before Thomas Haldry, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Thornbrogh, esq., by the oath of John Willett, Thomas Sotten, William Sherewyn, Robert Hyde, Humphrey Cardull (?), Roger Tomlynson, John Adams, Robert Barns, Thomas Wanles, John Tailler, William Molle, William Page, and Thomas Paynton, who say that

Robert Thornbrogh was seised of 9 tenements in Fletestreet, in the parish of St. Bridget, in the ward of Farringdon Without.

So seised, by charter dated 20 August, 13 Henry VIII [1521], he granted the said tenements to William Honychurche, William Sulyard, and others: to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Robert Thornbrogh and his heirs for ever.

By his will dated 11 July, 12 Henry VIII, the said Robert Thornbrogh declared that Anne Thornbrogh, his wife, should take the profits of the said premises for her life, and that out of the same she should pay to Mary, Agnes, and Elizabeth Thornbrogh, daughters of the said Robert and Anne, when they shall attain the age of 16 years, £100 each. If the said Anne should happen to die before William Thornbrogh, son and heir of the said Robert, shall accomplish the age of 21 years, then William Pownd and Peter Phillpott shall take the said profits until the coming of age of the said William.

The said premises are held of Babyngton, Warden of the Fleet, by fealty, and the yearly rent of 3s., and are worth per ann., clear, £20.

Robert Thornbrogh died 12 March, 14 Henry VIII [1523]: William Thronbrogh is his son and heir, and is now aged 14 years and more.

Inq.p. m. 16 Henry VIII, No. 88.

William Buck.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 9 July, 24 Henry VIII [1532], before Nicholas Lambert, knight, Mayor and escheator, John Daunce, knight, and John Brier, recorder by the oath of John Gressa, Robert Barefote, Richard Colyer, William Byrche, Robert Lorde, William Samper, Martin Wyvell, Thomas Kele, William Loke, John Baxter, John Plummer, and Richard (?) Gybson, who say that

William Buck, late citizen and tailor (scissor), and freeman of the city of London, was seised of the capital messuage lying in the parish of St. Mary the Virgin of Aldermanbury, and the garden in the parish of St. Lawrence in Old Jewry in the ward of Chepe, in which messuage John Preste, citizen and grocer of London, now lives together with 4 tenements, situate in the said parish of the Blessed Mary of Aldermanbury in the ward of Crepulgate: William Bothe, citizen and shearman, lives in one of these tenements; in another John Gybbs, scrivener, lately dwelt, Thomas Man, 'syngyngman,' now lies in the third, and Richard Whythers, yeoman, in the fourth.

So seised, the said William Buck made his will in the parish of St. Martin within Ludgate in the ward of Faryngdon, whereby he willed that Margaret, then his wife, should have the said premises for her life on condition that she found yearly 13s. 4d. for an obit for the soul of the said William Buck in the said parish of the Blessed Mary during her life. After the decease of the said Margaret, the said premises to remain to John Buck, eldest son of the said William and his heirs; for default then to William Buck, second son of the said William and his heirs, with remainder thereof successively to Matthew Buck, third son of the said William, to Thomas Buck, fourth son of the said William, and to Agnes, late wife of Christopher Rawson, daughter of the said William Buck.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 20 marks.

The said John Buck and William Buck, junior, died without heirs.

The said Margaret Buck died 16 March, 13 Henry VIII [1522].

William Buck, senior, died 28 March, 17 Henry VII [1502]; the said Matthew Buck is still living in the parish of All Souls, Barking, London, and is now aged 40 years and more.

Immediately after the death of the said Margaret, Stephen Jenyns, knight, took the profits of the said premises for 2 years; after that the said Thomas Buck took them for 3 years, and then Robert Cheseman received them for 6 years.

Inq. p. m. 24 Henry VIII, No. 87.

Thomas, Marquis of Dorset.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 30 November, 24 Henry VIII [1532], before Stephen Peycoke, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas, late Marquis of Dorset, by the oath of William Davys, John Briggs, Thomas Robynson, John Twyford, William Mosseman, Andrew Chesham, William Roydon, Nicholas Nolthorp, Richard Harrys, John Hawthorn, Roger Taylor, Stephen Benett, Richard Madock, William Wycherley, and Ralph Harbotell, who say that

Thomas, late Marquis of Dorset, after he married the Lady Margaret, late his wife (who still survives), was seised of the large messuage or tenement in the parish of St. James at Garlyke Hythe within the ward of Vintrey, and of 9 messuages situate in the parish of St. Andrew in the ward of Barnardez Castell.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage: the messuage in the parish of St. James is worth per ann., clear, 40s., and the said 9 messuages are worth per ann., clear, 46s. 8d.

