Inquisitions
Henry VIII (part 3 of 3)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

60-78

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: Henry VIII (part 3 of 3)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 60-78. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65869 Date accessed: 25 November 2014.


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Robert Harrye, fishmonger.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 13 October, 38 Henry VIII [1546], before Martin Bowes, knight, escheator, after the death of Robert Harrye of London, fishmonger, by the oath of John Shyrwyn, John Fyssher, John Sampson, Benedict Burton, Robert Moldyng, Robert Warter, William Morgan, Edward Taylor, Thomas Rydley, Thomas Pygot, Thomas Loune, Robert Cade, William Prowton,John Dormer, and Nicholas Assheton, who say that

Robert Harrye was seised of a tenement with shops, cellar, and solars situate in the parish of St. Nicholas Coldeabbye in Fysshestrete, a stable and divers warehouses situate in the parish of St. Mary Somers, and a bakehouse with divers tenements thereto adjoining lying within the parish of St. Andrew Undershafte.

So seised, the said Robert Harrye made his will the 19 day of March, 36 Henry VIII [1545], whereby he bequeathed to Thomas Harrye, his eldest son, his house with shops wherein he (testator) then dwelt, lying in the parish of St. Nicholas Coldeabbye, to hold to him and his heirs. To his wife Agnes, testator bequeathed all his said bakehouse, to hold for her natural life, and after her decease to his 2 sons Thomas and Robert, and to their heirs. The residue of testator's goods, etc., to be divided between his said wife and sons. The said Robert's part to remain in the keeping of Thomas Beston, fishmonger, until his age of 21, and the share of the said Thomas to be in the custody of Robert Reygnolds until he come out of his apprenticeship. The said Agnes to be sole executrix.

The said tenement with the shops, etc., is held of the King in chief by the 20th part of a knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, £4. The said stable with the warehouses are held of the King in chief by the 20th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, 60s. The said bakehouse is held of the Mayor and burgesses of the city of London in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 60s.

Robert Harrye died 17 March, 36 Henry VIII [1545]; Thomas Harrye is his son and next heir, and was then aged 18 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 38 Henry VIII, No. 145.

Sir Thomas Leigh, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 23 October, 38 Henry VIII [1546], before Martin Bowes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Leigh, knight, by the oath of John Shirwyn, John Fisher, John Sampson, Benedict Burton, Robert Mouldon, Reginald Conygrave, Robert Warter, Richard Foorde, Christopher Nicholson, Thomas Blakwell, Thomas Rydley, John Leylande, William Prowton, James Crosse, Richard Cade, William Luddington, Richard Loune, Edward Taylor, and Nicholas Assheton, who say that

Thomas Leigh was seised of a large messuage or tenement in the tenure of Philip Cockerham (?) and John Borowgh, mercers, and of a small tenement adjoining the said messuage, in the tenure of Thomas Averye, gent., together with all shops, cellars, solars, etc., thereto belonging, lying in the parish of St. Peter le poore in the City of London.

So seised the said Thomas Leigh made his will [here recited in English] whereby he by the title of Thomas Leigh of Hogston beside London in the county of Middlesex, esquire, willed that all his lands, tenements, and hereditaments should be divided into 3 parts, one whereof was to be paid to the King during the nonage of testator's heir for his wardship; the second part with his house called Hogsdon in co. Midd. he bequeathed to Joan, his wife, for her natural life, in full recompence of her dower: and the third part with his house called Saint Oswalds, in Yorkshire, except his lands of Caldre, in Cumberland, he willed his wife should have for the payment of his debts, which being done, the said third part should remain wholly to her for her life. Testator devised to Thomas Leigh, eldest son of his brother William Leigh, and to his heirs male his house and manor called Caldre, in Cumberland, together with all lands, tenements, rents, etc., thereto belonging. If testator died without heirs male of his body, then the said 2 parts devised to the said Joan for her life, together with his house and manor called Saint Oswalds and all the 'implements of household stuff' therein contained to the said Thomas Leigh and his heirs male; for default of such issue, then the said premises to go to William Leigh, younger son of the said William Leigh and his heirs male. If he die without issue male then the said premises to remain to testator's next of kin bearing the name of Leigh and his heirs male. The house in Cambridge adjoining St. Nicholas hostel and testator's chamber within the said hostel he devised to Mary, his wife's maid, and her heirs, and for default the same to remain to his (testator's) nephew, Thomas Leigh, and to his heirs male.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £13 sterling.

