Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1614

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

94-107

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1614', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 94-107. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65990 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Contents

1614

5 January, 11 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of Thomas Bignell of Kensington co. Midd. yoman, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said Thomas Bignell's appearance at the next Session, "to prefer an indictment and give evidence against Edward Sommer for breaking the Cage of Kensington and holping a woman to scape, that was ther kept by the Constable being charged with felony." G. D. R., 12 Jan., 11 James I.

11 January, 11 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of eleven butchers of Feilde Lane co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the same butchers at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd., "to answere their vttering and putting their meate to sale openly vppon the Sabboathe daye."—Also the Bill of the Recognizances, taken on 9 Jan., 11 Jas. I., before the same Justice of the Peace, of ten butchers of Smithfeild Barrs co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For their appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer for the same offence of putting their meat to sale openly on the Sabboathe Day. G. D. R., 12 Jan., 11 James I.

12 January, 11 James I.—"Forasmuch as Alice James hath openlye in Court charged Sir William Waad (sic) that he should slubber up the matter of witchcrafte touchinge Hunte and his wife, It is ordered that shee shall presently aske Sir William Waade (sic) forgivenes, and shall bringe certificate under his hand to the next Sessions. The said Alice James hath acknowledged her faulte in Courte and is sorrye for it. Shee is to be bounde to her good behaviour if Sir William Waad (sic) desire it." G. D. Reg.

28 February, 11 James I.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of Robert Kilpatrick there lying dead and slain; With Verdict that, on the 26th inst. between 5 and 6 p.m. the said Robert Kilpatrick and a certain John Jemison late of the aforesaid parish yoman were drinking together at a tavern called the Princes Armesin St. Martin's Lane in the said parish, when they quarrelled and exchanged words of insult, whereupon John Jemison went from the tavern and from Robert Kilpatrick's company in the direction of Charing Crosse, whither he was followed quickly by the said Robert who, with his sword drawn from its scabberd, challenged John Jemison to fight by calling loudly to him 'Turn thy selfe, slave,' upon which the said John turned and drew his sword; and That, in the fray thus forced upon him, John Jemison with his sword gave the said Robert Kilpatrick a wound in the left side of his belly, of which wound he died on the following day.—A memorandum on the Coroner's writ, which was used as the bill of indictment for manslaughter, shows that John Jemison was found 'Guilty,' had no chattels, asked for the book and could not read it, whereupon he was reprieved without judgment. G. D. R., 6 May, 12 James I.

1 March, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Martinin-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, John Dicke and Rouland Vaughan, both late of the said parish yomen, broke burglariously into King James's dwelling-house at Whitehall, and stole therefrom one collar of gould sett with pearles and diamonds worth three hundred pounds, and a silver warminge panne worth five pounds, and a silver candlestick worth five pounds, and "unum Stationale argenti anglice one silver standishe" worth four pounds, and divers pieces of linen cloth worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Lewis Duke [of] Lenax. At the bill's head, over the name of each burglar this clerical memorandum, "Cogn' Ss. r' pr' pt. judiciu' "=Cognoscit, Suspendatur, Retro prehensus post judicium=He confesses; Let him be hung; Reprieved after judgment. G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

4 March, 11 James I.—True Bill that, at Hampsteed co. Midd. on the said day, William Hunt of the said parish yoman and his wife Joan Hunt at the instigation of the devil practised and exercised certain impious and diabolical arts, called witchcraftes inchantments charmes and sorceries, upon and against a certain Richard Parrett, so that he languished and wasted from the said 4th of March to the 29th of the same month, and still remained greatly consumed and injured by the same wicked practice. On their arraignment, William and Joan put themselves 'Not Guilty' and were acquitted. G. D. R., 6 May, 12 James I.

5 March, 11 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Johnson knt., of Robert Stanton sailor and Thomas Rutter barberchirurgian, both of Radcliffe co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and of John Kempe of . . . . gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said gentleman's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, he being so "bound over for beinge founde in a house of incontinencie with one Mary Harrison a woman of verie lewd conversation." G. D. R., . . . .,12 James I.

