Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1622

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1887

Pages

164-173

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1622', Middlesex county records: Volume 2: 1603-25 (1887), pp. 164-173. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=65998 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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Contents

1622

26 January, 19 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Lewes Lewkenor knt. J.P., of John Lee of St. Andrew's in Holborne scrivener, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Lee's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answer the complaint of Allen Mockes or any other complainant against him for the convaying away of sundrie peeces of Manchester bayes which were stollen from Mrs. Fretwell widow." G. D. R., 15 Feb., 19 James I.

. . . January, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at St. John's Streete co. Midd. on some day of the said month, no longer discoverable from the faded bill, Joseph Clissalls, late of the said street yoman, stole three score and ten pounds' weight of tobacco (Nicotiani exotici) worth twenty pounds and four shillings. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' Joseph Clissalls was acquitted. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 James I.

1 February, 19 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Arthur Robinson esq. J.P., of James Oley of Tottenham co. Midd. yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said James Oley's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for Middlesex, to give evidence against Thomas Barker "for begging as a souldier and drawing his sword vpon ye constables." G. D. R., 15 Feb., 19 James I.

7 February, 19 James I.—Coroner's Inquistion-post-mortem, taken at St. Leonard's Shoredich co. Midd. on view of the body of Henry Jent there lying dead and slain; With verdict of Jurors, that on the 6th of the said month the said Henry Jent and a certain Robert Barnes late of Shorditch aforesaid yeoman were together playing "quendam lusum vocatum bowles" in the said parish when they quarrelled about "quandam vadacionem anglice a bett" made between them, and that in an affray arising out of this dispute about a bett, Robert Barnes with a sword gave Henry Jent in the left part of his belly a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly, being thus and in no other way killed and slain by Robert Barnes. Arraigned at the Old Bailey for the manslaughter of Henry Jent, Robert Barnes was found 'Guilty,' when he asked for the book, could not read it, and was therefore sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 19 James I.

8 February, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at Clarkenwell co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Benjamin Selden late of Clarkenwell aforesaid yoman, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of the Most Noble Edward Lord Dudley, putting Edward Dudley esq. servant (famulum) of the said Lord Dudley in fear and danger of his life, and, stole therefrom "unum ornamentum vehiculare anglice one coach curtaine" worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of the said Edward Lord Dudley. Found 'Guilty,' Benjamin Selden was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 19 James I.

10 February, 19 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Buttolfes-withoutAlgate co. Midd. on the said day, Margaret Hodshone late of the said parish spinster, stole five pounds and ten shillings in numbered moneys, a stuffe gowne worth ten shillings, "unum vestimentum muliebre anglice a wastcote" worth two shillings, "unum foramen anglice a kirtle" worth two shillings, one hatt with a Sipere band worth two shillings, three pairs of stockinges worth four shillings, and five wrought coifes worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of Edward Cawdewell. Found 'Guilty,' Margaret Hodshone pleaded 'pregnancy,' but, it being found by a jury of twelve matrons that she was not pregnant, she was forthwith sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 15 Feb., 19 James I.

19 February, 19 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Roger Horton esq. J.P., of Henry Turner of Turmill Street blacksmith, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Henry Turner's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to give evidence against Lowia Kinbert "who is under suspicion of coyninge French money." G. D. R., . . . ., 20 James I.

9 April, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Heneage Finche esq. Recorder of London, of Nicholas Wilcock, Augustus Jacob and John Coble, all three of St. Andrew's in Holborn butchers, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of John Searchefeilde of St. Andrew's aforesaid butcher, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said John Searchefeilde's appearance at the next Gaol Delivery, to answer &c, "for suspicion of ventinge forknowne counterfeit coyne." G. D. R., 3 May, 20 James I.

19 April, 20 James I.—Recognizances taken before Sir Thomas Bennett knt. J.P., of Richard Baxter of St. James's at Clerkenwell gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Richard Baxter's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to give information against Richard Gill,—Also, on the same parchment, the Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, of Thomas Chapman and William Chapman, both of St. Sepulchre's co. Midd. coopers, in the sum of ten pounds each, and Richard Gill of the same parish writer of court letters (scriptor Ire' curial') in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Richard Gill's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for threateninge Mr. Baxter and the other Redbull players to ruyn theire house and persons." G. S. P. R., Easter, 20 James I.

6 May, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before George Goulman Professor of Sacred Theology and J.P., of William Gay (?) chandler and Christopher Emerson bandmaker, both of St. Andrew's-in-Holborne, and Christopher Wilmott of Bloomsbury within St. Giles-in-the-Fields wyerdrawer, all three in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Thomas Williams of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Thomas Williams at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for counterfeiting himself to be a sworne Messenger to the High Commission Court, and the Archbishop of Canterbury his Grace, by pretence whereof he hath forced diverse of his Majesties leige people to compound with him and cosened them of their moneys." G. D. R., 5 June, 20 James I.

10 May, 20 James I.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at Ratcliffe co. Midd. on view of the body of Mathea Woodward a girl of seven years of age, there lying dead and slain; With Verdict of Jurors that, on the 10th instant, at Ratcliffe aforesaid, Katherine Woodward, wife of Richard Woodward late of Ratcliffe aforesaid laborer alias Katherine Woodward of the same place spinster, assaulted the said Mathea Woodward and kicking her on her breast gave her a mortall bruse and contusion, of which she died on the following day. Arraigned on this inquisition, which was used as a blll of indictment, Katherine Woodward was found 'Guilty,' and sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 5 June, 20 James I.

14 May, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Tobias Markham and Robert Rea, both of St. Giles'swithout-Criplegate co. Midd. gardiners in the sum of ten pounds each, and Henry Gad of Oldstreete of the same parish brickmaker, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Henry Rea's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer "for dividing his dwelling howse into diverse Tenementes vppon the Informacion of the Officers of Old Strete. G. D. R., 5 June, 20 James I.