Thomas Leigh, knight, died 24 November, 37 Henry VIII [1545]; Katherine Leigh is his only daughter and next heir, and is now aged 5 years, 1 month and more.

Inq. p. m. 38 Henry VIII, No. 146.

Oliver Richardson.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 18 October, 38 Henry VIII [1546], before Martin Bowys, knight, mayor and escheator, after the death of Oliver Richardson, citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of John Sherwyn, John Sampson, Robert Moldynge, Reginald Conygrave, Robert Warter, Richard Forde, Thomas Blackwall, Thomas Rideley, John Leylond, William Prowtrynge, Richard Cade, James Crosse, William Roberts, John Dormer, Nicholas Assheton, who say that

Oliver Richardson did not hold any lands of the King or others within the City of London.

He died 2 May, 38 Henry VIII [1546].

Inq. p. m. 38 Henry VIII, No. 118.

William Rest.

Inquisition indented taken at the Guildhall, 4 October, 38 Henry VIII [1545], before Martin Bowes, knight, mayor and escheator, after the death of William Rest, citizen and grocer of London, by the oath of John Shyrwyn, John Fisher, John Sampson, Benedict Burton, Robert Molding, Richard Forde, Christopher Nicholson, John Leylond, William Calton, William Ledyngton, William Prowting, William Roberts, John Dormer, and Nicholas Assheton, who say that

William Rest was seised of 16 messuages, 3 gardens and 2 curtilages in the parishes of the Blessed Mary Wolnoth and the Blessed Mary Wolchurchhawe, London.

So seised, the said William Rest made his will in the said parish of St. Mary Wolnoth on the 8th February, 1545, whereby he devised all the said premises to Katherine Rest, his daughter, and her heirs.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, 40 marks.

William Rest died 8 February, 37 Henry VIII [1546]; Edward Rest is his heir, and was then aged 38 years.

Thomas Marrow, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 21 August, 31 Henry VIII [1539], before William Forman, knight, mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Marrow, esq., by the oath of Richard Close, Richard Madox, Patrick Cornysshe, Henry Nortryche, John Cokkes, John Broun, Ralph Harbotell, William Bull, Robert Reason, John Clerke, William Bottysham, William Hyllyarde, and Guy Benett, who say that

Thomas Marrow was seised in fee-tail, as appears by the will of William Marrow, his father, of a capital messuage, called Galley 'Key,' in the parish of Barkyng in London; a capital messuage called Marroys 'Key,' in the parish of St. Marie At Hyll next Byllyngsgate in London; 3 tenements lying together in St. Clement's Lane, in the parish of St. Clement's; 2 messuages lying without Creplegate, in the parish of St. Giles; 3 messuages without Busshoppysgate, in the parish of St. Botolph; a messuage called the Glayue in Colmanstreet, in the parish of St. Stephen; 2 tenements in St. Dunstan's Lane, in the parish of St. Dunstan's in the Est; 2 messuages in Berelane, in the parish of Barkyng; a messuage in Philpott Lane, in the parish of St. Andrew; and 3 tenements in Petywales, in the parish of Barkyng: the reversion thereof being to his right heirs.

The said Thomas Marrow was likewise seised in fee of the 3rd part of 3 tenements in Bogerowe, in the parishes of St. Antholin and Eldermarye; and of the 3rd part of a tenement in Redrosestrete, in the parish of St. Giles without Creplegate.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage and by the yearly rent of 1d., and are worth per ann., clear, £53 10s.

Thomas Marrow died 2 September, 30 Henry VIII [1538]; Thomas Marrow is his son and heir, and was then aged 22 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 31 Henry VIII, No. 110.

John Mynne, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 June, 35 Henry VIII [1543], before John Cootes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Mynne, esq., by the oath of Hugh Church, Oswald Dokeray, John Lewtt, Richard Madox, William Botesham, Robert Johnson, John Wrnham (?), John Watson, Ralph Harbotell, Henry Nortrich, Thomas Ellys, John Barton, John Samson (?), William Bull, John Ramsey, Robert Reason, John Clark, William Hilyard, Henry Robertes, Robert Tayllor, Christopher Nicholson, John Horsepole, and Freman Overton, who say that

Before the death of John Mynne, Richard Andrewe, of Hales, gent., and Leonard Chamberlayne, of Woodstock, in the county of Oxford, esq., were seised of 1 capital messuage, and 4 tenements thereto adjoining, lying in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichegate in the suburbs of London. So seised, the said Richard and Leonard by force of a licence from the King under his Great Seal of England, dated 20 June, 34 Henry VIII, by their charter, dated 4 July, 34 Henry VIII [1542], granted to the said John Mynne and Alice his wife (who still survives) all the said premises, by the name of a capital messuage in the tenure of the said John Mynne, in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichgate, lately belonging to the monastery of St. Bartholomew next Westsmythefield, now dissolved, and 4 tenements thereto adjoining: to hold to the said John and Alice and to the heirs of the said John for ever.