7 March, 11 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of William Shelton of Islington co. Midd. inholder, in the sum of twenty pounds, and Robert Pierson of Islington aforesaid inholder, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Robert Pierson's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer "for brewing beere or ale in his owne house of extraordinary strength above the rate of viiis. the barrell, and for exercising the misterie of a Brewer having never been an apprentice according to the law."—Also on the same file ten other sets of Recognizances, for the appearance at the next Session of Peace for the county, of ten other persons charged with brewing in their own houses malt-liquor of extraordinary strength, and with exercising the brewer's mystery and trade without having been educated thereto. G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

11 March, 11 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Saunderson esq. J.P., of Edward Ingram locksmith and John Potter masterclockmaker, both of St. Clements Danes, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and John Potter (servant of the previously mentioned John Potter) of the same parish journeyman or apprentice clockmaker, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said servant's appearance at the next Session of the Peace and in the mean time for his good behaviour, he being "charged to be one of the unlawfull assembly of the apprentizes that pulled down Joane Leak's howse in Shorediche."—Also, six other sets of similar Recognizances, for the appearance before the Justices at their next Session, of divers other persons charged with taking part in this apprentices' riot. G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

12 March, 11 James I.—Recognizances, taken before John Barne esq. J.P., of Walter Whithe and Robert Chiltern, both of Henden co. Midd. labourers, in the sum of ten pounds each; For their appearance at the next Session of the Peace for the county, to answer to the rather curious charge, set forth at the bill's foot in these terms,—"The Condicion of this Recognizance is such, That Whereas the abovebounden Walter Whithe and Robert Chiltern are both charged by Elizabeth Wilkinson to be the reputed father of a woman-childe which the said Elizabeth was lately delyuered of in the parishe of Henden in the said County of Midd., which she vpon her examininge at sundry tymes doth in such sort charge both of them, that as she sayth shee cannot cleere either of them, but that the one of them may as well be the trewe father of the childe as the other, and will not directly charge one but tother also. If therefore the said Walter Whithe and Robert Chiltern make theire personall appearaunce at the next Sessions of the Peace to be holden in the county aforesaid then and there before His Majesties Justices to be ordered for the dischardginge the said parishe of Henden of the said childe and for the releiving and keepinge of the same, Then this Recognizaunce to be voyde and of noe effect, or els yt to stand in full force and power.—J. Barne." G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

8 April, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the same day, Thomas Bonde alias Whitehead, John Ryder, Thomas Thompson, Thomas Smye alias Bleetes alias Bootes, Richard Harris and Thomas Davies, all late of the aforesaid parish yomen, broke into the dwellinghouse of Sir William Smyth knt., and stole therefrom a black woollen-cloth cloak worth three pounds, a rapier with a paire of hangers worth thirty shillings, three carpets worth thirty shillings, a bench clothe guarded with velvet worth . . . . shillings, a pewter bason worth two shillings and sixpence, and a paire of shoes with black roses laced with black lace, worth four shillings, of the goods and chattels Qf the late Sir William Smyth knt. Clerical memoranda over the names of the culprits show that on their arraignment Thomas Bonde and John Ryder stood mute and were sentenced to the peine forte et dure; and Thomas Thompson was found 'Guilty' and sentenced to be hung. No memoranda touching the other culprits. G. D. R., 6 May, 12 James I.

13 April, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's in West minster co. Midd. in the night of the said day, William Wyatt late of the said parish glover broke burglariously into the dwellinghouse of Sir Richard Worsley knt. and baronett, and stole therefrom a black woollen-cloth cloak lyned with velvett worth five pounds, a grograyne silk cloak worth three pounds, and a rapier with silver hangers worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Richard Worsley knt. and baronet. Found 'Guilty,' William Wyatt was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 6 May, 12 James I.

16 April, 12 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of Thomas Brett gardiner and James Clemens taylor, both of Clarkenwell co. Midd., in the sum of thirty pounds each, for the appearance of Prudence Prouse late of the same place spinster at the next Gaol Delivery, she being "suspected to be privie to the melting downe of a peece of plate that was stolen forth of the house of Wm. Cooke.'' G. D. R., 6 May, 12 James I.