The said Marquis died 10 October, 22 Henry VIII [1530]: Henry Gray, now Marquis of Dorset, is his son and next heir, and was then aged 13¾ years, 12 weeks, 4 days and more.

Inq. p. m. 24 Henry VIII, No. 97.

William Boly.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 12 June, 26 Henry VIII [1534], before Christopher Ascue, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Boly, late of London, sadler, by the oath of John Palmer, Walter Thomas, John Watson, William Mosseman, Andrew Chesham, William Roydon, Willam Bottesham, Richard Harrys, Roger Taillor, John Hawthorne, Richard Forde, William Wycherley, and Thomas Archer, who say that

William Boly, by the name of William Bully, citizen, sadler and freeman of London, was seised of 10 tenements in Wodestreet, London, and of 6 tenements in Stanyng lane, next Wodestreet. Four of the said tenements in Wodestreet are situated together in the parish of St. Albans, to wit, between the tenements of John Williams, gent., on the north part, the great gate or place of Edward North, gent., on the south and west, and the highway of Wodestreet on the east: the other 6 tenements (residue of the said 10 tenements) are situated together, to wit, 2 of them are next to the gate of the said Edward North in the said parish of St. Albans, and 4 in the parish of St. Michael in Wodestreet, to wit, between the lane called Maydenlane on the south part, the said great gate of the said Edward North on the north part, the highway of Wodestreet on the east, and the place and land, late of Lord Beamond, now in the tenure of John Lounde, haberdasher, on the west. The said 6 tene ments in Stanynglane are situate together in the parish of St. Mary Stanyng, to wit, between the stable adjoining Haberdashers Hall on the south part, the lane there leading between the said tenements and the said Church of the Blessed Mary on the north part, Stanyng lane on the west part, and the tenements of the said John Williams on the east part.

So seised, the said William Boly made his will whereby he bequeathed all the said premises to Mathew Danby, Edward Stewarde, Thomas Yonge, and Robert Adelsey, 4 of the wardens of the art or mystery of sadlers, and to the community [? commonalty] of the said mystery and their successors for ever.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £16 sterling. William Boly, alias Bully, died 21 June, 25 Henry VIII [1533], but who his heir is the jurors know not.

The said wardens have taken all the rents and profits of the said premises from the said 21 June up to the taking of this Inquisition.

Inq. p. m. 26 Henry VIII, No. 54.

Thomas Englefield, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 2 June, 30 Henry VIII [1538], before Richard Gressham, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Englefield, knight, late one of the Justices of the Common Bench, by the oath of Richard Close, Richard Madox, Robert Wandsworth, Henry Nortriche, Walter Thomas, William Archer, John Aleyn, John Barton, Guy Benet, John Ramsey, William Bull, William Helyard, Richard Forde and John Nicolson, who say that

Thomas Englefield, knight, father of the said Thomas named in the writ, was seised of a messuage called the Taverne of the Kyngeshedd, lying in a street called Burye street, London.

So seised the said Thomas Englefield, senior, by charter dated 11 October, 24 Henry VII [1508], bequeathed the said messuage to the said Thomas Englefield, his son and heir-apparent, and to Elizabeth, then his wife; to hold to them and to the heirs of the said Thomas by the said Elizabeth. The said messuage is held of the King in burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Thomas Englefield, junior, died 28 September last past; Francis Englefield is his son and heir, and was then aged 15 years and more.

The said Elizabeth still survives.

Inq. p. m. 30 Henry VIII, No. 71.

John Hone.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 31 August, 30 Henry VIII [1538], before Richard Gressam, knight, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Richard Close, Patrick Cornisshe, Richard Madox, Robert Wanesworth, William Harbery, John Brown, John Watson, Guy Benet, John Ramsey, William Bull, William Hillyard, Robert Jonson, and John Vernon, who say that

John Hone, citizen and tallowchandler, was seised of one messuage or tenement and 4 shops adjoining, the same called Pilkynton's Place, in the parish of St Botolph without Aldrichegate in the ward of Aldrichegate.