The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 8s., and are worth per ann., clear, £3 12s.

John Mynne died 14 December, 34 Henry VIII [1542]; Edward Mynne is his son and next heir: he was 8 years old on the 22nd day of June last past.

Inq. p. m. 35 Henry VIII, No. 120.

Thomas de Wyrlyngworth.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 June, 35 Henry VIII [1543], before John Cotes, knight, Mayor and escheator, by the oath of Baldwin Smythe, Richard Yonge, William Wynkell, Lancelot Strynger, Michael Lobley, James Byrrall, Edward Gunne, John . . ., Robert Wodde, Thomas Galely, John Lake, Michael Baker, Richard Dawson, Thomas Spenser, and William Bowde, who say that

Thomas de Wyrlyngworth, citizen and goldsmith of London, was seised of 1 messuage or tenement in Fridaystrete in the parish of St. Matthew in Fridaystrete in the ward of Bredstrete, which said messuage was lately divided into 2 messuages, in one of which Nicholas Russell, haberdasher, lives, and in the other John Robertes, draper.

The said messuage was held of the King in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, £8.

Thomas de Wyrlyngworth died 4 April, 39 Edward III [1365] (sic) without heirs.

Inq. p. m. 35 Henry VIII, No. 218.

Dame Elizabeth Rede, widow

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 15 December, 25 Henry VIII [1533], before Christopher Ascue, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Dame Elizabeth Rede, widow, late the wife of Bartholomew Rede, knight, citizen, and Alderman of London, by the oath of William Davys, John Brydges, William Wylde, John Palmer, John Watson, William Archer, John Alyn, William Moseman, 'Audrie' Chesham, William Roydon, William Botsham, Roger Tayler, Robert Johnson, William Wyncherley, Thomas Archer, and John Shyngylhurste, who say that

Bartholomew Rede, citizen and freeman of London, was seised of 1 capital messuage, with a garden thereto adjoining, and 1 'computator' situate on the gate of the said messuage, in the parish of St. John Zacharie in the ward of Alderyche Gate. So seised, the said Bartholomew made his will, whereby he bequeathed the said premises to the said Elizabeth, his wife, for her life, and after her decease the same to remain to the wardens and commonalty of the art or mystery of the Goldsmiths of London and to their successors for ever. By force whereof after the death of the said Elizabeth, Thomas Calton, Henry Aberell, Roger Horton, and Martin Bowes, then wardens, and the commonalty of the said Goldsmiths by William Southewoode and John Chaundeler, their attornies, entered into the said premises, which are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 10 marks.

The said Elizabeth died 23 December, 24 Henry VIII [1532]; but who her heir is the jurors know not.

The said wardens have taken the profits of the said premises from the said 23 December up to the taking of this Inquisition.

Inq. p. m. 25 Henry VIII, No. 55.

Rowland Lathom.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 11 March, 33 Henry VIII [1542]. before Michael Dormer, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Rowland Latham, esq., Serjeant of the Catry by the oath of Hugh Chyrche, Ralph Close, Oswald Dockewrey, John Levett, William Botsam, Robert Johnson, John Vernon, Robert Platt, John Cockes, Thomas Elys, John Bonde, William Bull, John Ramsey, Robert Reason, Thomas Jorden, John Clerke, William Helyard, Henry Roberts, and Ralph Hurbotel, who say that

Rowland Lathom, esq., was seised of 1 messuage, with solars, cellars, etc., in Sermon Lane, within the parish of the Blessed Mary Magdalene, in Olde Fysshestrete, in the City of London.

So seised, the said Rowland died at Longworth, in the county of Berks, 10 February, 32 Henry VIII [1541] leaving his wife Dorothea enceinte. Afterwards, to wit, on 20 April, 33 Henry VIII [1541] she was delivered of a daughter, who was then named Joan. On 8 August in the same year, the said Joan, daughter and next heir of the said Rowland, died at Blakmore, in the county of Essex. The said Dorothea still survives, and is now the wife of John Smyth, esq.

