Inquisitions
1580

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

E. A. Fry (editor)

Year published

1908

Pages

19-32

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'Inquisitions: 1580', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 3 (1908), pp. 19-32. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65888 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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Jasper Fisher, Esquire.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 November, 22 Eliz. [1580], before Edward Osborne, citizen and Alderman of London and William Necton, gent., feodary of the City of London, after the death of Jasper Fyssher, esq., late one of the Six Clerks of the Queen's Court of Chancery, by virtue of a commission to them and to William Fletewoodd, serjeant-at-law, and Francis Bowyer, citizen and Alderman of London, directed, by the oath of John Haddon, Arthur Raynscrofte, George Gynne, John Crowche, John Keblewhite, William Povye, John Jackson, John Irelonde, William Stiche, William Jones, William Typper, John Stodderd, Edmund Allen and Henry Shawe, who say that

Jasper Fyssher was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 capital messuage with all the buildings, yards, gardens, &c., thereto belonging, situate at Bishopsgate, London, which formerly were the 6 gardens late purchased of Martin Bowes, Knight, deceased, and of Thomas Bowes and Martin Bowes his sons, and of William Clopton, esq.; all that alley called Toddes Alley with all the houses, &c., within the same; and divers cottages, orchards, gardens, lands, &c., situate in the parish of St. Botolph without Bisshopsgate in London, now or late in the several tenures of Nicholas Parkinson and Robert Egles: which said alley and other the premises last mentioned were late of Christopher Campyon and afterwards of Nicholas Culverwell, and by him conveyed to the said Jasper Fysher and his heirs; and 9 gardens now reduced into one with certain cottages or tenements in Houndesdytche within the said parish of St. Botolph with the gardens thereto adjoining, now or late in the tenure of the said Jasper Fyssher, John Goodwyn, Knight, William Savage, Thomas Milles, Robert Medcaulf, Edward Strete, John Powell, — Goustone, widow, Henry Glyne alias Glyme, Nicholas Hollidaye, Thomas Maynerd, Christopher Lawrence, Hugh Wattes alias Walker, William Nicholls and John Wilkensonne: which said gardens and tenements were late purchased of William Ryges and William Bugberd, gentlemen.

So seised, the said Jasper Fyssher made his will as follows [here given in English]: Whereas I have enfeoffed John Ellys of Grayes Inne in co. Middlesex, gent., and Vincent Pointer alias Corbett, citizen and draper of London, of my capital messuage, gardens, &c., in the parish of St. Botolph aforesaid and have previously conveyed the same to Margaret my wife for life, and inter alia, to Richard Bostock and John Glascock, gentlemen: now my intent is that my said wife shall enjoy my said capital messuage and all other my lands, tenements, &c., in the said parish for life, and that Sir William Cordell, Knight, Sir Rowland Hayward, Knight, Thomas Bromeley, George Bromeley, William Fleetewood, Thomas Fanshawe, Peter Osborne, Nicholas Bacon, of Redgrave in co. Suffolk, Thomas Powle and John Frenche, esquires, Nicholas Woodroffe and Edward Osborne, citizens and Aldermen of London, and Richard Younge, citizen and grocer of London and their heirs shall sell the reversion of all the said premises after the decease of my said wife and with the money therefrom coming shall pay the sum of £1,600, bequeathed by Richard Blunt, deceased, to Elizabeth Blunt, daughter of my said wife if she at the time appointed by her said father will make a release of all her right or interest to the annuity granted by Sir Thomas Kempe, Knight, to her said father and his heirs, but if she refuse, then they shall pay her £1,300 and no more, and the surplus of such sale shall go to my executors.

The capital messuage and other the premises lately purchased of Martin Bowes are held in free burgage of the city of London, and are worth per ann., clear, £20. The said alley and other the premises late purchased of Christopher Campyon and Nicholas Culverwell are held of the Queen in chief, by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors do not know, and are worth per ann., clear, £5. The tenements, gardens, &c., late purchased of William Ryges and William Bugberd are held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich in co. Kent, by fealty only, in free socage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £5.

Jasper Fyssher died on the last day of February, 21 Eliz. [1579]; Katherine Norwood, widow, and Anna Woulrytche wife of Richard Woulrytche are his kinswomen and next heirs, viz., daughters and heirs of Cicily Taylor late wife of Robert Taylor and sister of John Fyssher father of the said Jasper Fyssher, and are now both aged 40 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 4.

