Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1619

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

142-150

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1619', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 142-150. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65995 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


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1619

11 January, 16 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Leonard's Shoredich co. Midd. on the said day, Phillip Metcalfe late of the said parish labourer was guilty of begging alms as a discharged soldier, under colour of false and forged Passport and Letters Testimonial. The spurious Letters Testimonial ran thus,—"North Holland: To all Governors Coronells Capteynes Lieutenantes Searchers Controllers Burgomasters and to all others greeting Know yee that I George Brookes Lieutenant under Sir George Veare under the pay of the Lords of the States of the United Provinces have absolutely discharged the bearers hereof Phillip Metcalfe and John Wright souldiers of my company to passe and repayre into the Real me of England for their better prefermentes in regard of their long and dutifull services and hurtes received, Theis may be therefore to pray and require all and every of you to whom theis shall or may concerne quietly to permit and suffer them to passe without any your letts stayes or molestacions. Given at my Garison at Horne under my hand xvith of December 1618—George Brookes." Beneath these spurious letters testimonial appeared on the same document the following forged certificate, "4 of Jan. 1618 com. Kent. These bearers landed at our towne and porte of Feversom in the Countie aforesaid and having taken the oath of allegeance to His Majestie I have allowed them the space of xxx days to passe to live in Norfolke and no longer at their perill— John Hall, Maior." Found 'Guilty' at the Newgate Gaol Delivery of 18 Feb., 16 James L, Phillip Metcalfe was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 14 Jan., 16 James I.

14 January, 16 James I.—Memorandum that Israell Fryer of the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Field co. Midd. gentleman, bound to appear at the Gaol Delivery "for being a Popish Recusant and for having masse bookes and popish Reliques in his house," came and was discharged. G. D. Reg.

1 March, 16 James I.—True Bill that, at Lymehouse co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Sterrey wife of William Sterrey late of Lymehouse aforesaid assaulted Katherine Bett, and by kicking her with the right foot gave her a mortal blow on the right breast, of which blow the said Katherine died on the 6th day of the same month. On her arraignment Anne Sterrey put herself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted; it being found by the jury that Katherine Bett died by the visitation of God. G. D. R., 20 May, 17 James I.

7 March, 16 James I.—True Bill that, at Fynchley co. Midd. on the said day, Agnes Miller, wife of Robert Miller late of Fynchley aforesaid yoman, practised certain devilish arts, called witchcraftes inchantments charmes and sorceryes, upon and against Richard Harte son of Salomon Harte, so that the said Richard Harte forthwith languished and continued to languish of the said arts, until he died of them on the 14th day of the same month. On her arraignment Agnes Miller put herself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., 9 April, 17 James I.

7 March, 16 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of Common Prayer on the said day, nor at any time during the month then next following,—against Thomas Jallet late of Edmonton co. Midd. gentleman; Elizabeth Etheringgam wife of William Etheringgam late of Hendon . . . .; Daniel Knolinge . . . . ., and Elizabeth Knolinge spinster, both late of Newbrainforde co. Midd.; Richard Paggington late of Stanmore co. Midd.; Richard Abbington gentleman and his wife Katherine Abbington, late of Hackney co. Midd.; Jane Watson wife of Richard Watson barber-surgeon and Mary Hotton spinster, both late of Chauncery Lane co. Midd.; Mary Awdley of Clarkenwell spinster; Ferdinand Emerson cutler, his wife Jane Emerson, John Dam cutler, his wife Elena Dam, Mary Heyward widow, Susan Sall wife of Edwin Sall gentleman, Richard Sall yoman, William Cooke gentleman, his wife Bridgitt Cooke, Anne Dowse widow, William Beswicke cordweyner, his wife Elizabeth Beswicke, Israeli Fryer gentleman, his wife Susan Fryer, John Coe stationer, his wife Elizabeth Coe, Thomas Knighte scrivenor, his wife Gilian Knighte, Katherine Knight wife of Richard Knight goldsmith, Susan Strang wife of Thomas Strang tailor, Mary Scrogges spinster, Jane Woodfall widow, all twenty-two late of High Holborne co. Midd.; Lewis Evans . . . ., his wife . . . ., and Elizabeth Nash widow, all three late of St. Johnstreete co. Midd.; . . . . Lord Wormewood and William Hawkins gentleman, both late of Kensington co. Midd.; and John Maldred . . . ., and his wife Katherine Maldred, both late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd.—At the foot of the bill, the usual memorandum of proclamation having been made in accordance with the statute. G. D. R., 12 May, 17 James I.

23 March, 16 James I.—True Bill that, at St. John's Street co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Hatche, Lawrence Sibley and Thomas Old, all three late of the said street yomen, stole three cloaks worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir Maximilian Dallyson knt. All three culprits were at large. G. D. R., 12 May, 17 James I.