The said messuage is held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a Knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, 30s.

Thomas Lathom is the kinsman and next heir of the said Joan, to wit, son of Thomas Lathom, son of Thomas, father of Edmund, father of Rowland, father of the said Joan, and is aged 28 years and more.

Inq. p. m. 33 Henry VIII, No. 117.

Luke Wyborne (idiot).

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 16 July, 32 Henry VIII [1540], before William Hollis, knight, Mayor and escheator, to enquire about the idiocy of Luke Wyborne, son and heir of Nicholas Wyborne, late citizen of London by the oath of Roger Mundy, Hugh Churche, Patrick Cornysshe, Richard Close, William Horbury, Nicholas Assheton, Robert Johnson, William Hylliard, William Dull, John Ramesey, John Clerk, Robert Platt, John Cokkys, and John Watson, who say that

Nicholas Wiborne was seised of 4 tenements in the City of London, whereof 2 are in the parish of St. Mildred, in the ward of Quenehith, the 3rd is in the parish of St. Leonards, in the ward of London Bridge, and the 4th is next the Mineris, in the parish of St. Botolph without Algate, in the ward of Algate.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 66s. 8d.

Nicholas Wiborne died 10 June, 30 Henry VIII [1538], Luke Wyborne is his son and heir, and was then aged 22 years and more. From his birth the said Luke has been an idiot quite incapable of governing either himself or his lands. Thomas Chamberleyn, of London, pewterer, has taken the profits of the said premises from the death of the said Nicholas up to the present time.

Luke Wiborne was seised of divers goods and chattels to the value of £16 8s. 4½d., being in a tenement wherein the said Nicholas Wyborne lately dwelt, situate in the parish of the Blessed Mary Wolnoth, in the ward of Langeborne: which said goods afterwards came into the hands of the said Thomas Chamberleyn, who still possesses them.

Inq. p. m. 32 Henry VIII, No. 58.

House of Hallywell, and House of St. Thomas of Acon.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 16 August, 34 (?) Henry VIII [1542 ?], before John Aleyn, knight, Mayor and escheator by virtue of his office, by the oath of John Charley, Richard Madom, Patrick Cornysshe, John Browne, William Archer, John Ramsey, William Mosseman, William Hyllyard, Andrew Chessham, Robert Johnson, John Barton, and John Hite, who say that

Maria de Storteford, prioress, Margery Donestaple, sub-prioress, Matilda, of Thorkkyng, precentrix, and Margaret Vernoun, 'Sacrista' of the House of Halywell, next London, and the convent of the same place, by their deed dated in the Chapter House of the said House on Friday next, after the feast of St. Gregory the Bishop, to wit, the 16 March, 1330, made between themselves of the one part and Reginald Leighton, rector of the church of St. Thomas the Apostle, London, Benedict de Folsham, Thomas de Bytyne, Robert le Caller, and Roger de Lavyne, parishioners of the said church, of the other part, for £100 sterling, paid to them by the executors of the will of John de Borford, formerly citizen and merchant of London, and of Roesie his wife, for the use of the said church and house, unanimously agreed to find at their own expense a fit secular chaplain to celebrate Divine service for ever, for the souls of the said John de Borford and Roesie, and all Christian souls, in the church of St. Thomas the Apostle, next the Rioll, in the City of London, he to receive for his services 6 marks sterling for ever out of their said house and out of their rents, lands, and tenements as follows, to wit, out of all that tenement which the said Maria, Margery, Matilda, and Margaret had in Soperslane, in the parish of St. Pancras, which is situated between the tenement of John Knopwod towards the south, and the tenement of Roger de Waltham towards the south; those tenements situate in the parish of St. Stephen in Wallebroke, between the tenement of Henry Panner, towards the west, and the tenement called Bokerelesbury towards the east; those tenements in the parish of St. Peter, of Wodestrete, between the tenements of Robert le Brete on the east, and the tenements of the church and parishioners of All Saints of Honylane, between the lane called Honylane towards the east, and the tenements of Odonis of Essex, sometime citizen and apothecary of London, towards the west.

Sibilla Nudygate is now prioress of the said House of Halywell; she has not found a chaplain to certain Divine service in the said church of St. Thomas the Apostle, neither has she paid the said 6 marks sterling.

