Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1609

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

47-58

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1609', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 47-58. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65985 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Contents

1609

9 January, 6 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of John Dodridge and William Elme, both tailors of St. Buttolph's-without-Aldgate, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Emma Robinson of London spinster at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., "for thatt she is a notorious Common Queane and sitteth vp at the doare till xj or xij a clock in the night to entertayne lewde persons that resort vnto her." G. D. R., 11 Jan., 6 James I.

10 January, 6 James I.—True Bill that, at Shepperton co. Midd. on the said day, Reginald Robinson late of London yeoman stole "duos cignettos mansuet' vocat' yong tame swannes" worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of James Hodgson of London citizen and vintner, the said cignets being marked with the said James Hodgson's "swanmark." Reginald Robinson was 'at large.' G. D. R., 6 Sept., 7 James I.

12 January, 6 James I.—Ordered "that Thomas Thomas an apprentice to John Stocke of Ratcliffe taylor shalbe discharged out of his master's service, and his indentures to be cancelled," and further that the same "John Stocke shall deliver xls. in monye and two suites of apparell to the parents of the said Thomas, which he had with the said Thomas to his vse"; it being thus Ordered because John Stocke "hath not maynteyned him with sufficient apparrell as an apprentice ought to have, but kepte him full of lyce." S. P. Reg.

14 January, 6 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Daniel Powell of the Inner Temple gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds, for the appearance of George Conwey of St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd. gentleman at the next Session of the Peace, "for thatt" the said George Conwey "is an obstinate recusant and will not take the oath of obedience." G. D. R., . . . . 6 James I.

26 January, 6 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Henry Fermor esq. J.P., of Abraham Bailye of Fewter Lane London gentleman, John Bradley of Staple Inne co. Midd. gentleman, and John Barker of St. Bridget's parish in Fleete Street waxe-chaundler, in the sum of one hundred marks each, and of Anne Heath of High Holborne co. Midd. widow, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said Anne Heath's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate, she "being suspected to have murdered one Richard Heath her late husband." G. D. R., . . . . 6 James I.

26 January, 6 James I.—True Bill that, at Turmilstreete in St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, John Fortescue late of London yoman stole a pair of silke garters worth twelve pence, a pair of woosted stockins worth three shillings, a pair of gloves worth sixpence, a knife worth sixpence, and a woodden combe worth three pence, of the goods and chattels of John Besbeeche. Found 'Guilty' of stealing chattels appraised at eleven pence, John Fortescue was sentenced to be whipt and to pay the fee. G. D. R., . . . . 6 James I.

27 January, 6 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of William Ewyer inholder and Martin Hill cook, both of St. Sepulchre's-without-Newgate, in the sum of five pounds each, and Geoffrey Owen of the same parish yeoman, in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of Elizabeth, wife of the said Geoffrey Owen, at the next Session of the Peace for the said county, "for that the said Elizabeth did turne a fellowe which lodged att the Talbott (being her Master's house) out of the doores, who presentlie after died in the streetes full of godes Tokens." G. D. R., . . . ., 7 James I.

5 February, 6 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of John Coles of St. Mary's Woolmoth London haberdasher and John Baker of St. Buttolph's-without-Bishopsgate London baker, in the sum of ten pounds each, for the appearance at the next Session of the Peace of George White of Whitechappell baker, "for that the said George White was taken in a notorious bawdie howse in Turnemill street where he and others had bene swaggeringe and drinkinge all the nighte, and in the morninge he abused the constable." G. D. R., . . . ., 6 James I.

8 February, 6 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P, of John Johnnes of St. Martin's-le-Grand of London cordwayner and John Bayly of St. Sepulchre's parish ostler, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Ellen Allen alias Floyde of Clarkenwell spinster at the next Session of the Peace, "for thatt she is a bad woman and inticed a Dutchman to lewdness, and whilst shee was kissinge him her mayde stole away his dagger." G. D. R., . . . . 6 James I.

