Inquisitions
Edward VI (part 2 of 3)

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

G.S. Fry (editor)

Year published

1896

Pages

95-110

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: Edward VI (part 2 of 3)', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 1 (1896), pp. 95-110. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65871 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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Rowland Goodman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall 20 Sept., r Edward VI [1547], before Henry Hoberthorne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Rowland Goodman, by the oath of John Watson, John Harrys, Robert Molding, Thomas Rydley, Christopher Nicholson, William Hynton, William Beswyke, Rowland Staper, Nicholas Mars he, William Petyngale, Thomas Duckynton, Thomas Smythson, Thomas Anneston, William Box, John Ilearde, and William Saddoke, who say that

Rowland Goodman was seised of 1 piece of land or garden containing 2 acres; 1 tenement or lodge built in the said garden, 2 dye-houses (tentoriis) constructed in the said garden, sometime belonging to the late House or New Hospital of the Blessed Mary without Bysshoppisgate, now dissolved, situate in the parish of St. Botolph without Bysshoppisgate, to wit, between the garden now or late in the tenure of John Newton sometime belonging to the said late House and parcel of the possessions there formerly belonging to the late House of the Carthusians near the City of London, now dissolved, on the west part, between the land there of the Parish Church of St. Michael in Cornhill on the north part, and the land there in the tenure of the said Rowland on the south part.

The said Rowland was likewise seised of free ingress and egress to and from the said premises; also of one capital messuage called the Crowne, and of all houses, buildings, cellars, shops, etc., thereto belonging, lying in the said parish of St. Botolph, in the tenure of the said John Newton, to the said late House formerly belonging; 1 tenement called the Cheker, and 1 garden thereto belonging; 1 piece of land called a yarde; 1 piece of waste land lying on the north part of the said yarde, lying in the said parish of St. Botolph, sometime in the tenure of John Crosse, "Pulter," and afterwards in the tenure of the said John Newton: free ingress and egress to and from the said premises, with horses, carts and carriages by the great gate there leading to the house and garden within the said gate, now or late in the tenure of Edmund Gaile; and 10 cartloads of clay (luti), and 10 cartloads of sand yearly issuing out of the premises.

All the said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee, and by the yearly rent of 16s. 8d., and are worth per ann., clear, £7 10s.

Rowland Goodman died 6 May, 36 Henry VIII [1544]; Thomas Goodman is his son and heir, and is now aged 21 years and more.

Anna Goodman, late the wife of the said Rowland Goodman, and the said Thomas Goodman, his son, have taken all the profits of the premises from his death up to the present time.

Inq. p.m., 1 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 95.

William Garrard, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 28 Feb., 1 Edward VI [1547], before Henry Huberthorpe, escheator, after the death of William Garrard, gent., by the oath of John Watson, William Petyngale, John Abbott, William Box, Ralph Davy, Henry Moptide, Roger Norres, Thomas Lytton, Edmund Key, Thomas Tendale, Thomas Gybson, Richard Bowynton, Nicholas Dalton, Clement Nuce and Richard Elryke, who say that

Before the death of the said William Garrard one William Lambe of London, gent., was seised of 1 messuage with a garden adjoining, situate in Fletestrete in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West, in the suburbs of the City of London, to wit, between the common way leading towards the Inner Temple on the east part, the tenement now in the tenure of Giles Atkynson and Richard Wheeler, on the west part, the highway on the north part, and the garden of the said Inner Temple on the south part, sometime belonging to the Priory or Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, and then in the tenure of the said William Garrard.

So seised, the said William Lambe by his deed in consideration of a sum of money to him in hand paid, granted the said premises to the said William Garrard and Margaret, his wife: to hold to them and to the heirs of the said William for ever.

The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 40th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, 36s.

William Garrard died 12 January, 38 Henry VIII [1547]; George Symcote, gent., is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, son of John, son of Margery, sister of William Garrard, father of Thomas Garrard, father of the said William Garrard, and is now aged 30 years and more.

The said Margaret still survives in the said parish of St. Dunstan in the West.

Inq. p.m., 1 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 125.