Anthony Gamage, Citizen and Alderman.

Delivered into Court, 22 November, 22 Eliz.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 October, 21 Eliz. [1579], before Richard Pype, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Anthony Gamage, citizen and Alderman of London, by the oath of John Haddon, Robert Dykynson, John Keblewhyte, George Gynne, Thomas Russell, William Povie, John Harryson, Arthur Raynscrofte, Thomas Broomley, William Tipper, John Jackson, John Crouche, William Curteis, Edward Owen, Thomas Elyott, Richard Smyth, Griffin Jones and William Jones, who say that

Anthony Gamage was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage situate in Fryday strete in the parish of St. Matthew in Frydaystreet in the Ward of Bredstreete, London, now or late in the occupation of Richard Wright; 1 capital messuage situate in the parish of St. Pancras in Westchepe, London, in the tenure of the said Anthony Gamage at the time of his death, and now in the occupation of Alice Gamage his relict; and 1 messuage situate in Dystaffe Lane in the parish of St. Margaret Moyses, London, now or late in the occupation of John Warsop.

The said messuage in Frydaystreete is held of the Queen as of her manor of Grenewiche in co. Kent, in free socage by fealty only and not n chief, and is worth, per ann., clear, £3 6s. 8d. The said capital messuage in the parish of St. Pancras in Westchepe and the said messuage in Dystaffe Lane are held of the Queen by fealty only, in free burgage of the City of London and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £12.

Anthony Gamage died 11 June last past; William Gamage is his only son and next heir and is now aged 22 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 22.

Thomas Coppinger.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 20 May, 22 Eliz. [1580], before Nicholas Woodroffe, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Coppinger, by the oath of Robert Dycconson, John Ireland, William Styche, George Gynne, Thomas Elyott, Griffin Jones, John Keblethwayte, William Povye, John Stoddard, Richard Smythe, John Jackson, Edward Owen and John Rycardes, who say that

Thomas Coppinger was seised in his demesne as of fee tail, viz., to him and his heirs male, of 1 capital messuage lying in the parishes of St. Mary in Lothburye and St. Olave in Olde Jurye in the City of London; 2 other tenements next adjoining on the east side of the said capital messuage, namely, at the south east corner of the garden of the same messuage, now in the tenure of Thomas Ryvette, Knight, and formerly parcel of the possessions of the late monastery of the Salutation of the Mother of God, of the Order of the Carthusians next London; and 1 other tenement lying in the parish of St. Margaret in Lothbury, London, now or late in the tenure of — Walkadyne.

Long before the death of the said Thomas Coppinger a certain Henry Coppinger father of the said Thomas was seised in his demesne as of fee of the manors of Buxall alias Bukesalles, Cockesalles olde Nectons and Fasebornes in co. Suffolk, and of the advowson and right of patronage of the parish Church of Buxall aforesaid, lying in the vills, fields and parishes of Buxall, Ratisden, Hecham, Fynbarrowe and Bretham in the said county; 60 acres of land, 20 acres of pasture and 20 acres of meadow in Buxall, Ratisden, Fynbarrowe, Hitcham and Brethenham in the said county; and so seised, the said Henry by his will dated 26 August, 12 Eliz. [1570], gave all the said manors, lands, &c., in co. Suffolk to Agnes Coppinger then his wife for life by the name of her jointure, but if she should marry again he willed that there should be paid to her £20 yearly during her life out of the lands late purchased by him: which said Agnes still remains unmarried; and the reversion of all the said premises after the decease of the said Agnes to remain wholly to the said Thomas Coppinger, son and heir of the said Henry and the heirs male of his body, with divers other remainders over in fee tail; and the remainder thereof afterwards to the right heirs of the said Henry Coppinger for ever.

After the death of the said Henry the said Thomas was seised in his demesne as of fee tail of the reversion of all the said premises in co. Suffolk; also of the manor of Devington alias Brunston or Knighte's place in co. Kent; and the manor of Wornedalle alias Borden in the parish of Newington and Borden in co. Kent, with the woods, underwoods, &c., in the parishes of Newington, Stokeberye and Borden; the manor called Ravens in co. Kent, now or late in the tenure of William Ashurste; 2 mills called corne milles with divers lands, &c., thereto belonging lying in the vills, parishes and fields of Ospringe, Feversham and Devington in co. Kent, now in the tenure of Bartholomew Ball; 1 mill called a Brasell Mill, with the houses, lands, &c., thereto belonging, lying in the parishes, vills and fields of Ospringe, Fersham and Devington aforesaid, now or late in the tenure of William Hampton; also in his demesne as of fee of the manor of Churchestrete in the parish of Allhallowes Stoke and St. Mary's in co. Kent.

