Inquisitions
1583

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

E. A. Fry (editor)

Year published

1908

Pages

58-70

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'Inquisitions: 1583', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 3 (1908), pp. 58-70. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65891 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Philip Gunter, Citizen and Skinner.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7 June, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, Knight, Mayor and escheator of the City of London and the suburbs thereof, after the death of Philip Gunter, citizen and skinner of London, by the oath of Robert Dickonson, Roger Hole, William Layer, John Harryson, Thomas Russell, John Irelande, John Jackson, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, Griffin Jones, William Povye, George Robertes, Robert Peacoke, Henry Shawe, John Bonde, John Ricardes, William Stiche and Nicholas Hawkysford, who say that

Philip Gunter was seised in his demesne as of fee of 3 messuages as now they are divided with all the shops, cellars, solars and other easements, lying together on the south side of a plot (platee) of the Lady the Queen in Cornhill in the parish of St. Michael upon Cornhill within the said City, in one of which 3 tenements, commonly called the Sarazens Heade the said Philip Gunter dwelt, being on the west part of the Back Alley or approach of the tenement or wine tavern commonly called the Popesheade, and the other two, formerly in the tenure of Elizabeth Stansfielde of London, widow, situate on the east part of the said Back Alley are in the several tenures of John Eldred and Anthony Soda: all which said premises the said Philip Gunter purchased to him and his heirs of George Monoux, esq., son and heir of Thomas Monoux late of Walthamstowe in co. Essex, esq., deceased, as by the charter of the said George and Elizabeth his wife dated 7 July, 1 Mary [1553], and acknowledged before Robert Brooke, esq., Recorder of the said City, and Richard Dobbes, Alderman, and enrolled at the Hustings Court of Common Pleas of London, held in the Guildhall on Monday next before the feast of St. Benedict the Abbot in the 2nd year of the reign of Queen Mary more fully appears.

So seised, the said Philip Gunter made his will, 14 January, 1582 [in English], as follows:—

I will that Anne my wife shall have for her life, if she remains unmarried, my mansion now known by the name of the Sarazen's Head situate in the parish of St. Michael upon Cornhill, reserving to Francis Gunter my son out of the same house, all the shops and warehouses thereof and the use of the same with one chamber in the same house, all rent free, with "ingresse egresse regresse and accesse" thereto, and after the death or marriage of my said wife, I give the said house to my said son Francis Gunter and to the heirs male of his body for ever; for default, I give the same to Philip Gunter my second son and to the heirs male of his body for ever; for default, to Thomas Gunter my son and the heirs male of his body for ever; for default, to John Gunter son of my brother William Gunter and the heirs male of his body for ever; and for default, to the right and next heir male of me the said Philip, being of my blood and to his heirs male for ever, and so "forthewards" shall remain to the right and next heir male of my blood from heir male to heir male by way of entail for ever.

I give to my said son Philip my 2 houses lying together and next adjoining my said dwelling house sometime in the occupation of Mres. Stansfeilde and others and now in the tenure of John Eldred and Anthony Soda: to hold to him and the heirs male of his body for ever; for default, I give the same to my said son Francis and the heirs male of his body; for default, to my said son Thomas and the heirs male of his body for ever; for default, to the said John Gunter and the heirs male of his body for ever; and for default, to the right heirs of my blood in fee tail for ever.

All the said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage by the service of 1d. yearly, and are worth per ann., clear, £11.

Philip Gunter named in the writ died 15 February, 25 Eliz. [1583] at London; the said Francis Gunter is his son and next heir, and was then aged 44 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., No. 39.

Thomas Langham, Citizen and Fishmonger.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 29 August, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, Knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Langham, citizen and fishmonger of London, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Richard Smythe, Roger Hole, Thomas Russell, John Irelande, John Jackson, Edmund Owen, William Povye, George Robertes, John Stoddarde, John Bonde, John Rickardes and Nicholas Hawkesforde, who say that

Thomas Langham was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage or brewhouse commonly called the Hartes Home situate in Basing Lane in the parish of St. Mildred in Bredstreate in London; and 2 messuages and tenements thereto adjoining on the west side thereof, now or late in his own occupation, and now in that of Thomas Arte, merchant tailor: all which said premises the said Thomas Langham purchased to him and his heirs of Walter Woolfleete of Howsden in co. York, yeoman, and of Robert Wright of Great Grimsby in co. Lincoln, yeoman; also of 1 other messuage, with the shops, cellars, solars and yards, situate in the said parish of St. Mildred, formerly in the tenure of John Clapshawe, late in that of John Collins, citizen and salter of London, and now in that of William Graunte, salter, next adjoining the messuage in the occupation of Robert Gibbes, salter of London, on the south part and abutting upon the Rectory belonging to the parish Church of St. Mildreds aforesaid on the north part, by purchase of William Boxe, citizen and grocer of London.

