Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1601

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

266-276

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1601', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 266-276. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65970 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1601

4 January, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hendon co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Nicolls late of London spinster stole a bushel and half a bushel of wheat worth six (sic) shillings, and a bushel and three pecks of oats worth six (sic) shillings, of the goods and chattels of Humfrey George. Putting herself 'Guilty,' of petty larceny, Joan Nicolls was liberated. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 43 Eliz.

8 January, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Norton Follgate co. Midd. in the night of the same day, Elizabeth Cooper late of London spinster broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of William Radley, and stole therefrom two linen pillowebeeres worth eighteen pence, a linen smocke worth twelve pence, "unum fronticulum panni linei vocatum a Crossecloth ad valenciam vid.," a child's bedd worth twelve pence, and a woollen kertle worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of the same William Radley. Putting herself 'Guilty,' Elizabeth Cooper was sentenced to be hung. G, D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz.

9 January, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's in Shordiche co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Arnold and Peter Sharpe, both late of London yomen, stole two woollen-cloth cubbordclothes worth five shillings, a woollen carpett worth four shillings, a silver forke worth four shillings, six pieces of corrall worth two shillings, four spoons of mother-of-pearle worth three shillings, six knyves worth two shillings, a box covered with redd velvett worth three shillings and four-pence, a Jewell of golde and pearle worth two shillings, "vnam peciam Argenti vocatam a Cattamountayne of silver ad valenciam xxs.," of the goods and chattels of Thomas Marten, Doctor of Sacred Theology. Confessing the indictment, Henry Arnold asked for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the letter T, and delivered according to the form of the Statute. Peter Sharpe put himself 'Guilty,' and, there appearing evidence that he had committed burglary in another county, was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz.

20 January, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hamersmithe in the parish of Fullham co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Morgan late of London spinster, and Anne Simpson also late of London spinster were seen and found in the company of society of vagabonds commonly called Egyptians, and call themselves Egyptians, and thus have done feloniously for the space of one month after the said day at Hamersmithe aforesaid, and elsewhere in the same county. Joan Morgan put herself 'Guilty' and pleaded her pregnancy; but on being found 'Not Pregnant' by a jury of matrons, she was sentenced to be hung. Putting herself 'Guilty,' Anne Simpson pleaded her pregnancy and was reprieved, it being found by a jury of matrons that she was pregnant. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 43 Eliz.

22 January, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the highway of Mylend in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Peckham late of London yoman assaulted Nicholas Lee, and with a staffe murdered him, by giving him on the hinder part of his head with the same weapon a mortal blow, of which he then and there died instantly; and that Thomas Freeman, late of Mylend aforesaid yoman, knowing him to have perpetrated the said murder, received aided and comforted the same Henry at Mylend on the same day. Thomas Freeman put himself 'Not Guilty' and did not retract. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Henry Peckham was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz.

28 February, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Wrothe knt. J.P., of Marke Antony of Whitechappell stranger, and Thomas Shepperd of the parish of Crechurch within Allgate draper, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Thomas Woode of East Smythfeild scrivener, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Thomas Woode's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, "to aunswer for the forgeinge or counterfeitinge of writinges." G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

28 February, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Edward Stanhope LL.D., one of the Masters of Chancery and J.P. for co. Midd., of Henry Marshe of St. Gregory's in the city of London leatherseller and Robert Bucke of the Mynores in London gunmaker, and Thomas Samon alias Smith of the parish of Whitchappell, in the sum of one hundred pounds each, and John Cadwallader of Whitechappell gentleman in the sum of two hundred pounds; For the said John Cadwallader's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, and afterwards for his appearance at such Sessions as shall be appointed, from time to time during an entire year, and for his good behaviour during the same time, and for his continuance during the same term within the jurisdiction of the Court unless he shall have licence to depart therefrom. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

3 March, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's parish in Westminster on the said day, Teague Warde late of London gentleman assaulted Arthur Prickett, when he was in God's and the Queen's peace, and with a sword called "an arminge sworde" slew the same Arthur, by giving him under the right side of his breast a mortal wound, of which he died on the 8th day of the same month. On the back of the bill, a memorandum that it was taken at the Castle in St. John's Street on 3 April 43 Eliz. before seven Justices, by the oath of twenty jurors, whose names, like the names of the Justices, are given in the endorsement. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Teague Warde asked for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the letter T, and delivered according to the form of the Statute. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

16 March, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of John Daviesof St. Leonard's Shoreditch co. Midd. taylour, in the sum of ten pounds, and of John Price of Plaestow co. Essex yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said John Price's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace, he having been "taken in a suspitious house and haveing noe busines in towne." G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

