Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1577

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

103-111

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1577', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 103-111. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65946 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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1577

29 January, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day of January, Giles Percy late of London yoman, being over eighteen years old, took at Shoreditche and carried off a certain "cathenam auri vocat' a cheene ad valenciam xxv li.," of the goods and chattels of his master John Tanfeilde, who had confided the said chain to the same Giles, to keep for his said master's use, before he (the said Giles) carried it off with the intention of feloniously converting it to his own use. G. D. R., 2 Aug., 19 Eliz.

20 February, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harefeilde co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Fleetewoode late of London yoman stole a linen sheet worth sixteen pence, another linen sheet worth twelve pence, and another linen sheet worth twenty pence, of the goods and chattels of an unknown man; and further stole two linen sheets worth two shillings and sixpence, of the goods and chattels of Francis Weethered at Harefelde. Po se cul ca null' petit librum legit vt clericus et deliberatur juxtaformam statuti. G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz.

28 February, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day, Thomas Barlowe, late of London yeoman, stole a gold ring worth thirty-six shillings, and also stole fourteen shillings in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of Thomas Walthoe.— Declaring himself 'Guilty,' and being asked by the Court how he would acquit himself of the charge, Thomas Barlowe declined to put himself on a jury of the country, but would put himself wholly on God and Justice: whereupon it was decreed that he should go to punishment. G. D. R., 30 Aug., 19 Eliz.

4 March, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day, Ralph Busbye late of London yeoman stole "novemdecim camisias vocat' shertes ad valenciam xix li., duodecim mappas vocat' handkerchers ad valenciam xxs., tresdecim pecias panni linei vocat' bandes and ruffes ad valenciam xxxs., tres pecias panni linei vocat' gorgets ad valenciam xs,." of the goods and chattels of some unknown man, being in the keeping of John Maunchester and his wife Agnes at Westminster. Po se cul ca null petit librum legit vt clericus et deliberatur juxta formam statuti. G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz.

11 March, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Est Smythfeld co. Midd. on the said day, a certain Richard Blunt was killed by a certain John Tarlton alias Thorneton, fighting in his (the said John's) lawful self-defence, and after death was carried to a certain house belonging to the Queen aforesaid in the same Est Smythfeld, and called "the Queen's store house": and that thereupon Robert Hodeson of London gentleman, the Queen's coroner within the city of London, came to the same storehouse, and then and there by color of his office, but unlawfully and without any sufficient warrant, held and took an inquest, how and when the said Richard Blunt came by his death. G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz.

12 March, 19 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken on the said day at Est Smythfeld co. Midd., on view of the body of Richard Blunt late of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that, whereas John Tarlton alias Thorneton, late of Est Smythfeld yoman, was with divers unknown persons on the 11th inst. in a certain close called Well Close in Est Smythfeld in God's and the Queen's peace between three and five p.m., there came to the same place Richard Blunt, having in his right hand "unum gladium de ferro et calibe Anglice a raper," worth five shillings, and in his left hand a dagger worth twelve pence, who with the same sword and dagger assaulted the said John Tarlton with the intention of killing him; upon which the said John withdrew from his assailant for the space of ten ells or more, even to a certain ditch beyond which he could not retreat, by reason of the multitude of persons then being there; And That the said Richard with his sword and dagger drawn followed the said John, who, having in his right hand a sword worth six shillings and in his left hand a dagger worth sixpence, in his self-defence with the said sword struck the said Richard a blow in the left eye, giving him a mortal wound of which he instantly died, and so killing the said Richard in no other way than that of self-defence; and That John Tarlton alias Thorneton neither on the said day nor now has any lands tenements or chattels besides the sword and dagger afore-valued. At the foot of the Inquisition this memorandum: Et cons est qd. Johes Tarlton alias Thorneton eat inde sine die virtute perdonac' dce dne Regin' eidem Joh'i' concess gerent dat xij die Aprilis anno regni sui xix°. G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz.

20 March, 19 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Jasper Fyssher esq. J.P., of William Gunter of Kynbereye co. Bark, gentleman and Arthur Readinge of Underleigh co. Herts, gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Richard Chatterton of Carleton co. Wilts. gentleman, in the sum of one hundred marks; For the said Richard Chatterton's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz.

6 April, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day, Hugh Aprise, William Davis and Thomas Caverly, all late of London yomen, stole a gown of "tuffed mockadoe" worth four pounds, a russet-coloured woollen-cloth cloak worth forty shillings, and "vnam tuniculam de mockadoe ad valenciam xviiis.," of the goods and chattels of . . . . "Po se cul ca null sus'." G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz.