17 April, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Wapping in the parish of Whitechappell co. Midd on the said day, John Elgar late of Wapping aforesaid maryner assaulted Richard Wattes, and slew him by giving him "in et super ventrem ipsius Ricardi Wattes videlicet prope testiculos anglice the coddes" with a knife a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly. Found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, John Elgar asked for the book, read it like a clerk, and was delivered after being branded. G. D. R., 6 May, 12 James I.

1 May, 12 James I.—Information by Bartholomew Benson against Lawrence Penne late of Whitechappell co. Midd. yoman, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on 1 May, 12 James I., nor during the eleven months then next following. G. S. P. R., Easter, 13 James I.

2 May, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Stanes co. Midd. on the said day, Ursula Smith and Agnes Wilde, both late of the aforesaid parish spinsters, stole a paire of flaxen sheetes worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Leonard Redworth. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of ten pence, both women were sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., 6 May, 12 James I.

. . . June, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Shordiche co. Midd. on some day (no longer discoverable from the decayed writ) of the aforesaid month, Nicholas Stanes alias Tayne late of the said parish yoman stole a bright bay gelding worth ten pounds, and a "cloudy grey" gelding with one eye worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir Edward Wylde knt. On his arraignment, Nicholas Stanes put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., 18 July, 12 James I.

24 June, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Wappinge co. Midd. on the said day Unica Balme late of Wappinge aforesaid stole "unam patinam argenti anglice a silver plate" worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Gilbert Earl of Shrewsbury. When the bill was found, Unica Balme was at large. G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

24 June, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Griffen and Francis Nethercott, both late of the said parish yomen, unlawfully took and carried away (illicite ceperunt et asportaverunt) seven pieces of iron called "iron barres" worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Ockolde. Found 'Guilty,' John Griffen and Francis Nethercott were each fined in the sum of three shillings and four pence. G. D. R., 18 July, 12 James I.

25 June, 12 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Thomas Saunderson esq. J.P., of William Cock of Lymehouse co. Midd. . . . ., in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said William Cock's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for the said county, "to give in evidence against Thomas Seeley for giving poyson to his mother." G. D. R., 18 July, 12 James I.

13 July, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. John's Streete co. Midd. on the said day, Dominic Lopus of the said street yoman assaulted John Bramstone, striking and wounding him, when he was executing his office of headburrow. Confessing the indictment, Dominic Lopus was fined three pounds three shillings and eight-pence, and was further adjudged "to be sett in the Stockes with a paper one his heade in the place where the offence was done, and from thence to be remanded to prison for vi moneths, and not to be discharged tyll he hath founde foure suretyes subsidye men to be bounde for his good behaviour." G. D. R., 18 July, 12 James I.

16 July, 12 James I.—Memorandum respecting the misdemeanors of ''John Noye of Cheesewicke gentleman brought in by warrant for abusinge Sir William Smith, when he was brought before him for committing a verye greate outrage yesterdaye beinge Sondaye in the afternoone att Hamersmith and beating Richarde Bushe verye soare vppon the heade and other partes of his bodye. Jur' in Cur' doth affirme itt and Sir William Smith askinge suretyes of him for the peace or else was to be comitted, the said Noye in peremptorye manner asked him 'Are you a Justice?' holdinge his sworde in his hande." With Order for the said John Noye to "put in sureties" for his good behaviour and his appearance at the next Session of the Peace. S. P. Reg.

6 August, 12 James I.—True Bill that, in the highway at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, James Billin alias Billingsley, Thomas Billin alias Holman alias Smythe, George Billen alias Hunte alias Billingsley alias Bankes, all three late of London yomen, assaulted a certain Susan Witley, natural daughter of Thomas Witley deceased, she then being of the age of fourteen years, and possessed for eight years of divers messuages in Eastsmythfelde of the yearly value of fifty pounds, and also possessed of one hundred pounds in numbered moneys; and That having assaulted the said Susan Witley, the aforesaid James, Thomas and George feloniously took and carried her away; and further That, on the day next following, to wit on the 7th of August, 12 James I., The aforenamed named James Billin alias Billingsley took the same Susan for his wife in the parish-church of Munnings-end co. Essex, though at the time of her caption and abduction he neither claimed nor was able to claim the same Susan as his ward. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 12 James I.

