Inquisitions
1598

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

E. A. Fry (editor)

Year published

1908

Pages

256-266

Citation Show another format:

'Inquisitions: 1598', Abstracts of Inquisitiones Post Mortem for the City of London: Part 3 (1908), pp. 256-266. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65905 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

John Cox.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 7 January, 40 Eliz. [1598], before Richard Saltonstall, Mayor and escheator, after the death of James Cox, citizen and saddler of London, by the oath of William Harvie, Edward Pillesworthe, Hugh Ingram, John Jenninges, Andrew Feilde, George Holman, Cuthbert Lee, Michael Crowche, Henry Earsley, Edward Catcher, Richard Blinkerne, James Fell, Humphrey Hooper, Richard Milles and Richard . . . who say that

John Cox long before his death was seised in his demesne as of fee of a messuage called Le Cocke in the street called Fleetstreet in the parish of St. Dunstan in the West, London, wherein he dwelt.

So seised, the said John Cox as well in consideration of a marriage heretofore had between him the said John and Alice then his wife, as in consideration of a marriage then afterwards to be had between Stephen Cox, his son and heir apparent and Mary Robinson daughter of Henry Robinson, deceased, and for the love he bore to the said Stephen and the heirs of his body, and for a sufficient jointure to be made for the said Mary, by indenture dated 12 August, 31 Eliz., made between him, the said John Cox, of the one part, and John Robinson, citizen and mercer of London, of the other part, agreed that he and his heirs would be seised of the said messuage immediately after the marriage between the said Stephen and Mary to the use of him the said John Cox and Alice his wife for the term of their lives and of the survivor of them; and after their decease, to the use of the said Stephen and Mary and the longer liver of them; the remainder thereof to the use of the said Stephen and the heirs male of his body by the said Mary; for default, to the use of the said Stephen and the heirs of his body; and for default, to the use of the said John Cox and his heirs for ever. Afterwards the said marriage was solemnised between the said Stephen and Mary, by reason whereof and of the said indenture and by force of the Statute of Uses the said John Cox and Alice his wife and the said Stephen Cox and Mary his wife were seised of the said messuage.

Afterwards, viz., on the 15th day of August, 38 Eliz. [1596] the said Stephen died so seised, having issue Stephen Cox the younger, his son, by the said Mary.

The said messuage is held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and is worth per ann., clear, 40s.

John Cox died 6 July last past; the said Stephen Cox, junior, is his kinsman and heir, viz., son and heir of the said Stephen Cox, eldest son and heir of the said John Cox, and was then aged 7 years, 3 months and 8 days.

The said Alice and Mary still survive.

Chan. Inq. p. m., ser. 2, vol. 252, No. 10.

Benedict Barneham, Esq.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 11 July, 40 Eliz. [1598], before Thomas Wrothe, esq., William Necton, gent., and Richard Morgan, gent., deputy escheator by virtue of a commission to them directed after the death of Benedict Barneham, esq., alderman . . . by the oath of William Crowche, Hugh Ingram, John Jeninges, Richard Durant, Clement Buck, Peter Noxton, Christopher Askewith, Cuthbert Lee, Henry Best, Richard Kirkby, Edward Katcher, Richard Mills, Henry Earsley, Humphrey Hooper, Richard Crayford, Richard Blinckhorne, and William Abbott, who say that

Benedict Barneham, esq., on the day that he died was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 capital messuage wherein he then dwelt, situate in a certain lane called St. Clement's Lane near . . . St. Clement in the ward of Langburne in the City of London; and of 1 messuage called le Shippe lying within the parish of St. Christopher near le Shambles called le Stockes within the said City.

Before [the death] of the said Benedict one Thomas Antrobus was seised in his demesne as of fee of 4 messuages lying in the said lane of St. Clement near Eastcheap in the said City; also 1 capital messuage lying in the said lane; 1 other messuage there, then in the tenure of Thomas Knowher; 1 other messuage there, late in the tenure of Katherine Lamley, widow.

