Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1613

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

84-94

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1613', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 84-94. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65989 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1613

6 January, 10 James I.—True Bill that, at Grey's Inn Lane co. Midd. on the said day, Winifred Davis wife of Phillip Davis late of the said lane locksmith stole a silver cuppe worth forty shillings "et duas patinas stanni anglice two pewter sawcers" worth four pence, of the goods and chattels of John Finche esq.—On her arraignment, Winifred Davis put herself 'Not Guilty,' and was acquitted. G. D. R., . . . ., 11 James I.

13 January, 10 James I.—Memorandum, "Grace Watson wife of Peter Watson of St. Johnstreete apothecarye for givinge revylinge speeches against Sir Baptiste Hickes touchinge the buildinge of the Sessions House and alsoe for her unruly behauiour in the open courte beinge sent for concerninge the sayd cause."—This is the whole of the note touching Grace Watson, in the minutes of proceedings at the Session of Peace held at Hickes Hall, before Sirs Walter Cope, William Waad Lieutenant of the Tower of London, Henry Mountague Serjeantat-Law and Recorder of the City of London, George Coppyn, John Kaye, Thomas Smythe, William Bowyer, Thomas Fowler, Baptiste Hickes, William Smythe knts., and Richard Brownlowe, John Hare, Valentine Saunders, Edward Forsett, Henry Spyller, Thomas Watson, Francis Roberts, Thomas Sanderson, John Sucklinge, Nicholas Bestney, Edmund Dobledaye and Richard Sutton esquires, Justices of the Peace;— George Longe gentleman, Clerk of the Peace, being then and there in attendance.—The Minutes and Orders of this first Session held in the new Court House close with this Memorandum:—"Md. yt att this Session of ye Peace itt was agreed and resolved that ye Session House now standinge in St. John's-streete and beinge there built by Sir Baptist Hickes and given to ye Justices of ye Countie of Midd. for a Session House shold for euer hereafter be called by ye name of Hickes Hall and yt all Inquisitions or other offices that shold be there taken for ye sd. countie sholde be from henceforthe entered of Record as taken apud Hickes Hall in St. Johnstreete in com. Midd. and then agreed upon—per totam Curiam" (by the whole Court). S. P. Reg.

15 January, 10 James I.—True Bill against Anne Lady Skynner widow, Lewis Bathon gentleman, and John Waldron yoman, all three late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd.; Thomas Dicken cook and his wife Joan Dicken, late of St. James's Clerkenwell; . . . . Churche widow, and Mary Shirley widow, both late of St. Margaret's in Westminster; and Robert Collins late St. Clement's Danes co. Midd.,—for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said 15th of January, nor at any time during the three months then next following. G. D. R., 19 May, 11 James I.

18 January, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Bestney esq. J.P., of William Sowth of Cowecrosse in St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. victualler his wife Isabel Sowth and Edward Sowthe of the same parish taylor, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Richard Harrison of St. Leonard's Shorediche yeoman and Andrew Frenche of Cowecrosse aforesaid blacksmith and Geoffrey Trotter of Wood Streete in London taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said William Sowth, Isabel Sowth and Edward Sowth at the next Session of the Peace, held at Hickes Hall in St. John's Street, to answer "for keeping misrule in their house in devine service tyme on the Sabboth Day and for keeping a lewde defamed house." G. D. R., . . . . 10 James I.

19 January, 10 James I.—True Bill that, about the third hour of the night of the aforesaid day, John Legge late of St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. yeoman and his wife Margaret Legge broke burglariously in the dwelling-house of Susan Lady Stanhoppe in the same parish and stole thereform three holland smockes worth twelve shillings three crossclothes worth twelve pence, six quoifes worth three shillings, eight handkerchiefes worth six shillings, eleven collars called bands worth thirty shillings, "quatuor capitalia Anglice foure squares" worth three shillings, sixe paire of cuffes worth three shillings, sixe holland aprons worth six shillings, four other aprons worth two shillings, one paire of sheetes worth five shillings, and five paire of pillowebeares worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of a certain Mary Newark, servant of the aforesaid Susan Lady Stanhoppe.—Also, True Bill that on the same occasion the same John and Mary Legge stole divers articles of wearing-apparel, such as aprons, kerchiefs, ruffe-bands, "two shagd wastcotes," and "duo ornamenta muliebria vocata nightrayles ad valenciam duodecim denarioriorum," of the goods and chattels of the said Susan the Lady Stanhoppe.—On their arraignment, John and Mary Legge put themselves 'Not Guilty' to both indictments, and were acquitted. G. D. R., 26 March, 11 James I.