11 August, 12 James I.—True Bill that, in the night of the said day, Robert Chapman, Thomas Jones and John Waterman, all late of London yomen, broke burglariously into the dwellinghouse of the Lord King James called Whitehall co. Midd., and stole therefrom sixe needle-worke cushions worth eighteen pounds, sixe needle-worke covers for stooles worth eight pounds, three needle-worke covers for chaires worth sixe pounds, and forty pounds' weight of silke worth twenty pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir Thomas Walsingham knt. Found 'Guilty,' Robert Chapman and Thomas Jones were sentenced to be hung; John Waterman was "at large." G. D. R., 7 Oct., 12 James I.

15 August, 12 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of David Allen of Clarkenwell co. Midd. silversmith, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said David's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to give evidence against Adam Gladstones in a case of felony. G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

30 August, 12 James I.—Memoranda and Order respecting a misused maid-servant.—"John Ball of St. Clementes Danes and Elizabeth his wife brought to this Courte touchinge the misusinge of Johanne Akerley their servante and for not payinge iii li. xvs. iiijd. to Richard Gamon a butcher without Temple Barre which she oweth for meate she hath fetch att severall times by her Master's appointment,—It appeareth to this Courte that the saide John Ball and his wife hath given the saide Johan Akerley undue correccion at seuerall times as appeareth vpon othe and hath throwen a naked kniffe att her therefore she is to bee discharged out of their service and for the moneye due to the butcher it is lefte to the Comon Lawe. The said Mr. Ball doth promise to deliuer the said Johane her clothes.—Forasmuch as itt appeareth vnto this Courte vpon othe that the saide John Ball hath oftentimes beaten and misused Johan Akerley his servant with undue correccion and hath likewise violently throwen a naked kniffe att her with intente to doe her harme, Itt is therefore ordered by the Courte that the said Johan Akerley shalbe forthwith discharged out of the service of her saide Master and shall deliuer her all her clothes vpon the sight of this order." S. P. R.

10 September, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Marybone co. Midd. and divers other places in the same county on the said 10th of September and at divers times before and alter the same day, John Mathewes late of London laborer was "omnivagus anglice a Roague incorrigibilis et periculosus qui non vult reformari de vago et vagabundo more sue vite." Found 'Guilty,' John Mathewes was branded with the letter R: the clerical memorandum at the head of the bill running thus—"Po' se cul' Crem' cum Ira R." G. D. R, 7 Oct., 12 James I.

15 September, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. in the night of the said day, William Dickson late of Whitechappel yoman and his wife Katherine Dickson broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Thomas Earl Arundell (John Powell gentleman being then in the said house), and stole therefrom two golde ringes worth nine pounds, a carnation silke and silver purse worth twelve pence, and one hundred and forty-four pounds in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of a certain Margaret Smyth, then being in the said house. On their arraignment, William and Katherine Dickson put themselves 'Not Guilty' and were acquitted. G. D. R., . . . ., James I.

22 September, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Golding Lane co. Midd. on the said day, Charles Flood, late of the said lane gentleman, maliciously assaulted and feloniously killed and murdered a female infant, by taking her and throwing her on the ground, so that she then and there died instantly. On his arraignment Charles Flood put himself 'Not Guilty,' and was acquitted, it being found by the Jury that the infant died by the visitation of God. G. D. R., 7 Oct., 12 James I.

27 September, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at 'le Stronde' co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Peter Plesington late of the Strond aforesaid broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Sir Thomas Parry knt., and stole therefrom a cloak worth forty shillings, a sword worth five shillings, and a pewter pott worth four shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Thomas Parry. Found 'Guilty,' Peter Plesington was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

1 October, 12 James I.—True Bill against John Wade yoman, Dorothy Chappell spinster, Grace Finche spinster, Ambrose Burch yoman, George Kenney yoman, Susan Greene spinster, Barbara Piersey spinster, Joan Smyth spinster. Ambrose Willis yoman, and Mary Elliott spinster, all ten late of St. Andrew's in Holborne; Anne Laune spinster and Mary Grower widow, both late of St. James's in-Clerkenwell; Jane Wright, wife of John Wright late of St. Leonard's-in-Shoredich yoman; Anne Rogers widow, Anne Rogers spinster, and Mary Pearche, all three late of St. Sepulchre's London co. Midd.,—for not going to church, chapel, or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said 1st of October, nor at any time during the two months then next following. G. D. R., . . . ., James I.