2 April, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Bordman, Richard Carrycke, John Payman, Robert Purfrey and William Clapham, all late of the said parish yomen, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of John Lord Digbye, and stole therefrom "duo lavacra argentea anglice two silver basons and ewers" worth fifty pounds, "unum vas argenteum anglice vocatum one silver chaffing-dishe" worth ten pounds, "duo sextaria argentea anglice two flagons of silver" worth twenty-five pounds, "duo magna sextaria argentea deaurata anglice two tanckerdes of silver parcell-guilt worth eleven pounds, "duo olla argentea anglice two white pottes of silver" worth twelve pounds, "duo pocula argentea anglice twoe white Bolles of silver" worth five pounds, "undecim patinas argenteas anglice eleven Trencher Plates of silver" worth twenty-two pounds, "unum saltellum argenteum anglice one doublebell salte of silver" worth five pounds, "unum aliud saltellum argenteum anglice one plaine Salte of Silver" worth two pounds, fifteene spoones of silver worth eight pounds ten shillings, "et sex furcas argenteas anglice sixe silver forks" worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said John Lord Digbye. Found 'Guilty,' all five culprits were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 9 April, 17 James I.

2 April, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Richard Bordman, Richard Carrycke, John Payman, Robert Purfrey and William Clapham, all late of the said parish yomen, broke burglariously into the dwellinghouse of John Lord Digbye, and stole therefrom four silver parcelguylt candlestickes worth twenty-five pounds, a bason and ewer of sylver parcell-guylt worth thirty pounds, foure and twenty plate trenchers of silver parcell-guylt worth sixty pounds, and one charger of silver parcell-guylt worth twenty-three pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Lord King James. Found 'Guilty,' all five culprits were sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 9 April, 17 James I.

8 April, 17 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Thomas Bennett knt. J.P., of John Lewes, servant of John Williams serjeantat-arms of the Lord the King, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said John Lewes's appearance at the Session of Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to give evidence &c. against John Stapylton, "for lifting a cloke oute of the Serjeantes-at-Armes chamber at Whitehall." G. D. R., 9 April, 17 James I.

13 April, 17 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Richard Baker knt., of Henry Ascue of Highgate co. Midd. gentleman, and Robert Longe of St. Albone's co. Hartford gentleman, each in the sum of forty pounds, and William Rowe of Wreste co. Bedford gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said William Rowe's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer for his part in an affray, recently fought with drawen swordes between him and a certain Raphell Neale of Woollestone co. Northampton gentleman. G. D. R., 12 May, 17 James I.

17 April, 17 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Edmund Doubleday esq. J.P., of Thomas Cumberford of Westminster gentleman, and William Goodman of Draiton co. Midd. yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds each; The condition of the Recognizances being that the said Thomas Cumberford and William Goodman shall at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex prefer "a bill of Indightment and prosecute with effecte against John Lawrence and William Sharpe . . . . touchinge the breaking of the howse of the Right Honourable William Lord Pagett at Draiton in Midd., and for the stealinge of diverse parcelles of lynnen from thence." G. D. R., 12 May, 17 James I.

21 April, 17 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Edmund Doubleday esq. J.P., of David Sincleer gentleman and Bartholomew Tock yoman, both of Westminster, in the sum of ten pounds each; For their effective prosecution of the law, at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, against "John Hammond, charged with the stealinge of three clothe clokes out of the howse of the Right Honorable Mary Countess Hume in Channon Rowe in Westminster." G. D. R., 12 May, 17 James I.