10 February, 6 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day and for the two following months, Richard Barbor late of the said parish followed the art and mystery of a barber-surgeon, without having served an apprenticeship to the said calling. G. D. R., 28 April, 7 James I.

15 February, 6 James I.—Highway Order running thus, "The charge nowe given to the Jurye to enquire of the defects of the High Waies betweene Islington and Highgate and from thence to Browneswell and soe to Whetston, and it is ordered by the Courte that the Jurye shall call before them anye person or persons to enquire who hath formerly from tyme to tyme repaired them, and who of right ought now to repaire them, And the Jurye hath daye to give up their verdict until Fryday which shalbe the xxviiith daie of April next by viii of the Clocke in the forenoone at the Castle in St. John's Streete." S. P. Reg.

15 February, 6 James I.—Ordered that, whereas "Rebecca Pleasant was delivered of a childe in the fieldes betweene Islington and Newington, and for that she then remayned, and was setled in the said parishe of Newington," the said child shall with her mother remayne and be kept at Newington, for that the said Rebecca was "before hyred in the service of one Maudlyn Rouse for a yeare" in the said parish. S. P. Reg.

16 February, 6 James I.—Committal to Newgate Gaol, there to remain without bail, for an assault on Richard Morgan, of Peter Lambert of London gentleman, Robert Wingfielde of Knuckton co. Hunt. gentleman, Francis Dyer of Great Stalton co. Hunt, gentleman, Miles Forrest of Malborne co. Hunt. gentleman, and Thomas Hutchins of Great Stalton aforesaid gentleman. Against this entry appears this marginal note: "These five persons were brought into the Court at the verye risinge and endinge of this Sessions, and upon examinacion it then appeared to be a most fowle outrage and riott. It was ordered by the Court that they should be committed to Newgate without baile, and that the Clerke of the Peace should forthwith acquaint the Right Honourable the Lord Chancellor that thereupon suche further order might be taken as His Lordshipp should direct." G. D. Reg.

6 March, 6 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of John Brome of St. Leonard's Shoreditch shoemaker, and Mathew Milton of St. Clement's Danes mercer, and Christopher Postlett of St. Michael's at Quene Hive London clothworker, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Katherine, the wife of the aforesaid John Brome, at the next Session of the Peace, "for that shee is charged by the Constable of Norton Folgate to be ayding and assisting to the apprentices on shrove-tuesdaie last when they weare committing dyvers and sundry outrages and misdemeanours." G. D. R., . . . .,7 James I.

24 March, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Hackney co. Midd. on the said day, Stephen Dawson late of London yoman stole a paire of silke stockins worth ten shillings, a paire of worsterd stockins worth three shillings and fourpence, a silver handle for a fanne worth six shillings and eightpence, a little silver yewer worth twenty shillings, and a jewel called "a carkanell of golde and pearle" worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir Richard Griffin knt. G. D. R., . . . ., 7 James I.

29 March, 7 James I.—Order for stay of proceedings on a certain indictment "for not comminge to church," preferred at the Gaol Delivery of 20 June 1808 against Walter Fowler late of St. Andrewesin-Holborne co. Midd. esq., and for his discharge of the said indictment for recusancy; The said Order being made on a sufficient certificate under the hand of the Rt. Reverend William Bishop of Coventre and Lichefeild of the religious submission and conformity of the same Walter Fowler, "by the name of Walter Fowler of St. Thomas of the parishe of Berkswicke in the countye of Stafford esquier." G. D. Reg.

4 April, 7 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of John Borne of Knaptofte co. Leicestre gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the same John Borne at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., "for that he hath broughte lxxx sheep to Islington to sell in the Lent time contrary to the king's proclamation." G. S. P. R., Easter, 7 James I.