And moreover, the jurors say that Brother Ralph de Coumbe, master of the House of St. Thomas of Acon, next the conduit in the City of London, brother Thomas de Sandwich, knight, Brother Thomas de Warlyngham, and Brother Henry de Delamore, priests, confrères of the said house, with the unanimous assent of all the brethren and chapter of the same, by a certain deed dated in the Chapter House on Thursday next after the feast of St. Matthew the Apostle, to wit, 1 March, 1329, made between themselves and Sir Reginald de Leighton, rector of the said church of St. Thomas the Apostle, Benedict de Folsham, Thomas Beteigne, Robert le Caller and Roger de Lavyne, parishioners of the said church, for 100 marks sterling, paid by the executors of the will of the said John de Borford and Roesie his wife, agreed to find a chaplain to celebrate Divine service for the souls of the said John and Roesie in the said church of St. Thomas the Apostle for ever, and to pay him at the least 6 marks yearly for his service, out of the said house and out of the rents of all their lands and tenements which they had in the said city, to wit, in the parishes of the Blessed Mary of Colcherche, opposite the conduit towards the north, St. Olave, of Old Jewry, and St. Martin de Pomers in Ismongereslane, some of which tenements are situated between the entrance of the church of St. Thomas of Acon on the east side, and the said church of St. Mary of Colcherche, some are founded on the east part of the said church from the said church in the circuit of the corner of the said Colecherche Street. Some are situated between the great gate (?) of the said House of St. Thomas in Colcherche Street, and the church of St. Olave in the said street, and some are situated between the small lane which leads from Ismongerlane on the west of the said street up to Colchurche Street towards the east, and the tenement of John de Enefeld, chandler, on the north.

Laurence Gopserler is now master of the said House of St. Thomas of Acon: he has neither found a chaplain to celebrate Divine service nor paid the said 6 marks.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 3, No. 56–58.

James Andrewe.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 1 December, 29 Henry VIII [1537], before Richard Gresham, knight, Mayor and escheator by virtue of his office, by the oath of Patrick Cornysshe, Richard Maddox, Stephen Rowland, John Lewte, Robert Wansworth, Thomas Kery, William Archer, John Aleyn, John Barton, Guy Benett, John Ramsey, William Bull, William Mosseman, Andrew Chesham, William Hyllyard, Robert Johnson, and John Varnon, who say that

James Andrew was seised of divers lands and tenements lying together in Thamystrete, within the parish of All Saints, on the Cellars (the Less), London, which were formerly of Richard Andrew, father of the said James, and of Matilda, wife of the said Richard; also of the tenements which were of Adam Excestr, called Borgoyne, and Matilda his wife; also of the tenements which were of Hugh Pykard, in the ward of Dowgate, one head (caput) whereof abutts upon the land of John Studde, gent., on the east part, another head abutts upon the lane called Wolsey lane on the west part, the highway of Thamystrete on the south, and the land sometime of the Duke of Buckingham on the north.

So seised, the said James Andrew, by his will enrolled in the Court of Hustings, dated Wednesday, in the vigil of St. Matthew the Apostle, 1374, bequeathed 10 marks sterling of yearly rent to be taken every year for the foundation and sustentation of a perpetual chantry to be held by a fit and honest chaplain to celebrate for the souls of the said Richard, Matilda, James, and Matilda, and of all faithful deceased in the said church, the said chaplain to be presented by 4 parishioners of the said parish. The said James Andrew also willed to the Master of the College of Corpus Christi, in the Church of St. Laurence, next Candelwykstrete, London, 10s. of yearly rent, to be divided between the said Master and the chaplains and clerks of the said College, to be taken out of all testator's tenements yearly for ever at the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, so that the said Master, chaplains, and clerks shall observe his (testator's) anniversary solemnly with the service for the dead every year on Sunday next after the Feast of St. James the Apostle, and shall also keep 2 candles burning about testator's body, to wit, 1 at his head and the other at his feet, during the said service.

To his daughter Katherine the said James Andrew bequeathed all his lands and tenements so charged, to hold for her whole life; and after her death the same to remain to 4 parishioners of the said Church of All Saints, to provide necessary things for the said church.

James Andrew died on Wednesday, in the vigil of St. Matthew the Apostle, 1374.

After the death of the said Katherine, John Brereton, now Master of the Hospital of St. Bartholomew, in West Smythfeld, London, occupied the said premises, and took the profits of the same, but by what title the jurors know not.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £17.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 3, No. 81.