16 March, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Johnstrete co. Midd. on the said day, James Dowdall late of London yoman stole a piece of linen cloth called lawne worth twenty-one shillings, and another piece of lawne worth twenty-five shillings, and another piece of lawne worth thirty-two shillings, and another piece of lawne worth fiftyfive shillings, and another piece of lawne worth three pounds four shillings, and another piece of lawne worth thirty-nine shillings, and eight elles of white holland worth thirty-two shillings, and fifteen elles of greene . . . . holland worth thirty shillings, and fifteen elles of . . . . holland worth . . . ., and eleven elles of browne holland worth twenty-six shillings, and a piece of . . . . holland worth forty-two shillings, and a piece of white holland worth . . . ., of the goods and chattels of Gilbert (?) Walden. Memorandum at the head of the bill, "Cogn Ind petit libru' legit vt Cl'icus repr. ante cremat' Confessing the indictment, he asks for the book, reads like a clerk, is reprieved before being branded." G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

20 March, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Johnstreete co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Procter late of London stole a redd woollen pettycoate worth ten pence, of the goods and chattels of Hugh Fludde; and that, on the 23rd of the same month, Richard Robenson yoman and Joan Robenson spinster, both of the same street, knowing him to have perpetrated the said felony, received aided and comforted the said Robert Procter. Robert Procter and Joan Robenson confessed the indictment; Richard Robenson was at large. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

20 March, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that (whereas Thomas Tycheburne late of London clerk, born within this kingdom of England, who, after the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist 1 Eliz., and before the 20th June 21 Eliz. was made and ordained a priest by authority, derived and pretended from the See of Rome) George Baylie late of St. James's in Clarkenwell co. Midd. glover and his wife Mary Baylie alias Mary Baylie spinster, knowing the said Thomas to be such a priest as is aforesaid, at large and out of prison, willingly received, comforted, aided and maintained him at St. James's aforesaid, on the 20th March, 43 Eliz. At the foot of the bill, a memorandum that the aforesaid George and Mary Baylie were exonerated in this matter by the Queen's pardon. G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz.

20 March, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Braineford co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Heyward late of London yoman stole thirtie poundes of feathers worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Michael Goodyeare. Confessing the indictment, Richard Heyward asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was reprieved before he was branded. Cognovit Indictamentum petit librum legit vt cl'icus repr. ante cremat. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

22 March, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Heyes co. Midd. on the said day, John Worrall late of London yoman feloniously entered the dwelling-house of Mary Mynne widow, and stole therefrom twenty shillings, of the moneys of John Glysson; and that, on the following day at Hillingdon co. Midd., Amy Blakey late of Hillingdon aforesaid, knowing him to have committed the said felony, received, aided and comforted the same John Worrall. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' John Worrall was acquitted; Amy Blakey being exonerated in consequence of his acquittal. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

30 March, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Candeler esq. J.P., of John Hoffe of Tottenham co. Midd. butcher in the sum of twenty pounds, and Robert Hooffe of the same place butcher, in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Robert at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer to a charge of "huntinge and killinge certen of her Majesties deere in the forest of Waltham." G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

31 March, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Pickthatch co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Foulsome of the same place yoman, built a certain house called "his Meltinge house" upon and to a certain tenement there, against the form of the statute in this case provided. G. D. R., 3 April, 43 Eliz.

1 April, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Nortonfollgate co. Midd. on the said day and for the time of an entire month, Susanna Newland late of the same parish spinster, impiously and diabolically kept a brothel, causing thereby riots and tumults, scandal amongst her neighbours, and "the overthrowing" of many of the Queen's lieges. Po se non cul nec r'. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz.

5 April, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of John Lawrence of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West of London gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds, and of William Lawraunce of St. Gregory's in London gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the same William Lawraunce at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer to a suspicion "of stealing ii shoes." G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz.

. . . . 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances taken (on Friday in the third week of Lent) before Sir Edmund Anderson, knt., Chief Justice of the Queen's Bench, and George Kyngsmill, one of the Justices of the same bench, Cristofer Holgilb' alias Ogilb' of Kettleby co. Lincoln yeoman, of Robert Tyrwhitt of Kettlebye co. Lincoln esq., and Robert Markham of Newark co. Nott. esq., in the sum of two hundred pounds each; For the appearance of the said Christopher Holgilb' alias Ogilb' at the next General Gaol Delivery of the Feast of Easter next ensuing, to answer to all such matters as shall be objected against him. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz.