30 January, 10 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir William Waad knt. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of George Lytchfeild of Clerkenwell chaundeler, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said George Lytchfeild's appearance at the next Sessions of the Peace, to answer "for makinge fifteen tenementes of one." G. D. R., . . . ., 10 James I.

2 February, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Saunderson esq. J.P., of Robert Rolfe, of St. Sepulchre's smith, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Richard Praiser of St. Sepulchre's silkweaver and John Coxe of East Smithfeild smith, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the said Robert Rolfe's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, and in the mean time for his ceasing "to cry old iron and to buy it out of his shoppe." G. D. R., . . . ., 10 James I.

7 February, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Saunderson esq. J.P., of John Kinnard, John Sharpe and Christopher Garrat, all three of East Smithfield smiths, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said John Kinnard's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, he being "accused for buying and crying old iron." G. D. R., . . . ., 10 James I.

3 March, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of John Rayly of London trumpeter and William Blags of London taylor, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Alexander Fulsis of Hoxton co. Midd. silkewever, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of the aforesaid Alexander, "suspected to have pict a purse and iii li. in money in the same purse out of the pocket of one Robert Sweete at the Red Bull in St. John's Street." G. D. R., 26 March, 11 James I.

10 March, 10 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Collyn esq. J.P., of John Turner and John Flowers silkwevers, and of John Coggyn and Richard Woods glovers, all four of St. Leonard's Shoredich co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance at the next Session of the Peace of Thomas Wittes of the same aforesaid parish yeoman, "charged to be one of them that committed the ryot on Shrove Tuesday last." G. D. R., 26 March, 11 James I.

20 March, 10 James I.—True Bill that, at East Smithfeilde co. Midd. on the said day, Humfrey Mountaigne late of Eastsmithfeilde aforesaid butcher with a certain drawn sword struck at Edward Rotheram sheriff of the said county, when the said sheriff was executing his office. Found 'Guilty,' Humfrey Mountaigne was fined ten shillings; it being further adjudged that he should "be sett in the stockes ii severall daies one in Cheapside and another daie in Eastsmithfeilde neere to the place where the offence was done with a paper one his heade shewinge his offence, and thens be comitted to prison for iii moneths and finde sureties for his good behaviour." G. D. R., 26 March, 11 James I.

25 March, 11 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Nicholas Bestney esq. J.P., of William Hammelton gentleman and Richard Smalley shoemaker, both of Great St. Bartholomew's London, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Giles Cannon of the same parish gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said Giles Cannon at the next Gaol Delivery, "vppon suspicion of felony for a ring with ii sparkes and a harte diamond taken from one Amos Newman." G. D. R., 26 March, 11 James I.

26 March, 11 James I.—True Bill against Mary Elliott spinster, John Warden yoman, Anne Valentyne spinster, Elizabeth Lawrence spinster, John Aimer yoman, Richard Huddells yoman, William Eglestone yoman, Charles Fieldinges yoman, William Evenson yoman, his wife Mary Evenson, Rowland Mathew yoman, his wife Margaret Mathew, Anne Cramedge spinster, Susan Greene spinster, and Richard Knighte yeoman, all of St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd.; and Elizabeth Gravenor spinster, and Henry Marvyne esquire, both of St. James's-at-Clerkenwell co. Midd.,—for not going to church, chapel, or any place of Common Prayer on the said 26th of March, nor during the three months then next following. G. D. R., 30 June, 11 James I.

16 April, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Philip Foote late of Westminster aforesaid yoman assaulted Thomas Cowlson, and with a rapier (cum quadam framea anglice a rapier) gave him on the left flank a mortal wound, of which the said Thomas then and there died instantly. On his arraignment Philip Foote was found 'Guilty' of killing Thomas Cowlson in selfdefence.—At the bill's foot, this indictment, "Et postea scilicet ad deliberacionem gaole domini Regis de Newgate factam pro comitatu Middlesexie xxx°. die Junii anno undecimo Jacobi Regis predictus Philippus Foote placitavit perdonacionem domini Regis sibi concessam sub magno sigillo suo Anglie gerentem datum xix June Anno xi°. et ei allocatur &c. &c." G. D. R., 19 May, 11 James I.