Robert Phelippes.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 August, 1 Edward VI [1547], before Henry Hoberthorne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Phelippes, by the oath of Christopher Dreye, Benedict Burton, James Banester, Thomas Pygott, Robert Moldyng, Thomas Cole, Thomas Rydley, Christopher Nycholson, William Hynton, William Beswyke, Rowland Taper, Nicholas Marshe and William Petyngale, who say that

Robert Phelippes was seised of 7 messuages situate in the parish of St. Martin Ludgate, London, in the ward of Faryndon, late parcel of the possessions of the late Priory or New Hospital of the Blessed Mary without Bysshoppisgate, London, now dissolved; which said messuages were granted to the said Robert Phelippes and his heirs by Letters Patent dated 24 April, 32 Henry VIII [1540], for the sum of £82 15s.

So seised, the said Robert Phelippes made his will on the 12th day of April, 1547, as follows:

I Robert Phelippes of the parish of St. Martyns without Ludgate give my body to be buried within the body of the Church of St. Martin.

I will that Katherine, my wife, have all my lands in the said parish for her natural life; after her decease the same to remain wholly to Katherine, my daughter, and to the heirs of her body; and for default, to remain to William Bowlesse, my sister's son, and to his heirs for ever. The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 12s. 4d., and are worth per ann., clear, £5 8s.

Robert Phelippes died 20 April, 1 Edward VI [1547]; Katherine Phelippes is his daughter and heir, and is now aged 8 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 1 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 108.

John Potkyn, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 August, 1 Edward VI [1547], before Henry Hoberthorne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Potkyn, gent, by the oath of James Banester, John Harrys, Robert Colt, Robert Moldynge, John Hennams, Thomas Rydley, William Beswyke, Thomas Armistronge, Thomas Smythson, Nicholas Marshe, William Petyngale, Thomas Cole and Christopher Nicolson, who say that

John Potkyn was seised of 1 capital messuage called the Sterre situate in a certain street called Bredestrete, in the tenure of Thomas Martyn; 1 messuage in the parish of All Saints in Bredstrete, in the tenure of Richard Rede; 1 messuage in the said parish in the tenure of Humphrey Hart; 1 yearly rent of 26s. 8d. issuing out of a messuage in the said parish in the tenure of Thomas Dichefeld; 1 yearly rent of 27s. 4d. issuing out of a messuage there in the tenure of — Malte, widow, late the wife of John Malte, deceased; and 1 yearly rent of 10s. issuing out of a messuage there called the Cheker, in the tenure of the Masters and Fellows of the mystery called the Salters.

So seised, the said John Potkyn made his will the 8 day of April, 34 Henry VIII [1543], and thereby bequeathed all the said premises to John Baker, knight, Thomas Smyth, Richard Randall, Thomas Argall, Edmund Jenny, gentlemen, and Thomas Hynde: to hold to them and their heirs for ever. Afterwards, to wit, on the 29 day of August, 1545, the said John Potkyn made a codicil to his will as follows:

I give to the School of Sevenock £9 yearly for ever, to be levied out of my said capital messuage called the Sterre. I devise to Nicholas Payne and to the heirs of his body all my lands, etc., in co. Kent; and for default the said lands to remain to Thomas Potkyn and his heirs. To Luce Smyth for her life one annual rent of £5 issuing out of my said capital messuage. To my sister Phillipp Asteley for life one annual rent of £5, to be levied out of my said capital messuage; after her death her son — Asteley to have the said rent to him and his heirs; for default, the said Nicholas Payne to have the same to him and his heirs male. To my cousin Langlei's wife all my napery remaining in her house except one towel of 8 ells, which together with a crimson cross I give to the high altar of Sevenock.

The said messuages are held of the King in free burgage and common socage, and are worth per ann., clear, £5 0s. 7d.

John Potkyn died 29 August, 37 Henry VIII [1545]; Philippa Asteley, widow, late the wife of John Asteley, and Nicholas Payne are his next co-heirs, to wit, the said Philippa is the sister of the said John and is now aged 30 years and more, and the said Nicholas is the son and heir of Elizabeth Payne, another sister of the said John, and is now aged 18 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 1 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 94.

Richard Reynolds.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 8 October, 1 Edward VI [1547], before Henry Hoberthorne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Reynoldes, by the oath of John Watson, James Banester, John Harrys, Robert Moldyng, John Hennams, Thomas Rydley, Christopher Nycholson, William Beswyke, Rowland Staper, Nicholas Marshe, William Petyngale, Thomas Smythson, William Box, John Ileard and Thomas Duckyngton, who say that

Richard Reynolds was seised of 1 messuage, 1 garden and 3 tenements thereto adjoining lying next the Stockes in the parish of St. Christopher within the City of London.