1 May, 17 James I.—True Bill, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of Common Prayer on the said day, nor at any time during the three months then next following,—against Robert Lockey yoman, his wife Margaret Lockey, Mary Loweman widow, Joan wife of Richard Gresham carpenter, Margaret Feild widow, Richard Lovett goldsmith, all six late of Saffronhill co. Midd.; Ferdinand Emerson cutler, his wife Jane Emerson, John Dam cutler, his wife Helen Dam, William Mathewes cutler, his wife Helen Mathewes, Mary Heyward widow, Susan wife of Edwin Saule gentleman, Richard Saule yoman, John Blague taylor, his wife Magdalen Blague, William Cooke gentleman, his wife Briget Cooke, Israeli Fryer yoman, his wife Susan Fryer, Anne Dowse widow, William Beswicke cordweyner, his wife Elizabeth Beswicke, John Coe stationer, his wife Elizabeth Coe, Thomas Knighte scrivenor, his wife Juliana Knighte, Katherine wife of Richard Knighte goldsmith, Susan wife of Thomas Strange taylor, Mary Scrogges spinster, Jane Woodfall widow, all twenty-six, late of High Holborne co. Midd.; Henry Pennington yoman, William Atterbury yoman, his wife Jane Atterbury, Elyas Tuckey yoman, his wife Margaret Tuckey, Christopher Abdey yoman, all six late of St. Giles's-without-Creplegate London co. Midd.; Elizabeth Nashe widow, Lewis Evans yoman, his wife Anne Evans, all three late of St. Johnstreete co. Midd.; John Webbe gentleman, his wife Anne Webbe, Elizabeth Bolton spinster, Humfrey Paule yoman, Anne Robinson widow, John Clythrop yoman, all six late of Clarkenwell co. Midd.; . . . . Clare late of Fulham co. Midd. widow; Mary Cutler late of Ratcliffe co. Midd. spinster; Richard Abington gentleman and his wife Katherine Abington, both late of Hackney co. Midd.; Alice Cole spinster, Agnes Cole spinster, Jane wife of Thomas Cole yoman, all three late of Heston co. Midd.; Elizabeth wife of William Etheringham late of Hendon co. Midd. yoman; Daniel Knowleing late of Newbraynford co. Midd. yoman; and . . . . Gyllott late of Edmonton co. Midd. widow. G. D. R., 8 Dec, 17 James I.

9 May, 17 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Thomas Watson knt. and Edmund Dowbleday esq. Justices of the Peace, of Henry Kentishe of Paddington yeoman, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said Henry Kentishe's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer "for chasinge and killinge his Majestyes outlying deere." G. D. R., 25 June, 17 James I.

11 May, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at Fynsbury co. Midd. on the said day, Walter Castell, Thomas Greene, and William Maney, all three late of Fynsbury aforesaid yoman, stole "sex collaria rugata anglice sixe Ruffe-bands" worth six shillings. Over Walter Castell's name, at the head of the bill, appears the memorandum "Cogn' Ind' pe' li' le' cre'"=He confesses the indictment, asks for the book, reads it, is branded. Found 'Guilty' of petty larceny to the value of ten pence, each of the two other thieves was sentenced to be whipt; the memorandum over their names being "Po se cul de p'vo latroc'o ad val' xd. flag." G. D. R., 12 May, 17 James I.

14 May, 17 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Lewes Lewkenor knt. J.P., of Nicholas Smyth gentleman and Christofer Wright vintener, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For their appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, "to preferre a byll of indictment and to give evidence against William Goodwridge committed to Newgate for vsinge of traiterous speeches against our Soueraigne Lord the Kinge, sayinge yf the kinge vse us not well, wee will cutt his Throat." G. D. R., 25 June, 17 James I.

4 June, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at Enfeild co. Midd. on the said day, John Smith late of Enfield aforesaid yoman stole "unum vestimentum muliebre vocat a wastcote" worth six pounds, and a sheete worth six shillings, of the goods and chattels of Sir Edward Fynes knt. On his arraignment John Smith put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., 25 June, 17 James I.

13 June, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at Chiswellstreete co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Johnson late of the said street yoman stole "two hatbandes with gold buttons set and wrought with Berills and Rubies" worth ten pounds, six silver spoones double gilt worth three pounds, six parcell-gilt silver spoones worth twenty shillings, one silver ladle worth twenty shillings, and one hundred and thirty-eight pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the Lady Dorothy Thornhurste. On his arraignment Richard Johnson put himself 'Not Guilty'; but it does not appear from any note on the bill whether he was convicted or acquitted. G. D. R., 8 Dec, 17 James I.

23 June, 17 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Daveys esq. J.P., of Anthony Paine of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. haberdasher and John Beale of Clarkenwell tailor, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Jane, wife of the said Anthony Paine, at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to answer "for being in the Nag's Head taverne in St. John's Street in company of Thomas (? Ralph) Salvin" of Newbiggen co. York gentleman "a stranger to her and there causing an affray to be made about her ring."—Also, on the same file, Recognizances, taken on 24 June, 17 James, before the same Thomas Daveys esq. J.P., of Robert Stanley of Grayes Inne co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds, and Ralph Salvin of Newbiggin co. York gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Ralph Salvin's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to answer "for hurting Thomas Barnes to the effusion of blood in the Nagg's Head Taverne in St. John's Street, and for having and deteyning a golde ringe from" the aforenamed "Jane Paine." G. D. R., 25 June, 17 James I.

26 June, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at a common Inne called the Maidenhead in Hounslowe co. Midd. on the said day, John Starre late of Whitecrossestreet co. Midd. yoman and William Walter late of Hounslowe aforesaid yoman, cheated and defrauded Mathew Foster of forty-four shillings, in playing with him a certain game of cards, called "Thy carde and my carde." Both card-sharpers were at large. G. D. R., 28 July, 17 James I.