20 April, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day and continually afterwards from the said day to the 6th of May then next following, William Barnewell late of the said parish gentleman, and his wife Thomasina Barnewell gentlewoman kept and maintained a common brothel, "communem domum lupinariam vocatam A common house of Bawdrye in qua quidem domo diverse male-disposite persone et meretrices juratoribus predictis ignote procuracione ejusdem Willelmi Barnewell et Thomazine uxoris ejus scortacionem et fornicacionem tam per noctem quam per diem adtunc et ibidem commiserunt ad inquietacionem et perturbacionem diversorum ligeorum domini Regis ibidem commorantium."— At the bill's foot appears this clerical memorandum, "Judicium:—To be openly whipte att a carte's Taile from the prison to their owne house in the parishe of St. Gyles aforesaid, and there remayne for some space to the end the inhabitantes maie take notice of them and from thence to the prison againe, there to remaine tyll they fynde sureties for their good behaviour hereafter." G. D. R., 19 May, 11 James I.

24 April, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Charterhouselane co. Midd. on the said day and throughout the twenty days then next following, Robert Coverte late of the said lane gentleman kept a public Bowlinge Alley for his convenience gain and livelihood. G. D. R., 19 May, 11 James I.

1 June, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, John Parrishe late of the said parish of Stepney (who refrained from going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on 20th Nov., 8 James I., and throughout the three years next following) moved and persuaded divers unknown lieges of the Lord King James, to deny, withstand and impugn the said King's power and authority in causes ecclesiastical. John Parrishe confessed the indictment.—At the bill's foot appears this memorandum: "Predictus Johannes Parrishe requisitus est per Curiam accipere sacramentum abjuracionis ad istam Sessionem sed recusavit"=The aforesaid John Parrishe was required by the Court to take the oath of abjuration, but he refused. Nothing further on the bill about the matter. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 11 James I.

1 June, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Uxbridge co. Midd. about eleven o'clock in the night of the said day, John Samon late of the said parish yoman broke burglariously in the dwelling-house of Michael. Page gentleman, and stole therefrom four silver saltes worth thirteen pounds thirteen shillings and four pence, of the goods and chattels of the aforesaid Michael Page. Found 'Not Guilty' of the burglary, but 'Guilty' of felony, John Samon asked for the book, read it, and was burnt. G. D. R., . . . ., 11 James I.

5 June, 11 James I.—True Bill that, on the said day at The Fortune (le Fortune) near Gouldinglane in the parish of St. Giles-withoutCreplegate co. Midd., Richard Bradley late of St. James's at Clarkenwell yoman assaulted Nicholas Bestney junior gentleman, and with a knife gave him two grievous wounds, by stabbing him with the said weapon in the first place on the right breast, and then in the left part of his belly, of which two wounds the said Nicholas languished and still remains in danger of death.—At the bill's head a memorandum that Richard Bradley confessed the indictment; and at the bill's foot another memorandum that, in consideration of Nicholas Bestney's perilous state, the case was remanded to the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 30 June, 11 James I.

18 June, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Old Streete co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Bowyer late of Old Streete aforesaid yoman stole five little pigs worth four shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Geelinge. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of eleven pence, Henry Bowyer was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., 30 June, 11 James I.

20 June, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, George Fyssher late of the said parish broke burglariously into the house of William Sybson, and stole therefrom two women's gownes worth sixty shillings, three coates worth ten shillings, three table-clothes worth six shillings, one dozen table-napkins worth four shillings, one pair of sheetes worth ten shillings, and "unum vestimentum anglice one suite of apparrell" worth five shillings. That on his arraignment George Fyssher stood mute, and was therefore sentenced to the "peine forte et dure," appears from the clerical memorandum at the bill's head, "Stat mut' h'et iudiciu' pen' fort' et dur'." G. D. R., 30 June, 11 James I.