James Pegge.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 14 October, 30 Henry VIII [1538], before Richard Gresham, knight, Mayor and escheator by virtue of his office, after the death of James Pegge, late of the parish of St. Brigide, in Fleatestrete, London, 'Bruer,' by the oath of Stephen Rouland, Robert Wanseyworth, Henry Nortriche, John Watson, William Archer, John Alyn, John Ramsey, William Bull, William Hylliard, Richard Forde, Robert Jonson, John Browne, and John Varnon, who say that

James Pegge, on 1 April, 26 Henry VIII [1535], was seised of 7 messuages, with gardens adjoining, in Shoe Lane, in the parish of St. Brigide, London.

So seised, the said James Pegge, being a citizen and freeman of the City of London, bequeathed the said messuages to Joan, his wife, for the term of her life, and after her death the said premises to remain to the Master and warders of the mystery of the Brewers of London and their successors, on condition that they observe yearly a certain anniversary for the soul of the said James Pegge, and also give certain alms, as by his last will more fully appears. But if they be remiss or negligent, then the said premises shall remain to the Master and wardens of the Fraternity of the Blessed Mary the Virgin and St. Brigide, founded in the parish church of St. Brigide, London, and their successors, on the like conditions. If they be remiss, then the said messuages shall remain to the Master and Wardens of the Fraternity of the Blessed Mary and St. Dunstan and their successors, in the parish Church of St. Dunstan, in the West, London. The said tenements are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, 5 marks.

James Pegge died 12 November, 28 Henry VIII [1536]; Joan Pegge, his widow, took the profits of the said premises by reason of his last will.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 3, No. 92.

Richard Stace.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 20 June, 31 Henry VIII [1539], before William Foxman, knight, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of his office, by the oath of Richard Close, Richard Madox, Stephen Rowland, John Lute, John Brown, John Watson, William Bull, John Ramsey, Robert Reason, John Clerke, Richard Forde, Robert Johnson, William Hyllyard, John Vernon, Patrick Cornysshe, Hugh Churche, Henry Nortryche, John Burton, Guy Benett, and William Bottysham, who say that

Richard Stace, late citizen and jeweller of London, was seised of 1 messuage or tenement with cellars, solars, etc., situate in the street and ward of Cornhyll, in the parish of St. Christopher, London, between the tenement late of John Gedney on the east, and the tenement late of Guy Laurens on the west in breadth, and extending in length from the highway of Cornhyll towards the south to the tenement late of John de Erethe towards the north.

So seised, the said Richard Stace, by his will dated 12 March, 1433, bequeathed the said messuage to Wynne (Wynneto) Chamberleyn, then rector of the church of St. Christopher, William Mette, clothier, and John Curteys, grocer, citizens of London, churchwardens, and to the parishioners of the said parish, and to their successors, to the intent that they should hold every year for ever in the said church an anniversary for the souls of the said Richard Stace, Alice, his wife, Thomas, his brother, Joan, his mother, and for the souls of all his benefactors, etc., the said rector then being present to have 12d. yearly, each chaplain 4d., and each of the 2 clerks of the said church 6d. yearly. And for bread and ale for the said rector and chaplains 16d. Testator also willed that the said rector and wardens should pay yearly towards the works of the said Church of St. Christopher 3s. 4d., and towards the sustentation of the Fraternity of St. Christopher in the said church 2s. yearly. Out of the profits of the said premises the said rector, wardens, and parishioners were to provide yearly and for ever 30 yards of wide woollen cloth, the price of each yard to be 20d., and 30 yards of wide blanketting, the price per yard to be 12d., to make cloaks and blankets for 10 of the poorest and most needy men and women of the ward of Cornhill and other adjoining wards, the said cloaks to be presented every year on the feast of St. Michael the Archangel. If the said rector and wardens should neglect to carry out testator's wishes, then their estate in the said premises to pass to the wardens and masters of the mystery of the Goldsmiths of the City of London: to hold to them and their successors in frankalmoigne for the sustentation of the poor of the community of the said mystery for ever.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £5 6s. 8d.

Richard Stace died many years ago.

Richard Stannye, clerk, the now rector of the parish Church of St. Christopher, Robert Herdes and Thomas Dady, wardens of the said church, and the parishioners there have held the said premises for the space of 5 years.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 3, No. 119.

Richard Charleton, knight.

