Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1621

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

158-164

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1621', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 158-164. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65997 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


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1621

1 January, 18 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Thomas Fisher knt. J.P., of William Dalley yeoman and Henry Smith labourer, both of Fulham co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each, and Robert Burbage of Fulham aforesaid gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Robert Burbage's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, and in the mean time for his good behaviour. G. D. R., 12 Jan., 18 James I.

18 January, 18 James I.—True Bill that, at Islington co. Midd. on the said day, William Dames late of Islington aforesaid yoman assaulted William Sanney, and robbed him of one pound-waight of tobacco worth twenty shillings, and a sworde worth twelve shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said William Sanney. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' William Dames was acquitted. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 18 James I.

25 January, 18 James I.—Recognizances, taken before William Duckett esq. J.P., of Robert Barnes of Stokesley of the parish of Cawne co. Wiltes and John Pockridge of Summerfourd co. Wiltes, both carriers, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Thomas Looker of Quimmerfourd of the parish of Cawne aforesaid carrier, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Thomas Looker's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for drivinge in his waine seaven oxen and horses to the spoile of His Majesties High waies."—Also, on the same file, several other like sets of Recognizances, for the appearance of public carriers at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer for injuring the King's high-ways by driving more than the lawful number of horses, or horses and oxen in their waggons. G. S. P. R., Easter, 19 James I.

4 February, 18 James I.—True Bill that, at Chancery Lane on the said day, Richard Byleth late of the said lane yoman stole a silver cup worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir Robert Riche knt. Found 'Guilty,' Richard Byleth "pe' li' le' cre,"=asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R., 16 Feb., 18 James I.

7 February, 18 James I.—Recognizances, taken before William Duckett esq. J.P., of Roger Griffin of Oxford carier, in the sum of ten pounds, and William Warden also of Oxford carier in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said William Warden at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for driving aboue five horses in his waggon."—Also, on the same file, five other similar sets of Recognizances taken before the same Justice of the Peace; For the appearance at the Session of the Peace, next ensuing the date of the Recognizances, of certain carriers—viz. Lambert Searle, John Wells, and Richard Sparkes, all three of Odium co. Southampton, John Pooley of Edgworth co. Midd., and Richard Mathewe of Wattfeild co. Hertfourd—each of them being so bound, to answere "for drivinge aboue five horses in his carte."—Also, the Recognizance, taken before the same Justice of the Peace, of Thomas Franckum of Sadberie co. Gloucester carier, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Thomas Franckum's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for driving six Oxen and three horses in his wayne." G. D. R., 16 Feb., 18 James I.

21 February, 18 James I.—True Bill that, at Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Mason late of the said city yoman stole "one plate dishe of silver" worth three pounds, of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble George Marquis Buckingham. Found 'Guilty,' Robert Mason asked for the book, could not read it, and therefore was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . ., 18 James I.

3 April, 19 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Thomas Stevenson labourer and Thomas Waye tayler, both of Cowcrosse, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Ellionor Scott at the next Session of the Peace, "to answere for beinge privie to the stealinge of a coach-bedd and curtines forth out of the coach-howse of Sir John Sydenham knt."—Also, on the same file, Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, For the appearance of Ottowell Savill and Margaret Blisse at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answere to the same charge. G. S. P. R., Easter, 19 James I.

24 April, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at Cowcrosse co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Penne late of Cowcrosse aforesaid yoman stole three silver saltes worth six pounds, of the goods and chattels of Sir Roger Moston knt. Found 'Guilty,' Francis Penne "pe' li' non h'et quia alias h'uit" = asks for the book, does not have it, because he had it on another occasion. G. D. R., 16 May, 19 James I.

1 May, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at Clarkenwell co. Midd. on the said day, John Moore late of Clarkenwell aforesaid yoman, an idle fellow given to wander about under pretence of being a discharged soldier, feigned to have come from a certain place in Ireland called Monaughan from a certain Sir Edward Blaney knt., governor of the town and castle of Monaughan, and "to have landed in England" (sic) "ad quandam partem terre Wallie vocate the pointe of Eare" co. Flint, and showed in support of his statements respecting himself false and counterfeited Letters Testimonial, purporting to have been given him by Ralph Mosten esq. J.P. for Flintshire, and running in the following words, "Flynt: The bearer hereof landed at the pointe of Eare in the Countie aforesaid the viiith. day of Aprill 1621 and comeing before me Raphe Mosten one of his Majesties Justices of the Peace next adjoineinge hath taken the oath of Allegeaunce as a dutifull subject and I have allowed him for his travell to Sandwich in the Countie of Kent two monethes by reason of his lameness; Willing all Constables and Churchwardens to be aydeing and assisting him in his travels and . . . . lodgeing in due tyme to avoyde the daunger of the law. By me Ralphe Mosten." The result of the inquiry does not appear from any note on the bill. G. D. R., 16 May, 19 James I.

