Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1588

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

175-182

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1588', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 175-182. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65957 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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1588

12 January, 30 Elizabeth.—Recognizance, taken before Humfrey Smythe esq. J.P., of Thomas Mountague of Southmimes co. Midd. vpholster, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said Thomas Mountague's appearance at "the next Session," to give evidence against John Hunt and Elizabeth Harris. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz.

16 January, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Hanwell co. Midd., on view of the body of Agnes East, late of Hanwell . . . .; With Verdict that, on the 15th instant between the hours eight and nine a.m., the said Agnes East and a certain John Pryor were together in a certain place called "the hall," within the dwelling-house of a certain Thomas Millet at Hanwell, when he struck her on the head with an axe, giving her a blow, of which she died immediately; and that after so murdering her, John Pryor fled and made good his escape. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz.

12 February, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Eastsmythfeild co. Midd., on view of the body of Mathew Egers, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on the 10th inst. between the hours twelve and one p.m. of the same day, the said Mathew Egers and a certain Joyce Oven Howson alias Joyce Overs, late of . . . ., co. Midd., was in a certain place called "the hall" within the dwelling-house of a certain Coone Johnson at Eastsmythfield aforesaid brewer, when the said Joyce Overs assaulted the said Mathew Egers with a meat-knife, striking him therewith on the fore part of his body, and giving him a wound in the left side of his belly, of which wound he died on the following day.—On his arraignment Joyce Oven Howson alias Joyce Overs alias Joyce Overhowse put himself 'Not Guilty' of killing with aforethought, but Guilty of manslaughter; when asking for the book, he received it and read it like a clerk. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz.

7 March, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that William Goughe, late of Islington co. Midd. inholder, on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, sold and uttered to divers persons unknown twenty gallons of Gascoyne wine at 2s. 3d. per gallon, and twenty gallons of sack at 3s. 4d. per gallon, being beyond the prices appointed and limited by the statute in that case provided. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz.

8 March, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Westminster, on view of the body of James Yonge, an infant of seven years, there lying dead: With Verdict that, on 25 February 30 Eliz. between the hours nine and ten a.m., the said James Yonge and a certain Margaret Yonge late of Westminster spinster, were together within the dwelling-house of John Yonge the same James's father at Westminster, when the said Margaret assaulted the said James, and with both her hands took him and held him over a fierce fire burining up the chimney, and so held him for the space of a quarter of a half-hour, with the intention of killing and murdering the same James Yonge, whereby the "nates" and left "tibia" of the said James were much burnt; from which burning he languished till the 6th instant, when he died; and that in so dealing with the child the aforesaid Margaret murdered him. On her arraignment, Margaret Yonge put herself 'Guilty,' and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz.

18 March, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said 18th of March at Whitechapple, Lion Aldworth late of London yoman stole a sword, worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Smythe. Putting himself 'Guilty' of Petty Larciny, Lion Aldworth was tried by a Jury who appraised the sword at eleven pence half-penny. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz.

20 March, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill against Philip Baker of Stepney co. Midd. gentleman, Nicholas Lee of Clarkenwell gentleman, and Richard Palmer of Edmonton yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, from the said 20 March 30 Eliz. to the 17th of June then next following. G. D. R., . . ., 30 Eliz.

30 March, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem taken at the parish of Stebunheth, on view of the body of Arthur Gardyner, late of London yoman: With Verdict that, on the 29th inst. between the hours nine and ten p.m., a certain Thomas Comes late of London yoman and a certain unknown person were together in a certain place called the Brickhills, within the field called Spittell Feild in the aforesaid parish, when they were joined by the said Arthur Gardyner and a certain Henry Clerke late of London shoemaker; whereupon the aforesaid Thomas Comes with malice aforethought assaulted the same Arthur Gardyner, and with a sword gave him on the left side of his breast a blow, of which he instantly died.—At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that at the Gaol Delivery held on 16 Jan. 31 Eliz. Thomas Comes put himself 'Not Guilty,' and was acquitted. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz.

