Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1615

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

107-119

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1615', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 107-119. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65991 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1615

13 January, 12 James I.—Order touching Foot-Ball.—"Whereas greate disorders and tumults doe often arise and happen within the streetes and lanes neere adjoyninge to ye Cittye of London by playinge at the foote-ball: It is now Ordered that henceforthe" all Constables "doe from tyme to tyme represse and restrayne all manner of Footeball-playe in the lanes and streetes adjoyninge to the Cittye of London." S. P. Reg.

13 January, 12 James I.—Ordered, that Constables henceforth take care that "no butcher poulter or other person whatsoever do sell or utter or suffer to be sold or uttered any manner of the fleshe victuall or other commoditye (other than Inkeepers cookes and victuallers) onely for necessarye foode upon the Sabaothe Daye"; the order being made in consideration that "greate abuse is committed within the partes adjacent to the Cittye of London in this Countye of Midd. by poulters butchers and other persons that do keepe open shambles and sell theire wares and commodities upon the Sabothe daye to the greate dishonour of Almightie God and the slaunder of religion and government." S. P. Reg.

17 January, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Fynchley co. Midd on the said day, Elizabeth Rutter late of Fynchley aforesaid widow practised certain wicked detestable and devilish arts, called witchcraftes inchauntmentes charmes and sorceries, upon and against a certain Priscella Fielde daughter of James Fielde, so that the said Priscella languished from the said 17th of January till the 18th of the same month, on which last-named day she died of the said arts, being in this way murdered by the said Priscella. Putting herself 'Not Guilty,' Priscella was found 'Guilty,' had no chattels and was sentenced to be hung.—Also, on the same file, three other True Bills against the same Elizabeth Rutter for practising witchcraft at Fynchley—to wit, (1) for practising witchcrafts upon and against William Lyon the son of John Lyon on 1 November, 12 James I., so that he languished thereof from that day even to the date of the present inquisition and still so languishes; (2) for practising witchcrafts on the 30th January, 12 James I., upon and against Frances Fielde, daughter of the above-mentioned James Fielde, so as to kill and murder her on the 31st day of the same month; and (3) for practising the same hateful arts on 18 February, 12 James I. upon and against John Fielde, son of the same aforementioned James Field, so as to kill and murder him on the 1st of March, then next following. Memor nda on each of these three indictments that Elizabeth Rutter was found 'Guilty' and sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 29 March, 13 James I.

19 February, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Hollowell Street co. Midd. about 12 o'clock in the night of the said day, Henry Elliott yoman, his wife Emma Elliott, and Thomas Pierson yoman, all three late of the aforesaid street broke burglariously into the dwellinghouse of Cuthbert Burbage gentleman, and stole therefrom a French russettcoloured cloake worth sixty shillings, another russett cloake worth forty shillings, and another cloake "color Daroye" worth twenty shillings, and a green saye apron worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Cuthbert Burbage gentleman.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same three culprits, for breaking burglariously at the same aforementioned hour of the same night of 19th February, 12 James I., into the dwelling-house of Richard Burbage gentleman in Hollowell Street aforesaid, and stole therefrom "a darinxe carpett" worth six shillings and eight pence, a fowlinge peece worth twenty-four shillings, forty peeces of pewter worth twenty shillings, three holland aprons worth eight shillings, a smocke worth four shillings, eleven fallinge bands worth twenty-five shillings, seven cuffes worth four shillings, a fallinge band laced worth five shillings, three laced cuffes worth five shillings, a handkercheife worth twelve shillings, three other handkercheifes worth seven shillings, two cambricke headbands and biggens worth ten shillings, five cross cloaths worth seven shillings, five children's aprons worth eight shillings, three women's bands worth eighteen shillings, two laced handkercheifes worth six shillings, two crossclothes worth twelvepence, "duo alia capitalia vocata a Call and a Quoife" worth two shillings, one "diaber starchinge clothe" worth four pence, and divers other parcels of linen worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Richard Burbage gentleman. On his arraignment, Henry Ellyott stood mute and was sentenced to the "peine forte at dure." Emma Ellyott put herself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. Found ' Not Guilty' of the burglary but 'Guilty' of felony, Thomas Pierson received benefit of clergy and was delivered after being branded. G. D. R., 29 March, 13 James I.