And further the said Henry Coppinger long before his death in consideration of a marriage formerly had between the said Thomas Coppinger his son and heir apparent of the one part, and Frances Coppinger daughter of William Broke, Knight, Lord Cobham, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, and now the wife of the said Thomas Coppinger, of the other part, and in performance of certain covenants specified in a deed dated 16 February, 10 Eliz. [1568], by deed dated 1 May, 10 Eliz. [1568], made between Henry Nevill, Knight, Lord Burgavenye and William Broke, Knight, Lord Cobham of the one part and the said Henry Coppinger of the other part gave to Francis Coppinger, daughter of the said Lord Cobham and now wife of the said Thomas Coppinger, an annuity or yearly rent of 100 marks issuing out of all the premises in Devington and Ravens in co. Kent, and Preston, Feversham, Ludnam, Devington and Newington in the said county, now or late in the several tenures of Alvered Gyles, William Ashurste, John Bradbourne, gentlemen, Bartholomew Ball, and William Hampton: to hold to the said Frances after the death of the said Thomas during the life of the said Henry and Agnes his now wife.

By another deed of even date the said Henry Coppinger gave to the said Frances an annuity of £100 issuing out of all the said premises: to hold for her life after the deaths of the said Henry, Agnes and Thomas Coppinger.

Afterwards the said Henry and Thomas died, but the said Agnes still survives.

The said Thomas Coppinger long before his death, by indenture dated 28 March, 17 Eliz. [1575], in consideration of the sum of £100 to him paid by John Taylor of Cobham in co. Kent, gent., gave to the said John Taylor an annuity of £10 issuing out of the manor of Churchstreete and all the lands thereto belonging, situate in the parish of All Saints and out of all other the manors of the said Thomas in co. Kent: to hold to him and his heirs for ever, on condition that if the said Thomas should pay to the said John the said sum of £100 on the last day of March, 1577, at the porch of the Church of Cobham, then the said grant to be void and of no effect: at which said day neither the said Thomas Coppinger or his heirs had paid the said sum.

So seised, the said Thomas made his will dated 16 March, 1579 [here given in English], as follows:—

I Thomas Coppinger of Allhallows in co. Kent, esq., and "highe shirryf" of the same county give to my brother Robert Coppinger the lease of the tenement and lands now in the tenure of John Waller for the same yearly rent as he now pays.

I give to my brother Raffe Coppinger a lease of my lands which he now occupies, for 21 years if he so long shall live, he paying no rent for the same.

I give to Frances my wife the annuity of £100 assured to her upon her marriage out of my lands in Feversham, &c.; also all my houses, lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever lying within the parishes of Allhallows Stoke and St. Mary, which I late purchased of my brother Ambrose Coppinger, for her life.

I will that my son William shall have to him and the heirs male of his body all my lands whatsoever and wheresoever on condition that he pay to my son Francis an annuity of £40 yearly for life, and also to my child unborn, if a man child £30 yearly, for life, and if a woman child then the sum of £300 on her marriage day.

Touching the entail of all my lands and tenements, if all my men children should die then my will is that the last will of my late father Mr. Henry Coppinger, deceased, shall be of full force and strength on condition that my said brother to whom I have made a devise of my lands and tenements in Feversham, Preston, Dore, Ludnam, Newenton, Stockeberrye, Babchild and Hartlippe shall be liable to pay to the marriage of my child unborn if a daughter £500.

