Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1610

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

58-70

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1610', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 58-70. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65986 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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Contents

1610

4 January, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Hornesey co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Sowthwell late of London yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Robert Symons, and stole therefrom a silver goblett worth thirty shillings, a dagger worth ten shillings, a woollen-cloth apron worth sixpence, three linen handkerchiefs worth six-pence, three linen quoyfes worth three-pence, "unum par manicarum panni lanei vocat' a payre of cuffes" worth two-pence, a greene silke girdle worth twelve pence, "unum horologium vocat' a litle hower glasse of pearle" worth six-pence, a copper ringe worth a penny, "unum capitale panni linei vocatum a calle" worth a penny, and a bone combe worth a penny, of the goods and chattels of the said Robert Symons. Found 'Not Guilty' of burglary, but 'Guilty' of breaking into the house &c, Thomas Sowthwell was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 7 James I.

5 January, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields on the said day, Walter Spencer of London gentleman (who on 6 Oct., 7 James I., was and still is a popyshe recusant, convicted of not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer for divers months) approached and entered the King's palace called Whyte Hall, whilst the said King was there in his royal majesty; And further that, on the 14th, 19th and 21st days of February, the same Walter Spencer entered the same King's royal palace called St. James, situated in the aforesaid parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, whilst Henry the Prince of Wales &c. was in the same palace, and that the same Walter Spencer to the danger and contempt of the said King and Prince did and acted in this manner, without the King's command or any written warrant from any of the Lords and others of the said King's Privy Council. Walter Spencer was at large. At the bill's foot, a memorandum that his offence was a 'trespass.' G. D. R., 22 March, 7 James I.

7 January, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Isleworth co. Midd. in the night of the said day, John Morrell late of London yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Sir Gedeon Awnsham knt, and stole a black cloak worth ten shillings, a black grogran cloak worth ten shillings, a sword called "a damasked skeane " worth twenty shillings, a dagger with damaske hiltes worth six shillings and eightpence, and a velvet girdle imbrodered with silke and gold worth three shillings and fourpence.—Also, a True Bill against the same John Morrell for breaking burglariously into the dwelling-house of the same Sir Gedeon Awnsham knt. at Isleworthe co. Midd. in the night of 30th Jan. 7 James I.—Also, two other indictments for theft against the same culprit. Found 'Guilty' in respect to all four indictments, John Morrell was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 7 James I.

9 January, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Yonge and John Thome, both late of London yomen unlawfully took and carried away ("felonice furati fuere" being struck out of the bill) two hundred and thirtie-seven pounds of lead worth twenty-six shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Owen Oglethropp knt. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' John Thorne was acquitted. Confessing the indictment, Thomas Yonge was sentenced to stand upon the Pillory in Cheapside with a paper on his head, next marketday. G. D. R., 17 Jan., 7 James I.

13 January, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Henry Rosse of Cowelane gentleman and Robert Robertes of the same place cordwayner, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Mary Dickson of Cowelane spinster in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Mary's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., "for that she was taken in a notorious bawdiehowse behind a painted cloathe." G. D. R., 17 Jan., 7 James I.

17 January, 7 James I.—Order for stay of proceedings on an indictment "for not comminge to church," preferred at the Gaol Delivery for Middlesex of 16 Dec. last past against James Thatcher the Elder late of Stepney co. Midd. gentleman, and for his discharge of the same indictment; The Order being made on the certificate by the Archbishop of Canterbury of the same James Thatcher's religious submission and conformity. G. D. Reg.

7 February, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at Hendon co. Midd. in the night of the said day, George Newman alias Dorche late of London yoman, Henry Courte late of London yoman, Joan Elliott late of London spinster, and Henry Elliott late of London yoman broke burglariously into the house of Edward Kempe, and stole therefrom a woman's violet-coloured gown worth forty shillings, and many other articles of personal raiment, particularly mentioned and described in the bill of indictment, of the goods and chattels of the said Edward Kempe. George Newman alias Dorche and Henry Courte were at large. Henry Elliott put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. Joan Elliott stood mute—"Ideo h'et judiciu' pene fort' et dur'." G. D. R., 22 March, 7 James I.

11 February, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Margery Isham of Oldstreet co. Midd. widow, in the sum of ten pounds, and of Martin White of the same street yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Martin White's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Midd., "for that they" (sic) "haue bene sene at Masse att the Spanishe Embassadors." At the bill's foot, this other memorandum, "est in prisona de Newgate." G. D. R., 16 Feb., 7 James I.