The messuage or brewhouse called the Hartes Home and the 2 messuages thereto adjoining now in the tenure of Thomas Arte are held of the Queen as of her manor of East Greenwich in co. Kent, by fealty only in free socage, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £6. The messuage now in the tenure of William Grannte is held of the Queen in free burgage of the said City by the yearly rent of 1d., and is worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Thomas Langham died 13 August, 24 Eliz. [1582], at London; John Langham, citizen and writer of Court-hand, is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, son of Richard Langham brother of the said Thomas Langham, and was then aged 47 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., No. 40.

Christopher Whichcotte, Citizen & Merchant-tailor.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 20 September, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, Knight, Mayor and escheator after the death of Christopher Whichcott, citizen and merchant-tailor of London, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Richard Smythe, Roger Hole, Thomas Russell, John Irelande, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, William Povye, George Robertes, John Stoddarde, William Feake, John Bonde and Nicholas Hawkesforde who say that

Christopher Whichcott was seised in his demesne as of fee of the moiety of 2 messuages with the shops, cellars, sollars, &c, situate in the parish of St. Peter in Cornhill, London, which he purchased of Robert Dunkyn, citizen and cordwainer of London, and Elizabeth his wife, sometime belonging to the late Fraternity or Guild of St. Peter, founded in the Church of St. Peter in Cornhill, and late being parcel of the possessions thereof; 7 messuages with all the buildings, shops, cellars, &c. situate in Shoelane in the parish of St. Brigett within the suburbs of the City of London; 11 gardens or garden grounds in Shoelane aforesaid which the said Christopher had and purchased of Henry Lysley of London, gent., and Frances his wife, and which were formerly parcel of the possessions, lands, &c. of John Tuchet, knight, Lord Audley, as by a certain deed of bargain of the said Lord Audley made to a certain John Studd, gent., and Katherine his wife and their heirs, dated 11 May, 14 Hen. 8 [1522] more fully appears.

So seised, the said Christopher Whichcott on the 12th day of January, 1575, made his will [in English] as follows: I give to Lucy my wife all my lands and tenements lying in Shoelane and Cornewall [sic] within the Freedom of London, for life; after her decease, the same to remain to my sons John and Christopher Whichcott, in equal parts, for their lives, and then to the heirs of their bodies; for default, to my daughter Margaret and the heirs of her body; for default of issue to any of my children, all my lands and tenements in Shoelane aforesaid shall remain to the heirs male of the body of my brother Anthony Whichecott; for default, to the heirs male of the body of my brother Leonard Whichcott; and for default, the same to remain to my right heirs for ever.

The moiety of the said two messuages in the parish of St. Peter in Cornhill is held of the Queen by fealty only, in free burgage of the said City and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £5. The premises in Shoelane are also held of the Queen in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £7.

Christopher Whichcott died 18 May last past, John Whichcott is his son and next heir, and was then aged 25 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., No. 41.

Giles Lamberd, Citizen and Draper.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7 June, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Giles Lamberd, citizen and draper, of London, by the oath of Robert Dickynson, Roger Hole, William Layer, John Harrison, Thomas Russell, John Irelond, John Jackson, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, Griffin Jones, William Povye, George Roberts, Robert Peacocke, Frauncis Gunter, Henry Shawe, John Bonde, John Ricardes, William Stiche and Nicholas Hawkisford, who say that

Giles Lamberd was seized in his demesne as of fee of 1 mansion house without a tenement thereto adjoining lying in a lane called Cosyn Lane in the parish of Allhallows the Great within the City of London, near the street called Thames Street now or late in the occupation of Thomas Russell; 1 other mansion house with divers tenements thereto adjoining, lying in the parish of the Blessed Marie Bothawe, near the street called Candelwek street within the said City, now or late in the tenure of Anthony Edridge and Launcelott Bathurste; 1 tenement called the White Harte lying in the parish of St. Mildred in the Puttrye within the said City, late in the occupation of the relict of — Slye, deceased; 1 other house called a Bakehouse lying in the parish of St. Lawrence Poulteney near the street called Thames street, now or late in the tenure of Richard Baker; 1 waste piece of land called "A Tenisplace," then situate in a lane called Suffolke Lane in the parish of Allhallows the Less in the said City, now or late in the occupation of Simon Webbe; and divers tenements lying in the parishes of St. Saviours and St. Olave in the borough of Southwark, in co. Surrey, now or late in the several tenures of John Etherupp, Edward Dubbar, Cornelius Harryson, William Coxe, Edmunde Candishe, William Bonam and — Bonam, widow.