So seised, the said Richard Reynolds by charter dated 13 Jan., 33 Henry VIII [1542], for the love which he bore towards Blanche, his wife, and for other considerations, granted to William Watson, citizen and clothier (pannario), of London, and to Oliver Burche, citizen and mercer of London, all the said premises; to hold to them and their heirs to the use of him the said Richard, of the said Blanche and of their heirs for ever.

After the death of the said Richard Reynolds, the said Blanche by charter dated 18 May, 35 Henry VIII [1543], granted all the said premises to John Gresham, knight, and Guy Craforde, esq., to hold to them and their heirs for ever, to the use nevertheless of the said Blanche and of Robert Palmer, mercer, whom the said Blanche then intended to marry, and of their heirs; for default, to the use of William Watson and Joan, his wife, and their heirs; and for default, to the use of the right heirs of the said William Watson for ever.

The said Robert Palmer died 12 May, 36 Henry VIII [1544], in the said parish. The said Blanche still survives by the name of Dame Blanche Forman. The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 24s., and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Richard Reynolds died 6 May, 34 Henry VIII [1542]; Joan Lamberde is his sister and heir, and is now aged 60 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 1 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 102.

Anne Whithers, widow.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 3 September, 1 Edward VI [1547], before Henry Hubbelthorne, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Anne Whithers, widow, by the oath of Benedict Burton, John Watson, Robert Moldinge, Thomas Ridley, Christopher Nicolson, William Beswike, Rowland Staper, William Petinggale, Robert Colt, Stephen Rowland, Thomas Duckington, Thomas Smithson, Thomas Armeston and William Saddoke, who say that

Anne Whithers was seised of 1 brewhouse (mesuagio brasineo) called the Wrastelars in Aldrichegate street in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldrichegate, London; 1 messuage thereto adjoining, and all the tubs and other necessaries for brewing, now in the tenure of John Longe; 5 tenements with a garden adjoining, situate on the south part of the said brewhouse; and 1 tenement called Flees with a garden adjoining, lying on the north part of the said brewhouse.

So seised, the said Anne made her will at Hadley Staunford, co. Middlesex, the 27 day of August, 1 Edward VI (1547), and thereby bequeathed the said 5 tenements to 5 poor women to dwell in without paying any rent, but only to pray daily for the souls of the said Anne, her father, mother, husband and children. The said Anne further willed that her executors should pay 6d. every Sunday to each of the said women, to be levied out of the messuage called the Wrastelars.

The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 10th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £9.

Anne Whithers died at Hadley Staunford 27 August, 1 Edward VI [1547]; William Whithers is her son and heir, and is now aged 13 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 1 Edward VI, p. 1, No. 98.

Marion Bennett, widow.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 29 June, 3 Edward VI [1549], before Henry Amcottes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Marion Bennett, widow, by the oath of Christopher Jackson, Thomas Jurden, Robert Moldyng, William Wytt, Thomas Dewxell, Edward Taylour, William Boxe, John Trull, John Morrys, John Leyland, John Beynton, Thomas Roodes and Thomas Petytt, who say that

Marion Bennett was seised of 2 messuages in Grub Street, in the parish of St. Giles without Cripulgate, in the suburbs of London.

So seised, the said Marion by charter dated 4 January last past, gave one of the said messuages to Marion Rolf, wife of Jasper Roulf, of London, yeoman, and to Thomas Roulf and George Roulf, sons of, and to Isabella Roulf, daughter of the said Jasper and Marion; to hold to them and their heirs to the use of the said Marion Bennett during her life; after her death to the use of the said Marion Roulf for life; after her death to the use of the said Thomas and his heirs; for default, to the use of the said George and his heirs; for default, to the use of the said Isabella Roulf and her heirs; and lastly, for default, to the use of the right heirs of the said Marion Roulf for ever, on condition that the said Marion, Thomas, George and Isabella Roulf, and their heirs should pay every year for ever in frankalmoign 4s. 4d. to 13 poor people on the vigil of the Assumption of the Blessed Mary the Virgin.

The said messuage is held of the King by free burgage, and is of the clear yearly value of £3. The said Marion Bennett by deed indented dated 8 February last past, made between herself of the one part and John Hill, citizen and "Iremonger" of London, and Joan, his wife, of the other part, sold the other said tenement to the said John and Joan Hill for the sum of £22, to hold to them and their heirs for ever.