11 April, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Godfrey Levill of St. James's Clerkenwell laborer, and William Francklyn of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate yeoman, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of John Burgayne of St. Giles's aforesaid yeoman at the next Session of the Peace, then and there to answer "for receivinge people into his howse sick of the plague brought from other parts to the prejudice of the parish, and" for having "at the same tyme another sick of the French pockes" who "liveth incontynently with one Fayth Langley." G. S. P. R., Easter, 7 James I.

25 April, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt., of James Reade of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate playsterer, in the sum of twenty pounds, and Edward Heskins of the same parish currier, in the sum of ten pounds; For the appearance of Anne Reade, wife of the said James Reade, at the next Session of Gaol Delivery, "for that she is suspected to have stolen a coach-cushion of crymson velvett from out of the Lord Fenton's coach, and hath putt to sale parte of the velvett" G. D. R., 28 April, 7 James I.

30 April, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of James Goodale plasterer, Thomas Person victuler and William Elder chandler, all three of St. Sepulchre's parish co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and Edward Wells horsecourser and Roger Goodale bucher, both also of St. Sepulchre's parish, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Edward and Roger at the next Session of the Peace to answer &c, "the said Edward Welles and Roger Goodale" being "suspected and noted to be notorious cutpurses, and this present Sunday weare taken swageringe in one Mungo Parker's house a victualler who is a comon harborer of such persons." G. D. R., 31 May, 7 James I.

3 May, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. John's Streete co. Midd. on the said day, by colour of a certain bond forged by him, James Mathewes late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. yoman defrauded William Trollopp gentleman of fifty-two pounds one shilling and eight pence, of the moneys of the said William Trollopp. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' James Mathewes was acquitted. G. D. R, 10 July, 7 James I.

5 May, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt., of William Harvye of the parish of St. Michael's Bassishawe in London baker, in the sum of ten pounds, and of George Thorowgood of St. Giles's without Creplegate yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said George Thorowgood's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, "for that he and William Harvye have threatned to pull down ye cage and within a while after ye cage was throwne downe." G. D. R., 31 May, 7 James I.

8 May, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields on the said day, Edward Machyn of the Middle Temple in London gentleman took and carried off a tame stagge of brown colour worth five pounds, he knowing well that the same tame stagge was of the goods and chattels of the Most Serene Lord Henry the Prince of Wales the first-born son of the Lord James now King of England. Edward Machyn was at large. At the bill's foot, a memorandum that his offence was only a trespass. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 7 James I.

9 May, 7 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of William Prior of Tharbie co. Lincoln yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said William Prior's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Midd., to give evidence against James Mathewes who "standeth charged vpon suspicion with the forging of a bond and counterfeting of the hand of Sir Edmond Bushie knight to the same wherevppon lii li. is. viiid. due unto Sir Robert Osborne knight was payd vppon the same by the said William Pryor." G. D. R., 10 July, 7 James I.

24 May, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Clarkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Owen late of London spinster stole three sheets worth four shillings, a table-cloth worth eightpence, and a mingle-coloured woollen-cloth cloak worth three shillings, of the goods and chattels of Richard Morris. Found 'Guilty,' of petty larciny to the value of eleven pence half penny, Elizabeth Owen was sentenced to be whipt and after the whipping to be delivered on payment of the fee. G. D. R., 10 July, 7 James I.

30 May, 7 James I.—Ordered, that Robert Batte of Hillingdon co. Midd. yoman, "shalbe set in the Stockes at Hillingdon, the next Markett Daie kepte at Woxbridge, by the space of three hours, vizt. from xi till ii for his contempte in refusinge to ayde the Constables apprehendinge a number of Rogues in a Barne at Hillingdon." S. P. Reg.

31 May, 7 James.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of George Savell of Wakefeild co. York gentleman in the sum of ten pounds, and of John Savell of the same place in Yorkshire gentleman in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said John's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer &c.—Also, under the same date, similar recognizances in the same amounts, whereby George Savell gentleman was bound in twenty pounds to appear at the next Session of the Peace, John Savell being his manucaptor, under a penalty of ten pounds. Each bill has at its foot this memorandum,— "Bound over for that he was taken swaggering in a bawdye howse at ii of the clocke in the night." G. D. R., 31 May, 7 James I.