18 March, 12 James I.—True Bill that, at Cowcrosse co. Midd. on the said day, Henry Pyke late of Cowcrosse aforesaid yoman, stole six-and-twenty books called "gramers" worth twenty-four shillings, ten books called "ten virgills" worth ten shillings, twenty-four books called "Esop's Fables" worth eight shillings, one book called "Castilians Dialogues" worth four pence, three books called "The Practise of Piety" worth five shillings, five books called "Delightes wth closett" worth two shillings and six pence, a book called "A Historie Bible" worth eight shillings, three books called "Sutten on the Sacramente" worth two shillings and sixpence, and two other books called "To Learn to live" worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Drawater. On the bill a memorandum that Henry Pyke was at large. G. D. R., 29 March, 13 James I.

. . . .,12 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-le-Strond alias Savoy co. Midd. in the night of a day no longer discoverable from the decayed bill, Thomas Pooley alias Trunckes, late of St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. yoman, burglariously broke into the dwelling-house of the Most Noble George Lord Carewe, and stole therefrom two petticoates worth twenty shillings, two aprons worth five shillings, one wastcoate worth three shillings, a ruffe-band worth five shillings, two crosscloths worth eighteen shillings, "et vnam velam anglice one greene scarffe" worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of Dorothy Baker, then being in the house of the said George Lord Carewe. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Pooley alias Trunckes was sentenced to be hung; but was reprieved after judgment. G. D. R., . . . .,12 James I.

25 March, 13 James I.—True Bill against John Dam alias Adam yoman, his wife Helen Dam alias Adam, William Champney yoman, Joan wife of Christofer Emerson cutler, Isabella wife of George Moodye taylor, his servant Hanna Smythe, William Mathewes cutler, his wife Helen Mathewes, Susan wife of Edwin Sawle gentleman, Magdalen wife of John Blake taylor, his servant Sara Smyth, William Woodfall taylor, his wife Jane Woodfall, William Cooke gentleman, his wife Margaret Cooke, . . . . Hart gentleman, . . . . wife of [Richard] Haskins gentleman, Mary wife of William Cobbe gentleman, Anne Dowse widow, William Beswicke shoemaker, his wife Mary Beswicke, and his servants Ambrose Burche and George Kenney, Susan wife of Thomas Strange taylor, Mary Sincleare widow, her servant Susan Banninge, Margaret Morley spinster, her servant Alice Baylief, John Knight scryvenor, his wife Joan Knight and his son John Knight and his servant Richard . . . ., Christobel wife of Thomas Bateman ymbroderer, Margaret wife of Thurstain Field shoemaker, Joan wife of Richard Gresham carpenter, all thirty-five late of St. Andrewes in Holborn co. Midd.; Christiana wife of Thomas Sleepe gentleman, her servant Helen Vaughan, Elizabeth Jones spinster, Dorcas Lady James wife of Sir Henry James knt., his daughters Anne James and Martha James, Elizabeth Wade spinster, Mary Lunne widow, Tobias Hinderson yoman, his wife Mary Hinderson, Elizabeth Palmer spinster, Mary Gower spinster, Elizabeth Reynolds spinster, Jane Derrey spinster, Elizabeth wife of Richard Penrose yoman, Katherine Cashe alias Hutchenson spinster, Peter Smythe printer, John Higgins laborer, Edmund Yates esq., his wife Elizabeth Yates, his servants Richard Aldreor, Sara Brackett and Elizabeth Boldinge, Jane wife of Christopher Beeston . . . . yeoman, and his servante William Allen, all twenty-five late of St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd.; Elizabeth Reynoldes late of Hallowellstreete co. Midd. . . . .; Alice Nashe widow, Margaret wife of Robert Gutteris gentleman, Christian Banckes widow, all three late of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd.—for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said 25th of March, nor at any time during the three months then next following. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

28 March, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Hampstead co Midd. on the said day, Joan Hunte wife of William Hunte late of Hampstead aforesaid yoman practised certain detestable, impious and devilish arts, called witchcraftes inchauntmentes charmes and sorceries, upon and against John Nuttinge, an infant aged three years, so that the said John Nuttinge sickened and languished from the said 28th of March to the 10th day of April then next following, on which last-named day he died of the said exercise of the said devilish arts. Found 'Guilty,' Joan Hunte was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 21 April, 13 James I.