The premises in the City of London are held of the Queen in chief by the service of the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the yearly rent of 29s., and are worth per ann., clear, £13 0s. 4d. The manor of Buxall alias Bukesalles, Cockesalles, Old Nectons and Fasebornes with the advowson of Buxall, in Buxall, Ratisden, Hecham, Fynbarrowe and Bretham in co. Suffolk are held of the Queen as of her Duchy of Lancaster, by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £36 7s. 5½d. The 60 acres of land and other the premises in Buxall, Ratisden, Fynbarrowe, Hecham and Bitchenham are held of the Queen as of her said Duchy and are worth per ann., clear, £10. The manor of Devington in co. Kent is held of the Queen as of her manor of Feversham by fealty, suit at court and the yearly rent of £4 8s. 0¾d., and is worth per ann., clear, £10. The manor of Worndall alias Borden in co. Kent, is held of the Queen as of her manor of Milton by fealty and the rent of 13s. 4d., and is worth per ann., clear, £16 13s. 4d. The manor of Ravens is held of the Dean and Chapter of the Church of Christ in Canterbury as of their manor of Copton, by fealty and the yearly rent of 31s. 6¾d., and is worth per ann., clear, 100s. The 2 mills in Ospringe, Feversham and Devington are held of Henry Lord Cheynee as of his manor of Quenecourt by fealty and the rent of 3s., and are worth per ann., clear, 60s. The mill called a Brasel mill in Ospringe, Feversham and Devington is held of the said Lord Cheynee as of his said manor by fealty and a rent of 12d., and is worth per ann., clear, 2s. 6d. The manor of Churchstrete is held of the Queen as of her manor of Wyndell by fealty and the rent of 10s., and is worth per ann., clear, £10.

Thomas Coppinger died 21 March, 22 Eliz. [1580]; the said William Coppinger is his son and next heir and is now aged 6 years, 10 months and 7 days.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 25.

Bartholomew Brookesbie, Gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 18 May, 22 Eliz. [1580], before William Cordell, Knight, Master of the Rolls of the Court of Chancery, Ruland Heyward, Knight, David Lewes Doctor of Laws and William Necton, gent., after the death of Bartholomew Brookesbie, gent., by virtue of a commission to them and to Thomas Fanshawe directed, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Thomas Russell, John Ireland, William Stitche, Arthur Reynescrofte, Roger Hoell, Thomas Eliott, John Crowche, John Ricardes, Griffin Jones, William Jones, Henry Shawe, William Curtes, John Keblewhite, William Povie and Richard Smythe, who say that

Bartholomew Brookesbie was seised in his demesne as of fee of the moiety of a messuage called The Three Cranes in the Vyntree, lying in the parish of St. Martin in the Vintree in the ward of the Vintree in the City of London, now in the tenure of Thomas Prouse citizen and vintner of London; 1 messuage called the Sarazen's Head next the Yeldhall Gate of the said city, lying in the parish of.St. Lawrence in Old Jewry, in the ward of Chepe, London, now or late in the several tenures of George Allen, Joan Frend, Robert Whipp and Fulk Heath; and 2 messuages in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West in the ward of Farringdon, without the said city, now or late in the tenures of William Kingsley, gent., and Henry Beverley.

The said moiety of the messuage called The Three Cranes in the Vintree is held of the Queen in free burgage of the said city, and is worth per ann., clear, £10. The said messuage called the Sarazen's Head in the parish of St. Laurence in Old Jewry is held of the Queen in free burgage of the said city by fealty only, and not in chief, and is worth per arm., clear, £36 16s. 8d. The said 2 messuages lying in the parish of St Dunstan's in the West are held of the Queen in free and common socage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £8.

Bartholomew Brookesbie died 10 August last past; Thomas Brookesbie is his kinsman and next heir, viz., son of Bartholomew Brookesbie, son of John Brookesbie, son of Bartholomew Brookesbie, father of William Brookesbie, father of the said Bartholomew named in the said commission, and was then aged 40 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 26.

Miles Exelbye, Citizen and merchant-tailor.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 March, 22 Eliz. [1580], before Thomas Woodroffe, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Miles Exelbye, citizen and merchant-tailor of London, by the oath of Robert Dyckenson, John Harrison, Thomas Russell, John Irelond, William Stytche, Arthur Reynescrofte, Roger Hoell, George Gynne, Thomas Elyot, John Crowche, John Ricardes, Griffin Jones, William Jones, William Curteys, John Keblewhite, William Povye, Richard Smyth and John Stoddard, who say that

Miles Exelbye was seised in his demesne as of fee of 2 messuages late purchased by him of Richard Tonge, gent., situate in Fleetstrete in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West in the suburbs of the city of London, between the messuage of John Walker on the west side and the messuage in the tenure of John Wooddie, skinner, on the east side, abutting upon the highway towards the Bar, and a certain parcel of land or garden belonging to the Inner Temple, London, towards the south; and 1 other messuage late in the tenure of Richard Bolto and now in that of John Nusham situate in Chancery Lane, in the parish of St. Dunstan aforesaid.