6 April, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Ratcliffe co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Newton late of London yoman assaulted Richard Baker, and murdered the same Richard by giving him with a rapiour on his left cheek a mortal wound, of which he died on the 15th of the same month. Putting himself 'Not Guilty' of murder, but 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Thomas Newton asked for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the letter T, and delivered according to the form of the Statute. G. D. R, 27 May, 43 Eliz.

7 April, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Millett late of London yoman broke into and entered the dwelling-house of Edward Harberte esq., and stole therefrom a silver porringer worth fifty shillings; and That, knowing him to have committed the said felony, Robert Payne and Thomas Yarner, both late of London yomen, received, aided and comforted the said Thomas Millett on 8 April 43 Eliz., in the aforesaid parish. Pleading his clergy, Thomas Millett was branded and delivered. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz.

15 April, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Daneswithout-the-Bars of the New Temple co. Midd. on the said day, Margaret Tayke late of London spinster stole a box worth two shillings, two white aprons worth three shillings, a payre of vpperboddyes worth twelve pence, two linen sleeves worth twelve pence, five linen crosse-clothes worth eighteen pence, a linen handkercher worth two shillings, three linen collars called falinge bandes worth eighteen pence, three linen coyfes worth twelve pence, a leather purse called "a Barbarye purse" worth ten shiilings, a linen smock worth two shillings, a paire of Jercye stockens of silke-russett color (coloris silke russett) worth twelve pence, a linen table-napkin worth twelve pence, and two beddes for a child worth twelve pence, being in the same box, of the goods and chattels of Robert Whiskine. Putting herself 'Guilty' of petty larceny, and the jury appraising all these goods and chattels at eleven pence, Margaret Tayke was liberated on payment of the fee. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz.

20 April, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Henry Thoresby esq. J.P., of James Hunter of Rattcliff co. Midd. saylor, and Thomas Chamberlayne of Fleet Streete in London jewell-box maker, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence against Clement Fishman and Katherine Ladbrooke. G. D. R., 24 April, 43 Eliz.

23 April, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields in the night of the said day, Thomas Fludde late of London yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Lady the Queen Elizabeth, and stole therefrom an olyffe-culloured velvet woman's gowne worth forty pounds, a figured satten woman's gowne "prone coloris" worth twenty-four pounds, a greene carpett worth three pounds, a pair of "curtaines for a windowe coloris watchett" worth forty shillings, nine dozen napkins worth sixteen pounds, a pair of "flaxen sheetes" worth fifty shillings, three linen smockes worth three pounds, and three shirts worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Lady Frances Borroughe. At the bill's foot, the memorandum "Respectuatus." G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz.

27 April, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster in the night of the said day, William Harvye late of London yoman broke burglariously into the house of the Most Noble Edward Earl of Hertford, and stole therefrom "tria horologia de auro et argento et aliis metallis voc' clockes" worth three hundred pounds. Pntting himself 'Guilty,' William Harvye was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz.

19 May, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the highway of St Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Calverley late of London gentleman assaulted Christofer Beare, and with a rapiour gave the same Christofer on his throat a mortal blow, of which he then and there in the said highway died instantly. On his arraignment Thomas Calverley put himself 'Not Guilty' of manslaughter, but 'Guilty' of defending himself. G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz.

20 May, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the Parsonage Close at Harlington co. Midd. on the said day, John Hunte late of London yoman "quamdam vaccam colons brynded fugavit in quoddam fossatum . . . et cum vacca ilia adtunc et ibidem existente carnaalem copulationem habuit &c." Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Hunte was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 27 May, 43 Eliz.

28 May, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Newton of the said parish skynner made of wheat fifty pounds of starch, and on the same day sold the same starch to divers of the Queen's lieges, against the form of Her Majesty's proclamation, in that case published. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz.

4 June, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, on the said day at St. Johnstreete co. Midd., Henry Feildinge, servant of Sir James Scudamore, knt, and Richard Stevenson, another servant of Sir James Scudamore knt., assaulted Samuel Cartred in his dwelling-house, and that with a sword the same Henry Feildinge then and there gave the same Samuel Cartred a mortal blow, of which he died on some day, no longer to be discovered from the decayed bill. Henry Feildinge and Richard Stevenson were both at large. G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz.

24 June, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at "le Stronde" co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Harecourte late of London yoman stole a rapiour with silvered hiltes worth ten shillings, a daggar with silvered hilte worth five shillings "unum parr' vestiment' cerici et auri voc' a pare of hangers of silke and golde" worth thirty shillings, a white satten dublett worth twenty shillings, a pare of white silke stockens worth thirteen shillings, a shirt worth three shillings, and a collar called "a band " worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of Nicholas Tufton esq. Confessing the indictment, Robert Harecourte asked for the book, read like a clerk, and was delivered according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz.