28 March, 13 James I.—Ordered, that Priscella Circillier, the wief of Thomas Circillier of Holborne in Eelye Rents shalbe kuckt for a Common scowlde and disturber of her neighbours; for that it appeared to the Courte by a certificate under the hands of the inhabitantes, whereof she stands indyted at this Sessions." S. P. Reg.

16 April, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of Ralph Hollson of Aldersgate Street London tailor, William Hudson of Long Lane tailor and Henry Terryll of Charterhouse Lane co. Midd. taylor, in the sum of forty pounds each, and Richard Ireland of Dolgelle co. Merioneth, in the sum of one hundred; For the said Richard Ireland's appearance at the next Session of Peace for the county. At the foot of the bill, this memorandum,—"He was convented before by a warrant from the Lord Chief Justice of England, in which warrant it was said he had beat and hurt certeyne officers that had arrested him and so rescoused himself from them, and noe particular partie was nominated in the warrant." G. S. P. R., Easter, 13 James I.

20 April, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Rosemarylane co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Dewer late of the said lane yoman stole "unam velam vocatam a Counterpoynte" worth twenty pounds, of the goods and chattels of John Murrey esq. On his arraignment, Robert Dewer put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., 21 April, 13 James I.

21 May, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Charterhouselane co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Henry Fisher and Valentine Brookes, both late of the said lane yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Katherine the Lady Countess of Huntingdon widow, and stole therefrom two pieces of pewter worth six shillings and two bookes worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of the said Countess of Huntingdon. On their arraignment, both prisoners put themselves 'Not Guilty' and were acquitted. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

27 May, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P. of John Bainbrick of Clifford's Inn gentleman and Thomas Morris of Grayes Inn gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Robert Deerough of the Inner Temple, London, gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Robert Deerough's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answere the abusing the officers and the Watch of Clarkenwell in the night." G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

27 May, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Cheswick co. Midd. on the said day, Friswel Hamond wife of Richard Hamond late of Cheswicke aforesaid yoman stole "unam orbem argenteam anglice a trencher plate" worth five shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble Francis Lord Russell. Friswel Hamond was at large. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

3 June, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Johnson knt. J.P., of Henry Blackman button-maker and Newman Trape silk-weaver, both of Whitechappell co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said Henry Blackman's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for wrongfully charging a woman with felony for vs., being three shillinges which he gave her for a lewde purpose." G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

5 June, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Tottenham co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Branche wife of Thomas Branche late of Tottenham aforesaid yoman practised certain wicked detestable and devilish arts, called witchcraftes inchauntementes charmes and sorceries, upon and against Edward Wheeler a three-year-old infant, so that the said Edward Wheeler languished from the said 5th of June till he died of the same wicked practice on the 14th day of the said month, being thus murdered by the said Anne Branche.—Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same Anne Branche for practising on the aforesaid 5 June, 13 James I., at Tottenham aforesaid certain devilish witchcraftes &c. upon and against Anne Howell, so that she languished and wasted in her body from the same 5th of June till the 5th September 14 James I. —Also, on the same file, a True Bill against the same Anne Branche, for practising at Tottenham aforesaid on the 27th day of May, 14 James I., witchcraftes &c. upon and against a certain Joan Aldridge, so that the same Joan languished on the said day of the said practise, and through it has wasted away in her body from the said 27th day of May, 14 James I., till the 5th of September then next following. To each of these three indictments, Anne Branche put herself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., . . . ., 14 James I.

