Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1552

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

8-12

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1552', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 8-12. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65922 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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1552

5 January, 5 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at the Stroond co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Foster late of London yoman entered the house of Henry the Earl of Arrundell and stole therefrom "quadraginta sex pisces salsar' vocat' haberdynes" worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Earl. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Thomas Foster was sentenced to be hung. G. D., 21 Jan., 5 Edward VI.

22 February, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at Hoggesden co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Adams late of London spynster broke into the house of John Shepherd at Hoggesdon, and stole therefrom "a womans kertyll of Russell worsted superbodied with damaske" worth forty shillings, "unum par manicarum de seric' voc' tawin damaske ad valenc' vs.," a piece of gold called "an olde ryall" worth fifteen shillings, a piece of gold called "a di-soueraign" worth ten shillings, a piece of gold called "an old aungell" worth ten shillings, eight pieces of linen worth six shillings and eightpence, and sixteen shillings in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said John Shepherd. Alice Adams put herself 'Guilty' and was remanded on account of her pregnancy. G. D. R., . . . . ., 6 Edward VI.

26 February, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at Chartterhouse Churchyarde co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Nedham late of London spinster stole a piece of gold called "a doble duckett," a piece of gold called "a French Crowne," and a piece of gold called "a Cruesadowe," of the goods and chattels of an unknown man. Po se non cull nec. G. D., . . . ., 6 Edward VI.

14 March, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes without the bars of the New Temple on the said day, Philip Danyell late of London yoman entered the house or hospice of Clementes Inne, and stole therefrom sixty pieces "vasorum electri anglice vocat' pewter vessels" worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Fellows of the said Hospice, then in the custody of Leonerd Stephenson, Principal of the same hospice. G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI.

29 March, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at Stebunheth co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Browne late of Stebunheth aforesaid yoman entered the house of George Lyster, and stole therefrom a linen sheet worth eight shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Balton of London citizen and goldsmith. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Thomas Browne was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 3 June, 6 Edward VI.

6 April, 6 Edward VI.—Coroner's Inquisition-post mortem, taken at Westminster on view of the body of John Rypley late of the said city yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on 8 Nov. 5 Edward VI. about ten p.m., in a certain place within the said city called "the lytle Sent Tuarie," a certain Thomas Rugg late of the said city yoman was in God's and the King's peace, when the said John Rypley "gladiis et cultellis" assaulted him, and forced upon him an affray, in which the said Thomas Rugg, fighting in self-defence and for the preservation of his life, with a staff gave the same John Ripley on the fore part of his head a mortal blow, of which he died on the 22nd day of the same November. [Here again the length of the time between the death and the inquest is noteworthy.] G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI.

25 April, 6 Edward VI.—Coroner's Inquest, taken at Westminster on view of the body of Richard Jorden late of the said city yoman: With Verdict that, on the 26th of May 5 Edward VI. at Grenewiche co. Kent, in a certain place called "the backesyde of the late Freer House," William Evans late of Est Grenewiche yoman with a sword gave the said Richard Jorden a mortal blow, of which he languished from the said 26 May 5 Edward VI. to the 17th of June then next following, on which last-named day the said Richard died of the said blow. [The length of time between the death and the inquest is remarkable]. G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI.

28 April, 6 Edward VI.—Coroner's Inquest, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Elizabeth Towers late of Suthwarke co. Surrey spynster, there lying dead: With Verdict that she died within the gaol on the day aforesaid by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI.

28 April, 6 Edward VI.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Robert Carden late of St. Katerins co. Midd. yoman: With Verdict that he died within the gaol on the said day by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 30 April, 6 Edward VI.