14 April, 19 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Seynt Katherins co. Midd., on view of the body of a certain female infant, there lying dead: With Verdict that, at the dwellinghouse of John Gott, her master, at the said parish hat-maker, Alice Saunders late of the said parish, on the 12th inst. between seven and eight a.m., secretly brought forth the same infant, and forthwith slew and murdered it by suffocating it. On her arraignment, Alice Saunders put herself 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 22 April, 19 Eliz.

20 May, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Wappynge co. Midd. on the night of the said day, John Bootes late of London yoman (not in custody) broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Thomas Hampton gentleman (the said Thomas and his family being at that time there), and stole therefrom "a medley grene" woollen-cloth cloak worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Thomas: And That Susanna Quiney, late of London spinster, and Richard Quynney late of London yoman (both being 'extra prisonem'), knowing that the said John Bootes had committed the said burglary, received, aided and comforted him on 8 June 19 Eliz. at Charingecrosse in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields. G. D. R., . . . . 20 Eliz.

9 June, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day of June, Benjamin Dale late of London yoman, by certain false and counterfeit letters addressed in the name of a certain Josias Meuse to James Normanton of Milende, induced the said James to deliver into his keeping a certain gelding with a bridle and a bit, of the goods and chattels of the said Josias; and that having thus "per fraudem deceptionem et astutiam vocat' cosenynge" gained possession of the animal he fraudulently sold it for the sum of five marks. It was ordered that Benjamin Dale should pay a fine of forty shillings and be put in the Cheapside pillory "Ponetur (sic) super pillorium in Cheapeside London et taxatur (sic) fine ad xls." G. D. R., 2 Aug., 19 Eliz.

17 June, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the highway at Busshie Heath co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Lawrence and John Cottingham, both late of London yomen, assaulted John Longe, then and there in God's and the Queen's peace riding on the same high way, and stole from him "unam bulgam vocat' a capcase cum diversis peciis argenti fracti vocat' broken silver ad valenciam liiiis., et certa lapida preciosa vocat' stones and perles ad valenciam xls., unum pilleum vocat' a woollen cap et unum pilleum velvett' vocat' a velvett cappe ad valenciam viiis.," a leather purse worth two pence, and four shillings of numbered money. Confessing the indictment, Francis Lawrence was sentenced to be hung. Et predictus Johannes Cottingham dicit quod ipse de felonia predicta in nullo est culpabilis, Et quesito ab eo per curiam qualiter se velit inde acquietare dicit quod ipse non vult super aliquam juratam patrie ponere nisi solumodo in deo et seipso. Ideo consideratum est quod idem Johannes Cottingham eat ad penam. G. D. R., 2 Aug., 19 Eliz.

1 July, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster on the said day, Helen Parker late of London spinster, and Joan wife of Richard Pound of Westminster bocher, stole a white cloak worth seven shillings, "unum par caligarum coloris albi anglice vocat' a paire of white knite hose ad valenciam duorum solidorum et quatuor denariorum," a felte hat worth two shillings, and a shirt worth twelve pence. Confessing the indictment, Helen Parker pleaded pregnancy. And afterwards at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, made on 30 August in the Queen's 19th year, it was found by the oath of matrons that she was 'Not Pregnant': whereupon it was decreed that she should be hung. G. D. R., 2 Aug., 19 Eliz.

7 July, 19 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Owyn Hopton and Sir George Peckham knts. and Justices &c, of Paul Whyte home gentleman and Thomas Russell cooke, both of the parish of St. Sepulchre London, in the sum of five pounds each, and of William Brooke of Wenlockes Barne co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds; for the said William Brooke's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for the said county. G. D. R., 2 August, 19 Eliz.

10 July, 19 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Barnard Randolph esq. and J.P., of John Jackson of Kentishtowne co. Midd. tanner in the sum of forty pounds, and of Jasper Hill of the said parish yoman, and Edward Cutte of the parish of St. Sepulchre's London bocher, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said John Jackson's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, "for that he was accused to abuse the bodie of one Jowan Hall beinge in his house runynge frome her mystres in London." G. D. R., 2 August, 19 Eliz.

20 July, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day of July, William Brynley of Wisterton co. Chester gentleman and Richard Fowall of the same place gentleman, broke into the house of Robert Baker at Westminster, and stole therefrom a black-and-tawney coloured gown "of tuffed mockadowe," and "a kyrtell of black burratoe tuffed" worth sixteen shillings, and a woollen-cloth petticoat worth twenty shillings. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 19 Eliz.