25 June, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before William Harrison esq. J.P., of Nicholas Foster of Westminster scholemaster in the sum of ten pounds, and of Hercules Scregge tayler and Robert Sandes cordwainer, both of the said city, in the sum of five pounds each: For the appearance of the said Nicholas Foster at the next Session of the Peace, there having been "found in his house a scandalous ballett or libell in print betwixt a Papist and Protestant," and he having "confessed that he had the same [? from an] other unknown Mr. Skinner." G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz.

6 July, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, John Hollowaye late of London yoman stole a woollen-cloth cloak "coloris sageculler" worth ten shillings, a purpell woollen-cloth cloak worth fifty shillings, a dagger worth two shillings, a lether girdle worth two pence, divers pieces of linen called "falinge Bandes and Ruffes" worth six shillings and eightpence, and a clokebagge of motteley culler worth three shillings and four pence, of the goods and chattels of Arthur Staverton gentleman.—Also two other True Bills against John Hollowaye for stealing, at Westminster on the 20th of the same July, divers articles of personal apparel (including a woollen-cloth cloak of phessante culler), of the goods and chattels of Arthur Staverton. Putting himself 'Guilty,' John Hollowaye asked for the book; but, evidence being offered that he had been guilty of burglary in Berkshire, he was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz.

20 July, 43 Flizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Tobias Wode esq. J.P., of William Bradley taylour and George Lunne tumour, both of Ratcliffe co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of John Peerce of the same place taylour, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Peerce's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, he being suspected "of steling of iii shepe from Walter Garnons at Coockoldes Haven in the com. of Surrey." G. D. R., . . . ., 43 Eliz.

27 July, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill against John Knollis late of Popler in the parish of Stebunheath co. Midd. gentleman, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer during the two months next following the said 27th of July.—Also, two several True Bills against John Clarke late of Lymehouse in the parish of Stebunheathe co. Midd. clothworker, and Richard Savage junr., late of Popler in Stebunheath yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer during the same aforesaid two months. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz.

9 August, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Fullham co. Midd. on the said day, Arthur Sotherton and Griffin Thomas, both late of London yomen broke into the dwelling-house of Richard the Bishop of London, and there stole a silver salte worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Lady the Queen Elizabeth, the said Queen in her Royal Majesty being then and there at Fullham and in the said house; and further That, knowing the same Arthur and Griffin to have perpetrated the said felony, Edmund Dye late of London yoman feloniously received and comforted them at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields on the 10th of Aug. 43 Eliz. In Latin the charge against the thieves was that they, on the aforesaid 9th of August, "Domum Mansionalem Ricardi Episcopi London scituatam et existentem apud Fullham in predicto comitatu Midd. felonice fregerunt et intraverunt et vnam salinam argenti vocatam a silver Salte ad valenciam iiii li de bonis et cattallis dicte dominenostre Regine Elizabethe (eadem domina Regina adtunc in regali Majestate sua existente apud Fullham predictam in predicto comitatu Midd. et in domo mansionali predicta) adtunc et ibidem inventam felonice furati fuere ceperunt et asportaverunt. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz.

12 August, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Tobias Wood esq. J.P., of John Williams of Wappinge co. Midd. carpenter, in the sum of ten pounds, and of Reynold Holdway of Whitechappell smyth, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Reynold Holdway's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, he being thus "bound ouer for that he is chardged by Richard Brock of Wapping smyth to have beaten his owne wife, of which beating she dyed." G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz.

27 August, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Ralph Waller esq. J.P., of George Page yoman and Richard Spright butcher, both of Cowe Crosse co. Midd., in the sum of . . . . each, and of George Baylye of Cowe Crosse aforesaid glover and Mary his wife, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said George Baylye and Mary Baylye at the next Session of the Peace. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum—"This is for recusantes that wilnot come to the church, [? and] for loydging of seminaries in the terme tyme." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 43 Eliz.

29 August, 43 Elizabeth.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of Richard Lewes taylour and Gilbart Spicer gouldsmith, both of St. Buttolph's-without-Aldgate, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Lawrence Lawfe of Charterhouselane co. Midd. yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Lawrence at the next Session of the Peace, to answer for "threateninge to burne divers houses." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 43 Eliz.