31 May, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt., of Roger Bradshawe of St. Sepulchre's without Newgate gentleman and Thomas Boothe of Westminster gentleman in the sum of five pounds each, and of William Winter of the parish of St. Andrew in Holborn gentleman in the sum of ten pounds; For the said William Winter's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer &c., he being so "bound over for that the said William Winter and others were taken fighting and quarrellinge in the house of Joane Griffithe in Mutton Lane at ii of the Clocke in the night where they misused the Constable and beate and wounded the watchmen swear inge to runne their swordes into their guttes." G. D. R., 31 May, 7 James I.

10 June, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Fynesbury co. Midd. on the said day, Ralph Tayler and Hugh Mawborne, both late of London yomen, stole thirty-two yards of white woollen cloth called cotton (triginta et duos virgat' panni lanei vocat' xxxii yardes of cotton coloris albi) worth twenty-five shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Weekestead.—Also, on the same file, five other Bills against the same thieves for thefts committed by them at St. Clement's Danes, Field Lane in St. Andrewe's parish in Holborn, and Fynnesbury, respectively, on one or another of the following days—the 10th, 12th, and 13th of June aforesaid. At the head of each indictment appear memoranda that both thieves were found 'Guilty,' and that Ralph Tayler was sentenced to be hung, whilst Hugh Mawborne after pleading his clergy and being branded with the letter T was delivered according to the statute. G. D. R., 10 July, 7 James I.

12 June, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Kyngesberry co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Allaley yoman, Margery Emys spinster, Stephen Darch yoman, and George Cannon yoman, all four late of London, broke into the dwelling-house of Humfrey Lyne gentleman, and stole therefrom a paire of sheetes worth ten shillings, a diaper tablecloth worth twelve pence, a longe flaxen tablecloth worth seven shillings, "a bible with parchment leaves ad valenc' xxs.," a fowlinge-piece worth twenty shillings, six paire of sheetes worth three pounds, twoe dosen of napkins worth ten shillings, twoe tableclothes worth six shillings, three diaper tableclothes worth ten shillings, a pillowbeere worth eighteen pence, a paire of worsted stockens worth five shillings, a shirte worth six pence, six blanckettes of divers colours worth twenty shillings, a carpett of tapestry worth thirty shillings, another carpett worth twenty shillings, a man's horneblew coloured gown worth thirty shillings, a paire of greene and yellowe saye curtaines worth thirty shillings, and a canopye for a bedd worth ten shillings.—A minute at the head of the bill shows that, on his arraignment Robert Allaley stood mute and was sentenced to the peine forte et dure. But a curious and noteworthy memorandum at the foot of the bill certifies that he went from this world by a quicker passage, "Et p'fatus Rob'tus Allaley," runs this memorandum, "stat mut' Et quia contumaciter et violenter percussit quendam Robertum Kemmicke p' execuc'one mandat' Cur' palam in facie Cur' (tunc sedent' Cur') bonu' gestu' suu' erga d'um no'm Rege' & cunctu' popul' suu' minime geren' contr' tenor' & condic'o'em cujusd' p'donac'o'is ei nup' concess' p' p'fat' dominu' Rege' pro felon & Robor' p' ipsu' Rob't'm p'antea p'petrat' unde Judic' sup' eu' redditu' fuit Ideo Adjudicat' est p' Cur qd. dextera manus eius pro violentia & percuss p'd' in fac' Cur (Cur' tunc sedent') extunc amputetur Et pro Robor' p'd' inde p'antea ut p'fertur convict' fuit imediate postea suss' p' collu' quousq' &c. apud portam Le Sessions House in Le Olde Bailie. Running in English thus,—"And the aforesaid Robert Allaley stands mute. And because he contumaciously and violently struck a certain Robert Kemmicke, for executing the order of the Court, openly in the face of the Court (the Court then sitting), in no way whatever keeping his good carriage towards our Lord the King and all people, against the tenor and condition of a certain pardon late granted to him by the said Lord the King for a felony and robbery by the same Robert heretofore perpetrated, in respect of which judgment was delivered on him, Therefore it was adjudged by the Court, that for the aforesaid violence and striking, in the face of the Court (the Court then sitting) his right hand should be forthwith cut off, and for the robbery, of which as is aforesaid he was convicted, he should immediately afterwards be hung by the neck until &c. at the gate of The Sessions House in the Old Bayly." Stephen Darche and George Cannon were at large. On the bill, no memorandum touching Margery Emys. G. D. R., 10 July, 7 James I.