24 June, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night (about mid-night) of the said day, George Easton late of Clerkenwell co. Midd. tanner and William Gilbert late of Seavenock co. Kent yoman, with dogs, staves, nets and other instruments for hunting broke in the king's park, impaled for the keeping of deer, and commonly called Hide Parke, and there, without any right title or authority for doing so, hunted chased and killed "one male deare" worth forty shillings. Confessing the indictment, George Easton and William Gilbert were each of them sentenced to pay a fine of ten pounds, to be imprisoned for three months without mainpernors, and then to remain in prison till they should find good sureties for their good behaviour for seven years. G. S. P. R., Easter, 18 James I.

28 June, 11 James I.—Memorandum (in Latin) that at Session of the Peace, held at Hickeshall in St. Johnstreete co. Midd. on 28th June, 11 James I., before Sir William Waad knt., Sir Gervase Helwys knt. and Lieutenant of the Tower of London, Sir Lewis Lewkenor knt., Sir William Bowyer knt.; Sir Richard Wigmore knt., Sir Thomas Fowler knt., Sir Baptiste Hickes, knt., Sir William Smyth knt., Sir John Kaye knt., Henry Spyller esq., Nicholas Bestney esq., Ralph Hawtrey esq. and Mathew Smale esq., Justices for preserving the Peace &c. &c., the aforesaid William Smythe knt. J.P. on his own observation presented that the King's highway in the parish of Fulham co. Midd. leading from Fulham to and through Hammersmythe to Braynforde co. Midd. (ducens a Fulham predicta usque et trans quandam villam vocatam Hammersmythe in comitatu predicto vsque oppidum forale de Braynforde in comitatu predicto) is out of repair and in ruin by default of the inhabitants and parishioners of Fulham aforesaid, so that the King's lieges passing there with their carriages cannot pass by that way without great danger and difficulty &c. G. D. R., 30 June, 11 James I.

29 June, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Reynoldes late of Edmonton aforesaid spinster stole a woman's gown worth two shillings, a kirtle worth twelve pence, a hatt worth four pence, a pair of stockinges worth three pence, three aprons worth eight pence, and three collars called bands worth three pence, of the goods and chattels of George Thompson. At the bill's head this clerical memorandum, "Po' se cul' ad val' xid. ca nul' flag," —showing that on her arraignment Joan Reynoldes put herself 'Not Guilty,' was found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of eleven pence, had no chattels, and was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., 30 June, 11 James I.

5 July, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Aldersgate Streete in St. Botolph's near Aldersgate London co. Midd., Jane Bay lie late of Goldinglane co. Midd. spinster stole a towell worth eight pence, a handkerchief worth twelve pence, "duas quadras vocatas squares" worth twelve pence, two yards of bone-lace worth two shillings, one girdle and pinpillow worth ten pence, "unum capitale anglice one blacke wroughte quoife" worth eighteen pence, one napkin worth twelve pence, five ruffe-bands worth ten shillings and eight-pence, one ell and a quarter of flaxen cloth worth four shillings, two pieces of linen cloth called 'tyffenye and lawne' worth ten pence, a pair of needle-work cuffes worth twelve pence, one pearle and gold button worth six shillings, 'one sylver handle for a fanne' worth eight shillings and six-pence, of the goods and chattels of Sir William Welch knt. On her trial by jury, Jane Baylie was found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of fourpence halfpenny, and was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., . . . ., 11 James I.

7 July, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Grey's Inn Lane co. Midd. on the said day, William Buckingham late of the said lane locksmith stole a paire of silke garters with silver fringe worth five shillings and a paire of grogeran breeches worth twelve pence of the goods and chattels of George Lucyes esq. On his arraignment William Buckingham put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., . . ., 11 James. I.

8 July, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. on the said say, Michael Harris late of the said parish yoman stole foure scarlett curtaines worth eighty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Francis Knowles knt. On his arraignment, Michael Harris confessed the indictment, asked for the book, could not read it, and therefore was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . ., 11 James I.