So seised, the said John Hone, by his will dated 15 March, 26 Henry VIII [1535], bequeathed the said premises to Cecilia, his wife, for her natural life, with remainder after her death to William Hone, his son.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £4. The said Cecilia took the profits thereof from the death of the said John Hone until the taking of this inquisition. The said John Hone was likewise seised of a messuage, or brewery, called the Redd Lyon, and 4 tenements thereto adjoining in the parish of St. Nicholas ad Macellas in the ward of Faryngdon, and so seised he by the said will bequeathed the same to the said Cecilia for her natural life if she should keep herself sole and unmarried, and after her death to the said William Hone and his heirs.

After the death of the said John Hone the said Cecilia married John Baynton, by pretext whereof the said last named premises remained to the said William Hone.

The said brewery and messuages are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 4 marks sterling.

John Hone died 10 May, 30 Henry VIII [1538]; William Hone is his son and heir, and is now aged 22 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 30 Henry VIII, No. 106.

Thomas Monoux.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 October, 30 Henry VIII [1538], before Richard Gresham, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Monoux, by the oath of Richard Maddox, Nicholas Assheton, Robert Wansworth, Henry Nortryche, John Watson, William Archer, John Alyn, John Ramsey, William Hyllyard, Robert Johnson, John Virnon, Ralph Harbotell, William Bull, and William Harbury, who say that

Long before the death of the said Thomas Monoux, one George Monoux, citizen and alderman of London, who still survives, was seised of a capital messuage called the Poppeshede lying in Lumberdstrete in the parish of St. Mary Wolmer and in the ward of Langborne; 3 messuages or tenements in the said parish and ward; and 2 messuages or tenements in the parish of St. Michael the Archangel in Cornehill, and within the ward of Cornehill.

So seised, the said George Monoux by indenture dated 1 July, 29 Henry VIII [1537], in consideration of the faithful services rendered to him by the said Thomas Monoux, his kinsman, granted to him and his heirs all the said premises, by the name of the messuage called the Poppeshed and 5 messuages, in which Thomas Stephyns, John Gardyner, Fabian Wythur, Richard Stanffeld, and Philip Gunter now dwell: all which premises were lately purchased to the said George Monoux and his heirs of Henry Owen, knight: to hold the said premises to the said Thomas Monoux and his heirs.

Afterwards the said Thomas Monoux, by the name of Thomas Monoux of Walkhampstowe, in the county of Essex, gent., at the special request of the said George, and to the intent that he (George) might distribute the profits of the said premises for pious uses at his pleasure, by deed dated 8 July, 29 Henry VIII [1537], demised all the said premises to the said George: to hold from Michaelmas then next following for 40 years.

The said premises are held of the King in burgage by the free service of 1 penny per ann.

Thomas Monoux died 4 December, 29 Henry VIII [1537]; George Monoux is his son and next heir, and was then aged 8 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 30 Henry VIII, No. 112.

Oliver Southworth.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 30 March, 30 Henry VIII [1539], before William Forman, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Oliver Southworth, by the oath of Richard Close, Richard Madox, Patrick Cornysshe, Hugh Churche, Robert Wansworth, Thomas Hancoke, Henry Nortryche, John Cokkes, William Archer, William Dunyng, John A . . ., John Barton, William Bull, Robert Reason, William Bottysham, and Seth Rowland, who say that

Oliver Southworthe was seised of 2 tenements situate in Fleetstreet, 2 tenements in the 'oulde Baylie' in the suburbs of the city, a void parcel of land in Fleetstreet called the Welcheman or a certain tenement or hospice there called the Welcheman, and 2 gardens situate in the Moone Alye in the parish of St. Botolphs without Bishopsgate.

So seised, the said Oliver Southworth by charter dated 20 January, 20 Henry VIII [1529], granted to Margaret Taylour, widow, whom he was then about to marry, William Sulyarde, gent., Thomas Brighteman, John Bate, senior, and John Stephens, all the said premises which he, together with Oliver Leyder, Roger Barker, John Wyllforde, William Hithe, Richard Lynde, and Richard Alyn, lately recovered against Edmund Knyvet, esq., sergeant at the gate of the King, to the use of the said Oliver Southworthe and his heirs.

The said Oliver Southworth and Roger Cholmeley, Robert Cheseman, Oliver Leder, and John Percyvall were seised to the use of the said Oliver Southworth and his heirs, of the gift of Richard Lynde (?), waxchandler, and William Hithe, citizens, of 2 gardens in Moone Alley in the parish of St. Botolph.