2 September, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Tottenham co. Midd. in the night of the said day, John Bryan late of London yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of George Kempe esq., and stole therefrom a pair of blacke silke garters, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Woodhouse esq., then staying in the said house. Putting himself 'Not Guilty' of the burglary, but 'Guilty' of the felony, John Bryan was allowed benefit of clergy. G. D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz.

25 September, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Bayleye late of London yoman stole seven "skynnes of Budge," of the goods and chattels of William Clarke. Putting himself 'Guilty,' he asked for the book, and was reprieved before judgment. Po se cul ca null petit libru repri ante judiciu'. G D. R., 2 Oct., 43 Eliz.

31 October, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Tower Wharfe co. Midd. on the said day, William Phillippes late of London yoman stole "duas balistas eris anglice two pieces of ordinaunce called Brasse Fawcons" worth fourteen pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Most Serene Lady the Queene Elizabeth. G. D. R., 26 May, 44 Eliz.

6 November, 43 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harmondsworthe co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Budden late of the said parish yoman assaulted his wife Margery Budden with malice aforethought, and murdered her by seizing her neck with his hands and wringing and breaking it. Putting himself 'Guilty,' Robert Budden was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . .,44 Eliz.

30 November, 44 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. and elsewhere in the said county on the said day and at other times before and afterwards, Willimott Golde alias Willson late of London spinster, a lazy and vagabond person, published and spread divers false rumours respecting the Queen, amongst the Queen's subjects. G. D. R., . . . ., 44 Eliz.

4 December, 44 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at the Charterhouse co. Midd. on the said day and at divers times before and afterwards, John Sankey and John Billengesley, both of Charterhouselane gentlemen, used and haunted "a dicinge house" situated and being in the said Charterhouse. G. D. R., . . . . April, 44 Eliz.

10 December, 44 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the highway at Hygate co. Midd. on the said day, Bartholomew Turpin late of London yoman assaulted Simon Fielder, and robbed him of a leather purse worth two pence, and a piece of gold worth three pounds. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 44 Eliz.

20 December, 44 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, in the highway at Howneslowe Heathe in the parish of Eastbedfounte co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Hylliard alias Higgins, late of London yoman, assaulted a certain unknown man and robbed him of three pounds in numbered money. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 44 Eliz.

31 December, 44 Elizabeth.—Thirteen several True Bills against the following thirteen persons for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer,—viz., (1) Elizabeth Crossefeilde late of St. Andrew's in Holborne widow, (2) Henry Jerningham junr. late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman, (3) Thomas Culpepper late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman, (4) Elizabeth Mordaunt late of St. Clement's Danes widow, (5) Thomas Booker late of St. Andrew's in Holborne gentleman, (6) Paul Wilkinson late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman, (7) William Cobbe late of St. Andrew's in Holborne gentleman, (8) James Godwyn late of St. Clement's Danes gentleman (against all eight for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, during the six months following the said 31 Dec. 44 Eliz.), (9) Mary Newdigate late of Hampton co. Midd. spinster, (10) Margery Blasson late of Hampton co. Midd. spinster, alias Margery Blasson wife of John Blasson of the same place . . . ., (11) John Clarke late of Stepney co. Midd. yoman, (12) Joan Snodon late of Cranford co. Midd. spinster, alias Joan Snodon wife of Richard Snodon of the same place yoman (against all four, for not going to church &c. for the three months, beginning on 10 March 44 Eliz.) and (13) Laurence Buttes late of St. James's in Clerkenwell co. Midd. gentleman, for not going to any usual place of Common Prayer, during the month beginning on 6 May, 44 Eliz.; each bill having at the foot a memorandum, that proclamation had been made in accordance with the form of the Statute.—Preserved by themselves in the same file (dated on the wrapper, 25 June, 44 Eliz.) these thirteen True Bills are prefaced by a long memorandum, that, proclamation having been made for the persons so indicted to surrender their bodies to the Sheriff of Middlesex at the next General Gaol Delivery of Newgate, then and there to answer to charges of trespasses and contempts, and twelve of them failing to surrender themselves in accordance with the proclamation at the Gaol Delivery, made on 1st September, 44 Eliz., each of the persons so failing to appear was convicted of the same trespasses and contempts. Thomas Culpepper surrendered himself; when it was ordered that he should be discharged of the indictment, should he be present on the next Lord's Day at prayers and sermon, at St. Andrew's church in Holborn. Respecting William Cobbe (named in the body of the writing as one of the twelve recusants, convicted on failing to appear and surrender) it is recorded in the last line of the Memorandum, "And the aforesaid William Cobbe appeared and is exonerated of the indictment." G. D. R., 25 June, 44 Eliz.