10 July, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at the Charterhouse co. Midd. about the twelfth hour of the night of the aforesaid day, Paul Berry, William . . . . and John Hunter, all three late of the Charterhouse yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Most Noble Robert the Earl of Sussex, and stole therefrom "unam togam panni lanei anglice one tawney cotton gowne" worth twenty shillings, two pairs of sheets worth ten shillings, and a saddlecloth worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Earl of Sussex. Found 'Not Guilty' of burglary, but 'Guilty' of the stealing, all three thieves asked for the book. Reading like a clerk Paul Berry was branded and delivered. Unable to read William . . . . was sentenced to be hung. John Hunter was also sentenced to be hung; 'the book' being refused to him, because he had received the clerical benefit on a former occasion. G. D. R., . . . ., 11 James I.

25 July, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd. on the said day and on divers days before and afterwards, Dorothy Magicke late of the said parish spinster practised and exercised certain impious and devilish arts called witchcraftes inchauntments, charmes and sorceries upon and against Thomas Poole and Thomazina Heath, wife of Walter Heath, with the intention of killing the said Thomas and Thomazina (ea intencione ad prefatum Thomam Poole et Thomazinam Heath tunc et ibidem per diabolicas artes predictas interficiendos et occidendos contra formam statuti inde editi et provisi). The indictment says nothing of the effect of Dorothy Magicke's wicked practice against and upon Thomas and Thomazina. Found 'Guilty,' Dorothy Magicke was sentenced to be imprisoned or held by sure mainpernors for an entire year, and further "to be sett uppon the pillorye foure tymes in the yeare and there openly to confes her offence, and then to fynde sureties for her good behaviour herafter." G. D. R., 18 July, 12 James I.

2 August, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Grey's Inn Lane co. Midd. on the said day, Phillip Davis late of the said lane . . . . stole forty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Tylsley esq. On his arraignment Phillip Davis put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., . . . .,11 James I.

4 August, 11 James I.—Order made at Hickes Hall,—"Forasmuche as Joane Lea vppon her owne peticion exhibited in Courte hath confessed that she had a bastard child begot on her body by Thomas Bates: It is therefore ordered that she shalbe openly whipte at a Cartes tayle in St. John's Streete vpon Saturdaye next vntill her body be all bloodye" (et interim committitur=and in the meane time she is committed). S. P. Reg.

11 August, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Kensington co. Midd. in the night of the said day, William Smyth and Thomas Bacon alias Baker alias Mason alias Heminge Tom alias Bacon Tom, both late of Kensington aforesaid yomen, broke burglariously into the dwellinghouse of Sir Thomas Cope knt. (the same Sir Thomas and all his family being then there), and stole therefrom two silver flagons worth twenty-two pounds, one silver ewer in the forme of a cocke worth sixteen pounds, one silver salt worth five pounds, seaven silver spoones worth three pounds and fifteen shillings, three square silver saltes worth thirty shillings, two silver bowles worth three pounds, and a silver tankard worth eight pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Thomas Cope knt. Found 'Guilty,' William Smyth was sentenced to be hung. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' Thomas Bacon alias Baker &c. was acquitted. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 11 James I.

27 August, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Whitehall co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Mundaye, Thomas Williamson and Thomas Mason alias Baker alias Hemminge Thom alias Bacon Thom, all three late of St. Margaret's Westminster yomen, broke burglariously into the King's dwelling-house called Whitehall, and stole therefrom four curtaynes of crymson velvett lyned with damaske and laced with golde lace worth forty pounds, forty yards of gold lace worth ten pounds, six yards of golde fringe worth six pounds, five curtaynes of checkerd velvett lyned with Taffata worth twenty pounds, the whole toppe and vallance of a Bed of Cloth of Silver worth twenty pounds, another toppe and vallance of a Bed of Cloth of Silver worth twenty pounds, fyve curtaynes of carnation and white damaske silke with silver and silke buttons worth fifteen pounds, fifteen holland sheetes worth fifteen pounds and ten shillings, and three velvett covers for cushions of crimson velvett worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Lord King James at Whitehall. Thomas Mundaye and Thomas Williamson were at large. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Mason was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 11 James I.

30 September, 11 James I.—Order, made at Michaelmas G. S. P. (Westminster), touching knights and gentlemen refusing to keep watch.—Forasmuch as William Goodall constable of St. Martins-inthe-Feildes hath made complaint in this Court that diverse knightes and gentlemen beinge Inhabitantes there doe refuse to watche and warde accordinge to the Lawe, It is therefore ordered by the Court that the Constables and officers of the place aforesaid shall upon sight hereof repaire to the houses of the knightes and other gentlemen, requiring them by vertue hereof to watche and warde as they ought to doe or to returne their answere to the Justices next adjoyninge. S. P. Reg.