4 July, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at Hampsteede co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Dixon, John Cooe, and William Chambers, all three late of Hampsteede aforesaid, made a forcible riotous and unlawful entry on a certain capital messuage called the Mannour Howse of Hampsteede alias Hampsteede Hall, being then the freehold of John Wrothe of Endfielde co. Midd. esq., John Wrothe of Petherton co. Somerset esq., and John Wrothe of London gentleman, and disseised the said John Wrothe John Wrothe and John Wrothe of their said freehold, and keep them out of possession of it even until now.— Robert Dixon, John Cooe and William Chambers put themselves 'Not Guilty'; when by the consent of the parties, the matter was remanded to the 14th of July next coming. G. D. R., . . . .,17 James I.

9 August, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at Eastsmithfeild co. Midd. in the night of the said day, James Dickenson late of Eastsmithfeild aforesaid yoman, broke burglariously into the house of William Cooke, and stole therefrom six rolles of tobaccoe worth five pounds, a payre of shoes worth sixpence, an ounce of browne thred worth a penny, a mortar and pestyll worth three pence and six poundes of flaxe worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said William Cooke. Acquitted of burglary, James Dickenson was found 'Guilty' of petty larceny to the value of eleven pence. No memorandum of punishment. G. D. R., . . . .,17 James I.

3 September, 17 James I.—Order (made for the more vigilant prosecution of dividers of houses, harbourers of inmates, and unlicensed keepers of common-alehouses) that the Town-Clerk of the City of London and the Clerk of the Peace for the county of Middlesex henceforth draw indictments against such offenders, without taking fee or reward for their labour of the parishioners of the parishes inhabited by the persons so indicted; With further Order that the said Town-Clerk and Clerk of the Peace be paid for their labour in drawing the indictments two shillings for each indictment, out of the fines imposed upon the offenders.—It being also Ordered, that "any chandler which doth sell or utter any beare or ale either out of his house or within other then of the smallest beere and ale and that to be sold out of the house to poore people . . . . shalbe reputed a comon alehousekeeper, and be proceeded against and punished as for keepeing a common alehouse without license." G. D. Reg.

8 September, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at Shordich co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Cromwell late of Shordich aforesaid spinster stole a silver spoone worth five shillings, two wrought cushions worth four shillings, one coife worth twelve pence, two blacke-worke coifes worth three shillings, "unum vmbral' anglice one shadowe" worth twelve pence, a laced croscloth worth two shillings, a tiffany coife worth twelve shillings, two neckclothes worth . . . ., and a silver bodkin worth three shillings, of the goods and chattels of Robert Paine; And Further that, on 9th of September, 17 James I., knowing her to have perpetrated the said felony, Emma Drewry and Mary Harvey, both late of Shordich aforesaid spinsters, harboured and comforted the said Anne Cromwell. Mary Harvey was at large, but Anne Cromwell and Emma Drewy were found 'Guilty' and sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . .,17 James I.

22 September, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at Grayes Inne Lane co. Midd. on the said day, George Sandes late of the said lane gentleman stole a gray gelding worth five pounds of the goods and chattels of Sir Peter Temple knt. On his arraignment George Sandes put himself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., . . . ., 17 James I.

10 December, 17 James I.—True Bill that, whereas Andrew Shinter late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields took to wife and lawfully married at Stepney a certain Elizabeth Batte on the 1st of December, 14 James I., the said Andrew Shinter on the said 10 Dec, 17 James I., at Clarkenwell co. Midd. during his said wife's life &c. feloniously took to wife and married a certain Elizabeth Chonninge late of Clarkenwell aforesaid spinster &c. Found 'Guilty,' Andrew Shinter pleaded his clergy, when the delivery of the book was deferred (pe' li' respr. tradic'o libr'=petit librum, respectuatur tradicio libri=he asks for the book, the delivery of the book is deferred). G. D. R., 28 April, 18 James I.

12 December, 17 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Katherin's co. Midd. on the said day, William Sabree late of Clerkenwell co. Midd. yoman "duxit in uxorem anglice did marry" Joan Lambert, during the life of a certain Elizabeth (heretofore called Hemmynge) whom he lawfully married at Clarkenwell co. Midd. on the 1st of December, 14 James I., the said Elizabeth not having continuously remained in parts beyond the sea for the space of seven years at a time after her said marriage, nor having been absent for the space of seven years at a time in any parts within the said King James's dominions from the aforesaid William Sabree, he not knowing whether she were alive within the said time. Found 'Guilty'at the Gaol Delivery of 31 May, 18 James I., William Sabree asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R., 30 March, 18 James I.