So seised, the said Giles Lamberd made his will 1 June, 1581 [in English], as follows: I will that for the better payment of my debt to William Elkyn for which sum my cousin Wyckyn stands bound with me by obligation, if I die before my said cousin be discharged for such sum, then in consideration thereof my said cousin Wyckyn shall have to him and his heirs for ever my mansion house with the tenement thereto adjoining situate in Cosyn Lane near Thames street in the parish of Great Alholhouse in London, now in the occupation of Thomas Russell.

I give to Margerye Lamberd my wife, for life, my mansion house and tenement thereto adjoining lying in the parish of St. Mary Botolfe near Candelweke street in London, now in the occupation of Anthonye Edridge and Launslett Bathurste; also my tenement in the parish of St. Mildred in the Pultrye, London, now in the occupation of Widow Slye, and late of Gyles Jacobe, deceased; also my bakehouse in the parish of St. Lawrence Poultney near Thames Street in London, in occupation of Richard Baker; also my tenements in the parish of St. Saviour in Southwerke, for life.

I give to my uncle John Horne for life £6 yearly, as a rent charge, out of my Tenysplace and the tenement situate in Suffolke Lane in the parish of Little Alhallowes, London. The other £7, parcel of the same rent payable for the said Tenisplace and tenement, in the occupation of Webbe and Ashebe, I will shall be for the "findinge" of my Godson Jasper Nicholson by the disposition of his father or mother during his minority; and after the decease of my said Uncle Horne the whole rent of the said Tenisplace and tenement shall be to the said Jasper Nycholson and his heirs for ever.

I will that the children of my cousin Thomas Wyckyn, now living, as well daughters as sons, shall be co-heirs, and have part and part alike of all the premises appointed for my wife's dower, to be divided immediately after her decease, if in the meantime I have no heir of my body.

I make my said wife and my cousin Thomas Wyckey to be my executors, and I give to such of them as shall take the execution thereof my stock in the Company of "Marchauntes of new trades" and I will my freedom of that fellowship to my said cousin. Written this tenth of June, 1581.

The said mansion house and tenement lying in Cosyn Lane are held of the Queen in free burgage and common socage, by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £5. The mansion house with divers tenements thereto adjoining lying in the parish of the Blessed Mary Bothawe are held of the Queen in socage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d. The tenement in the parish of St. Mildred in the Poultry and the said bakehouse in the parish of St. Lawrence near Thames street are held of the Queen in free burgage and common socage by fealty only and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £10. The said waste piece of land called a Tenysplace in Suffolk Lane is held of the Queen by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s. The tenements in the parishes of St. Saviour and St. Olave in the borough of Southwark are held of the Queen in free socage and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £6 13s. 4d.

Giles Lamberd died 30 August, 23 Eliz. [1581]; William Lamberde of Lyncolnes Inne in co. Middlesex, gent., is his brother and next heir, and was then aged 44 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., No. 44.

Henry Elsinge, Citizen and Merchant-tailor.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 13 September, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Elsinge, late citizen and merchant-tailor of London, by the oath of Robert Dickonson, Richard Smythe, Roger Hole, Thomas Russell, John Irelande, Edmund Owen, William Povye, George Roberts, John Stoddarde, John Bonde, Nicholas Hawkesforde, George Gynne and William Feake, who say that