15 April, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that Walter Hassellwricke, late of London yoman, stole a fetherbed worth forty shillings, "vnum straggulum voc' an Irish Caddo" worth twenty shillings, a blanket worth ten shillings, and "a pillowe of downe" worth nine shillings, of the goods and chattels of Robert, Earl of Essex, at Twickenham co. Midd. G. D. R., 19 April, 30 Eliz.

27 April, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the Strande co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Bradford late of London yoman stole and carried off "unam peciam argenti vocat' a spice box" worth four pounds, and a linen tablecloth worth six shillings, and a woollen cloak of "bricke collour" worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Carroll.—Putting himself 'Guilty,' Thomas Bradford was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz.

27 April, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harnesey co. Midd. during the night of the said 27th of April, Rowland Bellyn, and George Bold, both late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Thomas Ardern esq. (Cecilia the wife of the same Thomas Ardern being then in the same house with her family then at rest), and stole therefrom "a cheyne of golde of small linckes" worth twenty pounds, another gold chain worth twelve pounds, a pair of gold bracelettes worth nine pounds, thirty-two gold buttons worth six pounds, a pair of gold "tablettes" worth eight pounds, two gold rings set with "diamondes" worth seven pounds, another gold ring set with a "turkys" worth four pounds, "unum alium annulum vocat' an emerald" worth five pounds, twelve gold rings called "hoope ringes" worth six pounds, a jewel called "a border of perle" worth three pounds, a jewel of silver called "a bodkyn of silver" worth two shillings, twelve pieces of coined gold called "angelles" worth six pounds, one piece of coined gold called "a piece of xxxs.," three pieces of coined gold called "duble ducckettes" worth forty shillings, two pieces of coined gold called "Englisshe Crownes" worth ten shillings, one piece of coined gold called a "Frenche Crowne" worth six shillings, one piece of silk worth forty shillings, a silk purse worth twenty shillings, of the goods, chattels and moneys of the said Thomas Ardern. Confessing the indictment, Rowland Bellyn was sentenced to be hung. Against George Bold's name appears the note "extra prison'." G. D. R., . . ., 30 Eliz.

28 April, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that Robert Leadbeater yoman, Thomas Newberry . . . ., . . . . Thompson yoman, Richard Heyward yoman, and Francis Gravener cobler, all of Westminster, conspired together on 20 April 30 Eliz. to beat, wound and slay Richard Elye of Westminster gentleman, in consequence of which conspiracy the aforesaid Richard Heyward on the 28th of the said April assaulted the same Richard Elye with a drawn sword and would fain have killed him. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz.

1 May, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill against George Stocker gentleman, Godfrey Barton yoman, John Williams yoman, and William Braye yoman, all of Westminster, for not going to church, chapel, or any other usual place of Common Prayer from 1 May 30 Elizabeth to 20th July, then next following. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz.

3 June, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-withoutCreplegate in London on the said day, Nicholas Sye with malice aforethought assaulted Thomas Daffye with a rapier, and murdered him by giving with that weapon a blow, of which he died instantly. G. D. R., . . . . 30 Eliz.

19 June, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken in Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Isack Cockar late of London yoman, who in the said gaol died by Divine Visitation of "the bloody fluxe" on the 18th inst. after five days of illness. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz.

20 June, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, John Barthelett of Heston co. Midd. was and still is a common disturber of the Queen's peace. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz.

24 June, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of Isabell Springall late of London spinster: With Verdict that, being within the same gaol, the said Isabell died there by Divine Visitation of "the pining sicknes," on the day aforesaid after a fortnight's illness. G. D. R., . . . ., 30 Eliz.

29 June, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Whitechappell co. Midd., on view of the body of William Hudson, late of London yoman: With Verdict that, on the 27th inst. between the hours three and four p.m. the said William Hudson and a certain Richard Moore, late of London yoman, were together in Pattes Close near Mile-end in the aforesaid parish, when after parleying with one another, they drew forth their swords and daggers, and made an affray with one another, in which affray Richard Moore with his sword gave William Hudson on the fore part of his head a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly. At the bill's foot, a memorandum that on his arraignment for manslaughter Richard Moore confessed the indictment, asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., . . . . Aug., 30 Eliz.