Long before the death of the said Miles Exilbye a certain William Reinold of the said Inner Temple, gent., and Lucy his wife were seised in their demesne as of fee of 1 messuage then in the tenure of Edward Lutwiche, gent.; and 2 cottages then in the several tenures of John Tressham and Thomas Trowte situate in Chancery Lane in the said parish of St. Dunstan; and so seised, the said William and Lucy for a sum of money to them paid by the said Miles Exelbye and Alice his wife, by their charter dated 6 April, 11 Eliz. [1569], granted and confirmed to the said Miles and Alice the said messuage and cottages, with all the shops, cellars, &c., thereto belonging, situate in Chancery Lane: to hold to the said Miles and Alice and to the heirs of the said Miles for ever.

The said Miles was also seised in his demesne as of fee of 2 messuages in the several tenures of John Whytwell and — Chamberlain, situate in the city of Westminster in co. Middlesex and late parcel of the possessions of the Cathedral Church of Westminster, with the shops, cellars, &c., thereto belonging.

And so seised of all the above recited premises the said Miles Exelbye made his will dated 16 October, 21 Eliz. [1579], as follows [here given in English]:—

I will that after the Queen shall be satisfied of a full third part (in 3 equal parts to be divided) of all my lands, &c., held of her in chief by knight's service or by socage in chief, the said third part shall descend immediately after my death to my eldest son William Exelbye. And as to the remaining 2 parts: whereas I made my wife Alice joint purchaser with me for her life of certain messuages, lands, &c., in Chancery Lane in the said parish of St. Dunstan, now or late in the several tenures of William Boby, Thomas Tresham and James Trowte: I will that after her death the said premises shall remain to my son Miles Exelbye and to the heirs of his body; for default, to my son William Exelbye and the heirs of his body; and for default, to my right heirs for ever.

I give to my said wife one other house in Chancery Lane in the tenure of John Newsham, for her life; after her decease I give the same to my said son Myles and to the heirs of his body; for default, the remainder thereof to my said son William and to the heirs of his body; and for default to my right heirs for ever, provided always that if my said wife will not accept in full recompense of her dower such lands as I have hereby assured to her, then my will is that she shall take no benefit of this my will.

Whereas my brother Richard Millward with my money has purchased to him and his heirs 1 messuage with shops, &c., thereto belonging, situate in Fletestrete in the said parish, in the tenure of John Woodye, skinner: my will is that he shall convey the same to my wife and my son William and his heirs for ever, but if my wife shall claim any dower contrary to this my will then the said assurance of the said premises shall be made to my said son William and his heirs for ever.

I give all my lands, &c., in Westminster to my executors for so long and until they may have received out of the profits thereof the sum of £100 to the use of my daughter Elizabeth Exelbye, to be paid to her on the day of her marriage or at her age of 21 years; and afterwards to the use of my child unborn and the heirs male of his body if a son, but if it be a daughter and she be still living after the said £100 shall have been levied, then my executors shall retain the said premises until another £100 shall be levied to the use of such other daughter, to be paid as above. The reversion of the said premises in Westminster shall be to my said son Miles and the heirs of his body; for default, to my said son William and the heirs of his body; and for default, to my right heirs for ever.

I will that 2 parts (in 3 parts to be divided) of all my messuages, lands, &c., late purchased of Richard Tonge, gent., shall be to the uses hereafter expressed and I will that my said executors shall have all the said premises until my said son Myles shall be of the age of 21, and if he shall die before that time then until my next heirs have accomplished the said age, to the intent that they shall take all the profits thereof to the use of my daughter Jane, to be paid to her as above.

The 2 messuages in Fleetstreet purchased of Richard Tonge, are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors do not know, and are worth per ann., clear, £6. The messuage in Chancery Lane in the tenure of John Nusham is held of the Queen, but by what service is not known, and is worth per ann., clear, 20s. The messuage late in the tenure of the said Edward Lutwiche and the 2 cottages in Chancery Lane in the several tenures of the said John Tresham and Thomas Trowte are held of the Queen as of her manor of Wendover Ferens [sic] in free socage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £3. The 2 messuages in Westminster are held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich in co. Kent, by fealty only, in free socage, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, 66s. 8d.

Miles Exclbye died 17 October, 21 Eliz. [1579]; the said William is his son and next heir and was 16 years of age on the 11th day of December last past.

