Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1559-60

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

34-37

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1559-60', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 34-37. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65929 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Contents

1559-60

8 January, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Wyllesdon co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Barnes late of London yoman stole a woman's woollen gown worth thirteen shillings, a woman's petycote worth six shillings and eight pence, a linen shete worth two shillings, four linen kerchers worth three shillings and four pence, a payre of silver hookes worth sixteen pence, two silver rings worth twenty pence, two silver pins worth twenty pence, and an apron worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of John Chylde. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Henry Barnes was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . May, 1 Elizabeth.

12 January, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the highway at Ayehill co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Addyson bocher and Hugh Mychell yoman, both late of London, assaulted John Austen of Launston co. Cornwall, and robbed him of sixty pounds in a leather purse.—At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that Richard Addyson and Hugh Mychell were sentenced to be hung. G. D., . . . . 1 Eliz.

20 February, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Turmylstreyt co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Edwardes late of London yoman stole and carried off a man's fryse coat worth eight shillings, and a man's blewe woollen-cloth jacket worth three shillings, and a linen shirt worth twenty pence, of the goods and chattels of Bartholomew Kempsall of Turmyllstrete aforesaid.—At the foot of the bill a memorandum that the said Edward Edwardes put himself 'Guilty,' asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was committed to the Ordinary. G. D., . . . . 1 Eliz.

4 May, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. ClementDanes co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Shawe alias Stanley late of London yoman stole two silver goblettes worth eight pounds, and two silver spoons worth thirteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Cockes.—At the foot of the bill, a Memorandum that, on his arraignment on . . . . th of May in the Justice Hall in the Old Bailey, Thomas Shawe put himself 'Guilty,' and asked for the book, whereupon it was pleaded for the Lady the Queen that he had been burnt on the hand in former time, to which Thomas Shawe replied that he was not the same person who was so burnt; and a Jury having found at the Gaol Delivery of 14 Dec. 2 Eliz. that he was the same convicted clerk, so burnt in the hand on a previous occasion, he was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . May, 1 Eliz.

13 May, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Stratford-at-Bowe on the said day, Margaret Humfrey late of London spynster, stole twelve shillings of numbered money in a box, five kerchers and four rayles worth six shillings and eightpence, two linen aprons worth twelve pence, a silk cuffe worth four pence, and one pair of woman's stockings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Harvye of Estham co. Essex fyssherman. Putting herself 'Guilty,' Margaret Humfrey pleaded her pregnancy. G. D. R., . . . . May, 1 Eliz.

20 May, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at the lordship of Wallockes Berne in the parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate co. Midd., William Davys late of London yoman stole five spades worth ten shillings, and one other piece of iron called a coulter worth six shillings and eightpence of the goods and chattels of William Austen "apud dominium de Wallockes berne." Pleading his clergy, William Davys was burnt in the hand and delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., . . . . May, 1 Elizabeth.

26 September, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Wallockes Barne co. Midd. on the said day, William Baynard late of London cook stole ten shillings and tenpence in numbered money of the goods and moneys of Richard Skelton of Dunstable co. Beds., then being in the custody of James Tye of Dunstable aforesaid maltman. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Baynard was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 1 Eliz.

27 September, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Isseldon co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Cowke late of Westminster yoman assaulted John Papworth on the highway, and robbed him of a sword worth five shillings, a felte hat, and a leather purse containing twenty pence in numbered money. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Edward Cowke was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 1 Eliz.

1 October, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Laleham co. Midd. on the said day and before and afterwards, Thomas Ranyer of Lyttleton co. Midd. yoman kept a certain Elizabeth Goldock of Laleham spynster as his concubine at Laleham aforesaid, and lived with her in adultery. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 1 Eliz.

2 October, 1 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Cowley co. Midd. on the said day, Alexander Raynford late of Rypley co. Kent yoman stole "vnum coopertorium vocat' a bed kyveringe" worth two shillings, and a pair of flaxen shetes worth three shillings and four pence, of the goods and chattels of Roger Burton of Harlington.—At the foot of the bill a memorandum that the said Alexander put himself 'Guilty,' and asked for the book (viz. at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, 7 Oct., 1 Eliz.); when the matter was deferred "quia sedes episcopalis jam vacat ita vt competens ordinarius non aderat." Afterwards at the Session held on 3 Jan., 2 Eliz., the prisoner read like a clerk, was burnt on the hand, and handed over to the Ordinary.—At the same Session of 3 Jan., 2 Eliz., John Crowcher late of Keston co. Midd. shereman, who had at a previous Session acknowledged himself guilty of cattle-stealing was unable to save his neck by reading a verse. "Non legit vt clericus," runs the memorandum at the foot of his bill of indictment: "Ideo judicatum est quod suspendatur per collum." G. D. R., 7 Oct., 1 Eliz.