10 June, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Branham, Thomas Grynnaugh and John Hewett, all three late of Westminster aforesaid yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling house of Richard Massinger gentleman, whilst the said Richard and his family were in the said house, and stole therefrom three pewter pottes worth three shillings, a pewter potte called "a Thurndell potte" worth twelve pence, a bason worth twelve pence, "novem patellas stanni anglice nyne sawcers" worth twelve pence, two porringers worth twelve pence, "decem patinas stanni anglice tenn pewter dishes ad valenciam duodecim solidorum," two pye-plates worth eighteen pence, "unum poculum stanni anglice one pewter beaker" worth four pence, one pewter chamber-potte worth six pence, one stew pott worth three shillings, one brasse candlesticke worth four pence, an iron plate worth four pence, a coarse towell worth four pence, one sey curten worth two-pence, a piece of bacon worth six pence, of the goods and chattels of the said Richard Massinger. On his arraignment John Hewett put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Branham was sentenced to be hung. Found 'Not Guilty' of the burglary but 'Guilty' of felony, Thomas Gryn naugh was allowed the benefit of clergy, and delivered after having been branded. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

17 June, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. about the middle of the said day, Henry Bucke, John Mason and Thomas Phelipps, all three late of the said parish yomen, broke into a certain building called "the garner," adjoining King James's palace called Whitehall, and stole therefrom three quarters of wheat, worth sixty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Most Serene Lord the King. Memoranda on the bill, showing that all three thieves were at large. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

19 June, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Turnemilstreete co. Midd. on the said day, John Sell late of the said street yoman stole a black gelding, worth six pounds thirteen shillings and eight pence, of the goods and chattels of Sir George Peryent knt.—Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' John Sell was acquitted. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

20 June, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Mile-End co. Midd. in the night of the said day, John Castle late of Mile-End aforesaid yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Most Noble Anne Countess of Dorsett, and stole therefrom a sylver salte worth thirty shillings, a sylver wine bole worth thirty shillings, six sylver spoones worth forty shillings, one damaske tableclothe with a damaske towell and twelve damaske napkins worth five pounds, and six pairs of linen sheetes worth eighty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Countess of Dorsett. Found 'Not Guilty' of the burglary but guilty of felony, John Castle was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 12 Jan., 13 James I.

25 June, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of Robert Bowes of Grayes Inn and Edward Rattling of Lincolnes Inn, and Sapcoates Mollyneux of Lincolnes Inn, all three gentlemen, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Robert Coale of Grayes Inn gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Robert Coale's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Midd., "to answere the causing of a tumult and drawing their swordes in a quarrell, a poore man or two being much hurt."—Also, on the same file, three similar sets of recognizances, taken before the same Justices of the Peace, for the appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, of the aforesaid Sapcoates Mollyneux, Edward Rattling and Robert Bowes, to answer to the same charge. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

25 June, 13 James I.—True Bill against John Dam alias Adam cutler, his wife Ellen Dam alias Adam, William Champney yoman, Christopher Emerson cutler, his wife Joan Emerson, Anne Hutchinson widow, Isabel wife of George Moodye taylor, William Mathewes cutler, his wife Ellen Mathewes, Susan wife of Edwin Saule gentleman, Magdalen wife of John Blacke taylor, Sara Smythe spinster, William Woodfall taylor, his wife Joan Woodfall, William Cooke gentleman, his wife Margaret Cooke, Ellinor Cambridge spinster, Joan Edwards spinster, Agnes Wakley spinster, Joan Davies spinster, Avice Bridges spinster, Anne Dowse widow, William Beswicke shoomaker, his wife Mary Beswicke, George Beswicke shomaker, Susan wife of Thomas Stannge taylor, Mary Sincleare widow, Susan Baning (?) spinster, Grace Greygoose spinster, John Coe stacioner, his wife Margaret Coe, John Knight scrivenor, his wife Joan Knight, Mary wife of Thomas Howard cobler, all thirty-three late of Highe Holborne co. Midd.; Christobel wife of Thomas Bateman late of Chickelane co. Midd. imbroderer; Margaret wife of Thurstan Fielde shoemaker; Thomas Sleepe yoman, his wife Christian Sleepe, Dorcas James wife of Sir Henry James knt., Tobias Hinderson yoman, his wife Mary Hinderson, John Robinson taylor, his wife Agnes Robinson, Mary Gower widow, Joan Derry spinster, Elizabeth Raynalls spinster, and Margaret Talbott widow, all eleven late of St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd.; Peter Smyth printer, John Webbe gentleman, Martha James spinster, Anne James spinster, Elizabeth Wade spinster, Elizabeth Penvose wife of Richard Penvose yoman, Catherine Cashe alias Hutchinson spinster, William Allen yoman, Jane wife of Christopher Beeston yoman, all nine late of Turmilstreete co. Midd.; Alice Nashe widow, Robert Gutteris gentleman, his wife Margaret Gutteris, and Christiana Banckes widow, all four late of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd.,—for not going to church, chapel, or &c. on the said 25th of June, nor at any time during the three months then next ensuing. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