The said Alice still survives in the said parish of St. Dunstan.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 29.

Richard Clareson.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 17 June, 22 Eliz. [1580], before Nicholas Woodrooffe, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Richard Clareson, son and heir of Nicholas Clareson, deceased, and late being within age and in the wardship of the said Queen by reason of his minority, by the oath of Robert Dyckenson, Thomas Russell, John Jackeson, John Keblewhite, Richard Smythe, William Povie, Thomas Eliott, George Gynne, John Irelond, William Styche, Gryffin Jones, Roger Hole, John Stoddard, Edmund Owen, John Richardes and Robert Peacocke, who say that

Richard Clareson was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage situate in the parish of St. Helen next Busshops gate in the street of Busshopps gate within the City of London, late in the tenure of Edward Skegges: which said messuage is held of the Queen in chief, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors do not know, and is worth per ann., clear, 48s.

Richard Clareson died 20 January, 21 Eliz. [1579]. The said messuage ought to come to the Queen by reason of the minority of Thomas Clareson who is the brother and next heir of the said Richard and was aged 20 years on the 17th day of August last past.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 30.

Giles Harryson, Brewer.

Inquisition taken near the Church of St. Botolph without Algate in the suburbs of the City of London, 14 May, 22 Eliz. [1580], before William Fletewode, esq., Recorder of the said City, Robert Heyes, George Irelonde and John Guylpyne, gentlemen, by virtue of a commission to enquire concerning lands and tenements escheated, by the oath of Richard Wotton, Anthony Hall, Peter Collett, Thomas Cuttler, Thomas Armestronge, Hugh Wheler, John Inman, Thomas Dawson, Richard Swerlande, Richard Neale, Francis Wight, Thomas Bennett, Henry Sherwood, William Rylyon and Henry Browne, who say that

Giles Harryson late of London, brewer, was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage called the Flower de Luce, formerly in the tenure of John Hollande late of London, fletcher, lying in the parish of St. Botolph, with all those messuages and cottages situate in the said parish in or near a certain alley or lane called Shippe Alley near the Mynoresse.

So seised, the said Giles Harrison made his will 7 May, 1551, as follows [here given in English]:—

I give to Alice Waterscott the daughter of John Waterscott and Awdrie his wife on the day of her marriage my 2 tenements, one in the Sibill Vincent and the other in that of Edward Baxter: which 2 tenements are now rented at a mark a piece, lying in the parish of St. Botolphe between the Mynories and the said Church: to her and her heirs for ever.

I give to Gyles Eston son of William Eston and Elizabeth his wife at the day of his lawful age the tenement now in the tenure of John Hollande, fletcher, lying in the high street next to an alley called Wolsick Alley: to him and his heirs for ever.

All the rest of my lands and houses both within Ship Alley and without, lying near the late dissolved monastery called the Mynories I give to Elizabeth my wife for life; and after her decease, I give the same to the children lawfully begotten of John Waterscott, citizen and goldsmith of London, and Awdrie his wife and to the children of William Eston, citizen and fishmonger of London, and Elisabeth his wife and to their heirs for ever, equally divided.

After the death of the said Giles Harrison the said Giles Eston was seised of the said premises called the Flower de Luce.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free and common socage and not in chief or by knight's service, and are worth per ann., clear, £3 6s. 8d.

The said William Eston and Elizabeth had issue Giles, William and Lucretia Eston. The said John Waterscott and Awdrie had issue Alice Waterscott.

The said Giles, William and Lucretia Eston died without heirs general or special.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 23.

Giles Harrison, brewer.

Inquisition taken at the gate of the house of the late dissolved monastery of St. Mary of Graces near the Tower of London in co. Middlesex, 28 May, 22 Eliz. [1580], before William Fletewode, esq., Recorder of the City of London, Edmund Morrant, esq., George Irelonde and John Guylpyne, gents., commissioners, by virtue of a commission to enquire concerning lands and tenements escheated, by the oath of James Forman, gent., John Taylor, Richard Donnyngton, Richard Roughton, Richard Cowper, William Bunche, Peter Orrell, Thomas Gyttons, John Lighterfot, Richard Clyff, Richard Robson, Henry Stokes, Thomas Harryatt and John Goldyng, who say that

A certain Giles Harrison late of London, brewer, was seised in his demesne as of fee of one messuage then and now being a brewhouse called the Redd Lyonn situate in Estsmythfeeld in the said county; and so being thereof seised he made his will, dated 7 May, 1551, as follows [here given in English]:—

I give the profits of my brewhouse called the Redd Lyonn, wherein I now dwell, to Elizabeth my wife for life; after her decease, I give the lands and houses above bequeathed [see Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz, part 2, No. 33] to the children of John Waterscott, citizen and goldsmith of London, and Awdrey his wife and to the children of William Eston, citizen and fishmonger of London, and Elizabeth his wife: to them and their heirs for ever equally divided.