6 August, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hoxton co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Barlowe late of London yoman stole a leather purse, worth two pence, and twenty-seven shillings in numbered money, of the goods and chattels of John Bowen. At the foot of the bill this memorandum,—" Et prefatus Thomas Barlowe dicit quod ipse de felonia predicta in nullo est culpabilis; Et quesito ab eo per Curiam qualiter se velit inde acquietare, dicit quod ipse non vult se super aliquam juratam patrie ponere, nisi solummodo in deo et Justicia. Ideo consideratum est quod Thomas eat ad penam." In brief and English,—Declaring himself 'Not Guilty,' Thomas Barlowe was asked by the Court how he would clear himself of the charge, when he said he had no wish to put himself on any jury of the country, but would rely on God and Justice. It was therefore decreed that he should go to punishment. G. D. R., 30 Aug., 19 Eliz.

23 August, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day, Roger Baker late of Islington co. Midd. yoman, over twenty years of age, the servant of Thomas Pagitt of the Middle Temple gentleman, had in his custody five pounds of the money of the aforesaid Thomas, which five pounds Barbara Pagitt, wife of the said Thomas and mistress of the said Roger, at the order of the said Thomas, gave to the said Roger in order that he should keep it for her husband's use; and that said Roger went off with the said money, with intention of defrauding his master of the money, and putting it to his own use. G. D., . . . . Eliz.

19 September, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harrowe on the said day of September, William Agreenehill of Boxey, in the parish of Harrowe co. Midd. yoman, ingrossed and bought ten quarters of wheat, worth twenty shillings a-quarter, with the intention of selling the same against the form of a certain statute of 5 Edward VI. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 19 Eliz.

19 September, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harrowehille co. Midd. on the said day, William Fuller alias Barnatt butcher ingrossed and bought of divers persons one hundred sheep worth twenty pounds, with the intention of selling the same against the form of a certain statute of 5 Edward VI. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 19 Eliz.

22 September, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at Edgeware, Roger Greves late of London yoman stole "vnum ventrale et vnam ricam panni linei vocat' a neckercher ad valenciam xd., de bonis et catallis Agnetis Dente." Putting himself 'Guilty,' Roger Greves was sentenced to be flogged from Newgate prison to the Cross of Cheape (a prisona de Newgate vsque Crucem de Cheape London). G. D. R., 7 Oct., 19 Eliz.

28 September, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Tottenham co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Gorratt of London labourer stole and carried off a dunne gelding worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Robert Chatterton at Tottenham co. Midd. G. D. R., . . . . Eliz.

16 October, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Grenewich co. Kent and also at Stratforde-at-Bowe co. Midd., Thomas Dove of Stratforde-atBowe inholder and Thomas White of the same place baker conspired to cheat and defraud Alice Carre of Grenewyche co. Kent widow of her goods and chattels in this manner:—That on the aforesaid day and at divers other times, before and afterwards, Thomas White was a suitor to Alice Carre for marriage, who was assured by the same suitor's confederate that he (Thomas White) was a very rich man, having houses and tenements at Stratford-at-Bowe, whereupon at the request of the two conspirators she came from Grenewich to Thomas White's house, which house she was made by Thomas Dove to think was the property of the same Thomas White, though in truth he had no houses nor possessions in Stratforde-at-Bowe or any where else, as Thomas Dove affirmed; and That by this color and pretext of making and concluding a marriage between her and Thomas White baker, Thomas Dove inholder on the 18th of the aforesaid October took into his hands divers of the said Alice's goods and chattels, to wit a fetherbedd, a bolster, four pillowes and the same Alice's household utensils, and conveyed them to his house in Stratford-at-Bowe, with the intention of converting them to the uses of himself and his confederate Thomas White; and that the more craftily to cover their falseness and give it an appearance of truth the aforesaid Thomas Dove and Thomas White on the same 18th of October at Stratford-at-Bowe induced Alice Carre to sign, seal and deliver a certain writing of bargain and sale of the same goods and chattels to Thomas Dove for the sum of twenty-six shillings and eight pence (she being illiterate and ignorant of the contents of the deed), under condition that the writing should be void and of no effect, should she repay before a certain day to Thomas Dove the said twenty-six shillings and eight pence, no part of which sum she ever received to her own use; and that thus by their falsity and craft, called 'cosonynge,' the said Thomas Dove and Thomas White defrauded and despoiled the said Alice of her goods and chattels. G. D. R., 14 Feb., 20 Eliz.