So seised, the said Thomas Antrobus by indenture dated 26 January, 3 Eliz. [1561] sold the said premises to [Alice] Barneham and the said Benedict Barneham to hold to the said Alice and Benedict and the heirs of the said Benedict for ever, by virtue whereof and by force of the Statute of Uses the said Alice and Benedict were seised of the said premises, viz., the said Benedict in his demesne as of fee and the said Alice in her demesne as of freehold for the term of her life.

Long before the death of the said Benedict, one Edward Bartlett, esq., was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 messuage called "le signe of the greene dragon" situate in the parish of St. Bridget in Fleetstreet within the suburbs of the said City, and so seised, enfeoffed thereof the said Alice and Benedict Barneham to hold to them and the heirs of the said Benedict . . . by virtue whereof they were thereof seised as above.

Before the death of the said Benedict, one David Holilande was seised in his demesne as of fee of 1 capital messuage, orchard and garden, lying in the parish of St. Martin Outwitch in Busshoppsgatestrete in the said City, then in the occupation of . . . Foxe; 1 other messuage in the same parish, in the occupation of Andrew Treuers; 3 other messuages near adjoining in the several tenures of Thomas Bullock, James Austen, and Richard Faulkener, lying in the parish of St. Martin Outwitch, and of other messuages lying in the said parish in a certain lane called Hamondes Alley in the occupation of divers several persons.

So seised, a fine was levied at Westminster from the day of Holy Trinity in 15 days, 30 Eliz. [1588] between the said Alice Barneham, widow, and the said Benedict Barneham, plts., and the said David Holiland and Judith his wife, deforciants, of the said premises, whereby the said David and Judith acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of the said Alice and Benedict and the same remised to them and the heirs of the said Benedict for ever: which said fine was levied to the use of the said Alice and Benedict and the heirs of the said Benedict for ever.

The said Benedict was also seised in his demesne as of fee of the manors of Walmeston and . . . in co. Kent, 1 windmill called Wingham mill, 24 (?) a. of land, meadow and pasture late in the tenure of William Parker, 22 a. of meadow and pasture called the mannor landes . . . 10 a. of land lying in or near a certain field called mill field, late in the tenure of John Jones, situate in Walmyston alias Wyelmeston alias Welmeston, Wingham, Preston, Elmeston, Ashe and Staple in co. Kent, the manor of Bockingfolde alias Bockingfelde alias Buckingfield in the said county of Kent, 1 park called Buckingfield parke, lying in Buckingfield, Yaldinge, Horsmondyne, Brinchley and Marden in the said county; the manor of Reade in the said county, and 2 a. of land and . . . virgate of land in Marden; 1 shop and the half of a shop in Maidstone in the said county; the manor of Westfarborne in the said county, 160 a. of land, meadow and . . . wood being in Heriotsham, Ulcum alias Ulcumbe, Lennam, Sandhurst and Rowelden (?) in the said county; 1 messuage called Farnborne Tenement and 60 a. of land, meadow and pasture thereto belonging, 10 a. of land late in the tenure of Edward Ellis, 14 a. of land and meadow lying in Heriotsham, Ulcum, Bowtoner, Malherbe, Bromfielde and Headcorne in the said county; 1 other messuage and 110 a. of land, meadow, pasture and wood thereto belonging, being in Ulcom, Leedes, Bromfield and Heriodsham in the said county.

Before the death of the said Benedict a certain Thomas Fane, esq., was seised in his demesne as of fee of the manor of Swalcliff alias Swacliff in the said county, and 15½ a. of land lying in Seasalter and Rake in the said county, and of the moiety of the . . . part . . . in Swacliffe and Seasalter.

So seised, the said Thomas Fane and Dame Helen his wife by indenture dated 7 October, 31 Eliz. [1589], sold all the said premises last recited to the said Alice and Benedict Barneham: to hold to them and the heirs of the said Benedict for ever: by virtue whereof and by force of the Statute of Uses the said Alice and Benedict were seised of the said premises, viz., the said Benedict in his demesne as of fee, and the said Alice in her demesne as of freehold for the term of her life.