20 June to 5 September, 6 Edward VI.—Imperfect Roll (twenty membranes, stitched together in book-fashion) of three hundred and twelve Victuallers' Recognizances, taken on 5 June or on days of the three next following months, before Sir Roger Cholmeley knt. and Ralph Cholmeley esq., Justices of the Peace, in accordance with the requirements of the Statute 5 & 6 Edward VI. c. 25, which ordained "that none after the first Day of May next coming shall be admitted or suffered to keep any common Alehouse or Tipplinghouse, but such as shall be thereunto admitted and allowed in the open Sessions of the Peace, or else by two Justices of the Peace, whereof the one to be of the Quorum; And that the said Justices of the Peace, or two of them (whereof the one to be of the Quorum) shall take Bond and Surety from Time to Time by Recognisance of such as shall be admitted and allowed hereafter to keep any common Alehouse or Tiplinghouse, as well for and against the using of unlawful Games, as also for the using and Maintenance of good Order and Rule to be had and used within the same, as by their Discretion shall be thought necessary and convenient:" each of the three hundred and twelve persons, thus admitted to keep an Alehouse, being bound in the sum of ten pounds, together with two sureties, bound in the sum of five pounds each. Disappointingly silent on matters especially interesting to antiquaries, the Recognizances in no single case gave the name, sign or precise locality of an Alehouse; but in giving the names of the parishes or districts of parishes, in which the bound victuallers were licensed to follow their trade, the Roll affords the data for the following table of the number of taverns, licensed in forty-six parishes or districts of Middlesex in the 6th year of Edward the Sixth.

MIDDLESEX ALEHOUSES temp. EDWARD VI.

No. of Houses.
1. Stratfurds-atte-Bowe13
2. City of Westminster42
3. Whytechappell12
4. Hakney7
5. Bednall Grene4
6. Highgate5
7. Isseldon13
8. Grenestret in the parish of Kyntyshtowne1
9. Hoxton7
10. Blakwall1
11. Muswell Hill juxta Harnyngsey1
12. Saynt Clementes-Danes within the Libertie of Westminster10
13. Paddington3
14. St. Clementes within the Duchey13
15. Saint Gyles-in-the-Feilde.11
16. Norton Follye5
17. Hampsted3
18. Hollowaye3
19. Highe Holbourne14
20. Fynnesbury, Whyte-Cross Strete2
21. Grubbstrete2
22. Golding Lane7
179
No. of Alehouses carried over179
23. St. Martin's nigh Charing Crosse16
24. Shorediche9
25. Mylende5
26. Marybone1
27. Kentyshetowne1
28. Stoke-Newington8
29. Popler6
30. Freering-Barnet2
31. Lymehouse7
32. Stebenhithe9
33. Clerkenwell10
34. Saynt Johns-Strete12
35. St. Katherin's8
36. Chancery Lane11
37. Smithfild and St. Katherin's11
38. Fynchley3
39. Harnesey3
40. Knight Bridge1
41. Westburne-in-the parish of Paddington1
42. Willesdon3
43. Kensington3
44. Greys-Inne-Lane1
45. Wallock Barne1
46. Kilburn1
312

Of the 312 persons, thus licensed to keep taverns, twenty-two were women, designated in their respective Recognizances "widow" or "spinster." In their Recognizances the men, admitted to Alehouses, are invariably styled yeomen (spelt 'yomen'),—the comprehensive and elastic designation, that in Tudor London covered all the various sorts and conditions of men, who neither bore arms, nor followed a profession affording them at least a colour of gentility, nor subsisted by any known and lawful avocation that gave its followers a more precise and distinctive description.

7 November, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, on the said day at Monken Hadley co. Midd., Roger Daldorne laborer, Thomas Daldorne yoman alias laborer, and Richard Misterley serving-man, all three of Monken Hadley aforesaid, stole a sheep worth three shillings, of the goods and chattels of an unknown man. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Roger Daldorne received the King's pardon by Letters Patent dated 4 March, 7 Edward VI. Thomas Daldorne was at large. G. D., . . . . Edward VI.

30 November, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at Holbourne co. Midd. on the said day, William Harris and John Warren, both late of London yomen, stole a black gelding worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of. Richard Whalley esq. Both prisoners put themselves 'Guilty.' G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Edward VI.

2 December, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Moyses Bartlett late of London yoman, stole a quarter of an angell of gold worth two shillings and sixpence, of the goods and chattels of an unknown man. Clerical memorandum at the head of the bill, "Po se cul ca null petit libra' leg' vt cl'icus vst in man' et committ ordinario." He puts himself 'Guilty,' has no chattels, asks for the book, reads like a clerk and is delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Edward VI.

6 December, 6 Edward VI.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Davyd late of the said city yoman stole a leather purse worth fourpence, and two shillings of numbered money being in the same purse, of the goods chattels and moneys of an unknown man: and that William Holland, knowing him to have committed the said felony, on the same day harboured and aided the same Thomas Davyd. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Thomas Davyd was sentenced to be hung. No memorandum of sentence on William Holland, who also put himself 'Guilty.' G. D. R., . . . . Jan., 6 Edward VI.