11 February, 7 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Margery Isham of Old Street co. Midd. widow, in the sum of thirty pounds; For the appearance of Ann Isham, daughter of the said Margery, at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., "for that shee" (i.e. Ann Isham) "hath bene seene at masse in the Spanishe Embassadors howse." G. D. R., 16 Feb., 7 James I.

16 February, 7 James I.—Three several Orders for discharging John Thrill esq., Anne Thrill widow, and Elizabeth Thrill spinster, all three late of St. Buttolphes-without-Bishopsgate co. Midd., of indictments "for not comminge to church," preferred against them at the last Gaol Delivery for Midd.; the said Orders being made on sufficient evidence of the religious conformity of the said three persons. G. D. Reg.

18 February, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. John's Streete co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Elizabeth Bennett spinster, Alice Justice spinster, James Beckley yoman, John Holland yoman, and Richard Bradley yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Henry Packe, and stole therefrom three quarters of Allegant worth three shillings, three pynte pottes made of electrum worth three shillings, three half-pynte electrum pottes worth eighteen pence, two table-napkins worth eightpence, two course towells worth sixteen pence, a brasse lanthorne worth twelve pence, a brasse candlesticke worth sixpence, a pewter candlestick worth eightpence, and a plancke of wood worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of the said Henry Packe. James Beckley was at large. Found 'Guilty' of petty larceny, the two other men and the two women were sentenced to be whipped and after whipping to be delivered on payment of the fee. G. D. R., 22 March, 7 James I.

23 February, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of John Marser of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields yeoman, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Francis Robinson of the same parish Inholder, in the sum of sixty pounds; For the said John Marser's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., he being "charged uppon suspicion with the stealing of lix li. in monye forthe of a troncke at the signe of the Black Bull in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, being the goodes and monye of Christofer Loftus, Richard Vincent, William Hamond and William Forrest lodgers in the said house." G. D. R., 22 March, 7 James I.

2 March, 7 James I.—Two several Orders for discharging William Middlemore late of St. Andrewes-in-Holborne gentleman and Walter Ilseley late of St. James's in-Clerkenwell gentleman, of indictments "for not comminge to churche," preferred against them at the last Gaol Delivery for Middlesex; the said Orders being made on sufficient certificates of the religious conformity of the same two persons. G. D. Reg.

5 March, 7 James I.—True Bill that, in the dwelling-house of Richard Tilson at Ratcliffe co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Bowyer late of London yoman assaulted Sara Plombe, a virgin of the age of fourteen years, "et eandem adtunc et ibidem carnaliter cognovit et earn contra voluntatem ejusdem Sare adtunc et ibidem felonice rapuit et defloravit." Found 'Guilty,' Robert Bowyer was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 22 March, 7 James I.

6 March, 7 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Brett knt. J.P., of Roger Brand yeoman and Thomas Bridges taylor, both of Edmonton co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Phillipp Hamond of London gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Phillipp Hamond's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., "for that he was taken shootinge in a peece in His Majesties chase in the parishe of Endfeilde." G. D. R., 22 March, 7 James I.

10 March, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Madockes late of London gentleman falsely and felonionsly made coined counterfeited of tin and other mixed and false metals fourteen pieces of money in the likeness and similitude of the good current moneys called King James shillinges. Thomas Madockes confessed the indictment, and was sentenced to be taken from the Old Bailey Court House to Newgate Gaol and there to be hung. He was reprieved after judgment. Bill taken at the Castle in St. John's Street on 21 March, 7 James I., the indictment being preferred against the culprit in the Old Bailey Court House on the following day, before the Lord Mayor and divers of the King's Judges. S. S. O. T., 21 and 22 March, 7 James I.

17 March, 7 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir William Waad knt. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Francis Stone of Clarkenwell yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Francis at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer "for keepinge Pigeon-holes and other unlawfull games." G. D. R., 22 March, 7 James I.