The said Benedict was also seised of 1 messuage . . . lying in Padington in co. Middlesex, and 36 a. of land 10 a. of meadow and 24 a. of pasture thereto belonging, being in . . . Kensington and Chelsey in co. Middlesex, now or late in the tenure of Robert Coram and Roger Coram; 40 a. of land, meadow and pasture in Paddington, Kensington and Chelsey now or late in the tenure of William Lyle; 26 a. of land, meadow and pasture there now or late in the tenure of John Hopkins; 1 capital messuage called the Fa . . . lying in Chelmsford in co. Essex; 1 messuage called . . . farm, 65 a. of land, 11 a. of meadow, 78 a. of pasture, 20 a. of wood, 1 cottage and 1 orchard in Rotherwick, Hartley waspell, Hartlie Rowes, Stockmore and Wildemore in co. Southampton.

So seised the said Benedict Barneham made his will concerning all his goods on the 24th day of March, 39 Eliz., [1597] and thereby made William Bretewell and Abraham . . . ex[ecut]ors, and on the 1st day of April, 40 Eliz., made his will concerning his lands and tenements, as follows: I leave for a full 3rd part of all my manors, lands, &c., all my lands called Welmeston . . . of Wolmeston lying in Wingham in co. —, and all my marshes and marsh ground thereto belonging now in the tenure of — Parker, and . . . containing about 10 a.; parcel of Wormeston lands, and all my land and tenement called . . . in Rotherwick in Hampshire, and all other my lands and tenements in Hampshire, and all my lands in Chelmsford in co. Essex, and all my messuage called the Shippe in the City of London so that thereof and thereby the Queen may be answered . . . duties which may happen to her by reason of the nonage of my heirs.

I give to Dorathie my "verie good louinge and faithfull wife" in full recompence of her dower all my manors, lands and tenements whereof at any time since my marriage with her I have been seised of any estate of inheritance, all my manor of Bockingfold in co. Kent, and all my lands, tenements and hereditaments in Bokingfold . . . Horsemonden, Brenchley, Yalden and Marden in the said county; my manor of Reade in the said county; my lands and tenements in Marden in the said county, my shop and half a shop in Maidstone; 2 parts, in 3 parts to be divided of my manor of Welmeston; and 2 parts of all my lands and tenements to the said manor belonging: to hold to the said Dorothy for the term of her natural life; the remainder thereof after her decease, to the heirs male of my body; for default, to the heirs female of my body; and for default, to my right heirs for ever. I give to my ex[ecut]ors, my manor of Westfarborne in co. Kent, and all my messuages, lands and tenements in Leedes, Bramfield Harry (?) Ocham, Boughton Mathers and Headcorne . . . now or late in the several tenures of — Bowman, Mathewe Co . . . and — Braye, all my lands in Paddington and Chelsey in co. Middx. . . . and reversion of all my messuages, lands and tenements in St. Clements Lane near Eastcheap in the City of London, which Mrs. Alice Barneham my mother holds for the term of her life, except the capital messuage . . . gallery, yards, easements, tenements and edifices hereafter in this my will mentioned; also the reversion of the messuage called the Green Dragon in Fletestreet, London, and the reversion . . . Swalcliff in co. Kent, and the advowson of the parish Church of Swalcliff, and all the messuages and lands in Swalcliff to the said manor belonging: To hold until my child unborn, if it be a man child, come to the age of 21 years, but if it be not son or if he die, then my said ex[ecut]ors to hold the same until my daughters and the said child if a woman child come to the age of 18 years or be married, in confidence that my said ex[ecut]ors shall receive the rents of all the said premises, deducting expenses for the repairs of the said premises and all charges and reprises out of the same, and the residue of the said rents to the use of my said daughters and the child unborn, to be equally divided amongst them. And after the said child unborn if a man child, come to the age of 21, then the said premises to remain to him and to the heirs of his body; for default, to the heirs male of my body; for default, to the heirs female of my body; and for default, to my right heirs for ever: and if the said child be a woman child, then to my said daughters and the said child and to the heirs of their body; for default, to the heirs of my body, and, for default, to my right heirs for ever.

I also give to the said Dorathy my wife the capital messuage wherein I and my said mother do dwell in St. Clement's Lane, and all the gallery, yards and tenements there which I purchased of Mr. Antrobus, and all the edifices, yards, profits and comodities thereto belonging: to hold immediately after the death of my said mother during the natural life of the said Dorathy, the remainder thereof successively to the heirs male of my body, the heirs female of my body and my right heirs for ever.