Henry Elsinge was seised in his demesne as of fee of all that messuage called The Harp on the Hoop, now or late divided into 3 several tenements, in one of which Frances Elsinge wife of the said Henry now dwells: the 2 others are in the tenures of — Tirrell, baker, and Edward Dodding, "Doctor in the Art of Medicine"; 1 curtilage commonly called a garden plot, once in the tenure of Thomas Singleton and late in that of Richard Johnson, citizen and salter of London, now deceased, situate in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West, in London, sometime belonging to the late Fraternity of the Blessed Mary founded in the Church of St. Dunstans in the West, now dissolved; all that messuage late in the tenure of Alice Hopper, widow, deceased, and now in that of Henry Payne, merchant-tailor of London, situate in the said parish of St. Dunstan in the West; all that messuage and garden late commonly called the "Signe of the Bell," and now called the "Signe of the Fyrie Ball," situate in Hounesditch without Aldgate within the parish of St. Botolph in the suburbs of the City of London, late in the tenure of John Owen, "gounefounder," and now or late in that of Thomas Owen, "gounefounder," brother of the said John, formerly parcel of the possessions of Robert Brockett of London, baker, deceased, and late parcel of the possessions of the Master, Wardens and Commonalty of the freemen of the "mistery" of bakers of the said City; all that barn with a piece of waste land commonly called the yard, to the said messuage belonging and adjoining in Hounsdiche, late in the tenure of the said John Owen and now or late in that of the said Thomas Owen, and formerly parcel of the possessions of the said Robert Brockett and of the said Master, Wardens and Commonalty (as above); all that pasture commonly called the Hundred Acres, containing about 60 acres, lying in the parish of St. Pancras alias Kentishetowne or St. Andrew, near London, now in the tenure of John Ricardes, citizen and armourer of London; all that close or croft of meadow and pasture commonly called the Gubbes Close alias Gubbs Croft lying in Uxbridge alias Woxbridge alias Woxbrigges and in the parish of Hillingdon in co. Middlesex, now or late in the tenure of Robert Audience of Uxbridge, innholder; and all those 2 tenements situate and built upon or near the said close or croft, late in the several tenures of William Allen and John Cobb, and now or late in that of William Hitchcott.

So seised, the said Henry Elsinge made his will, 27 March, 1582, in English, as follows:—

I give to my wife [not named] my house wherein I now dwell, situate in Fleetestreet, in London, together with all the tables, painted clothes, hangings, shelves, boards and bedsteads now being about my house for her life; also the house Mr. Tirrell lives in, for her life.

The messuage in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West called the Harpe on the Hoope and the curtilage are held of the Queen in free burgage of the City of London, and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £5. The tenement now in the tenure of Henry Payne in the said parish of St. Dunstan in the West is held of the Queen in free burgage by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s. The messuage and garden called the sign of the Bell and now called the sign of the Firye Ball and the barn and piece of waste land, to the said messuage belonging, situate in Hounesdiche, are held of the Queen as of her Priory of Christchurch next the Tower of London, now dissolved, by the yearly rent of 8s. 6d., and are worth per ann., clear, 5 marks. The pasture called the 100 acres in the parish of St. Pancras is held of the Queen in socage as of her manor of East Greenwich in co. Kent, by fealty only and not in chief, and is worth per ann., clear, £5. The close of meadow and pasture called Gubbs Close in Uxbridge and Hillingdon in co. Middlesex, and the 2 messuages situate and built upon or near the same are held of Henry Chapman as of his manor of Cowley Hall by the yearly rent of 3s., and are worth per ann., clear, 40s.

Henry Elsinge (named in the writ) died 27 March, 24 Eliz. [1582]; Henry Elsinge is his son and next heir and was then aged 4 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., No. 50.

William West, Knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7th October, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of William West, knight, by the oath of Robert Diconson, Richard Smithe, Roger Hole, John Harryson, Thomas Russell, John Jackson, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, William Povye, George Robertes, Robert Peacocke, John Ireland, John Bonde, John Rickardes, William Stiche and Nicholas Hawkesford, who say that

William West, knight, was seised in his demesne as of fee of 5 messuages situate in Smythefeilde in the parish of St. Sepulchre without Newgate, London, which were late one capital messuage called the Olivaunt.

So seised the said William West made his will 7 December, 1557, as follows [here given in English]: I give all my manors, lands, tenements and hereditaments as well freehold as copyhold to Edmond my son and his heirs for ever, and I make the said Edmond sole executor.

The said premises are held of the Queen in free burgage of the City of London, and are worth per ann., clear, £5.

William West died about the 10th day of November, 5 and 6 Philip and Mary [1558]; Dorothy now the wife of Lionel Wombewell, and Anne now the wife of Nicholas Harvye are his kinswomen and next co-heirs, viz., daughters and heirs of Laudovicus West, son and heir of the said William West, knight, and were then aged respectively, the said Dorothy 9 years and the said Anne 8 years.

Immediately after the death of the said William West, the said Edmund entered the said premises and took the profits thereof.

Chan. Inq. p. m., Eliz., vol. 201, No. 75.