18 March, 7 James I.—True Bill that, at St. James's parish in Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, John Lockwood late of London clerk, born within the kingdom of England after the Feast of St. John the Baptist of 1 Eliz., and made and ordained a priest by authority derived and pretended from the See of Rome, in no degree regarding the statutes of this kingdom of England and the penalty thereof, was and remained feloniously, traitorously and as a false traitor of the Lord the King, against the form of the statutes aforesaid and against the said King's crown peace and dignity.—At the foot of the bill appears this memorandum (in Latin),—"And the aforesaid John Lockwood puts himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country and is found 'Guilty,' and has no chattels: Therefore it was decreed by the Court, that the same John be led by the Sheriff of Middlesex to the Gaol of Newgate, and thence be drawn directly to the gallows of Tyborne, and there be hanged upon the gallows, and whilst still living be thrown upon the ground and his members cut off, and that his entrails be taken out of his belly, and be burnt he being still alive, and that his head be cut off, and that his body be divided into four parts, and that his head and quarters be placed where the King has been pleased to appoint. And he was reprieved by the Court after judgment." The twelve jurors, before whom John Lockwood was arraigned, were John Cradock, Henry Hodge, Cuthbert Burbage, Richard Braytoft, William Motteram, Thomas Hill, Edward Theames, Cristofer Hayward, John Blomson, Christopher Smyth, Thomas Burton, William Marshe. S. S. O. T. (held at the Castle in St. John's Street, for the inquest of the Grand Jury, on 21 March, 7 James I., and adjourned till the following day at the Old Bailey, when the prisoner was arraigned before the Lord Mayor, the Chief Justice "ad placita coram ipso Rege tenenda)—22 March, 7 James I.

6 April, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at Chancerylane co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Edward Wattes late of London yoman broke into the dwellinghouse of Paul Ambrose Crooke esq., and stole therefrom a man's violet-coloured gown faced with black velvet worth eight pounds, and a greene carpet worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Paul Ambrose Crooke esq. Found 'Guilty,' Edward Wattes was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 5 July, 8 James I.

26 April, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Godfrey Clarke of the Inner Temple of London gentleman and Henry Barnes of Clarkenwell co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Winifrid Robinson of Clarkenwell spinster at the next Session of the Peace for the said co., to answer &c. "for lettinge Sara Berry and divers yonge gentlemen into her Mistriss's house at midnight and lodginge her there." G. D. R., 24 May, 8 James I.

29 April, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Henry Cantrell of St. Mary's-le-Strand gentleman and Henry Tunstall of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate silkeweaver, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Sara Asten alias Berrye of Clarkenwell co. Midd. at the next Session of the Peace for the said county, to answer &c, "for that she was taken in a bawdie house at xii of the clock in the night with divers yonge gentlemen." G. D. R., 24 May, 8 James I.

1 May, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, on the said day nor during the three months next following, against Elizabeth Hedger widow, Elizabeth Norton widow, Henry Shelley gentleman, Ann Fowks widow, William Hooper gentleman, Mary White wife of Sir Richard White knt., Elizabeth Smalbone wife of Thomas Smalbone gentleman alias Elizabeth Smalbone spinster, Henry Barnard gentleman, and Peter Knaresborowe gentleman, all late of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd.—Also, True Bill, for not going to church &c. on 1st Jan., 7 James I., nor during the two months next following the said day, against Alice Barner widow and John Barner gentleman, both late of St. Andrew's Holborne co. Midd.—Also, True Bill, for not going to church &c. on 1 May, 8 James I., nor during the two months next following, against George Rumney and Christofer Garthe, both late of the parish of St. Clement's Danes gentlemen.—Memorandum of Proclamation at the foot of each of these bills, which are preserved in a fragmentary file together with a separate memorandum of the conviction of the persons so indicted, on their failure to appear and surrender at the Gaol Delivery held on 7 August, 8 James I., in accordance with proclamation for their appearance &c. at the said Session. Broken File.

8 May, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Martin-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Gwido Hawkins alias Gwido Fludd late of London yoman broke into the house of Ralph Dobbinson gentleman, and stole therefrom a black woollen-cloth cloak lyned throughe with blacke velvett worth ten pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Francis the Earl of Cumberland. Found 'Guilty,' Gwido Hawkins was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

12 May, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Peter Advincula near the Tower of London on the said day, Henry Willson late of London yoman stole a gold ring called a seale of Armes worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Humfrey Baskervile knt. At the head of the bill, a memorandum that Henry Willson was discharged, because another indictment for the same matter was preferred against him in London. G. D. R., 24 May, 8 James I.

