Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1561

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

37-44

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1561', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 37-44. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65930 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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1561

1 January, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes without the bars of the New Temple on the said day, Henry Gery, late of the said parish yoman, uttered and sold by retail by little measure, viz. by the. quart, five several quarts of Gascoyne wine to divers unknown persons, then and there receiving of them four pence in numbered money for each quart, at the rate of sixteen pence for every gallon, against the form of the Stat. 7 Edward VI., in that case published and provided. I. R., . . . . May, 3 Eliz.

15 January, 3 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Goal on view of the body of Henry Dyckenson late of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said Henry died within the gaol on the said day, by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 23 May, 3 Eliz.

20 January, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, (whereas the citizens and other inhabitants of London have been accustomed from time beyond the memory of man to shoot with bows in all the open fields in the parish of Stebbynhith co. Midd. and elsewhere near the said city, viz. in the common lands called Stebbynhyth feyldes, Ratclyff feyldes, Mylende feyldes, Blethnall grene, Spyttlefeildes, Morefeldes, Fynnesbury feyldes, Hoggesdon feyldes, co. Midd. without hindrance from any person, so that all archers have been able to go out in the same open fields to shoot with the bow and come out from them at pleasure, in such manner nevertheless that the said archers do no harm to growing corn nor to grass reserved for seed) John Draney citizen and clothier of the city of London has notwithstanding, on the aforesaid day, trenched in with deep ditches a certain open field called Stebbynhithe close and against custom has planted it with green hedges, in order that the said archers may no longer be able to enter, pass through and leave freely and at their pleasure the said field of Stebbynhithe Close. At the foot of the bill, a Memorandum that, at the Session of the Peace held at Westminster on 21 May next following, John Draney was fined twelve-pence. S. P. R., . . . . 3 Elizabeth.

22 January, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Islyngton co. Midd. on the said day, William Aynesworthe, late of the said parish yoman, stole "a Buf skynne" worth nineteen shillings, a black woollen-cloth cloak worth thirty-three shillings and four pence, a felt hatt worth six shillings and eightpence, "vnam palliothecam vocat' a clokebagge de blak fustyan ad valenciam xxd." and a buckler worth six shillings and eight pence, of the goods and chattels of John Rolle gentleman. Putting himself 'Guilty,' William Aynesworth asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz.

23 January, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the Queen's highway at the Stonebridge in Shordyche co. Midd. on the said day, George Turke late of London gentleman assaulted Thomas Baker, and robbed him of twenty-six pounds thirteen shillings and four pence in numbered money. At the head of the bill a memorandum that George Turke was sentenced to be hung.—Also, a True Bill that, on the same day and at the same place (apud le Stonebridge in Shordiche co. Midd.), George Turke late of London gentleman assaulted Robert Whitney, and robbed him of twenty-two shillings in numbered money. At the head of the bill a memorandum that the said George Turke put himself 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz.

26 January, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Knightsbridge co. Midd. in the night of the said day, John Heywarde late of London yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Edward Yetton (the said Edward with his family being then and there at rest, in God's and the Queen's peace) and stole therefrom divers pieces of linen cloth worth forty shillings, four pewter disshes worth three shillings, "a kettell of bras" worth twenty-two pence, and six shillings and a penny and one halfpenny in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Edward Yetton. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Heywarde was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz.

2 February, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Wykested late of London tapster stole a leather purse worth three pence, and seven pounds fifteen shillings and ten pence in numbered money, of the goods and moneys of John Wase. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum, "Et p'd Thomas po se cul ca null petit libru' legit vt cl'icus et traditur ordinar', &c.' G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz.

16 February, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the highway at Ratclyf co. Midd. on the said day, William Murffett and John Dawson, both late of London yomen, assaulted Edmund Kaye, when he was in God's and the Queen's peace, and that William Murffett slew the same Edmund, by giving him in the belly with a sword a mortal blow, of which he died on the same day. Putting themselves 'Guilty' on their arraignment, both prisoners pleaded their benefit of clergy, whereupon the book was delivered to them. Unable to read like a clerk, William Murffett was sentenced to be hung; but John Dawson read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., . . . . Feb., 3 Eliz.

27 April, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Storye, late of London yoman, stole two parcel-gilt silver goblettes worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of William Clarkeson. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Thomas Storye asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 23 May, 3 Eliz.

1 May, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Shordiche on the said day, John Tonge late of London yoman, stole three diaper table clothes worth twenty shillings, three linen towels worth three shillings and fourpence, a linen cuppord-clothe worth two shillings, six linen tablenapkyns worth three shillings, eleven linen shirts worth three pounds thirteen shillings and fourpence, a linen pillowebere worth sixteen pence, six linen kercheves worth . . . . eight linen neckercheves worth twenty-six shillings and eightpence, a pair of linen sieves worth six shillings and eightpence, and five linen coverlets worth twenty-five shillings, of the goods and chattels of Giles Allen gentleman.—Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Tonge asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered to the Ordinary. G. D. R., 23 May, 3 Eliz.