8 July, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Fynesbury on view of the body of Richard Ryce late of London yoman, there lying dead: With verdict that, on the 7th inst., William Pennington late of Sowthemymes co. Midd. yoman was. walking from the dwelling-house of Henry Crompton at Shoreditche yoman to the house of Francis . . . . in St. Giles's-without-Creplegate tallowchaundler, to do business with the said Francis, when he was assaulted by Richard Ryce and three unknown persons, who came upon him with their swords and daggers drawn, and before whom he retreated as far as the bridge called "Turned Pyke" within the said field, where the same William Pennyngton standing at a certain post called "the rayles" drew forth his sword and dagger and lawfully defended himself against his assailants; and that in the affray thus forced upon him, the same William Pennyngton in self-defence with his sword gave the said Richard a blow on his left thigh, of which he died then and there. G. D. R., . . . . Aug., 30 Eliz.

3 August, 30 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Jerom Hawley esq. J.P., of John Pope, Robert Pennaril and William Russell, all three of Hyllingdon co. Midd. husbandmen, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Thomas Pope of the same parish in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Thomas Pope's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery after next Michaelmas, to answer respecting the manslaughter of a certain William Hunte, of which he is suspected and impeached. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz.

8 August, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at Fynnesberrie in the parish of St. Giles-without-Creplegate co. Midd., Thomas Johnson, late of London yoman, assaulted Gregory Porter and with malice aforethought slew and murdered the same Gregory Porter by giving him with a sword a wound under the left side of his breast, of which wound the same Gregory died instantly. In its original state the bill indicted John Tugge for being an accomplice in the felony, but marks on the bill show that the jury found no truth in the charges against him. Endorsement that the bill was taken by the Grand Jury at the Castle in St. Johnstreete: and enough remains of mutilated memorandum at the head of the much-defaced bill to show that on his arraignment Thomas Johnson pleaded his clergy, and that the book was given to him. G. D. R., . . . . Aug., 30 Eliz.

30 August, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken within Newgate Gaol on view of the body of John Clarckston, late of London yoman, there lying dead: With Verdict that, being a prisoner within the said gaol, John Clarckston died by Divine Visitation of "the pining sicknes" on the 29th inst., after seventeen days of illness. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz.

31 August, 30 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Flower esq. J.P., of Garret Tasker and Thomas Williams of St. Gregory's parish in London merchant-taylors, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of John Norris of St. Olave's parish in London "master of fence," at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz.

18 September, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that William Hartley late of Holborne co. Midd. clerk, alias William Garton late of the same place clerk, born within this kingdom of England after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 1 Eliz. and made and ordained a priest at Rheims (?) in parts beyond the sea by authority derived from the See of Rome before the 10th day of September 30 Eliz., in no degree regarding the laws and statutes of this kingdom of England, nor having respect to the penalty contained in the same, on the 18th of the aforesaid December was and remained traitorously and as a traitor at Holborn aforesaid, in contempt of the said Queen's crown and dignity, and also against the form of the statute in this case published and provided. With this memorandum (in Latin) at the foot of the bill,—"And the aforesaid William Hartley put himself 'Guilty' with no chattels. Therefore it was decreed that he be drawn on a hurdle to the place of execution, and there be hung by the neck, whilst still alive be laid upon the grown, his members be amputated, his entrails be drawn out of his belly, he being still alive, and be burnt, his head be cut off and his body divided into four parts, and his head and quarters be placed where the Lady the Queen has been pleased to appoint." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 30 Eliz.

19 September, 30 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Humfrey Smythe esq. J.P., of George Wille servant of Robert Walter of Wimbledon co. Surrey esq., Morgan Price and Denis Castlan servant of the same Walter, in the sum of ten pounds each; For their appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence against Gabriel Lingar, charged with "robbing Mr. Walter's howse." G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz.