So seised, the said Oliver by charter granted the said 2 gardens to the said Margaret Taylour, William Sulyarde, Thomas Brighteman, John Bate, and John Stephens: to hold for the term of the life of the said Margaret for her jointure, they paying to the chief lords of that fee the services thereof due and accustomed.

After the marriage of the said Oliver Southworth and Margaret Taylour, to wit, on the 23 January, 28 Henry VIII [1537], the said Oliver made his will, whereby he gave to the said Margaret, as well all his premises in the city of London as all the terms of years yet to come in a tenement next the Swanne, near the gate of Newgate: to hold for her life in the name of her jointure. The reversion of all the said premises immediately after the death of the said Margaret was to be sold, and the money from the same forthcoming was to be employed to fulfil the said will. Testator appointed the said Margaret his sole executrix.

Oliver Southworth died on the 23 January, 28 Henry VIII [1537], after whose death the said Margaret, for the performance of his said will, by the advice of John Tawe, Robert Knighte, and John Farlyon, supervisors of the said will, by charter [here recited at length in English] dated 24 April, 29 Henry VIII [1537], sold to Oliver Leder, gent., one of the 6 clerks of the Court of Chancery, for the sum of £112, the reversion of all the said premises; to hold to him and his heirs for ever.

The 2 gardens above mentioned in Moone Alye lie between the land belonging to the King's Chapel of St. Stephens of the town of Westminster on the east part, and the land of the Prior and Convent of the house called St. Mary's Spittell on the north part, the land belonging to the Church of St. Michael in Cornhill on the south, and the lands of the Prioress and Convent of St. Elenes within busshopes gatestreate on the west.

The said 2 tenements in Fleestreet, the 2 tenements in the Old Bailey, and the said void parcel of land are held of the King by the service of paying 1 red rose yearly at the feast of St. John the Baptist: they are worth per ann., clear, £11 6s. 8d. The 2 gardens in Moone Alye are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear. 13s. 4d.

George Southworthe is the kinsman and heir of the said Oliver Southworthe, to wit, son and heir of Robert, son and heir of Robert Southeworthe, brother of the said Oliver, and is now aged 23 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 30 Henry VIII, No. 41.

Thomas Creme.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 4 August, 28 Henry VIII [1536], before John Aleyn, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Creme, late citizen and clothier of London, by the oath of Richard Maddox, Patrick Cornysshe, John Charley, Richard Close, Stephen Rowland, Nicholas Assheton, John Browne, William Archer, John Watson, John Barton, Thomas Robynson, John Ramsey, William Mosseman, William Hellyard, Andrew Chesson, Robert Johnson, John Warnone, and John Lewte, who say that

Thomas Creme was seised of one capital messuage with a garden and of 2 other messuages or tenements thereto adjacent in Mynchyn Lane in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East in the ward of the Tower, which are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Thomas Creme died 26 September, 1526: after his death the said premises descended to Robert Creme, his kinsman and heir, to wit, son of John, brother of the said Thomas, because the said Thomas died without heirs of his body. The said Robert is aged 56 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 28 Henry VIII, No. 114.

Sir Hugh Vaughan, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 October, 28 Henry VIII [1536], before John Alen, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Hugh Vaughan, knight, by the oath of Richard Madoxe, John Palmer, William Botsam, John Browne, William Archer, John Alen, John Ramsey, William Mosseman, William Hyllyard, Andrew Chesham, Robert Johnson, John Lute, and John . . ., who say that

Hugh Vaughan, knight, was seised of 2 messuages or tenements with 2 shops and a stable thereto belonging in the parish of the Blessed Mary Somersett at the Brokynwharf, London: which said premises are held of the King in burgage by the service of 1 red rose only to be paid yearly at the feast of St. John the Baptist, and are worth per ann., clear, £5.

Hugh Vaughan died 28 August last past; George Vaughan is his son and heir, and is aged 14 years and more, and is not married.

Inq. p. m. 28 Henry VIII, No. 92.