I nquisition taken at the Guildhall 20 October, 2 Henry VIII [1510], before William Capell, knight, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of his office, by the oath of Andrew Evynger, John Condale, John Herdman, Philip Cowper, Alan Felyson, John Houshold, John Cokkes, Henry Nortrich, Robert Pyersson, Robert A. Legh, William Burton, Robert Gustard, Oliver Holyngbrigge, and Thomas Pykyll, who say that

Richard Charleton, knight, who was attainted of high treason by an Act of the Parliament held at Westminster 7 November, 1 Henry VII [1485], was seised of 13 tenements lying in the parish of St. Andrew, in the south part of Holborn, in the suburbs of London called Charleton's lands; 1 messuage situate at the corner of Bowlane, in the parish of St. Michaels Paternoster at Dowgate, within the City of London; and 3 pieces of waste land situate in Cuffyn lane, there called Charleton's lands.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage: the said 13 tenements in Holborn are worth per ann., clear, £4; the messuage at the corner of Bowlane with the 3 pieces of waste land are worth per ann., clear, £4.

John Charleton, son of the said Richard Charleton, and Thomas Kendall, gent., have taken all the issues of the said premises from the said 7 November up to the present time.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 1, No. 54.

Richard Charleton, knight.

I nquisition taken at the Guildhall 4 December,—, Henry VIII, before Henry Kebeell, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of his office, by the oath of John Bristall, John Condale, John Herdman, Philip Cowper, Robert Pyersson, Robert Gustard, Thomas Pykyll, John Houshold, Robert A. Lygh, William Burton, Thomas Gybbons, Alan Fyndelson, Robert Bardyssey, Oliver Helynbrygge, and Henry Nortrich, who say that

Richard Charleton, knight, who was attainted of high treason, was seised of 1 tenement lying in Chepesyde, London, called the Sterre, wherein Anthony Malyard lives; 1 other messuage in Chepesyde wherein John Adamson now dwells; 2 messuages lying in a certain lane called Saynt Laurens lane, in the parish of St. Laurence, wherein John Gare, 'Gyrdyller,' and John Haregoode, Goldbeter, now dwell; a messuage called the Whyteheer, and a tenement thereto belonging, situate in St. Laurence lane; 2 tenements or cottages with gardens adjoining situate in Whytecrostrete, in the parish of St. Giles without Crepulgate, London, called Charleton's lands; 1 tenement in Wodestrete, within the parish of St. Peter, now in the tenure of Richard (?) Meltham, goldsmith; 10 rooms there; 1 tenement there, now in the tenure of Richard Yong, grocer; 1 shop there, now in the tenure of William Staunford; — shops, with the room now in the tenure of William Barnard, purser; 2 tenements in the said parish of St. Peter, now in the tenure of William Campion, grocer; 1 tenement in the parish of the Blessed Mary Magdalene in Mylkestrete, now in the tenure of Thomas Thomson; 2 tenements with 2 shops in the tenure of . . . Cranks and John Wryght; and 2 shops in the said parish of St. Mary Magdalen in the tenure of Robert Ymber and Ralph Warreyn, mercers, called Charleton's lands.

All the said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £15.

Richard Nanfant (?), knight, Humphrey Grey, esq., Peter Curteyes, John Charleton, and Thomas Kendall took the issues and profits of all the premises from the 7 November, 1 Henry VII [1485], up to the present time.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 1, No. 55.

Richard Charleton, knight.

I nquisition taken at the Guildhall, 21 May, 21 Henry VIII [1529], before John Rudstone, knight, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of his office, by the oath of William Mosseman, John Hyll, Alan Creswell, Hugh Tergose, Richard Cherington, William Molle, Thomas Pakington, John Saxey, Philip Dee, Humphrey Prowdman, Robert Johnson, Henry Kettlewood, and Stephen Benett, who say that

Richard Charleton, knight, who was attainted of high treason on 7 November, 1 Henry VII [1485], was seised of 6 tenements, called Charletons lands, lying together in Bucklersbury, in the parish of the Blessed Mary Colchurch, London.

So seised, the King that now is by his letters patent dated at Canterbury, 15 February, in the 4th year of his reign [1513], granted the said tenements to Reginald Wolvedon and John Tregean: to hold for their lives as of freehold. Afterwards the said Reginald died at Grenewyche, in the county of Kent, and the said John Tregean survived him.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £13 13s.