Whereas I bought of William Saunderson, citizen and fishmonger, certain messuages, lands and tenements in Heriotsham in the said county of . . . and caused the same to be conveyed to the said Mrs. Alice Barneham my mother and to my brother Mr. Martyn Barneham and their heirs in trust that they should assure the same . . . I now desire my said mother and brother to convey all the said premises as soon as may be after my decease to the said Dorothy my wife for the term of her natural life, with remainders as above.

I give to the parson and Churchwardens of the parish Church of St. Clement in Eastcheap and to their successors a yearly rent of £10, issuing out of all my . . . in Bisshopsgate street in the parish of St. Martin Outwitch: to hold to them and their successors for ever, to be by them employed for such uses for which a yearly rent of £7 was lately . . . my said mother to certain persons and their heirs, to be issuing out of the said premises in the said parish of St. Martin Outwitch, and the rates and portions mentioned in the said grant to be employed for the maintenance of the said uses . . . provided nevertheless that the said parson and Churchwardens within 3 months after my decease shall cause the said yearly rent of £7 to be . . . and discharged, and the said grant thereof to be cancelled.

The said capital messuage in St. Clement's Lane wherein the said Benedict Barneham dwelt was held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, viz., by the 40th part of a knight's fee, and is worth per ann., clear, and after the death of the said Alice, 100s. The messuage called le Shipp in the parish of St. Christopher near the Shambles was held in free burgage of the City of London, and is worth per ann., clear, 60s. The 4 messuages lying in St. Clement's Lane, the capital messuage lying in the said lane in the tenure of Thomas Knowher, and the messuage there in the tenure of Alice Lamley, which said premises were lately purchased of Thomas Antrobus, are held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, after the death of the said Alice, 40s. The messuage called the Greene Dragon lying in the parish of St. Bridgett in Fleetstreet is held of the Queen in chief by knight's service, and is worth per ann., clear, after the death of the said Alice, 30s. The capital messuage, orchard and garden lying in the parish of St. Martin Owtwitch in Bisshopsgate street in the occupation of Richard Foxe, the other messuage there late in the occupation of Andrew Trevers, the 3 messuages lying together in the several occupations of Thomas Bullock, James Austen and Richard Faulkener, and the 9 messuages adjoining lying in the said parish in Hamondes Alley, which said messuages were purchased of David Holiland, are held of the Queen in chief, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, after the death of the said Alice, £7; of whom or by what service the manor of Wolmston alias Walmeston, the windmill and other the premises in Walmeston are held the jurors are ignorant: they are worth per ann., clear, £14. Of whom the manor of Walmyston alias Wyelmeston alias Welmeston and other the premises in Walmeston, Preston, Elmeston Ashe and Staple in co. Kent are held the jurors do not know: they are worth per ann., clear, 20s. The manor of Bockinfolde and the park of Buckingfold are held of the Queen in chief by the 40th part of a knight's fee, and are worth per ann., clear, £7. The manor of Read is held of . . . in free socage as of his manor of Marden in co, Kent, and is worth per ann., clear, £4. The 2 a. of land and 3 a. and 3 virgates of meadow in Marden are held in free socage, but of whom the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, 6s. Of whom the said shop and half a shop in Maidstone are held is not known: they are worth per ann., clear, 5s. The manor of Westfarborne in co. Kent. is held of the Queen as of her castle of Dover, in co. Kent by the service of castlegard, and is worth per ann., clear, 60s. The messuage or farm called Farborne and 60 a. of land, meadow and pasture thereto belonging, the 10 a. of land in the tenure of Edward Ellis, and the 14 a. of land and meadow lying in Hariodsham, Ulcom, Bowthoner Malherbe, Bromefield and Headcorne in co. Kent are held of the Queen in chief, but by what part of a knight's fee the jurors know not, and are worth per ann., clear, £4. Of whom the messuage and no a. of land, meadow and pasture lying in Ulcum, Leedes, Bromefield and Hariodsham in co. Kent are held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, 60s. The manor of Swalcliff and other the premises in Swacliff, Seasalter and Roke in co. Kent are held of the Queen in chief, viz., by the 20th part of a knight's fee and by the rent of £3 13s. 4½d., and are worth per ann., clear, after the death of the said Alice, £4. The messuage or farm of Westbourne and other the premises . . . Kensington and Chelsey in co. Middlesex, in the several tenures of Robert Coram and Roger Coram are held of the Queen in chief, viz., by the 40th part of a knight's fee. Of whom the 40 a. of land, meadow and pasture lying in Paddington, Kensington and Chelsey in the tenure of William Lile, and the 26 a. of land, meadow and pasture there in the tenure of John Hopkins are held the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £3. The said messuage in Chelmsford in co. Essex is held in free socage, but of whom the jurors are ignorant: it is worth per ann., clear, 30s. The messuage or farm called Rooke farme and other the premises in Rotherwick, Hartley, Waspell, Hartley Rowe, Stockmore and Wildemore in co. Southampton are held in free socage but of whom the jurors know not: they are worth per ann., clear, £10.