22 September, 30 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, whereas William Tedder late of Westminster clerk, born after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 1 Eliz., was made and ordained a priest before 26 August 30 Eliz. by authority derived from the See of Rome, Dorothea White spinster alias Dorothea White wife of Humfrey White of Westminster gentleman, moved by the devil's instigation, knowing that the said William Tedder was such a priest, received, comforted, aided and maintained him being at large and out of prison, against the form of the statute in this case published and provided, and against the Queen's peace, dignity and crown. Endorsement that the Bill was taken at St. John's Street on 4 October 30 Elizabeth, before Sir Owen Hopton knt. and four other Justices "ad audiendum et terminandum" by the oath of under-written jurors. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum (in Latin),—"And the aforesaid Dorothea White put herself 'Guilty,' with no chattels. Sentence that she be hung. And afterwards, that is to say, at the Gaol Delivery made here on the 4th day of . . . . 31 Eliz., the aforesaid Dorothea White produced the pardon of the Lady the Queen under the Great Seal of England, bearing date 11 July 31 Eliz., and prayed that it might be allowed to her."—A bill so defaced and mutilated as to be in places decypherable only with extreme difficulty.—G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 30 Eliz.

29 September, 30 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Jerom Hawley esq. J.P., of John Heyes of Waltham Holie Crosse co. Midd. yoman, in the sum of ten pounds, and of John Sissemore of Southwarke co. Surrey clothworker, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said John Sissemore's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, to answer concerning a certain felony of which he is suspected. G. D. R., 4 Oct., 30 Eliz.

2 November, 30 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Westminster on view of the body of John Bannester late of Westminster yoman: With Verdict that the said John, being sick and weak, died on the 1st inst. by Divine Visitation of a certain disease called "plurisey and inflamacon of the longes." G. D. R., 11 April, 31 Eliz.

26 November, 31 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Cutler wife of Anthony Cutler of Whitechappell alias Alice Cutler of Whitechappell spinster, exercised and practised certain detestable impious and devilish arts, called witchecraftes inchauntementes charmes and sorceries, against and upon a certain Sibilla Chappell daughter of William Chappell, with the intention of murdering her, from which detestable unholy and diaboli cal arts the said Sibilla languished from the said 26 November 31 Eliz. to 21 March 31 Eliz., on which last-named day the said Sibilla died of the same detestable arts, and that, by so practising on the said Sibilla, the aforesaid Alice Cutler killed her. At the bill's head, the clerical memorandum, 'Po se non cul nee rec'—Also another True Bill (with the same clerical note at its head) against the same Alice Cutler for practising the detestable and devilish arts of witchcraft in and upon Juliana Cooper, wife of John Cooper of Whitechappell baker, on 1 March 32 Eliz., "de quibus quidem detestabilibus nefariis et diabolicis artibus predicta Juliana Cooper die anno et loco predictis languescebat et valde infirma et debilis in corpore suo devenit. Et sic ibidem languescens jacebat per spacium unius anni tunc proxirae sequentis per quod ac racione et vigore predictorum detestabilium et diabolicarum artium per prefatam Aliciam Cutler predictis die anno et loco nequiter et diabolice exercitatarum et practicatarum in et super predictam Julianam Cooper, eadem Juliana Cooper valde vastata et consumpta fuit in corpore suo et adhuc est contra formam statuti in hujusmodi casu editi et provisi &c." G. D. R., 16 April, 33 Eliz.

23 December, 31 Elizabeth.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Katherin's co. Midd. on view of the body of James Gardyner late of the same place cutler: With Verdict that, on the 22nd inst. between the hours nine and ten of the night of the said day, the said James Gardyner and a certain Richard Churche late of St. Katherine's aforesaid cutler were together in the "hall" of the dwelling-house of Cecilia Johnson of St. Katherin's aforesaid spynster, when Richard Church, unaware that the weapon was loaded, took up from a table "quoddam tormentum de ferro vocat' a gonne alias dict' a horseman's peace, being chardged with gonnepowder and one bullet of lead," and without intending to do ill to the said James or any other person discharged the gun and shot James Gardyner in the throat, so that he died instantly. G. D. R., 11 April, 31 Eliz.