John Copynger, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 February, 34 Henry VIII [1543], before John Cootes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Copynger, esquire, by the oath of Hugh Churche, Oswald Dockwray, Richard Madox, William Botsam, Robert Johnson, John Vernham, Henry Northriche, Robert Plott, John Cockes, William Bulle, John Ramsey, Robert Reason, Thomas Jorden, John Clerk, William Hyllyarde, and John Watson, who say that

Before the death of the said John Copynger, the King, in consideration of the true and faithful services rendered by the said John as one of the doorkeepers of his chamber, granted to him a capital messuage or tenement lying in the parishes of St. Margaret in Lotheburye and St. Olave in Hold Jurye, and 2 other tenements next adjoining the east part of the said capital messuage, to wit, at the south east corner of the garden of the said messuage, which were then used for a coalhouse and woodhouse, and were late in the tenure of John Parke, citizen and mercer of London, and formerly belonged to the monastery 'Salutacionis Matris Dei,' of the Order of the Carthusians, next London; also another tenement situate in the said parish of St. Margaret in Lothebury, to wit, between the capital messuage late in the tenure of the said John Parke and then in the tenure of John Sadler, citizen and alderman of London, and lately belonging to the monastery of Holy Trinity called Christchurch, now dissolved, on the west part, and abutting upon the tenement of John Clyfford, citizen and mercer of London, then in the tenure of Robert Smythe, gent., towards the south, and upon the street there called Lothebury towards the north: to hold to the said John Copynger and his heirs male, as by the said letters patent dated at Westminster 1 March, 30 Henry VIII [1539], it may appear.

The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and by the rent of 29s. and are worth per ann., clear, £13 0s. 4d.

John Copynger died 26 March, 31 Henry VIII [1540]; Henry Copynger is his son and next heir, and is now aged 21 years and more

Inq. p. m. 34 Henry VIII, No. 9.

Sir William Hollys, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 February, 34 Henry VIII [1543], before William Cotys, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Hollys, knight, by the oath of Richard Aloffe (?), Richard Madox, Thomas Hancock, William Botsam (?), Robert . . ., Richard . . ., John Sampson, William Bulle, John Ramsey, Robert Reason, Thomas Jorden, William . . ., Christopher Nicholson, John Horsepole, Francis Overton, John Chirch, . . . Harbotell (?), and John Drax, who say that

William Hollys was seised of 2 messuages lying in the parish of the Blessed Mary of the Arches (le Bow—de Arcubus), and 3 messuages and 1 garden lying in the parish of St. Botolph. . . .

The said 2 messuages are held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and by the rent of 28s. 4d., and are worth per ann., clear, £12 15s.

The said 3 messuages and garden are held of the King in free burgage by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £11 3s. 4d.

William Hollys died 20 October last past; Thomas Hollys is his son and next heir, and was then aged 29 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 34 Henry VIII, No. 19. (fn. 1)

William Crane, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 18 October, 38 Henry VIII [1546], before Martin Bowes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William Crane, esq., by the oath of John Sherwyn, John Sampson, Robert (?) Molding, Reginald Conygrave, Robert Warter, Richard Forde, Thomas Blackwall, Thomas Rideley, John Leylond, William Prowtryng, Richard Cade, James Crosse, William Roberts, John Dormer (?), and Nicholas . . ., who say that

William Crane was seised of 10 messuages or tenements with gardens thereto adjoining, now in the several tenures of John Parker, James Peskyn, Edward Payton, Thomas Colsell, John Heron, William Clarke, Stephen Martell (?), John Croppe (?), and Adrian Byscombe, lying together within the close or precincts of the late Priory of St. Ellen within the city of London, now dissolved; 3 rooms now in the tenure of William Damerall and Emma . . . lying within the said close; 6 rooms late in the several tenures of Richard Atkyns, Alice Paule, Reginald Dene, Elizabeth Watson, and the said William Crane, lying together in a certain alley within the said close; that tenement now in the tenure of John Parker situate within the close now in the parish of St. Andrew Undershaft; and that tenement now in the tenure of Margaret Crane, widow, late the wife of the said William Crane, situate within the close aforesaid: all which premises aforesaid the King by letters patent dated 3 March, 31 Henry VIII [1540], granted to the said William Crane and Margaret: to have to them and to the heirs male of the said William, to hold the same of the King by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, they paying yearly 34s. 8d.: all the said premises are worth per ann., clear, £17 6s. 8d.

William Crane died 7 July, 37 Henry VIII [1545]; Domynyke Crane is his son and heir, and was then aged 21 years and a half.

The said Margaret survived the said William.

Inq. p. m. 38 Henry VIII, No. 120.