29 May, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of John Jenckes of St. Faith's parish in London haberdasher and Hugh Oldbury of the parish of St. Michael Bassishawe in London haberdasher, and William Mason of St. Olive's in Southwark co. Surrey feltmaker, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of John Fryne of St. Olive's aforesaid feltmaker at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd. to answer &c. for his part in "a notable outrage att the Playhowse called the Redd Bull."— Also, under the same date, similar Recognizances for the appearance of Edward Brian of St. Bride's parish feltmaker at the next Session of the Peace &c., to answer in respect to the same "notable outrage." G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

29 May, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of John Carter of St. Sepulchre's parish in London hosier and Robert Straker of St. John's Street co. Midd. glover, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of William Tedcastle of St. Andrew's in Holborn yeoman at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer "for that he and others made a notable outrage att the Redd Bull, the Play House." G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

30 May, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Richard White of the parish of "Sancti Petri Pauperis" in London yeoman, and Thomas White of St. Sepulchre's in London cook, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Edward Purfett of St. Olive's in Southwark co. Surrey feltmaker at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer "for that he and others made a notable outrage att the playhouse called the Red Bull." G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

1 June, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of Henry Inkersell of the parish of St. Lawrence Poltney in London merchant-taylor and William Lewellin of St. Clement's-inEastcheap haberdasher, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Thomas Williams of the parish of St. Katherine near the Tower of London feltmaker at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd, to answer &c., "for that he and others made a notable outrage att the Playhowse called The Redd Bull." G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

7 June, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's-Danes without the Bars of the New Temple on the said day, William Ward alias Hynnckes late of London yoman stole "unam cistulam vocat' a cabonett" worth thirty shillings, a chayne of golde worth fourteen pounds, a Jewell with three stones set in it worth six pounds, a bracelett sett with stones and pearles worth twenty pounds, three small jewells worth six pounds, a golde hattband worth ten shillings, a paire of crimson velvett mittons imbrodered with gold and silver worth forty shillings, fyve laced falling bandes and a linen collar called a ruffe band worth ten pounds, a paire of willow-culloured silke stockens worth seven shillings, a glasse "implet' cum unction' anglice with ballsome" worth ten pounds, a book worth twelve pence, two gold "fifteene shillinges pieces," and ten pounds and six shillings in numbered moneys, being in the aforesaid cabonett, of the goods and chattels of Sir Thomas Seamor knt. Confessing the indictment, William Ward asked for the book, read like a clerk, was marked with the Letter T and delivered according to the Statute. G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

10 June, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, John Wilkinson weaver, John Heynes yoman and William Serbye yoman, all late of London (who did not go to church, chapel or any usual Place of Common Prayer during the month beginning on 1 May, 8 James I.) voluntarily came together at, and were present in, an unlawful assembly and conventicle under pretent of the exercise of religion. John Wilkinson was found ' Guilty.' On their arraignment John Heynes and William Serbye said nothing. All three had judgment according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., 5 December, 8 James I.

21 June, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Leigh knt. J.P., of George Moody of St. Andrew's in Holborne cuttler and Richard Davison of the same place cutter (scissor) in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Fardinando Emberson of St. Andrew's aforesaid cuttler in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Fardinando Emberson at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer &c. "for that he is an obstinat recusant and refuseth to goe to church and to take the oath of Allegiance." G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

26 June, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, in the gallorye leadinge from the Starrechamber by the Duchy Chamber into the Great Hall of Pleas there, Thomas Oldfeild late of London yoman assaulted Henry Farrar esq., when he was in God's and the King's peace and had no weapon drawn, and with a knyfe stabbed the same Henry on the lower parte of his bellye, so that he died thereof on the 28th of the said month. Found 'Guilty' of murder, Thomas Oldfeild was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 3 July, 8 James I.

3 July, 8 James I.—Whereas Walter Spencer late of London gentleman was indicted att the Sessions of Gaole Deliverye, holdsn for the said Countye of Middlesex the xxiind daye of Marche last past, for goeinge to the Kinges Majesties Courte att Whitehall, and to the Prince's Courte att St. Jeames without Iycence havinge bine before convicted of Recusancye, And for that it appeareth vnto this Courte, that the saide Walter Spencer hath conformed himselfe in causes of Religion of the Churche of England: It is therefore ordered by the Courte that the saide Walter Spencer shalbe discharged of the said Indictment, and noe fine to be sett untill the Sessions after Michaelmas next. G. D. Reg.