25 June, 13 James I.—True Bill against John Garnett late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. yoman and his wife Elizabeth Garnett; William Deane late of Hackney co. Midd. yoman; Richard Judd yoman, Richard Sympson yoman, Sir Edward Winter knt., his wife Anne Lady Winter, . . . . Lady Turrey widow, Joan Woodward widow, all six late of the Liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster co. Midd.; Joan wife of Richard Gresham carpenter, Margaret wife of Thurstan Field shomaker, and Mary wife of Thomas Bateman ymbrotherer, all three late of Saffronhill co. Midd.; Ferdinando Emerson yoman, his wife Joan Emerson, William Mathewes yoman, John Blague taylor, Isabel wife of George Moodie taylor, Thomas Hayward cobler, his wife Mary Hayward, William Beswicke yoman, Anne Dowse spinster, William Cooke yoman, Thomas Wilforde, Susan wife of Edwin Saule gentleman, Francis Clarke yoman, his wife Anne Clarke, Thomas Knighte yoman, and John Knighte yoman, all sixteen late of Higheholborne co. Midd.; Thomas Abington gen tleman, his wife Mary Abington, Judith Hippon widow, . . . . Russell widow, her servant Elianor Jones, Mabel Griffithe spinster, her servant Elizabeth Bundell, William Vavisor esq., his wife Anne Vavisor and his servant Thomas Percie, . . . . Hatton widow, her servant Richard Bosse, Edward Kinsman gentleman, his wife Alice Kinsman, Elizabeth wife of Oliver Drawater gentleman, John Waldron gentleman, his wife Margaret Waldron, Lady Browne widow, all eighteen late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd.; and Thomas Jollett late of Edmonton gentleman,—for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said 25th of June, nor at any time during the three months then next following. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

26 June, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of Thomas Pryce of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, and David Lloyd of Llangerick co. Montgomerie gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Thomas Townesend of St. Dunstan's-leWest London gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Thomas Townesend's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answere for making a tumult in the house of Daniel Nycholles and wounding Ralph Percivall."—Also, on the same file, a similar set of recognizances, taken before the same Justice of the Peace, for the above-said Thomas Pryce's appearance at the same next Session of the Peace, to answer for his part in the same broil. G. D. R., 3 July, 13 James I.

16 July, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Whitehall co. Midd. on the said day, John Willenhall and Thomas Jenynges, both late of London gentlemen, broke into King James's dwelling-house called Whitehall, and stole therefrom twelve silver dishes worth eighty-two pounds, sixe silver trencher plates worth twelve pounds, sixe silver sawcers worth six pounds, a silver bason worth ten pounds, sixe silver spoones worth twenty-eight shillings, a great rounde salte worth sixty shillings, "unum catharum argenti anglice one silver barrel canne" worth eighty shillings, a little rounde silver salte worth sixteen shillings, three silver candlestickes worth eighteen pounds, two-and-twenty napkins worth twenty-two shillings, a long towell worth four shillings, and a paire of holland pillowberes worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Fulke Grevill knt. Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Jenynges was sentenced to be hung. The clerical note over John Willenhall's name shows that he was at large. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

5 August, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Edmund Dowbleday, esq., J.P., of John Baker of Westminster gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and Thomas Gittens of Westminster yoman in the sum of two hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Thomas Gittens at the next Session of Peace for the county, and in the meantime for his peaceful bearing towards all people, and especially towards Nicholas Goad of Westminster yoman. G. D. R., . . . ., 13 James I.