The said messuage is held of the King in free burgage, and is worth per ann., clear, 26s. 8d.

By another deed dated 2 January last past the said Marion Bennett granted to John Pole, citizen and "joyner" of London, and Joan, his wife, all that south part or parcel of one tenement situate in Grubstrete, together with a garden on the west part of the said tenement, upon which a small house or barn has been built: which said south part contains in length from Grubstreet in the east part by the tenement of the Nuns of Clerkenwell in part, and the garden belonging to Henry Worley, late Alderman of the City of London, in part on the south part up to the land now of Richard Goughe on the west 76 feet, 2½ inches of assize, and contains in length from Grubstreet on the east part and within the residue of the tenement aforesaid on the north part up to the said small house or barn, late a garden, on the west part 59 feet and 3 inches of assize. The said south part of the said tenement contains in breadth by the land on the east part towards Grubstreet from north to south 10 feet and 7½ inches of assize, and contains in breadth on the lower part of the same at the Draught there belonging to the residue of the tenement aforesaid from north to south 13 feet of assize, and in breadth opposite the fountain there from the north to the south 17½ feet of assize. The said house or bam contains in length from the north to the south 19 feet and 3 inches of assize and in breadth from the east to the west 16 feet and 10½ inches of assize, and abbuts upon the land belonging to the Fraternity of St. Giles on the north and west: to hold the said south part of the said tenement to the said John Pole and Joan and their heirs for ever on condition that they pay every year for ever in frankalmoign on the vigil of All Saints 13d. to 13 poor people. The said south part is held of the King in free burgage and is worth per ann., clear, 13s. 4d.

Marion Bennett died 8 April, 3 Edward VI [1549]; the said Marion Roulf is her kinswoman and next heir, to wit, daughter of the sister of Thomas Stoketon, late the husband of the said Marion Bennett, and was then aged 33 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 3 Edward VI, No. 89.

Bartholomew Barne, mercer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 14 July, 3 Edward VI [1549], before Henry Amcottes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Bartholomew Barne, citizen and mercer of London, by the oath of Christopher Jackson, Thomas Jurdon, Robert Moldynge, William Wytte, John Baynton, John Layland, Thomas Dexyll, Thomas Pecooke, John Morrysse, John Sampson, John Trull and William Luddyngton, who say that

Bartholomew Barne was seised of 2 messuages, lying in the parish of St. Mildred the Virgin in Bredstreete, London; 2 tenements lying in Westcheepe, in the parish of the Blessed Mary-leBow; 1 messuage with the shops, cellars, solars, etc., thereto belonging in the parish of St. Lawrence in Old Jewry, London; and 2 messuages in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less in Bredstreet, London.

The said Bartholomew was also seised jointly with Joan Barne, his wife, of 18 messuages, cottages or tenements in London, to wit, 4 messuages in the parish of the Blessed Mary at Axe, 2 tenements in the parish of St. Martin in the Vyntrye, 1 messuage and 3 cottages thereto belonging in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Abchurch, 5 messuages in Candylwykestreet in the said parish of the Blessed Mary of Abchurch, and 3 messuages lying in St. Laurance Pounteney.

The 2 messuages in Bredstreet are held of the Dean and Chapter of Crystchurch in Canterbury by fealty only, and are worth per ann., clear, £5. The 2 messuages in Westcheep are held of the said Dean and Chapter by fealty and the yearly rent of 50s., and are worth per ann., clear, £8. The messuage in St. Laurance Lane in the parish of St. Laurence in Old Jewry is held of the said Dean and Chapter by fealty only, and is worth per ann., clear, £5. The 4 messuages in the parish of the Blessed Mary at Axe are held of the King in free burgage and common socage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £3 12s. The 2 messuages in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Less in Bredstreet are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £3. The messuage and 3 cottages in the parish of the Blessed Mary of Abchurch, the 5 messuages in Candylwykestreet and the 3 messuages in St. Laurence Pountney are held of the King by fealty only in free socage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £12 10s. The 2 tenements in the parish of St. Martin in the Vyntry are held of the King in free burgage and common socage and fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Bartholomew Barne died 26 August, 2 Edward VI [1548]; Thomas Barne is his son and next heir, and is now aged 28 years and more.

The said Joan Barne still survives.

Inq. p.m., 3 Edward VI, No. 86.