10 July, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at Chauncery Lane co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Robert Fenton, John Gentle, Hugh Tucker and Phillipp Perrey, all late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Sir Thomas Penruddocke knt, and stole therefrom tenne powndes of brasse worth ten shillings, three green woollen-cloth carpets worth five pounds, a basse viole worth forty shillings, a book called Orlando worth ten shillings, and two greene silke curtaines worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Thomas Penruddocke knt. Found ' Guilty,' Robert Fenton and Phillipp Perrey were sentenced to be hung. At large, when Robert Fenton and Phillipp Perrey were arraigned, John Gentle and Hugh Tucker, on 5 December, 8 James I., put themselves ' Not Guilty' and were acquitted. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 8 James I.

1 August, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer, on the said day nor during the two months next following the same 1st of August, against the Lady Ann Conwaye spinster, Lucy Smyth spinster and William Middleton yoman, all three being late of St. Clement's-Danes parish; Nicholas Yateman late of St. Pulchar's London co. Midd. yoman; Sibella Warren.widow, George Matchett yoman, both late of St. Andrew's in Holborne; Agnes Kinge wife of Robert Kinge late of Hestoun co. Midd. laborer; John Longe late of Edgware co. Midd. butcher; Thomas Birde late of the parish of St. Pancras co. Midd. tayler; and Mary Lytton wife of John Lytton late of Chelsey co. Midd. yoman.—The file, which preserves this indictment, opens with a memorandum of proclamation having been made in due form for the persons thus indicted to surrender their bodies to the Sheriff of Middlesex at the Gaol Delivery, to be held on 5 December, 8 James I., each and all of them failed to appear and surrender in obedience to the proclamation, and were therefore convicted of the offence charged against them in the indictment. G. D. R., 5 Oct., 8 James I.

8 August, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at Graye's Inn in the parish of St. Andrew in Holborne, in the night of the said day, Thomas White late of London yoman broke burglariously into the chamber and dwellinghouse of Thomas Cademan gentleman, and stole therefrom two falling bandes worth two shillings, a pair of black silk garters worth two shillings and sixpence, a leather purse worth three pence, and twenty-seven shillings and sixpence in numbered moneys, of the goods and chattels of Leonerd Nydds gentleman.—Also, a True Bill against the same Thomas White for breaking burglariously on the same occasion into the same "cameram et domum mansionalem Thome Cademan generosi," and stealing therefrom a felt hatt worth six shillings, a wroughte nightcappe worth ten shillings and "a paire of roses for showes" worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Thomas Cademan gentleman. Thomas White was at large. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 8 James I.

12 August, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster on the said day, John Ramsey late of London yoman stole "unam cistam vocatam a deske ad valenciam xiid., unam peciam Argenti vocatam a dollar ad valenciam iiiis. unum librum vocatum a dictionary ad valenciam xijd." and six shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Sir Richard Cognisbye knt. Found 'Guilty,' John Ramsey asked for the book, could not read it, and therefore was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 8 James I.

13 August, 8 James I.—Memorandum that, at the Courthouse in Westminster, Richard Abbingtcn gentleman, a Popish Recusant, being tendered the Othe of Allegiaunce . . . . refuseth to take the same, for that he alleageth that he hath alreadye taken the othe iii yeares sythene before the Bishop of Herefore, and therefore he will not nowe take it bycause he will not shewe that president to others of his profession, yet at that time he toke the oathe againe. G. D. Reg.

13 August, 8 James I.—Memorandum that, at the Courthouse in Westminster, Nicholas Bosgrave gentleman, beinge tendered the Othe of Allegiaunce refuseth to take it. He confesseth that he hath read Parson againste the Othe, and sayeth that he will sweare asmuch as anye Catholick will doe or ever hath done to anye other Prince, and will sweare asmuch as concerneth civell obedience; he doth not refuse it of disobedience, but out of scruple of conscience. Therefore he is committed.—A marginal note to this Memorandum says, " Md. the oath of Allegiaunce was tendered to him in open Sessions of Gaole Delivery and he refuseth to take it. 5 Oct. 1610."—Also, Memoranda that, on the same 13th Aug. at the Westminster Courthouse, Henry Baylie alias Tipson and Richard Raynesford gentleman, being tendered the oath, refused to take it and were committed for their refusal. At the same time Roberte Cannon took the oath and was discharged. G. D. Reg.