12 May, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day Peter Welthowe clerk, vicar of the parish church of Hillyngdon co. Midd. and Thomas Pyercye baker, Thomas Flye husbondman, Richard . . . . laborer, William Pynnar laborer, William Chapman gentleman, John Goste . . . . . . . . . Gape yoman, John Mannynge laborer, Robert Parke husbondman, Robert Carleton yoman, John Norrys yoman, Richard Clackham tailor, John Alaughton smyth, Thomas Vyncent smyth, Thomas Crosse yoman, Michael Welde alias Welles yoman, Thomas Bunbur horsecorser, John Annsell yoman, all late of Hillyngdon aforesaid, with swords and staves broke into a certain close of John Newdegate esq. at Herefeld co. Midd. called Cowe More, and trampled on the crop growing there, and dug up the soil, to the serious loss of the said John Newdegate. I. R., . . . . May, 3 Eliz.

15 May, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, Thomas Childe husbondman, William Leighton yoman, William Glysson yoman, John Taylor, yoman, John Robynson . . . ., . . . . Marlowe yoman, John Markes yoman, George Trowes yoman, John Gost . . . . yoman, Henry Cooke yoman, and John Wythewell yoman, alllate of Sunbery co. Midd., armed with swords, staves, hooks and pitchforks, broke riotously into a certain piece of waste, called Asheforde Marshe, parcel of the manor of Colkennyngton, and cut down three loads of wood there growing, and belonging to Francis Newdegate esq., to his serious loss. I. R., . . . . May, 3 Eliz.

1 August, 3 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Sowthemymes co. Midd. on view of the body of Thomas Mosse of Sowthemymes aforesaid laborer: With Verdict that John Grysley of Sowthemymes laborer was together with other honest persons shooting with bows and arrows at two certain goals or butts of the aforesaid parish, on the . . . . day of . . . ., Thomas Mosse aforesaid being then and there present; and that, unaware of Thomas Mosse's position, the said John Grysley drew his bow and sent from it a shaft that, by mischance striking the same Thomas Mosse in the neck, gave him a mortal blow, of which he died on the third day of . . . . At the foot of the record a Memorandum that, on 10 April 4 Elizabeth, John Grysley appeared at this Session of Gaol Delivery, and pleaded the Queen's pardon of the involuntary homicide, granted to him under the Great Seal by letters patent, dated on the 13th of last February. G. D. R., 10 April, 4 Eliz.

20 September, 3 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Holborne co. Midd. on view of the body of Lewis Howell, there lying dead: With Verdict that, at Holborne aforesaid on the 19th inst., Thomas Heweys late of same parish assaulted the same Lewis Howell, and murdered him by giving him with a dagger a mortal blow on his breast, of which he then and there died instantly. At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that on his arraignment Thomas Hewys put himself 'Not Guilty,' when the Jury returned a verdict that he had been furiously assaulted by Lewis Howell, and had endeavoured to escape the affray so forced upon him, before in self-defence he killed the same Lewis: wherefore the said Thomas Hewys was committed to Gaol "ad graciam domine Regine expectandam." G. D. R., 11 Dec., 4 Eliz.

12 October, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, for three months following the said day and even till now, Henry Edlin late of Hendon co. Midd. husbandman has had neither bow nor arrow for shooting, against the form of the statute in this case provided.

15 October, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the highway at Marybone on the said day, Robert Durant, John Powell, Thomas Huntley and Roger Ratclyf, all late of Westminster yomen, assaulted and beat a certain unknown man, and robbed him of twenty pence in numbered money. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' Robert Durant was reprieved without judgment, whilst John Powell and Roger Ratclyf were sentenced to be hung. No memorandum touching Huntley. At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that at the Gaol Delivery held on 8 January 5 Elizabeth, the said Robert Durant brought into court the Queen's special pardon of his felony, dated under the Great Seal on 1 December 5 Elizabeth, and begged humbly that it might be allowed him. G. D. R., 11 Dec., Eliz.

26 October, 3 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Stebenhuth co. Midd., on view of the body of Edmond Smythe late of Blackewall co. Midd. fisherman, there lying dead: With Verdict that the said Edmond died at Stebenhuth aforesaid on the 24th inst., between five and six p.m., by Divine Visitation. G. D. R., 26 June, 4 Eliz.

8 November, 3 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Newman alias Coopey late of London yoman stole a sword worth thirty shillings and a dagger worth three shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Fyssher gentleman. At the head of the bill, this memorandum—" Po se non cul nec se retraxit Id iudic qd eat inde quiet'." G. D. R., 11 Dec., 4 Eliz.