Walter Coppinger, Citizen and Mercer.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 20 September, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blanch, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Walter Coppinger, citizen and mercer of London, by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Richard Smithe, Roger Hole, Thomas Russell, John Irelande, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, William Povye, George Roberdes, John Stoddarde, William Feake, John Bonde and Nicholas Hawkesforde, who say that

Walter Coppinger was seised in his demesne as of fee of 2 messuages, with the shops, cellars, &c, &c, thereto belonging, situate in the parish of St. Michael in Cornehill within the City of London, now in the several tenures of Thomas Burdet, citizen and haberdasher of London, and William Hamonde citizen and vintner of London: which said messuages are held in free burgage of the City of London and not in chief, and are worth per ann., clear, £5.

Walter Coppinger died in the said City of London, 31 December last past; Walter Coppinger is his son and next heir and was then aged 20 years and more: he is still in full life.

Chan. Inq. p. m., Eliz., vol. 201, No. 105.

Robert Walker, Citizen and Innholder.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 September, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blanck, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Robert Walker, citizen and innholder of London, by the oath of Robert Dickonson, Richard Smithe, Roger Hole, Thomas Russell, John Irelande, John Jackson, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, William Povye, Henry Webbe, George Robertes, John Oldam, William Feake, Robert Peacocke, John Bonde, John Rickards and Nicholas Hawkesforde, who say that

Long before the death of the said Robert Walker, King Edward 6 was seised in his demesne as of fee in right of his Crown of England of 1 messuage with the houses, buildings, shops, &c., thereto belonging, late in the tenure of Thomas Forster, situate in the parish of St. Martin within Ludgate, London, and to the late Chantry called Morreis Chauntrye, founded in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in London sometime belonging and late being parcel of the possessions thereof.

So seised, the said King afterwards, viz., on the 24th day of August, in the 3rd year of his reign [1549] by Letters Patent dated at Westminster the same day and year, for a certain sum of money therein expressed gave the said premises, inter alia, to William Saul and William Bridges, gentlemen, to hold the same to them and their heirs for ever of the said King in free burgage of the City of London and not in chief.

Afterwards, the said William Saul and William Bridges by their Charter of feoffment dated 7 September, 3 Edw. 6 [1549], for a competent and reasonable sum of money to them paid by Lewis Tidder, citizen and merchant tailor of London, granted the said premises to the said Lewis and his heirs for ever.

So seised the said Lewis Tidder, by indenture dated 12 February, 19 Eliz. [1577], made between himself of the one part and Robert Walker, citizen and innholder, of the other part and afterwards enrolled in the Court of Chancery on the 17th February in the said year, for the sum of £300 paid by the said Robert to the said Lewis gave the said messuage by the name of all those 2 messuages, as now they are divided, formerly being 1 messuage, with all the houses, buildings, shops, &c., thereto belonging situate in the parish of St. Martin within Ludgate, London, formerly in the tenure of Thomas Forster and now in the several tenures of David Dunkyn, merchant tailor, and Robert Twessell, haberdasher, to the said Robert Walker and his heirs for ever.

So seised, the said Robert Walker on the 14th day of November, 1582, made his will in English as follows: I give my freehold lands, tenements and hereditaments in England to George Sayers, alias Walker, my daughter's son, and to the heirs of his body; and for default, the same to remain to Laurens Walker and Anthony Walker my brothers and their heirs for ever.

The said messuage lately divided into 2 messuages, one of which is now called the Green Dragon, and other the premises are held of the Queen in free burgage of the City of London and not in chief and are worth per ann., clear, £7.

Robert Walker died 24 November, 25 Eliz. [1582], at London; the said George Sayers is his kinsman and next heir, viz., son of Margaret Sayers, wife of George Sayers, deceased, the only daughter of the said Robert Walker, and was then aged 18 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., vol. 201, No. 140.

Elizabeth Tapping, Widow.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7 June, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Elizabeth Tappinge of London, widow, by the oath of Robert Dickynson, Roger Hole, William Layer, John Harryson, Thomas Russell, John Ireland, John Jackson, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, Griffin Jones, William Povye, George Robertes, Robert Peacock, Frauncis Gunter, Henry Shawe, John Bonde, John Richardes, William Stiche and Nicholas Hawkysford, who say that

Elizabeth Tappinge was seised in her demesne as of fee of 1 messuage in the parish of the Blessed Mary Abchurche in the City of London, in the street called Candelwicke Streete, called the Black Lyon; also of divers lands and tenements lying in the town of Estgrenewiche in co. Kent.