30 September, 11 James I.—Order, made at Michaelmas G. S. P. (Westminster, touching the City of London Pest-House in St. Giles'swithout-Cripplegate.—Complaint beinge now made that a straunge childe was loste within the gates and walls of the Pesthouse of London being in the parishe of St.-Giles-without-Cripplegate in the County of Midd., in which house one William Upton doth now inhabit and endevoureth to put the said child to be kept att the charge of the said parishe: Therefore forasmuch as it appeareth to the Court, that the Pesthouse is a thinge meerely exempt from the County of Midd. and is reserved for the particuler use of the City of London, and that the Countye hath noe government nor disposicion thereof, It is Ordered that the said Upton shall take care to free the said parishe of St. Gileswithout-Cripplegate of the said childe. S. P. Reg.

18 October, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Katherins co. Midd. on the said day, Anthony Loder, John Stuarte and Isaac Bacon, all three of St. Katherin's aforesaid yomen stole three rounde silver basons worth forty pounds, two silver ewers worth thirty pounds, tenn silver saltes worth sixty pounds and fourteen shillings, sixteene silver spoones worth eight pounds, two silver trencher-plates worth four pounds, three silver candlestickes (candelabra) worth fortyfive pounds and ten shillings, three silver dishes worth twenty-eight pounds, one guilt cuppe of assay worth nine pounds and ten shillings, and one silver boule worth four pounds and sixteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Thomas Earl of Suffolk. John Stuarte was at large. Acknowledging the indictment on 30 March, 12 Jas. I., Anthony Loder asked for the book, could not read it and therefore was sentenced to be hung. Found 'Guilty,' Isaac Bacon was also sentenced to be hung, there being evidence of a burglary committed by him in Essex. G. D. R., 2 Dec, 11 James I.

4 November, 11 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of William Wright of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields tombemaker, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said William Wright's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer &c. "for annoyeing the streate nere Charing Crosse with loading of cartes turning the Judges and all other passengers into the Channell." G. D. R., 2 Dec, 11 James I.

13 December, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Chiswicke co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Poole late of Chiswicke yoman, broke burglariously into the house of Sir Horace Veere knt. and stole therefrom a silver dishe worth ten pounds, a silver spoon worth eight shillings, three carpets worth three pounds, a green woollen carpet worth ten shillings, a sand-coloured woollen-cloth cloak worth three pounds, a sword worth twenty shillings, another sword worth twenty shillings, two diaper table-towells worth ten shillings, and a dozen linen-cloth napkins, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Horace Veere knt. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' Thomas Poole was acquitted. G. D. R., 12 Jan., 11 James I.

16 December, 11 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Christopher Merik esq. J.P., of Nicholas Moorecoile of Norcotte co. Midd. carpenter and William Smythe of Norwoode co. Midd. weaver, in the sum of five pounds each; For the appearance of Joan Jenkins, wife of Alexander Jenkins of Norwoode laborer, at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., to answer "to all things objected against her on the parte and behalfe of Sir William Reade knighte for lopping downe of his trees in Osterley Parke."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of Joys Millet of Norwoode co. Midd. spinster, at the next Session of the Peace, to answer for lopping and breaking down Sir William Reade's trees in Osterley Park. G. D. R., 12 Jan., 11 James I.

27 December, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Charterhouselane co. Midd. on the said day, John Butterworthe late of the said lane yoman stole a greene veluett pulpitt clothe worth twenty shillings, a Bible worth five shillings and ten yardes of greene fringe worth thirteen shillings and eightpence, of the goods and chattels of the parishioners "Sancte Fidei subter ecclesiam cathedralem divini Pauli London," being at Charterhouselane in the custody of the wardens of the parishchurch of the said parish. At the bill's foot this memorandum, "Triat' in London quia fuit sacrilegium ibidem et per opinionem Curie habere beneficium clericale pro bonis illatis in com. Midd."=Tried in London because the sacrilege was there, and by the opinion of the Court to have benefit of clergy for goods brought into the County of Middlesex. G. D. R., 12 Jan., 11 James I.