— October, 19 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Nortonfolgate co. Midd. on the said day, William Smythe late of London yoman stole and carried off three "oxehides dressed like buffe" worth five shillings, "a buckeskyn" and "duos coreos vocatos soreskynnes" worth five shillings, a little coat and a pair of leather breeches worth ten shillings, of Henry Etheridge. Po se cul ca null petit librum non legit vt clericus sus. G. D., . . . . Eliz.

1 December, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, Edward Dorrington and Elizabeth Braunte, having been adjudged on 3 June 19 Eliz. to be flogged and burnt on the gristle of the right ear, returned to vagrancy, and on the aforesaid 1 Dec. 20 Eliz. were vagrants at Clarkenwell co. Midd. Both vagrants put themselves 'Guilty'; Edward Dorrington asked for the book, and reading like a clerk was delivered "secundum formam statuti"; Elizabeth Braunte was committed for two years to the service and government of Edmund Morraunt of London gentleman, who bound himself in the sum of ten pounds to keep her for two years, and at the end of the term to produce her at G. S. P., or produce proof of her death. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 20 Eliz.

1 December, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Islington between ten and eleven of the night of the same day, Richard Male late of London yoman broke burglariously into the house of Miles Kingemen, and stole therefrom "unam libratam gariophilorum vocat' cloves ad valenciam xiis.," half a pound of saffron worth ten shillings and six pence, and a pound of aromatic nuts called "nuttemegges," worth ten shillings. Cognovit indictamentum: Sus. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 20 Eliz.

6 December, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Clement Danes co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Adams late of London yoman stole seven yards of silk called "silke damask" worth twelve shillings a yard, and six yards of "silke grograine" worth twelve shillings a yard, and six pounds six shillings and eight pence in numbered money; and That, Nicholas Ashebye of St. Clement's-Danes baker, on the same 6th of December, took counsel with the said Richard, before the commission of the said felony; and further That the same Nicholas on the same day received, aided, and comforted the said Richard after the commission of the felony, knowing him to have committed it. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Richard Adams asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the form of the statute. To the charge of being an accessory to the felony before its commission, Nicholas "po se non cull nee rec." In respect to the charge of aiding and comforting Richard after the commission of the felony, it is recorded that he put himself 'Guilty,' but was exonerated by the principal's benefit of clergy. G. D., . . . . 20 Eliz.

16 December, 20 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Wenloxbarne co. Midd. at a place called Mount Mill, about eight p.m. of the night of the said day, Richard Paunsforthe, William Paunsforth and Giles Harmer, late of London yomen, with seven unknown disturbers of the peace, refused to obey the orders of the watchers at Mount Mill aforesaid, viz. of William Dowdall, Nicholas Bettes, George Lawrens, Humfrey Price, William Scott and divers others keeping watch for the Queen at Wenloxbarne, and with their swords drawn threatened the said watchers, calling out to them, "Rascalles and drunken slaves cume and ye dare and we wilbe your deathes"; and that afterwards the said Richard Paunsforthe, William Paunsforthe, Giles Harmer and others their companions fled from the said watchers, who, together with Anthony Howson the constable of Wenloxe Barne, pursued them for the purpose of arresting them, whereupon the same disturbers of the peace with swords drawn assaulted the same watchers, and so handled Anthony Howson that his life was despaired of, and then withdrew to the house of Clementes Rigges yoman. G. D. R., . . . 20 Eliz.

17 December, 20 Elizabeth.—Recognizances of Giles Harmer of Islington yoman in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Robert Wood of Islington gentleman and Edmund Hynde of the parish of St. Sepulchre yoman, in the sum of fifty pounds each: for the said Giles Harmer's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 23 Dec, 20 Eliz.

17 December, 20 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Jasper Fyssher esq. J.P., of Walter Rawley of Islyngton co. Midd. esq., and Martin Eyre of London gentleman, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of William Pansfurthe, servant of the aforesaid Walter Rawley, in the sum of one hundred pounds; for the said William's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 23 Dec, 20 Eliz.

19 December, 20 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Jasper Fisher esq. J.P., of Thomas Cobham of Goldinge Lane co. Midd. esq. and John Rigges of Davis (sic) Inne London gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Richard Paunsford yeoman, servant to Walter Rawley esq. of the Court (de curia) in the sum of one hundred marks; for the appearance of the said Richard at the next Session of the Peace co. Midd., to answer to such matters as may be objected against him. G. D. R., 23 Dec., 20 Eliz.