13 May, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at Eastesmithfeild co. Midd., Stephen Richard late of Eastesmithfeild yoman stole two parcels of silver containing five ounces and half-an-ounce of silver worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Most Serene Lord the King. Found 'Guilty,' Stephen Richard asked for the book, read it, and was branded. G. D. R., 16 May, 19 James I.

16 May, 19 James I.—Order that Philip Roper gentleman, indicted under the Statute of Recusancy "for not coming to church," confer with Dr. Westfield for the better satisfaction of his conscience; The Order being made on the said Mr. Roper's appearance and humble prayer to the Court "to allowe him some reasonable tyme of conference with such a Mynister of the Church of England as this Court shall assigne him, for the better satisfaction of his conscience." G. D. Reg.

16 May, 19 James I.—Recognizance of "John Bromfeild of the parish of St. Bartholomew-near-the-Exchange London woodmonger in xl li to furnishe John Bromfeild the nowe prisoner with sufficient apparrell, and other necessaries to be sent to such place as this Court shall assigne the said prisoner to goe to"; With Order "that the said prisoner shall not departe from thence at any tyme hereafter without just cause and lawfull authoritie." G. D. Reg.

27 June, 19 James I.—Order for the discharge of Elizabeth Thrill late of Norton Folgate co. Midd. spinster of a certain indictment "for not coming to church," and for the stay of all proceedings on the same indictment, preferred against her at the General Session of Peace for Middlesex held on the 12th of April last past; the Order being made on evidence of the said Elizabeth's religious submission and conformity. G. D. Reg.

10 July, 19 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Suckling knt. J.P., of Mathew Barker of Twickenham co. Midd. fisherman, in the sum of ten pounds, and Nicholas Savage of the same place yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Nicholas Savage's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex. G. S. P. R., Michaelmas, 19 James I.

4 August, 19 James I.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on view of the body of Henry Fordham, there lying dead and slain; With verdict of jurors that, at the said parish Humfrey Frodsham of Nettlewood co. Oxon gentleman with "a dagger in likeness of an Irish skeyne" killed and slew the said Henry Fordham late of Westminster draper, by stabbing him in the left side of the body with the said weapon, thereby giving him a mortal wound of which he then and there died instantly; the Jurors further certifying, that Henry Fordham was unarmed and had not struck Humfrey Frodsham when he was so stabbed, and that immediately after perpetrating the said homicide Humfrey Frodsham made his escape. G. D. R., . . . .,19 James I.

30 August, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Dunstan's-in-theWest in the Ward of Farringdon-without-London in the night of the said day, Charles Bourne alias Vaughan gentleman, Richard Daines gentleman and John Ashfield yeoman, all three late of London, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Sir Thomas Merry knt., and stole therefrom a riche jewell worth two hundred marks, three gold rings worth ten pounds, five silver bolles worth forty pounds, two dozen silver-gilt spoones worth fifteen pounds, "unum pallium panni lanei nigri duplicatum cum holoserico anglice plushe "worth eighty pounds, a woman's gown of blacke velvet worth forty pounds, a carnacion satten petticoate laced with silver lace and silver fringe worth eighty pounds, a woman's gowne of carnacion satten laced with silver lace worth a hundred pounds, a woeman's doublet of rich tissue worth . . . ., a silke wastcoate lined with silke shagge worth forty pounds, a woman's cloake of blacke velvett worth twenty pounds, a bible with a covering of gold and silver wrought worth ten pounds, a gold ring with a diamond set in it, six remnantes of wrought velvet, nyne remnantes of wroughte damaske and twelve remnantes of tufftafataes worth forty pounds, divers vestments for women made of linen wrought with gold and silver worth one hundred and forty pounds, and twenty-seven pounds and ten shillings in numbered money of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Sir Thomas Merry knt.—No further information is afforded by the document as to the fortunes of the three principals in the felony; but notes at the foot of the bill show that Arthur Heynes late of Westminster yoman (an accomplice in the felony after the fact) was found 'Guilty' and was reprieved after judgment of death; and that Sage Haynes of Westminster spinster, charged in the indictment with being an accomplice after the fact, put herself 'Not Guilty' and was acquitted. G. D. R., 5 June, 20 James I.