6 October, 12 James I.—Ordered (at Michaelmas S. P., Westminster) that Francis Darcye knt. J.P., with twenty Justices of the Peace for Midd., be a Committee to enquire respecting the validity and force of the Letters Patent, on which the citizens of London base their claim to a right and interest in Bridewell Hospital; the said Order being made "vpon serious Consideracion had by His Majesties Justices nowe presente att this Sessions that no one thinge was holden to be so requisite for the governemente of this Countye which hath beene hitherto omitted by them by reason of ye expectacion that they had to have a Composicion from the Cittye of London for theire pretended righte and interest in and to the Hospitall of Brydewell of the foundacion of Kinge Edward the Sixthe late Kinge of England, as by the Letters Patent of the sayd Kinge appeareth." S. P. Reg.

6 October, 12 James I.—Memorandum (drawn in Latin), That on the said day Bartholomew Benson came before Sirs John Bennett, Richard Wigmore, Thomas Fowler, William Smyth, Robert Johnson, John Brett, and Ferdinand Heyborn, knts., and John Welde, Richard Brownlowe, Nycholas Collyn, Valcntyne Saunders, Edward Forsett, Henry Spiller, Edward Dowbleday and Francis Michell esquires, Justices for preserving the Peace in the county of Middlesex &c., assembled at General Session of the Peace held at Westminster on Thursday next after the Feast of St. Michael 12 James I., and gave information, that at Whitechappell co. Midd. on 1 August of the said year a certain Stephen Thompson, late of Whitechappell aforesaid, built and erected eleven cottages for habitation, without assigning and laying to each or any-one of the same cottages, four acres of the ground next adjoining thereto, to be continually 'occupied and manured' so long as the same cottages should be inhabited, against the form of a certain statute of 31 Elizabeth, and further gave information that he, the same informer —Bartholomew Benson, was ready and willing to prove that, in neglect and defiance of the same statute, the said Stephen Thompson had so neglected to assign and lay four acres of ground to each or any of the same cottages, whereby there accrued to the said informer the sum of 110£., to wit 10£. for each cottage, to be had and exacted of the said Stephen Thompson, by virtue of the same statute.— Also, on the same file, other informations laid by the same informer, against divers persons, for following and practising crafts and occupations without having been duly educated therein, or for following and practising them in unlawful ways. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 12 James I.

8 October, 12 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of . . . . Popleman esq. and James Patray gentleman, both of Westminster, in the sum of one hundred pounds each, for the personal appearance of Jane Dromond at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, she being "bound over to answer the complaint of the Earle of Argile." G. D. R., . . . ., James I.

21 October, 12 James I.—Ordered, at S. P. held on the said day at Hickes Hall, "that a Rate and Taxacion for the levyinge and raysinge of the somme of 2000 li. shold be ymposed and rated and taxed upon the whole Countye of Middlesex" (for the buyinge, buildinge and finishinge of a House of Correccion for the say'd countye) in manner and forme followinge, viz.

(1) The Hundred of Osulston.

£
St. Margaret's in Westminster60
St. Saviors and St. Clementes Danes36
St. Martyns-in-the-Fieldes48
The Dutchey of Lancaster48
Chancery Lane and Highe Holborne48
Saffron Hill and Eelye Rentes
St. Giles-in-the-Fieldes36
Paddington8
Marybone6
Chelsey6
Kentishtowne20
Kensington20
Fulham20
Hammersmithe20
Eelinge25
Cheswicke16
Acton16
Willesdon30
Hampsteade12
St. Katherin's48
Estsmithfeild40
Whitechappell40
Hackney60
Shorditche12
Hoxton12
Hollowellstreete12
Nortonfolgate6
Stepney70
Stratfordbowe36
Bromeley12
Finnsburye et Wenlaxbarne36
St. Johnstreete25
Clerkenwell25
Islington25
Fynchley25
Hornsey20
Fryarne Barnett20
Stoke Newington20

(2) The Hundred of Edmonton.