28 June, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of Richard Cooke taylor and Robert Cooke shoemaker, both of St. Bride's parish London, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of James Cooke (servant to John Hayton of London baker) in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said James Cooke's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Midd., to answer "for a breache of His Highnes peace by throwing Allice Spooner and Ann Spooner from theire horse backward." G. D. R., 10 July, 7 James I.

10 July, 7 James I.—Order that Henry Skyte late of London yoman (just acquitted by a jury of some charge, not stated in the Register) "shalbe forthwith sent to Bridewell and there soundlye whipped for speakinge contemptuous wordes against Sir Robert Leighe, sittinge upon the Benche, and to be kepte to beatinge of hempe and not to be delivered thence." G. D. Reg.

10 July, 7 James I.—Order for the stay of proceedings on an indictment "for not comminge to churche," preferred at the Gaol Delivery for Middlesex of 11 Jan. last past against Thomas Pudsey late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. gentleman; the said Thomas Pudsey having openly in court taken the oath of Allegiance, and given the Court sufficient assurance of his religious conformity. G. D. Reg.

8 August, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of John Gilderson brickmaker, William Badger gardner and Richard Harrison yeoman, all three of St. Leonard's in Shortdich co. Midd., in the sum of thirty pounds; For the appearance of Katheren Atkinson, wife of Christofer Atkinson of the aforesaid parish porter, at the next Session of the Peace for Midd., "for that she is accused and charged by Bridgett Bassett alias Brooke for sayinge these wordes next following, vizt. a plague of God on the said Bridgett being a Scotchman and of all Scottes that ever came into England." G. D. R., 6 September, 7 James I.

10 August, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in Holborn co. Midd. on the said day, Michael Groome late of London yoman stole four brasen weightes worth twelve pence, "unum pondus frumenti vocat' a pound of Tobacco" worth twelve shillings, a paire of tobaccotonges worth sixpence, and two tobacco-cases worth sixpence, of the goods and chattels of Arthur Coleman. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' Michael Groome was acquitted. G, D. R., 6 Oct., 7 James I.

15 August, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Edward Vinte of Charterhowselane tailor and Robert Wrattinge of St. Sepulchre's-without-Newgate tailor, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Thomas . . . . of Islington co. Midd. gentleman, there to answer "for counterfeytinge dyvers Justices of the Peace handes and seales, and for making counterfeite letters pattentes to begge in churches for losses by fyre and such like." G. D. R., 6 Sept., 7 James I.

16 August, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Henry Fermor esq. J.P., of John Nashe and John Kempe, both of St. Clement'sDanes without the Bars of the New Temple co. Midd. taylors, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of George Wood of the aforesaid parish taylor, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said George Wood's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer "for receiving of stolen goods, viz. a rapior and dagger, being the goodes of the Rt. Honorable the Earl of Hertford." G. D. R., 6 Sept., 7 James I.