Edmund Love.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 4 October, 3 Edward VI [1549], before Henry Amcotes, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Edmund Love, by the oath of Christopher Jaxson, Richard Kendelmersche, Robert Moldynge, William Witt, John Leylond, Thomas Petit, Thomas Pecock, John Morris, George Seawker, John Sampson, John Trull and William Persall, who say that

John Gates, knight, when he was esquire and one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber (private Camere) of King Henry VIII, and Thomas Thorogood were seised of 6 messuages lying in the Olde Chaunge within the city of London.

So seised, the said John and Thomas by charter enrolled in the Court of Hastings, held on Monday next before the feast of St. John ante portam latinam, 37 Henry VIII (1545), demised to the said Edmund Love and Elizabeth, his wife, the said 6 messuages in the several tenures of William Gymlett, John Burgesse, Walter Wryght, Thomas Harryson, Margaret Thornham and Richard Corbett, formerly belonging to the House or Priory of the Crossed or Crutched Friars (frm Crucifereñ) within the city of London, now dissolved, together with all houses, buildings, shops, etc., to the said messuage belonging, in such ample manner as the said King by Letters Patent dated 5 July in the 36th year of his reign (1544), granted the same to the said John Gates and Thomas Thorogood and their heirs for ever: to hold the said premises to the said Edmund and Elizabeth and their heirs to their sole use for ever, as by the said deed dated 28 April, 37 Henry VIII [1545] more fully appears.

After the death of the said Edmund Love the said Elizabeth married John Thatcher.

The said messuages are held of the King in free burgage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £8.

Edmund Love died 20 February, 3 Edward VI [1549]; Joan Love and Elizabeth Love are his daughters and heirs; the said Joan is aged 8 years and more, and the said Elizabeth 3 years and more; they are in the wardship of the said Elizabeth Thatcher, late the wife of the said Edmund Love.

Inq. p.m., 3 Edward VI, No. 87.

William Hynton.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 13 July, 3 Edward VI [1549], before Henry Amcotes, knight and escheator, after the death of William Hynton, by the oath of Christopher Jackson, Thomas Jurdon, Robert Moldyng, William Wytte, John Baynton, John Laylande, Thomas Dexyll, Thomas Pecooke, John Morrysse, John Sampson, John Trull and William Luddyngton, who say that

William Hynton was seised of 1 mansion and capital messuage with a garden adjoining; 4 tenements with 1 curtilage or place of land lately called a Carpenter's yarde thereto adjoining, lying in the parish of St. Peter in Cornhill in the ward of Lymestrete, London; and 2 messuages, 1 garden and 6 stables, late in the tenure of William Hawkes, situate in the parish of St. Botolph without Busshoppesgate.

So seised, the said William by the name of William Hynton, citizen and skinner of London, made his will the 22nd day of September, 1548, as follows: I will that Anne, my wife, shall have the moiety of the yearly rents and profits yearly forthcoming out of my 2 lordships or manors called Torperley Eaton and Rushton, with all messuages, tenements, lands, etc., as well within the county of Chester as within the City of London, during her life for her dower; and I specially desire that the yearly rents of my large messuage or place wherein Edward Elrington, esq., dwells shall be put into the portion of my said wife; after her decease I will that Joan, my said wife's daughter, wife of William Walker, shall have the profits of the said great messuage for her life. Out of the other moiety of the said rents I will that John Hynton, my brother, shall have £20 a year for life, and that Margaret, Joan, Alice and Elizabeth, daughters of the said John, and Katherine, my sister Joan's daughter, shall have £40 each. If they all happen to die then I give the said £200 to Gryffith, John, Thomas, William and David Hynton, sons of my said brother John Hynton, and Richard, John and Thomas Maddock, sons of my said sister Joan.

After the death of my said wife and brother and after the said £200 shall be fully paid, I give the fee simple and inheritance of my said lordships or manors, messuages, lands, etc. to the said Gryffith, John, Thomas, William and David Hynton and the said Richard, John and Thomas Maddock. If they should all die without issue of their bodies, then the said premises to go to the said Margaret, Joan, Alice, Elizabeth and Katherine. The said mansion and the said 4 tenements with the curtilage adjoining are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £8 10s. The 2 messuages, garden and 6 stables are held of the King in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, £6.

William Hinton died 22 September, 2 Edward VI [1548]; John Hinton is his brother and next heir, and was then aged 60 years 1 month and 1 day.

The said Anne, late the wife of the said William Hinton, still survives.