£
Edmonton40
Tottenham30
Southmyms20
Hadley6
Enfielde40

(3) The Hundred of Gore.

£
Harrowe and Pynnor80
Edgware8
Stanmur Magna10
Stanmor Parva10
Kingsburye12
Hendon50

(4) The Hundred of Elthorne.

£
Newbraineforde20
Hanwell12
Greeneforde and Perryvall24
Northall24
Southall alias Norwoode24
Heyes40
Cranford6
Harlington36
Woxbridge20
Hillingdon45
Rislippe50
Harfeld15
Ickenham12
Harmondesworthe28
Cowley10
West Drayton20

(5) The Hundred of Spelthorne.

£
Stanes40
Stanwell30
Laleham15
Shepperton18
Litleton18
Ashforde18
Sonburye22
Hampton22
Tuddington12
Hanworthe10
Feltham18
East Bedfonte18

(6) The Hundred of Istleworth.

£
Istleworth18
Twickenham18
Heston40
In all2043£. (?2028£)

Followed by the appointment of Sir George Coppyn, William Smythe, Baptiste Hicks knts., and Edmond Dobleday and Francis Michell, esqs., Justices of the Peace, to act as collectors of the several sums of money, promised by divers well affected persons, by way of voluntary contribution towards the charges of building the said House of Correction. S. P. Reg.

25 October, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Tottenham co. Midd. on the said day, John Howell late of the said parish yoman stole nine geese worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of a certain unknown man. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of ten pence, John Howell had no chattels for forfeiture, and was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., . . . ., James I.

3 November, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's-inShordiche co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Garforthe cutler and Stephen Randoll labourer, both late of St. Bride's parish in the suburbs of the city of London, and George Sawderye late of St. James's Clerkenwell laborer, maliciously cut a leaden water-conduite worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Mayor and Community of the city of London. Found 'Guilty,' the three culprits were each fined forty shillings, and were further adjudged "To be sett in the Stockes openly three dayes togeither neare vnto Bunne Hill beinge the place where the offence was done with papers on their heades, and afterwardes to be severally whipte from the gaole of Newgate to Bridewell, there to be kepte at hard labour." G. D. R. . . . . James I.

4 November, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Charterhouse Lane co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Tems and John Cuminges, both late of the said lane yomen, stole forty-six pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Sir Edmond Varney knt.—On their arraignment, Thomas Terns and John Cuminges put themselves 'Not Guilty' and were acquitted. G. D. R., . . . ., 12 James I.

4 November, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Hamptonwicke co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Hooke late of Hamptonwicke aforesaid husbandman stole three sackes worth twelve pence, and two bushels of wheate worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of George Cole. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of ten pence, Henry Hooke had no chattels for forfeiture, and was sentenced to be whipt. G. D R., . . . ., James I.

17 November, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster on the said day, Elizabeth Bedhouse late of the said parish spinster stole a greene rugge worth ten shillings, four sea-green curtens worth ten shillings, "novem indusia anglice shirtes ad valenciam octodecim librarum (sic)," two smockes worth ten shillings, three falling bandes worth fifty shillings (tria collaria anglice three falling bandes ad valenciam quinquaginta solidorum), a laced ruffed band worth twenty shillings, two wrought wastcoates worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Millicent Bray spinster. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of twelve pence, Elizabeth Bedhouse had no chattels for forfeiture, and was sentenced to be whipt; the clerical memorandum at the bill's head being "Po' se cul' ad xid. ca' nul' flag'." G. D. R., . . . ., James I.

3 December, 12 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir William Waad knt. and nine other Justices of the Peace at Hickes Hall, of Stephen Hare, son of John Hare of St. Katherin's yoman, in the sum of forty pounds, "for woundinge Agnes the wief of Thomas Lea with the ribb-bone of an oxe, who is in danger of hir lief, and for throwing a ball of wild fyer at hir." S. P. Reg.

3 December, 12 James I.—Recognizance, taken at Hickes Hall before Sir William Waad knt. J.P. and nine other Justices of the Peace, of Michael Shorditche of Ickenham gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the good behaviour of the said Michael Shorditche, brought before the same Justices, to answer "for speakinge diuers unfitt and mutynous speeches touching a rate made by His Majestyes Justices of Peace for the making of a House of Correction, namely, that "the Countye would withstand the rate." S. P. Reg.