Sir Michael Dormer, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 October, 38 Henry VIII [1546], before Martin Bowes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Michael Dormer, knight, alderman of the city of London, by the oath of John Sherwyn, John Fisher, John Sampson, Benedict Burton, Robert Moleden, Reginald Conygrave, Robert Warter, Richard Forde, Christopher Nicholson, Thomas Blacwall, Thomas Rydley, John Leyland, William Proton, James Crosse, Richard Cade, William Ledyngton, Richard lonne, Edward Taylor, and Nicholas Taylor, who say that

Michael Dormer was seised of a capital messuage and a garden adjoining and 3 messuages situate in the parish of St. Lawrence in Old Jewry; 3 messuages with cellars and solars lying in the parish of St. James in Garlikhithe; a large messuage, now divided into divers small cottages, situate in the parish of St. Giles without Cripplegate; 4 messuages with cellars and solars, situate in Philpot lane; 2 messuages in the parish of St. Peter le Poore; a messuage called the Soonne in Chepe in the parish of St. Mary at Bow; 3 messuages in the parish of St. Mary Magdalene in Mylkstrete, and a messuage in Abchurch lane.

So seised, the said Michael Dormer made his will, whereby he declared that Lady Katherine Dormer, his wife, should immediately after his death have the said capital messuage and garden in the said parish of St. Lawrence, so long as she should keep herself sole and unmarried: if she married again, then she should only have the said premises for one year after her said marriage. To John Dormer, his son, the said Michael bequeathed all other his messuages, lands, etc., within the city of London, immediately after his death; also the said capital messuage after the death or re-marriage of the said Lady Katherine; to hold to him and his heirs male. If the said John died without heirs of his body begotten, then all the said premises should remain to Ambrose Dormer, son of the said Michael, and his heirs male; for default, the remainder thereof to William Dormer, son of the said Michael, and his heirs male; and for default, the remainder to Jeffery Dormer and his heirs male, with divers remainders over.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage and socage. The said capital messuage and other the premises in the said parish of St. Lawrence are of the clear yearly value of £12 13s. 4d.; the premises in the parish of St. James are worth per ann., clear, £4; the large messuage in the parish of St. Giles is worth per ann., clear, £3; the premises in Philpotlane are worth per ann., clear, 59s. 4d.; the premises in the parish of St. Peter le Poore are worth per ann., clear, £16 13s. 4d.; the premises in the parish of the Blessed Mary at Bowe are worth per ann., clear, £13 6s. 5d., and the said premises in the parish of St. Mary Magdalene are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d.

Michael Dormer died 20 September, 37 Henry VIII [1545]; Thomas Dormer is his son and next heir, and is now aged 40 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 38 Henry VIII, No. 115.

John Hamond, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 May, 38 Henry VIII [1546], before Martin Bowes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Hamond, gent., by the oath of John Fyssher, John Sampson, Benedict Burton, Robert Moldyng, William Mathewe, Laurence Wylson, Edward Tayler, Christopher Nicolson, John Leylond, Thomas Pygott, Thomas Laund, William Ledyngton, James Crosse, and Nicholas Assheton, who say that

Before the death of John Hamond, King Henry VIII was seised of 4 messuages or tenements in the parish of St. Martin Owtwyche.

So seised, the King by letters patent dated at Terlyng 10 August, 31 Henry VIII [1539], for a certain sum of money, granted to the said John Hamond and Elizabeth, his wife, all the said messuages, by the name of one tenement wherein the said John then dwelt, one tenement wherein Richard Yarowe then lately dwelt, which the said John Hamond lately held by indenture for a term of years, and 2 other tenements lying together lately demised to Alan Hawte by indenture for a term of years: to which said premises belongs the moiety of a stone wall there: to hold to them and their heirs, of the King in chief by knight's service, to wit, by the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 11s. 4d.

So seised, the said John made his will at London in the said parish of St. Martin Owtwyche on the 8th of November, 37 Henry VIII [1545], as follows: Forasmuch as by force of a statute late made my eldest son must inherit the third part of my lands and tenements, I now give to my youngest son Robert and his heirs all my house with the great garden and stable which 'Master Reynoldes, physyc[i]on,' now holds in farm of me. All the residue of my lands, tenements, and hereditaments I wholly give to my other 2 sons John and Raphaell, and to their heirs, provided that they will pay the rents and charges due for the same.

The said premises are held as abovesaid, and are worth per ann., clear, £5 13s. 4d.

John Hamond died 15 November, 37 Henry VIII [1545]; John Hamond is his son and heir, and was then aged 25 years.

The said Elizabeth still survives.

Inq. p. m. 38 Henry VIII, No. 144.

Footnotes

1 This inquisition is quite illegible in places.