31 August, 19 James I.—True Bill that, in the highway at Fynchley co. Midd. on the said day, John Sherwood late of the said parish . . . . murdered Mary Danyell by shooting into the left part of her belly near the navel a leaden bullet from a pistol, charged with gunpowder and the said bullet, thereby giving her a mortal wound, of which she died on the following day. Found 'Guilty,' John Sherwood was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., . . . ., 19 James I.

8 October, 19 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Heneage Finche esq. Recorder of the city of London, of Robert Clay of St. Andrew's in Holborn cordwainer and John Robinson of St. Sepulchre's London tobacco-pipe-maker, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Robert Lockey of "St. Andrew's in Holborn in Field Lane girdler," in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Robert Lockey's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex. At the foot of the bill this memorandum, "Committed for Recusancy but now hath taken the othe of Allegeance." G. D. R., 5 Dec, 19 James I.

22 October, 19 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Nicholas Abell of Hoxden in St. Leonard's Shorditch corwinder (sic), in the sum of twenty pounds, and of William Milkum of Goldinglane yeoman and George Wood of Hoxden aforesaid weaver, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the said Nicholas Abell's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, "to answear the complaint of Jeronimo Bassano of Hoxton esq." and for his good behaviour in the mean time. G. D. R., 5 Dec, 19 James I.

19 November, 19 James I.—Recognizances, taken before William Daniell esq. J.P., of Edward Pardee of Purpoole Lane co. Midd. dyer and Joseph Church of Grayes Inn Lane chandler, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Richard Bradley of Purpoole Lane aforesaid husbandman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Richard Bradley's appearance at the next Session of the Peace held at Hickes Hall or elsewhere to answer "for refusing to take the oath of Alleadgience and sayinge the bible was a lier." G. D. R., 5 Dec, 19 James I.

10 December, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's-le-Savoy alias Strand co. Midd., Garrald Kevenaugh (sic) late of St. Mary's aforesaid yoman stole "one footeman's coat with twoe silver plate badges" worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of Edward Lord Dennye. Garrald Kevenagh was at large. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 James I.

16 December, 19 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Roger Horton esq. J.P., of Lahern Camen of Exeter House in the Strand yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For his appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to give evidence against Garald Kavenagh (sic), "for a footman's coate of the Lord Dennies with armes and a crest on the backe and breste." G. S. P. R., Epiphany, 19 James I.—This General Session of the Peace was held at Hickes Hall in St. John Streete co. Midd. on "die Jovis proximo post festum Epiphanii scilt. decimo die Januarii anno regni Regis Domini nostri &c. &c. decimonono." The calendar shows the trivial character of the matters on which the Justices adjudicated. Of the sixty-seven cases set forth in the calendar thirty-six were vagrancy cases, the other thirty-one charges being for small pilferings, petty assaults, insignificant misdemeanours, and other slight affairs. In eighteen of the cases, the culprit was sentenced to be whipt.

22 December, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at Highholborne co. Midd. on the said day, John Thompson late of Highholborne aforesaid yoman, a lazy fellow, was a vagrant, imposing himself on others as a discharged soldier, and supporting his statement with spurious Letters Testimonial and a forged passport. Purporting to have been written by John Bulleyn secretary of the city of Liew in parts beyond the sea, the false Letters Testimonial represented that John Thompson had served as a soldier under the command of Sir Allan Semple knt., and in default of payment of his military wages had sold his arms, clothes and other goods in the city of Liew. The forged passport, purporting to have been written by the Mayor of Dover, ran thus, "The bearer hereof John Thompson souldier with Joane his wyfe landed here at Douer from Callyes this 4th of December anno 1621,—Robert Garrett, maior." At the head of the bill appears a memorandum, that John Thompson was by order of the court referred, without trial, to Sir Edward Sackvile and Sir Henry Spiller. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 James I.