Inq. p.m., 3 Edward VI, No. 92.

Humphrey Luce.

Inquisition taken at London, 20 October, 3 Edward VI [1549], before Paul Sydner, esq., escheator, after the death of Humphrey Luce, citizen and "letherseller" of London, by the oath of Gabriel Pawlyn, gent., John Curtes, John Coke, sadeler, William Wodde, William Browne, John Barnes, Richard Sauny, John Somerton, Robert Holnys, Robert Hayne, Robert Mydleton, John Robartis and John Smyth, who say that

Humphrey Luce was seised of the manor of Bromley Hall in the parish of Bromley, co. Middlesex, sometime belonging to the late monastery or priory of Christchurch, London; and all the messuages, mills, houses, buildings, lands, etc., to the said manor appertaining.

The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 10th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 20s., and are worth per ann., clear, £16.

Humphrey Luce died 17 August last past; Evan Luce is his son and next heir, and is now aged 25 years.

Inq. p.m., 3 Edward VI, No. 97.

John Biston.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 November, 5 Edward VI [1551], before Richard Dobbes, Mayor and escheator, after the death of John Biston, citizen and haberdasher of London, by the oath of Henry Buckfold, Thomas Sutton, George Conyers, William Bradford, Thomas Michell, Edmund Style, Roger Martyn, John Richardson, Edward Tagge, Richard Foorde, Robert Cryppes, John Garlond, William Sutton and John Morrys, who say that

John Biston was seised of 2 messuages built under 1 roof; and 1 other messuage to the same adjoining situate in the Old Chaunge in the parish of St. Vedast, London; in which said other tenement Stephen Mason, vintner, lately dwelt.

So seised, the said John Biston made his will the 16th day of May, 37 Henry VIII, whereby he bequeathed the said premises to Elizabeth, then his wife, for the term of her life.

After the death of the said John the said Elizabeth entered into the said premises. By Letters Patent dated 9 October, 37 Henry VIII [1545], the said King, of his special grace and for 60s. paid into the hanaper, pardoned the said Elizabeth for the transgression and offence which she had committed, and gave her permission to enjoy the said premises for her life without any interruption.

The said premises are held of the King in chief by the service of the 40th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, to wit, the said 2 messuages under one roof £8, and the other messuage £3.

John Byston died 26 May, 37 Henry VIII [1545]; John Byston is his son and next heir, and was then aged 23 years.

The said Elizabeth Byston still survives; after the death of the said John Byston she married Richard Stanffelde, of London, skinner.

Inq. p.m., 5 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 16.

Roger Chaloner, esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 14 February, 5 Edward VI [1551], before Andrew Judde, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Roger Chaloner, esq., by the oath of John Sampson, Thomas Jorden, Robert Mouldinge, Christopher Jakson, John Leylonde, Thomas Petitt, Thomas Dexell, John Morrice, Thomas Peycocke, Thomas Mytchell, John Trolle, Thomas Thomlynson, Thomas Maunsey and John Underhill, who say that

Roger Chaloner was seised of 1 capital or large messuage called Abbottes Inne lying in the parish of the Blessed Mary on the Hill in the ward of Billingsgate, London, now or late in the tenure of the said Roger Chaloner; which said messuage is held of the King in chief by the service of the 50th part of a knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, 5 marks.

Also of 1 tenement in the parish of St. Peter in Pawles Wharf, in the ward of Baynerdescastel in London, late parcel of the possessions of St. Helens in London: which said tenement is held of the King in free burgage and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Likewise of 1 tenement formerly called the Julian in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East in the ward of the Tower, in the tenure of the said Roger Chaloner: which said tenement is held of the King in free socage, to wit, by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £3.

Roger Chaloner died 10 June last past; Thomas Chaloner, knight is his son and next heir, and is now aged 30 years and more.

Inq. p.m., 5 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 6.