I make Elizabeth my wife my principal executor, and co-administrator with her the said John Waterscott.

Afterwards the said Giles Harrison died without heirs general or special.

Because the said messuage was held in chief by knight's service the said will was void as to one whole third part of the said messuage, in 3 parts divided, and good and sufficient in law as to 2 parts thereof to the persons aforesaid to whom the said Giles had devised the said messuage.

The said John Waterscott and A wdrey his wife had issue one daughter called Alice and married to a certain John Ferne. The said William Eston and Elizabeth his wife had issue Giles, William and Lucretia.

The said Elizabeth could not lawfully alienate any part of the lands, &c., of the said Giles Harrison, yet nevertheless she and a certain Thomas Deane late her husband by a fine levied at Westminster without the licence of the said John Waterscott acknowledged the said tenement to be the right of a certain Roger Trigg as that which the same Roger had of the gift of the said Thomas and Elizabeth, and the said Roger by that fine delivered the said tenement to the said Thomas and Elizabeth and the heirs of the said Thomas; for which cause the said Elizabeth forfeited for life all her right and title therein.

The said Alice is seised of the 4th part of the 2 parts of the said messuage, in 4 parts divided, in her demesne as of fee, and the other 3 parts thereof belong to the Queen as escheats, because the said Giles, William and Lucretia Eston died without heirs general or special; and the said 2 parts of the said messuage are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, and the said 3 parts are worth per ann., clear, 10s.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2., No. 38.

Robert Kympton, Gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Inn called the Castle in the street called St. John Strete without the Bars of the City of London, 18 June, 22 Eliz. [1580], before Jasper Cholmeley, gent., escheator of the county of Middlesex, after the death of Robert Kympton, late of Greyes Inn in the said county, gent., by the oath of James Forman, gent., William Wood, John Tayllor, Richard Roughton, Richard Donnyngton, Robert Mann, Richard Robson, Henry Stokes, Henry A ntell, Peter Orell, Richard Cowper, James Mascall, Richard Clyffe and James Tude, who say that

Robert Kympton was seised in his demesne as of fee of one Chamber or Cubicle with 2 small houses called "Studdyes," and 1 cellar lying under the stairs of the same, also a free and common passage or way through a certain entrance above the said stairs to the said chamber and the said "Studdyes" belonging thereto: which said premises now are or late were parcels of a messuage lately built in divers cubicles, chambers or "Romeis" by a certain Edward Stanhope of Greyes Inn aforesaid, esq.; which said messuage so built was built upon a certain piece of soil or land, and of the brick wall upon the same, the said piece of soil or land being late parcel of the garden of the mansion house late of Geoffry Clyffe now deceased, situate in High Holborne in co. Middlesex, in the parish of St. Andrews in Holborn abutting upon the rear of a court called the back court lying on the south side of the Hall of Greyes Inn and above divers chambers of Grays Inn commonly called the Iryshhe Rents towards the west as appears by a certain indenture quinquepartite dated 24 July, 11 Eliz. [1569], made between Geoffry Clyffe of High Holborne aforesaid, gent., and Richard Clyffe son and heir apparent of the said Geoffry of the one part, and Robert Lane of Horton in co. Northampton, Knight, of the 2nd part, George Morton of Greyes Inn aforesaid, gent., of the 3rd part, Robert Kympton of Greyes Inn aforesaid, gent., of the 4th part, and Edward Stanhope of Greyes Inn aforesaid, esq., of the 5th part more fully appears.

The said chamber and premises are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors do not know, and are worth per ann., clear, 10s.

Robert Kympton died 10 February last past, leaving Margaret his wife who afterwards, viz., on the 10th day of May last, bore a daughter named Lucy, which said Lucy on the 13th day of May following was baptized in the Church of St. Augustine in the said City and now survives and is his only daughter and next heir.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 22 Eliz., part 2, No. 39.



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