19 August, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Stratfordebowe co. Midd. on the said day, Margaret Metcalfe late of London spinster stole three gold ringes with three diamonds set in them worth one hundred pounds, a gold ring 'with a turkye' set in it worth forty shillings, a gold 'hoope ringe' worth twenty shillings, a chamlett petticote of the colour called "changeable cullour" worth six pounds, "unum capitale panni linei vocat' a quoyfe" adorned with silk and gold worth sixteen shillings, a linen stomacher adorned with silk and gold worth twelve shillings, a vestment called 'a gorgett' adorned with silk and gold worth six shillings, a velvett vestment called a wrought veluett kirtle worth six pounds, a blacke felt hatte worth five shillings and fifty-three pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods and chattels of Richard Dungan gentleman at Whitechappell. Confessing the indictment, Margaret Metcalfe pleaded pregnancy, and was found pregnant by a jury of matrons. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 7 James I.

24 August, 7 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir John Kay knt. J.P., of Roger Tudder of Whitechappell, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Tudder's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer "for keeping of Pigeon holes." G. D. R., 6 Sept., 7 James I.

6 September, 7 James I.—Order "That Thomas Sampson shalbe committed without baile for counterfeitinge the Seall of the Privye Councell, and makinge counterfeit writinges annexinge the said seal unto them; And that Mr. Attorney is to be made acquainted therewith at the beginninge of the next terme, that he may be censured in the Starre Chamber for his saide offence." G. D. Reg.

7 September, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Robert Mitchell and William Haydon, both of Cowecrosse butchers, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Robert Pittes, also of Cowecrosse butcher, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Robert Pittes's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Midd., to answer "for selling olde croane sheek (sic) for lambes they beinge dressed lambe fashion."—Also, under the same date similar Recognizances, taken before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of the above-named Robert Mitchell butcher at the next Session of the Peace, to answer "for selling olde croane sheek (sic) for lambes they being dressed lambe fashion." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas 7 James I.

9 Septemeer, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of Edward Robbinson of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate co. Midd. baker, in the sum of five pounds, and of George Spratt of the same parish laborer, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said George Spratt's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer "for abusing Lady Cleere" (or Cleeve) "by throwing stones at her cochman, sundry times abusing her in such maner." G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 7 James I.

16 September, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Allam late of London widow assaulted her servant, a certain Edward Chaplyn, in her dwelling-house, and with a broomestaffe gave him on the left shoulder a blow, of which he died on the following day. Found 'Not Guilty' of murder, but 'Guilty' of homicide called 'manslater,' Mary Allam was sentenced to be hung, but was reprieved by the Court after judgment. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 7 James I.

21 September, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Southmymmes co. Midd. on the said day, Timothy Crowder late of London yoman stole a whyte geldinge worth five pounds, a daple-grey horse worth six pounds eight shillings and fourpence, a green woollen rugg worth six shillings and eightpence, a paire of sheetes worth two shillings, three blankets worth three shillings, a paire of breeches of black silke rashe worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Edward Ratcliffe knt. Confessing the indictment, Timothy Crowder was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 7 James I.

7 November, 7 James I.—True Bill that, on the said day at the parish of St. Giles-without Creeplegate co. Midd., Thomas Boswell late of London gouldsmith and Bartholomew Wilkins of Pickthatch co. Midd. yoman, traitorously and feloniously diminished certain current moneys by clipping and filing them,—to wit, two silver pieces called King James shillings, nine silver pieces called Elizabeth shillinges, one silver piece called a Phillipp and Mary shillinge, two silver pieces called King James halfe-shillinges, and nineteen silver pieces called Elizabeth halfe-shillinges. On the bill appear memoranda that both culprits were found 'Guilty,' and sentenced to be taken from the court in which they were arraigned, to Newgate Gaol, thence to Tyburne gallows, and there to be executed as traitors with all the usual incidents of such an execution. S. S. O. T., 5 Dec, 7 James I.