28 November, 4 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day, Katherine Harryson late of London spynster stole a woman's petiecote worth twenty shillings, a woman's cassock worth twenty shillings, a silk hat worth twenty shillings, and divers pieces of linen cloth worth two shillings and sixpence. Putting herself 'Guilty,' she pleaded pregnancy: "Et postea" runs a memorandum at the foot of the bill, "scilt. ad sessionem hic tent xxmo die Februarii anno quarto supra dicto coram Willo' Harper milit' Maiore civitatis London' et sociis Justiciariis &c. compt' fuit per sacrm' matronarum qd p'dicta Katherina tune pregnans fuit I'o repri' quousq' &c. Et postea scilt. ad Deliberacionem Gaole hic tent xxvito die Junii anno regni Regine Elizabeth quarto coram p'd' Willo Harper et sociis suis Justic' p'd comp't' fuit per sacrm matronarum qd p'd Katherina tune non fuit p'gnans I'o cons' est per Cur' qd sus' per collum." Found to be pregnant on 20 Feb. 4 Eliz. by a jury of matrons she was reprieved till the delivery of her child; and subsequently on 26 June 4 Eliz., being found not pregnant by a jury of matrons, she was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R. 11 Dec., 4 Eliz.

1 December, 4 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, from the said day even until now, John Hardy, Reginald Melcher, Thomas Cornysshe, Peter . . . ., Nicholas Carleton, Nicholas Kirston, Edward Nell, and Richard Hamlen, all of the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields yomen; and Thomas Collen, William Coker, Reginald Caysey, John Dickenson, Roger Marker, William Moreton, Thomas Waker, of the parish of St. Clement-Danes yomen; Henry Bocher, John Hollands, Robert Whyttell, Roger Bosewell, Richard Goodyar, John Reynoldes, Robert Beanforest, John Whyting, John Patynson, William Goldyng, and John Pokyns of the city of Westminster yomen; Richard Cyngle, William Anderson, Robert Parker, Robert Jennyns, Edward Hayne, Thomas Vyncent, William Hyde, Nicholas Hyde, Ralph Damporte and John Punchington of the parish of Stronde co. Midd. have without reasonable excuse neglected to provide themselves with bows and arrows, and neglected to practice archery, in contempt of the statute in this matter provided.

8 December, 4 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. in the night of the said day. about eleven p.m., John Doone late of London yoman broke sacrilegiously into the church of the said parish, and stole therefrom a horsecloth worth two shillings and a bible worth thirteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of the wardens of the said church. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Doone was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 4 Eliz.

13 December, 4 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, from the said day, Thomas Plott late of Edgware co. Midd. carpenter, albeit under no engagement of service to any-one, has refused to work and will not work in his vocation of carpenter at the salary and wage of twelve pence a-day, against the form of divers statutes and ordinances in this case provided.

28 December, 4 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Clement'sDanes without the barrs of the New Temple co. Midd. in the night of the said day, viz. about seven p.m., Robert Hammond, late of London gentleman, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Robert Jenninges, and stole therefrom a red woollen-cloth tunic trimmed with black velvet worth forty shillings, a woollen-cloth cloak "coloris rattis colour" worth twenty shillings, a linen cloth worth six shillings, a linen table-cloth worth three shillings, and a velvett nightcapp worth two shillings and six-pence. Po se quoad burgularia' non cul nec ret' set quoad feloniam cul ca null petit librum legit vt cl'icus et traditur Ordinario. G. D. R, 10 April, 4 Eliz.

— 4 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the highway at Fynessebery in St. Giles's-without-Criplegate, on a day no longer legible on the record, Nicholas Yarde late of London gentleman and Ralph . . . . assaulted Henry Byrkened of Lyncolnes Inne gentleman, and robbed him of a crymeson sattin purse with a key annexed to it, thirty-eight shillings being in the purse, a gold ring set with two precious stones called a Turkeis and a Rubey, another gold ring set with a Rubey, a woollen cloak, a leather girdle, "a pystolett de ferro et calibe," an ornament of gold called "a broitche of goulde worth iii li.," a hat, a linen kerchief, a sorrell gelding and a saddle. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' Nicholas and Ralph were sentenced to be hung.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill that, on the night of some day (obliterated from the record) of 4 Elizabeth, Nicholas Yerd gentleman and Robert Fitz yoman, both late of London, broke burglariously into the house of Simon Williams in the parish of St. Dunstan-in-the-West and stole therefrom two stone cups with silver-gilt covers, a playne cloth, six table-napkins, with other things of the goods and chattels of the said Simon Williams. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Robert Fitz was also sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 4 Eliz.

— 4 Elizabeth.—True Bill that (whereas certain underwoods called coppices containing thirty-two 'rodas' in Grynford co. Midd. between fourteen and twenty-four years of age, were on 20 Jan. 2 Eliz. lopt and cut) William Gerrard late of Harrowe-super-montem co. Midd. gentleman, who had and has the same underwoods in his possession from the 20th day of April next following the said lopping and cutting thereof, has neglected to hedge in or otherwise defend the "germen vocatum the yonge sprynge eorundem subboscorum a nocumento et destruccione bestiarum et pecorum," from the aforesaid 20 April even until now.