Benedict Barneham died 4 April last past, 40 Eliz. [1598], having issue Elizabeth, Alice, Dorothea and Bridgett Barneham. Afterwards, viz., on the 25th day of June last past, the said Dorothea relict of the said Benedict gave birth to a daughter who was called Benedicta: the said Elizabeth, Alice, Dorothy, Bridget and Benedicta are the daughters and co-heiresses of the said Benedict: the said Elizabeth at the time of the death of her said father was aged 6 years, 9 months and 21 days, the said Alice, 5 years, 10 months and 13 days, the said Dorothy 2 (?) years, 11 months and 19 days, the said Bridgett 1 year, 10 months and 2 days, the said Benedicta is now aged 16 days.

The said Alice Barneham, mother of the said Benedict, still survives in the said parish of St. Clement within the City of London.

Chan. Inq. p. m., ser. 2, vol. 253, No. 78.

Richard Jackman, lunatic.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 28 June, 40 Eliz. [1598], before Thomas Lowe, citizen and alderman of London, John Newman, Baptist Hixe, gent., William Necton, gent., feodary of the said City and Nicholas Morgan, gent., deputy escheator, commissioners, to enquire whether Richard Jackman is a lunatic, or has lucid intervals, so that he cannot govern himself or his manors, messuages, goods and chattels, lands and tenements or not, by the oath of Edward Pillesworthe, Hugh Ingram, John Jenninges, Robert Durant, Andrew Feilde, Clement Buck, Peter Noxton, Cuthbert Lee, George Holman, Michael Crowche, Richard Blinckorne, Richard Crafforde, William Abbott, William Crowche, and Henry Earsley, who say that

The said Richard Jackman is a lunatic and does not enjoy lucid intervals, so that he is unfit to govern himself or his lands and goods, he became a lunatic three years ago by the visitation of God and has been one ever since. During his lunacy he has not alienated any lands or tenements or goods, and during that time he had no lands or tenements to the knowledge of the jurors, but certain goods and chattels of the said Richard are in the hands of Jeronimus Haydon, citizen and ironmonger of London, but of what value they are the jurors do not know.

Joan Jackman is the kinswoman and next heir of the said Richard, and is now aged 8 years and more.

Chan. Inq. p. m., ser. 2, vol. 254, No. 68.

Anthony Wheatley.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 1 February, 40 Eliz. [1598], before Richard Saltonstall, Mayor and escheator, by virtue of a writ of the Lady the Queen to prove the age of Anthony Wheatley, gent., son and heir of William Wheatleye, gent., by the oath of William Harvey, Hugh Ingram, John Jenninges, Robert Durant, Andrew Feilde, Peter Noxon, George Holman, Cuthbert Lee, Michael Crowche, Henry Earsley, Richard Mills, Edward Katcher, Richard Blinckhorne, Nicholas Askwith, Humphrey Hooper and Richard Craford, who say that

Anthony Wheatlie was born and baptized on the 16th day of March, 1567, in the parish of St. Bridget in Fletestreete, London, and was of the full age of 21 years on the 16th day of March, 31 Eliz., and on the day of the taking of this inquisition was aged 29 years, 11 months and 13 days.

Chan. Inq. p. m., ser. 2, vol. 254, No. 104.

