Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1603

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1886

Page

287

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1603', Middlesex county records: Volume 1: 1550-1603 (1886), pp. 287. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65972 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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1603

—January, 45 Elizabeth.—True Bill that Charles Cornewallis gentleman and James Jackson yoman, both late of London, in a certain field called Woodes Close at Clarkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, assaulted a certain Christofer Wells, when he was in God's and the Queen's peace; and that with malice aforethought Charles Cornewallis murdered the said Christopher by giving him with a sword a mortal wound in the breast, of which wound he then and there died instantly; and that James Jackson was then and there present, aiding and encouraging the Charles Cornewallis to perpetrate the same murder. At the foot of the decayed and mutilated bill, a memorandum that, at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, made on . . . .,45 Eliz., Charles Cornewallis and James Jackson were found 'Guilty' of this murder, and that each of them was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 19 Jan., 45 Eliz.

2 February, 45 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Harefeilde co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Robert Skarres, Thomas Jen . . . ., Thomas Bennett and Oliver Browne, all late of London yomen, broke into the dwelling-house of Sir Thomas Egerton knt., Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, and stole therefrom "a pillowe of clothe of silver" worth ten pounds, and "a paire of vallance for a bed" worth ten pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Lord Keeper of the Great Seal.

4 February, 45 Elizabeth.—True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. on the night of the said day, John Squyer, Thomas Dixon and William Greene, all late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of John Shelley, and stole therefrom "a lokinge glasse" worth four shillings, a linen napkin worth sixpence, and a handkerchief worth four pence, of the goods and chattels of the same John Shelley. Putting themselves 'Guilty,' all three burglars were sentenced to be hung.