Thomas Broun, William Blounte, John Charleton, Thomas Kendale, and William Wymbush, took all the profits of the said tenements in Buklersbury from the said 7 November, 1 Henry VII [1485], up to 18 April, 1 Henry VIII [1510]. The said Reginald Wolvedon and John Tregean took all the issues of the same from the said 18 April up to the feast of St. Michael the Archangel, 20 Henry VIII [1528]. Richard Hylle, clerk of the cellar to the King, has taken the said profits from the said feast of St. Michael until the taking of this Inquisition.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 2., No. 92.

Edward, Duke of Buckingham.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 16 October, 17 Henry VIII [1525], before William Bailly, knight, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of his office, by the oath of John Harte, John Selybronde, James Sewen, Thomas Sheers, William Cotes, William Knyght, Thomas Sponer, Thomas Rede, John Waterhouse, Hamlet Blymston, John Chaundeler, Thomas Godfrey, Thomas Philipps, Richard Harrys, William Peppes, Philip Nele, William Dune, John Cassewell, Thomas Dykons, and William Mathewe, who say that

Whereas King Henry VII by letters patent, dated 6 January, in the 21st year of his reign [1506], granted to Edward, late Duke of Buckingham, and to his heirs male, all that messuage, place, or mansion, with a garden adjoining, lying in the parish of St. Laurence of Pountney, within the City of London; also the patronage and advowson of the College or Chapel of Corpus Christi, next the parish Church of St. Lawrence, near Candelwykstrete, within the said parish, and the nomination of the master or warden of the said College, which were late of Edmund de la Pole, late Earl of Suffolk, and which came into the hands of the King by reason of the attainder of the said Earl.

At the Parliament, held at the Friars Preachers, within the City of London, 15 April, 14 Henry VIII [1523], the said Duke of Buckingham was attainted of high treason, and was thereupon ordered to forfeit to the King all his lordships manors, etc., including the said messuage, patronage and nomination.

At the time of his attainder the said Duke of Buckingham was seised of 5 librates and 16 pence of rent, issuing out of the following messuages: to wit, 24s. rent, issuing out of 1 messuage in the parish of All Saints Major, in which Stephen Jenyns, knight, lately dwelt; 24s. rent issuing out of 1 messuage in the said parish, wherein — Haddon lately dwelt; 46s. 8d. rent issuing out of the lands and tenements of the said Church of All Saints to be paid yearly by the churchwarden; and 6s. 8d. issuing out of 1 messuage in the parish of All Saints Minor, in which Ralph Bukberd lately dwelt.

The said messuage and other the premises are worth per ann., clear, £7 and 16d.

The said Duke of Buckingham died 17 May, 13 Henry VIII [1521].

Richard Jernyngham and Francis Bryan, knights, took the profits of the said messuage and garden from the death of the said Duke until 1 September last past, but by what right the jurors know not.

Philip Carnnyon and John Hasylwood took the profits of the said rents from the death of the said Duke up to the date of these presents, but by what right the jurors know not.

Richard Roston, late master of the said college, died the last day of September last past.

William Webster, clerk, took the profits of the said college from the death of the said master until the taking of this Inquisition.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O. p. 2, No. 123.

John Harris.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 9 July, 18 Henry VIII [1526], before John Aleyn, Mayor and escheator by virtue of his office, after the death of John Harris, citizen and merchant-tailor of London, by the oath of Thomas Bartlett, Thomas Richardson, Edmund Brygges, Robert Aleyn, William Mesenger, James Curlew, John Taverner, William Mosseman, Andrew Chesham, Andrew Frauncis, William Pepper (?), Richard Harris, Robert Dunkyrk, and Ambrose Bekwith, who say that

John Harris was seised of the messuage called the Bell, in the parish of St. Martin, in Ludgate, in the ward of Faryngdon.

So seised, the said John Harris made his will, whereby he bequeathed the said premises to Jeffrey Vaughan, then Master of the merchant tailors of the fraternity of St. J.ohn the Baptist, London, Paul Wythipoll, John Hanfurth, John Coke, and William Heton, then wardens of the said fraternity; also to the brethren and sisters of the same: to hold to their own proper use for ever.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £4.

John Harris died 10 May, 15 Henry VIII [1523]; Anna, wife of Alexander Hylton, citizen and merchant tailor of London, is his daughter and next heir, and is aged 30 years and more.

After the death of the said John Harris, the said Master and wardens entered into the said premises, and were, and still are, seised of the same to their own proper use.

Inq. p. m. Henry VIII, V. O., p. 2, No. 139.