3 December, 12 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir William Waad knt. and nine other Justices of the Peace at Hickes Hall, of Roger Bedhouse of Westminster yoman in the sum of four hundred pounds, and of William Price of Lincoln's Inn gentleman and Gerard Pytham of the Newfishestreet in St. Margaret's in Westminster, in the sum of two hundred pounds each; for the said Roger Bedhouse's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer for wounding Henry Arnett and Michael Annond (?).—Also, Recognizances, taken before the same Justices of the Peace at the same place and time, of Thomas Price of Greenewich co. Kent gentleman, in the sum of four hundred pounds, and of William Clarke of Stretham co. Surrey gentleman and Edward Dendye of St. Martins-in-the-Fields gentleman, in the sum of two hundred pounds each; For the appearance of the said Thomas Price at the next Session of the Peace, to answer for his part in the same matter. S. P. Reg.

12 December, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Capell late of the said parish spinster assaulted Abigail Scowler, a female infant aged two years, by lifting up her clothes till she was naked from the feet to the shoulders, and exposing her thus stript to the heat of a sea-coal fire, till she was so scorched and burnt by the same fire on her buttocks and thighs, that she died thereof on the 3rd day of January next following. On her arraignment Anne Capell put herself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., . . . .,12 James I.

20 December, 12 James I.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said day, nor at any time during the three months then next following, against Anne Davison wife of Richard Davison tailor, John Damme alias Adam cutler, his wife Ellen Damme alias Adam, William Champney cutler, Fardinando Emerson cutler, his wife Joan Emerson, John Warden . . . ., Anne Hutchinson widow, Isabella wife of George Moody taylor, William Mathewes cutler, his wife Ellen Mathewes, Susan wife of Edwin Saul gentleman, William Woodfall taylor, his wife Jane Woodfall, William Cooke gentleman, his wife Elizabeth Cooke, Ellen Cambridge spinster, Joan Davies spinster, Thomas Holliday gentleman, his wife Frances Holliday, John Crayford gentleman, his wife Martha Crayford, Mary Kitch widow, her daughter Mary Kitch, Mary wife of William Cobb gentleman, Anne Dowse widow, William Besicke shoomaker, his wife Mary Besicke, Ambrose Besicke shoomaker, George Besicke shoomaker, Jane wife of Thomas Strange taylor, Mary Cleere widow, Susan Banninge spinster, John Coe stationer, his wife Ellen Coe, Margaret Morley spinster, John Knight scrivenor, his son John Knight, Thomas Howard cobler, and his wife Mary Howard, all forty late of St. Andrew's in Holborn co. Midd.; Christabel wife of Thomas Bateman imbroderer, Joan wife of Richard Gresham carpenter, Margaret wife of Thurstain Feilde shoomaker and John Netlam shoomaker, all four late of Chicklane co. Midd.; Thomas Sleepe yoman, his wife Christian Sleepe, Helen Vaughan spinster, Lady Dorcas James wife of Sir Henry James knt., their daughters Mary and Anne James, Elizabeth Wade spinster, Mary Lunne widow, Tobias Hinderson yoman, his wife Mary Hinderson, Frances Clarke wife of Sir William Clarke knt., Helen Luellen spinster, Elizabeth Barnesley spinster, John Robinson taylor, his wife Agnes Robinson, Mary Gower spinster, Elizabeth Reynolds spinster, Joan Derry spinster, Thomas Gage esq., Edward Gage esq., Barbara Gage spinster, Margaret Talbott spinster, Katherine Cash alias Hutchinson spinster, Jane wife of Christofer Beeston yoman, William Allen yoman, Peter Smyth printer, John Higgins laborer, all twenty-seven late of St. James's-at-Clerkenwell; Lady . . . . Harris spinster, Alice Nashe widow, both late of St. Johnstreete; Robert Gutteris gentleman, his wife Margaret Gutteris, and Christian Banckes spinster, all three late of Charterhouselane co. Midd. G. D. R., 29 March, 13 James I.