William Rastell, gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 Feb., 5 Edward VI [1551], before John Aylyff, knight, and Robert Clydley, esq., commissioners, by the oath of John Forest, Henry Harryson, Robert Dolsett, Thomas Wood, Matthew Smyth, Adam Wood, Thomas Preston, Hugh Wells, William Brygges, Thomas Lewes, Richard Jackson, Thomas Brayn, Richard Hartewell and Richard Gylman, who say that

William Rastell alias Restall, late of London, gent., on the 21st day of December, 3 Edward VI [1549], was possessed as of his own proper goods of 1 capital messuage called Skales Inne with the cellars and solars thereto belonging; and 2 other messuages adjoining the said capital messuage, late in the several tenures of Robert Smyth, gent., Robert Cheyny, Alexander Carlyle, James Wylson, Robert Albert and William Richardson, lying in Medelane alias Maydenlane in the parish of St. Michael called Whytyngton Colledge alias St. Michael Pater Noster alias St. Michael in the Royall, in the ward of Venytre alias Vyntre: which said premises the said William Rastell held for 21 years, still unexpired, by the yearly rent of £12, as by an indenture dated 20 February, 32 Henry VIII [1541], more fully appears.

Also of 7 other messuages and small tenements in the parishes of Bassynges Halle and Aldermanbery, in the wards of Crepillgate and Bassynges Halle, in the several tenures of John Forest, Henry Harrison, William Brygges, John Yonge, Thomas Bedlyngton, William Tonge and John Smyth, by the yearly rents of £3 2s. 6d., of the demise of Francis Styllicragge for the term of 20 years yet enduring.

So seised, the said William Rastell on the said 21st day of December, with his whole family, contrary to the allegiance which he owed to the King, deceitfully and rebelliously took flight and emigrated to Louvain in Flanders, and lived under the power of the Most Noble Prince Charles, Emperor, and remained there without having first obtained licence from the King, by reason whereof all the goods and chattels of the said William come into the hands of the King as forfeitures.

At the time of his death the said William was possessed of 70 yards of cloth called Hangynges in le Halle, 1 old cupboard, 1 old table, 2 tripods called tressles, 65 yards of paynted clothes in the parlour on which are flowers and branches (brachia), 1 table well joined, 1 form, 6 footstools well joined, 1 standing cupboard, 2 green chairs, 1 small chair well joined, 2 stools, 1 old table with a lock called a counter, 2 forms, 4 small stools, 2 small aundyrons, 2 fyershouelles, a payre of tonges, 1 green chest, a jacke of plate, 2 old cupboards, 1 small chest, 3 bowls with tin covers, 1 beer tankard, 3 other bowls or pottes in metal called pewter weighing 100½lbs., 1 pan to warm the bed, 1 pan of old metal weighing 38lbs., 120lbs. of potte metall, £18 in candelabra and chafing dishes, 1 large chair with 3 brass weights, 1 iron jacke to turne the spytt, 4 aundyrons, 2 fryeng pannes, 2 trevyttes, 1 grydyron, 1 drepyng panne, 1 iron called potthangers, 2 spyttes, a peace of a sesturne, metal called pewter, 3 pans of wood, 1 joined table with a frame, 1 olde bedstede, 2 olde feather beds, 3 bolsters, 2 of feathers and 1 of flock, 2 mattrasses, 1 old pillow full of feathers, 1 large chair, 1 coverlyd of arras work, 1 old coverlyd, 3 pillows of vedor worke full of feathers, 1 cupboard well joined, 1 small bed well joined with the covering thereof, 1 small bed called a truckell bed, 2 old featherbeds, 1 wool mattrass, 2 bolsters and 1 small pillow, 2 blankets, 1 joined bed with a small bed, 1 featherbed with a flock bed, 2 bolsters, 4 pillows, 2 woollen mattrasses, 2 blankets with 3 curtains of white fustian, 1 old chest of damask, 1 coverlet of arras work, 2 white woollen blankets, 4 pillows of vedor worke with one old vestment, 2 small green chairs, 1 old wainscott chair, 1 cobberd cloth, 1 diaper hand-towel (mantile), 2 lettys cappes, 1 small chair, 1 old pillow of dornyxe, 1 old chest bound with iron, 1 small bed, 1 old featherbed, 1 wool mattrass, a close jackes, 1 old chest, 1 old pillow of verdour worke, 4 cloths called paynted clothes, 24 pieces of cloth called paynted borders, 1 old chest bound with iron, 1 old saddle, 2 pairs of wheels bound with iron, and other utensils and domestic implements to the value of £30, valued by Thomas Hylton, skinner, and others.

The said Francis Styllycragge took all the profits of the said 7 small messuages from the said 21 December up to the present time, by what title the jurors know not. No one has as yet taken the profits of the said capital messuage called Skales Inne or of the other two messuages thereto belonging, but they remain in the hands of the tenants and farmers of the same.

Inq. p.m., 5 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 24.