25 August, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Enfielde co. Midd. on the said day, Agnes Berrye alias Wittingeberrye late of the said parish widow practised certain wicked and devilish arts, called witchcraftes inchantmentes charmes and sorceryes, upon and against Grace Halsey, so that the said Grace languished and wasted away from the said arts, from the said 25th of August to the 3rd of September then next following. Found 'Guilty,' Agnes Berrye was sentenced to be hung.— N.B. It was not charged against Agnes Berrye by this indictment, that she had caused Grace Halsey's death, and no other indictment against Agnes is preserved on the same file; but other bills against the witch may have passed from the roll, which is decayed and imperfect. G. D. R., . . . ., 13 James I.

28 August, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Old-Streete co. Midd. on the said day, Bennet Knight late of Old-Streete aforesaid yoman stole a rapier worth twenty shillings, a paire of hangers worth twenty shillings, and nine shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Sir John Butler knt.—Found 'Guilty,' Bennet Knight asked for the book, read it, and was delivered after being branded. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

1 September, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Eastsmithfeilde co. Midd. on the said day, John Israell late of Eastsmithfeilde aforesaid assaulted, struck, beat and wounded John Willis, so that his life was despaired of. No memorandum of judgment. G. D. R, 6 Oct., 13 James I.

1 September, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Whetstone co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Story late of Whetstone aforesaid yoman, stole a cloak worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Thomas Wentworth knt. and barronett. Richard Story was at large. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 13 James I.

4 September, 13 James I.—Ordered, that Tristram Warde and Sibill Taylor "both of them shalbe whipt at St. Giles-in-the Feildes," proof having been given the Court, that she was delivered at St. Giles'sin-the-Fields of a male childe, begotten on her body by the said Tristram Warde; it being further ordered by the Court, that the said Tristram Warde "shall put in good sureties to the Churchwardens of St. Giles's to discharge and save harmles that parishe from the keepinge of that childe, and that he mayntayne the childe, accordinge to the lawe." S. P. Reg.

4 September, 13 James 1.—Memorandum:—"William Pettitt of Istleworth yoman, bound before Sir Francis Darcye, for abusinge Mr. Valentyne Saunders, as appeareth upon the severall oathes of William Arnold, John Ladbye and John Browne, who depose that the sayd Petytt did saye that Mr. Saunders was a man of weake vnderstandinge, and not fitt to be a Justice of Peace, and made a floute of his warrante sayinge "he would not care a lowse for Saunders warrant, with other vilde and disgraceful speeches, and conveyed awaye one Fisher, being attached by the sayd Arnold Constable, by vertue of that warrant. Committitur, vntill he shall put in good sureties for his good conduct for a whole yeare." S. P. Reg.

7 September, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, William Starkey late of St. John Streete co. Midd. gentleman assaulted Henry Browne, and murdered him by giving him with a sword in the left part of his breast a wound, of which he then and there died instantly. Found 'Not Guilty' of murder but 'Guilty' of manslaughter, William Starkey asked for the book, read it like a clerk, and was delivered after having been branded. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

13 September, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Southmymmes co. Midd. in the night of the said day, William Roome late of the said parish yoman broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Simon Flexmore gentleman, and stole therefrom a greene woollen carpet worth three shillings, "tria fenestralia anglice vocato three cushions" worth eighteen pence, two songe-bookes worth four pence, and a paire of sheeres worth two-pence, of the goods and chattels of the said Simon Flexmore. Found 'Guilty,' William Roome was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

13 September, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Stanes co. Midd. on the said day, William Lewys late of the said parish laborer stole a bay browne gelding of the value of forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of William Nethercliffe. On his arraignment, William Lewys confessed the indictment and was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

18 September, 13 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Francis Michel esq. J.P., of Robert Hele of the parish of St. Nicholas ColeAbbey, London, fishmonger, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said Robert Hele's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to give evidence against John Dawkes alias Guy, William Purvey and John Owen, charged with "cutting a portmantua from a horse with 57 li. in it and other thinges." G. D. R., 6 Oct., 13 James I.