15 November, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's parish in Shorediche on the said day, Thomas Yonger late of Daventree co. Northt'on inneholder, Miles Yonger late of London yoman and John Jefferies late of London yomari with six other malefactors assembled themselves riotously, and armed with swords and clubs &c. &c. made a forcible and unlawful entry on and into a certain messuage in the said parish, being the freehold of a certain Henry Hodge, and there assaulted the said Henry Hodge and his tenants Robert Dalborne and Anne Dalborne, wife of the same Robert, and disseised them of the same messuage, and having so expelled them from it still keep them out of the said messuage. S. S. O. T. [Finnesbury], 25 November, 7 James I.

30 November, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Endfeild co. Midd. on the said day, Agnes Godfrey wife of John Godfrey of the said parish yoman alias Agnes Godfrey of the same parish spinster practised witchcraft &c. in and upon a steere, a pig, a little pig and a mare, of the goods and chattels of William Durante gentleman, thereby destroying the same steere, pig, little pig and mare.—Also, on the same file, True Bills against the same Agnes Godfrey (1) for practising witchcraftes &c, at Endfield co. Midd. on 5 Dec. 7 James I., against and upon Frances Baker of the said parish, and thereby causing her to be sick, weak and wasted in body, as she still remains; (2) for practising witchcraft &c., at the same parish on 1 Jan. 4 James I., and afterwards against and upon Jasper Tappes, whereby she caused him to die on 10 June, 7 James I.; (3) for practising witchcraftes, at Endfield aforesaid on 1 Jan. 39 Eliz., against and upon Thomas Phillippes an infant one-year old, whereby she caused him to die on the 4th day of the said month; (4) for practising witchcraftes &c, at Endfield aforesaid on 1 Jan. 40 Eliz., against and upon William Harvye, an infant one-year old, thereby causing him to die on the 3rd day of the said month. Pleading 'Not Guilty' to all these indictments, Agnes Godfrey was found 'Guilty' of killing William Durrante's steere, pig, little pig and mare in accordance with the first indictment, and 'Guilty' of killing Thomas Phillippes by witchcrafts in Jan. 39 Eliz., but was found 'Not Guilty' as to the other indictments. It does not appear what sentence was accorded to her. The file preserves also numerous bills of Recognizances, binding persons to give evidence against Agnes Godfrey. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 7 James I.

5 December, 7 James I.—Ordered that Owen Griffen of GreyesInne Lane "shalbe sett in the Stockes the next Sondaye at Kentishtowne . . . . for disturbing the Preacher of Kentishtowne when hee was in the pulpitt." S. P. Reg.

5 December, 7 James I.—Record of sentence passed on Thomas Boswell late of London goldsmith at a Session of Oyer and Terminer, held at The Castle in St. John's Streete co. Midd. on the said day, and adjourned to the Old Bailey Court House, when he was found Guilty of an offence (vide, p. 57) not stated in the present note; the Sentence being, that he be led by the Sheriff of Middlesex to the gaol of Newgate, and then be drawn to the gallows at Tyborne, there be hanged, thrown upon the ground whilst still living, be dismembered, disembowelled, his entrails being burnt whilst he still live, and be beheaded &c.—Also, the record of the same sentence passed at the same Session of Oyer and Terminer on Bartholomew Wilkins late of Pickthatche yoman. G. D. Reg.

11 December, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of William Smyth of St. Buttolph's-without-Bishopsgate pewterer and William Merrick of Whitcrossestreete co. Midd. turner, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Ann Hynde, wife of Augustine Hynde of St. John's Streete co. Midd. gentleman, at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., "for that she is a Recusant and useth commonly to heare masse." G. D. R., 17 Jan., 7 James I.

30 December, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Kingestreete in St. Margaret's parish in Westminster, between six and seven p.m. of the said day, Phillip Quarles late of London gentleman assaulted Andrew Bitterman, and with a sword gave the same Andrew on the left side of his breast a mortal wound, of which he died on the twelfth of January next following at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields. G. D. R., . . . . James I.