Henry Hewet.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 10 July, 40 Eliz. [1598], before Richard Salstonstall knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of Henry Hewet, citizen and clothworker of London, by the oath of William Crowche, Hugh Ingram, John Jenninges, Robert Durant, Clement Buck, Peter Noxton, Christopher Askwith, Cuthbert Lee, Richard Kyrkby, Edward Catcher, Richard Milles, Henry Earsley, Richard Crayforde, Richard Blinkhorne, Humphrey Hooper and William Abbott, who say that

Long before the death of the said Henry Hewet, a certain William Hewet, knight, was seised in his demesne as of fee of 2 messuages and tenements with shops, cellars, sollars, and buildings thereto belonging lying in the parish of St. Martin Orgar in the City of London, late in the tenure of the said William Hewet: which said 2 messuages and tenements now made into 1 messuage are called by the name of the signe of the Three Cranes in Candlewicke street in the said City.

So seised, the said William Hewet afterwards, viz., on the 3rd day of January, 9 Eliz., made his will in writing as follows:

I give to my nephew Henry Hewet, son of my brother Thomas Hewet, all that my messuage called the sign of the Three Cranes in Candlewick street, with all the shops, &c., thereto belonging: To hold to him and the heirs of his body; and for default, the said messuage to remain to his father Thomas Hewet, my brother, for the term of his natural life; and immediately after his decease, the same to remain to Edward Osburne his son and his heirs for ever.

Shortly afterwards the said William Hewet died in the said City of London; after whose death the said Henry Hewet (named in the writ) entered into the said premises and was thereof seised in his demesne as of fee tail, viz., to him and the heirs of his body.

The said Henry Hewet being so seised the said Thomas Hewet, Henry Hewet and Edward Osburne by the names of Thomas Hewet, citizen and clothworker of London, Henry Hewet, citizen and clothworker of London, son and heir apparent of the said Thomas, and Edward Osburne, citizen and clothworker of London, and Anne his wife, daughter and heir of the said William Hewet, knight, by their deed tripartite dated 27 April, 9 Eliz. [1567], demised to Thomas Bromley, esq., then Recorder of the City of London and Ralph Bosevyle, esq., the said premises which the said Sir William Hewet purchased to him and his heirs of the master and 4 guardians of the guild or fraternity of St. Katherine of the art or mystery of haberdashers of the City of London by charter dated 26 July, 1 Mary [1553]: To hold to the said Thomas Bromley and Ralph Bosevyle and their heirs to the use of the said Thomas Hewet for the term of his life; and after his decease, to the use of the said Henry Hewet and his heirs for ever, of the chief lords of that fee by the services thereof due and of right accustomed; by virtue whereof and by force of the Statute of Uses the said Thomas Hewet entered into the said premises and was thereof seised in his demesne as of freehold, with remainder as above.

Afterwards, viz., on the 29th day of April, 9 Eliz., the said Edward Osburne and Anne his wife by deed of even date remised to the said Thomas and Henry Hewet and the heirs of the said Henry all their title and interest in the said premises.

The said Thomas Hewet died so seised at London, 9 March . . . Eliz., after whose death the said premises remained to the said Henry Hewet and his heirs, who then entered into the same, and afterwards, viz., on the 19th day of December, 40 Eliz. [1597], made his will in writing as follows:

I give to my wife Mary Hewet my house wherein I dwell called the Three Cranes situate in Candlewick street, with free entry, ingress, egress and regress in and to the same (the shops, parcel of the said house only excepted) which said shop I will that Henry Hewet my second son shall have, together with the reversion of the said house after the decease of my said wife. By the said will the testator gave to the said Henry his second son the said shop with the reversion of the said house after the decease of his said wife: to hold to the said Henry and his heirs for ever.

The said messuages in the said parish of St. Martin Orgar are held of the Queen in free burgage of the said City, and are worth per ann., clear, 5 marks.

Henry Hewet (named in the writ) died at London 29 December last past; Thomas Hewet is his son and next heir, and was aged 10 years in the 5th day of July last past, viz., 39 Eliz.

Chan. Inq. p. m., ser. 2, vol. 255, No. 173.



<--Previous:
Inquisitions:
1597