23 August, 8 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of John Browne of St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. brickmaker, in the sum of one hundred marks; For the said John Browne's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Midd., to answer "for receaving and eating ii pheasantes wch. were stolen forth of the Spring Garden at Whitehall being the kinges Pheasantes."—Also, similar Recognizance, under the same date and in the same sum, for the appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Hugh Williams of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields yoman, to answer &c. "for receaving of the Kinges pheasantes and eating of them in his howse, the pheasantes being stolen forth of the Spring Garden." G. D. R., 4 Sept., 8 James I.

30 August 8 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's West minster on the said day, William White late of Westminster yoman assaulted William Edsall, and "cum quodam lapide vocato a brickbatt" beat and wounded the said William Edsall on the head so as to draw blood.—At the bill's head, a memorandum that William White was at large at the time of the Gaol Delivery of 4 Sept. 8 James I., but was afterwards committed. At the bill's foot, a memorandum that on 5 Oct. 8 James I. William White confessed the indictment and was fined three shillings and fourpence for the assault. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 8 James I.

1 September, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of Common Prayer on the said day nor during the next three following months, against the Lady Mary Grisly of the parish of Stepney widow.—At the foot of the bill, appears the memorandum of Proclamation. Broken File.

1 September, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said day nor during the three months next following, against John Lewes gentleman, John Merideth gentleman, and James Tomson gentleman, all three late of St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd.—Memorandum of Proclamation, at the foot of the bill. Broken File.

1 September, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said day nor. during the three months next following, against Thomas Brudnell of St. James'sin-Clerkenwell co. Midd. esquire.—At the foot of the bill, Memorandum of Proclamation. Broken File.

1 September, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said day nor during the three months next following, against Mary Friar wife of John Friar late of the parish of St. Botolph-without . . . . co. Midd.—At the foot of the. bill, Memorandum of Proclamation, and also a memorandum that said Mary had a further day for pleading to the indictment, because she was not the wife of John Friar, as the indictment alleged. Broken File.

1 September, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said day nor during the three months next following the same day, against Isabella Ollyver late of Hackney co. Midd. widow.—Memorandum of Proclamation, at the foot of the bill. Broken File.

20 September, 8 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said day nor during the two months next following, against William Nayler gentleman and Thomas Walwyn gentleman, both late of St. Margaret's Westminster. —Memorandum of Proclamation, at the foot of the bill. Broken File.

24 September, 8 James I.—Memorandum that, at the Questhouse in Holborne on the said day, Cyprian Dam on being tendered the Oath of Allegiance refused to take it, and was committed for the refusal.—At the same time William Sympcoxe of Ratcliffe and Richard Lovett took the oath and were discharged; and though she refused to take the oath, Marye Kitchen was " discharged for this tyme, because she is not convicted."—That these persons, on being required to take the oath of Allegiaunce, were examined and their words put on record appears from this note, " Their examinations whereunto their handes are sett are upon the file of Examinacions of quarto die September 1610." G. D. Reg.

16 October, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Edward Vaghan esq. J.P., of John Lock of Hallowell Street in St. Leonard's Shoredich glover, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Robert Lock and Robert More, both of St. James's in Clarkenwell glovers, in the sum of ten pounds each: For the said John Lock's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer &c. "for the keepinge of Katherin Griste a lewd woman, he being marryed." G. D. R., 5 Dec, 8 James I.

3 November, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at Acton co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Newdigate late of London gentleman stole a bay geldinge worth five pounds, a baye mare worth six pounds, two saddells worth sixteen shillings and two bridells worth four shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Thymelbye esq. Confessing the indictment, Edward Newdigate pleaded the King's pardon granted to him under the Great Seal. G. D. R., . . . . 9 James I.

7 November, 8 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of John Edwards of Stanes yeoman, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Thomas Hayward of Stanes and William Elkington of Eastcheape in London, both butchers, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said John Edwards's appearance at the next Session of Gaol Delivery for co. Midd., he being "charged with the stealing of xltl. sheepe forthe of the grownd of Erasmus Dreyden esq. at Hodney in the county of Warwick." G. D. R., 5 Dec, 8 James I.

14 December, 8 James I.—True Bill that, at Ickenham co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Newdigate gentleman and William Smyth yoman, both late of London stole a graye geldinge worth five pounds, a graye mare worth fifty shillings, and a white-leather saddle worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Cragge gentleman. William Smyth was at large; Edward Newdigate was found 'Guilty' and sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 8 James I.