19 September, 2 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Hill Felde in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, on view of the body of a certain unknown man, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on the 6th inst. between six and seven p.m., John Tyrrell alias Tayllour, late of London yoman, with other persons, in the said field assaulted the said unknown man, and that John Tyrrell aforesaid murdered him, by giving him with "a staffe of ashe" on the left part of his head a mortal blow, of which the same unknown man then and there died immediately.—On his arraignment John Tyrrell alias Tayllour put himself 'Not Guilty,' and did not retract; wherefore it was adjudged that he should go quit. Further it appears, from the Memorandum at the foot of the bill, that the Jurors found, that John Sturfurrowe of Ludlowe co. Salop husbandman murdered the said unknown man. G. D. R., . . . . Feb. 3 Eliz.

30 November, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Radcliffe co. Midd. about six p.m. of the said day, Christopher Woodworthe, late of London yoman, broke into the house of Robert Hilorde yoman (the said Robert being in the house), and stole therefrom "unam zonam virilem de nigra Cruell ad valenciam ijd., vnam crumenam virilem de corio albo ad valenciam iiijd., vnum annulum aureum cum lapide precioso in eodem infixo vocat' a dyamond ad valenciam xxxs., vnum alium annulum aureum cum sole in eodem sculpto ad valenciam xxs., vnum alium annulum aureum signator' ad valenciam xxxs., quatuor pecias monete anglie vulgariter nuncupatas Rose testours ad valenciam xvid., et xxxis. xd. in pecuniis numeratis in crumena predicta tunc existentes." At the foot of the bill this memorandum—"Et predictus Christopher po se non cul nec se retraxit Io' judic' qd. eat inde quiet'." G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz.

20 December, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the highway at Enfyld co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Nursse and John Smyth, both late of London yomen, assaulted Richard Tuffenalle and robbed him of forty-seven shillings and eightpence, in a leather purse worth fourpence. At the foot of the bill a memorandum that, at the Session held at the Justice Hall on 17 January 3 Elizabeth, the said Thomas Nursse and John Smyth were sentenced to be hung.—Also, another True Bill against the same Thomas Nursse and John Smyth, for assaulting Thomas Wylkinson on the same day, in the Highway at Edmonton, and then and there robbing him of a 'sackclothe' purse, a pair of gloves worth two-pence, a girdle worth two pence, and a dagger worth two shillings:—an indictment confessed by both robbers, who were forthwith sentenced to be hung.—These bills are followed on the file by a memorandum, that at the Gaol Delivery, held on 10 December 4 Elizabeth before William Harper, Mayor of the city of London, and other Justices, the aforesaid Thomas Nursse pleaded the Queen's pardon of the said felonies, dated under the Great Seal on 6 October in the 3rd year of Her Majesty's reign; and that at the Gaol Delivery, held on 20 February 4 Elizabeth, the aforesaid John Smyth pleaded the Queen's pardon of the same felonies, dated under the Great Seal on 3 December in the 4th year of Her Majesty's reign. G. D. R., 17 & 18 Jan., 3 Eliz.

20 December, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Clement Danes on the said day, Thomas Lloyd, late of London yoman, stole and carried off a silver goblet worth four pounds and ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Alice Folde of the aforesaid parish widow. At the foot of the bill a memorandum that, at the Session held at the Justice Hall on 18 January 3 Elizabeth before Sir William Chester knt., Mayor of London, and other Justices, Thomas Lloyd put himself 'Guilty,' asked for the book, read like a clerk and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 17 & 18 Jan., 3 Eliz.

28 December, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Turmylstrete co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Tylman alias Dericke locksmyth and John Dowdald yoman, both late of London, broke burglariously in the dwelling-house of Henry Walsted, and stole therefrom ten pieces of gold called soueraynes worth five pounds (decem pecias auri voc' soueraynes ad valenciam quinque librarum), eight pieces of gold called pistilates worth fifty-three shillings and four pence, and nine pieces of gold called Frenche crownes worth fifty-four shillings, of the moneys of the said Henry Walsted. At the foot of the bill a memorandum that, at the Session held at the Justice Hall on 18 January 3 Elizabeth before Sir William Chester, Mayor of London, and other Justices, the aforesaid Richard and John pleaded their clergy, but being unable to read were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 17 & 18 Jan., 3 Eliz.