5 October, 13 James I.—Orders made at General Sessions of the Peace, held on Thursday next after the Feast of St. Michael at Westminster, for the Government of the House of Correction erected at Clerkenwell; It being provided by the first three of the said orders that John Stoyte of Newington co. Surrey gentleman shalbe the Master and Governor of the said House; That by the said Governor a discreet woman shall be appointed as Matron and Governess of the women sent to the same House for correction, which women are to kept apart from prisoners of the other sex, in seven rooms especially assigned in the building to female prisoners; and that the same Governor shall appoint a discreet and honest person "to be the reader of divine service and praiers in some publique place in the said howse, who shall once euerie daye at the leaste reade publique prayers in the sayd house, and twice euerie Sabboth daye." It is also ordered, that in those parishes of the county, which have failed to render the full amount of the money appointed to be levied from their inhabitants towards the charges of erecting the said House of Correction, the Constables therof shall make "a new taxe of the inhabitants and occupyers of land" for the amounts in arrear. S. P. Reg.

18 October, 13 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Edward Forsett esq. J.P., of Richard Broome of Ketton co. Rutland gentleman, in the sum of one thousand pounds; For the said Richard Broome's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery of Newgate to answer &c., he being so "bound over uppon the complaynt of the Earle of Lincoln touching the opening of a chest with a false key and taking forth of the same 1,000 li. in gold." G. D. R., 1 Dec, 13 James I.

24 October, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Robert Johnson knt. J.P., of Barnett Unthank of East Smythfeild taylor and John Smyth of St. Katherin's carman, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Frances Phips at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, and that she "stand to and abide the order of the Court for unlawfully keeping the company of one Richard Wattes, and shee doe abandon his company untill they bee lawfully married."—Also, on the same file, Recognizances taken on the same day before the same J.P., of the above-named Barnett Unthank and John Smyth, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Richard Wattes of Rosemary Lane taylor in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Richard's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, and that he "abide the order of the Court for the unlawfull frequenting of the Company of Frances Phips, And that he doe hencforth abandon her company vntill they shalbe lawfully married according to the Lawes of the Church of England." G. D. R., 1 Dec., 13 James I.

31 October, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Michell esq. J.P., of Thomas Howe of Bushopsgate Street London yoman and Joan Warde of Shorditche co. Midd. widow, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Margery Willyams of Shorditche aforesaid at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to 'give evidence against John Clapham for making a print of seale having the Rose and Crowne and ye letters J. R. engraven on yt and another counterfeit print of ye Lord Admiralles seale of Office." G. D. R., 1 Dec, 13 James I.

1 November, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at Clerkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, John Howell and George Heard, both late of Clerkenwell yomen, stole five yards of flaxen cloth worth eight shillings, three shirts worth eight shillings, three fallinge bandes worth five shillings, a ruffe-band worth three shillings, and two pairs of cuffes worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of Sir Thomas Holt knt. Found 'Guilty,' both culprits pleaded benefit of clergy. Unable to read, John Howell was sentenced to be hung. Reading like a clerk, George Heard was delivered after he had been branded. G. D. R., 15 March, 13 James I.

15 December, 13 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir George More, knt. J.P., of Thomas Rock wax-chaunder and John Browne bricklayer, both of the City of London, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Richard Langley of the same city draper, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Richard Langley's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there to answer for "givinge oute that the Kinge of Spaine had a printe of the key of the Tower of London and can make no proofe thereof." G. D. R., 12 Jan., 13 James I.

20 December, 13 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Katherin's co. Midd. on the said day, Zacharias Hudson yoman late of St. Katherin's aforesaid stole a greene rugge worth eight shillings, a pair of sheetes worth twelve shillings, three greene sey curtens worth five shillings, a pillowbeere worth sixpence, and a carpett worth twelve pence, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Woolfall. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of eleven pence, Zacharias Hudson was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., 12 Jan., 13 James I.