So seised, the said Elizabeth Tappinge made her will 27 July, 1582, as follows [here given in English]: I give to Joan Jackson and Susanne Jackson late the daughters of my brother-in-law William Jackson and Joan Jackson his wife my sister, now deceased, my messuage with all the houses, gardens, orchards, &c., now in the tenure of the Right Honorable Lord Howard Lord of Effingham situate in Estgrenewiche: to hold to them and the heirs of their bodies, and for default, the remainder thereof to Thomas, Edward and Clement Burles, my brothers, and their heirs for ever. I give to John Burles, my brother, my messuage, with all the houses, gardens, &c., now in the tenure of Widow Pope, situate in Estgrenewiche, and all other my messuages, lands and hereditaments there: to hold all the same premises to the said John Burles and his heirs for ever on condition that he shall pay to my said brothers Thomas, Edward and Clement Burles £10 each, and to Mary Watson my sister £10, at his discretion.

I will that the said John Burles shall sell my messuage now in the tenure of Edward Clarke, "ventirer" situate in Candelwicke street in the parish of St. Mary Abchurch in London towards the payment of the debts of James Tappinge my husband, deceased, also my debts: the residue thereof to be equally divided amongst my said 3 brothers.

The said messuage in the parish of the Blessed Mary Abchurch called the Blacke Lyon is held of the Queen in chief, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and is worth per ann., clear, £4 13s. 4d. The lands and tenements in the town of East Greenwich are held of William Lambert as of his manor of Westcombe in free socage, and are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Elizabeth Tapping died 28 September, 24 Eliz. [1582]; John Burles is her brother and next heir, and was then aged 56 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., vol. 202, No. 167.

Thomas Cokkys, Gentleman.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 29 June, 25 Eliz. [1583], before Thomas Blancke, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Thomas Cokkys, gent., by the oath of Robert Dickenson, Richard Smythe, Roger Hole, John Harry son, Thomas Russell, John Irelande, John Jackson, Edmund Owen, George Gynne, Griffin Jones, William Povey, Henry Webb, George Robertes, Thomas Bonde, John Rickardes, William Stiche and Nicholas Hawkesford, who say that

Long before the death of the said Thomas Cokkys a certain John Cokkys, senior, citizen and leatherseller of London, father of the said Thomas, was seised in his demesne as of fee of all that messuage called the Three Fannes with gardens, &c., situate in the parish of All Saints in the Wall of the City of London, abutting on the north side on the Queen's highway, on the south side upon the lands of Shuxburgh, on the east side upon a tenement belonging to London Bridge, and on the west side upon a tenement belonging to the Art of the Leathersellers of London, late divided into several tenements.

So seised, the said John by his charter of enfeoffment dated 18 March, 15 Hen. 8 [1524], gave and confirmed to John Scragges, leatherseller, John Aleyn, armourer, Stephen Reding, skinner, and Simon Goldesmithe, blacksmith, citizens of London, and to John Clerke of Southwerke, in co. Surrey, brewer, John Loffkin of the same, barber, William Saunder of the same, brewer, William Smert of Southwerke, cordwainer, John Cokkys, junior, and William Cokkys, sons of the said John Cokkys, all the messuage and gardens abovesaid, to hold the same to them and their heirs for ever, to the use of Etheldrede, wife of the said John Cokkys, senior, and to the heirs of her body by the same John for ever, and for default, to the use of the fulfilment of his last will if he should make one: otherwise to the use of himself and his heirs for ever.

So seised, the said John Cokkys, senior, and Ethelrede had issue Thomas Cokkys, who after their decease by virtue of the said charter and of the Statute of Uses entered the said premises and was thereof seised in his demesne as of fee tail.

The said messuage late divided into several tenements and the said gardens and other the premises called the Three Fannes are held of the Queen for the rent of 1d. yearly, and are worth per ann., clear, £9.

Thomas Cokkys died 20 May, 25 Eliz. [1583], in the parish of All Saints on the Wall, in London, without issue of his body; Katherine Packington, wife of Richard Packington, citizen and salter of London, and Elizabeth Kemp, wife of Thomas Kempe, gent., are his kinsfolk and next heirs, viz., daughters and heirs of John Cokkys, junior, brother of the said Thomas Cokkys, son of John Cokkys, senior, and the said Katherine and Elizabeth are now both aged 40 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., 25 Eliz., vol. 202, No. 189.



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