25 May, 20 James I.—Recognizance, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Robert Newman of Wades Mill co. Hartford yeoman and Edward Sybly of the same place yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said Robert Newman's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to aunsweare for going with seaven horses in his cart contrary to His Majesties late proclamation."—Also, on the same file, Recognizance, taken on 18 May, 20 James I., before Sir John Weld knt., George Huxley esq. and Arthur Robinson esq. Justices of the Peace, of John Blany of Cambridge co. Cambridge carrier, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Blany's appearance at the next Session of . . . . for Middlesex, to answer "for travelling in the high way with a waggon with foure wheeles and six horses therein, contrary to His Majesty's Proclamation." G. D. R., 5 June, 20 James I.

1 June, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before William Duckett esq. J.P., of John Amye gentleman and Richard Coke blacksmith, both of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Alice Lee of the same parish spinster, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Alice Lee's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for saying she hoped to see the confusion of my Lord of Buckingham's house." G. D. R., 5 June, 20 James I.

5 June, 20 James I.—Order "that . . . . Pinfold bee sent to the House of Correccion and there whipped and put to hard labour and not bee delivered untill she putt in good sureties for her good behaviour" for renewing and again spreading abroad a certain scandalous untruth against Mr. John Squire and his wife, for uttering which at a former Gaol Delivery (when she confessed the falseness of t he malicious statement, and upon her knees asked forgivenes of the said Mr. Squire and his said wife) she was "adjudged by the Courte to bee conveied to Bridewell there to bee whipped." From the words of the entry, it appears that on this second occasion of appearing in Court against the defamer, Mr. Squire "made a solemne and voluntary protestacion by laieing his hand upon the Bible protesting that the accusasion and scandall of the said . . . . Pinfold was in euery particular thereof false." G. D. Reg.

20 July, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Lewes Lewkenor knt. and Edward Forsett esq. Justices of the Peace, of John Tailor of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields crossebowmaker and Philip Jones of St. Margaret's Westminster yoman, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Charles Jones of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields yoman; For the appearance of the said Charles Jones at the next Gaol Delivery of Middlesex, to answer &c. At the foot of the bill appears this note touching Charles Jones,—"He standeth indicted at the Sessions of the Peace holden at Westminster as accessarie after the fact unto William Morton, who stole divers parcells of plate forthe of Yorke Howse from the Lord Viscount St. Albans, and was by us bailed by the speciall licence of the Lord Chiefe Justice of England, for that after longe ymprisonment he was not proceeded against, the said principall having escaped forthe of the Gatehouse." G. D. R., 4 Sept, 20 James I.

26 July, 20 James I.—True Bill that, at London viz. in the parish of St. Mary Aldermarie (sic) in the ward of Cordwayner London on the said day, Thomas Sherrey late of London yoman stole (together with divers articles of clothing set forth in the indictment in familiar descriptions) "unam togam vocatam a Parapus rounde Gowne" worth thirtyeight shillings, of the goods and chattels of Walter Mormay; and that, at Feild Lane co. Midd. on the 27th of July, 20 James I., knowing him to have perpetrated the same felony, Henry Samage yoman, his wife Sara Samage and Mary Newton spinster, all three late of Field Lane aforesaid, received and harboured the said Thomas Sherrey. The document tells nothing of the matter after the finding of the bill. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 20 James I.

5 August, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Hattle (sic) Lyllinstone of the Strand co. Midd. tayler and John Norcraffe of St. Sepulchre's London habberdasher, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of William (sic) Lyllinstone at the next Session of . . . . for Middlesex, "to aunswear for the assawting and beating of Caesar Etherage of Dovegate clothworker." G. D. R., 4 Sept., 20 James I.

12 August, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Francis Williamson esq. J.P., of George Wirthinge and Peter Akar, both of St. Andrewe's in Holborn gentlemen, and John Barbar of New Inne co. Midd. gentleman, all three in the sum of forty pounds each; For the said George Wirthinge's appearance at the next Session of . . . . for Middlesex, "to answere to all such matters as shall bee objected against him, tuchinge the killinge of one John Bradshawe this yesterday in Grayes Inne Feildes." G. D. R., 4 Sept., 20 James I.

16 August, 20 James I.—True Bill that Susan Mason wife of John Mason late of Lymehouse co. Midd. laborer and Katherine Edwards late of the same place spinster, between nine and ten p.m. of the night of the same day at Lymehouse aforesaid, broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Thomas Yates and stole therefrom forty-six pounds of tobacco worth ten pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Thomas Yates. Katherine Edwards was at large. Found 'Guilty,' Susan Mason pleaded pregnancy, and being found pregnant by a jury of twelve matrons was reprieved without judgment. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 20 James I.

24 August, 20 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Andrew's in Holborne co Midd. in the night of the said day, Nathaniel Binckes late of High Holborne co. Midd, labourer broke burglariously into the dwelling house of Sir Edward Coke knt. and, putting the same Sir Edward's wife Elizabeth Lady Coke and all his family being within the same house in fear &c., stole therefrom a crimson velvet vallance for a bed laid with gold lace worth ten pounds, two greene cushions wrought with silver worth eight pounds, three tawny velvet cushions laid with silver lace worth twelve shillings, a cushion of tawney velvet imbroydered with silver worth three pounds, two covers for stooles of tawney velvett imbroydered with silver worth three pounds, twelve yardes of fringe of silver worth five pounds, a yellow curtaine of 'say' worth twenty shillings, and a curtaine of silke worth five pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Sir Edward Coke knt. Found 'Guilty,' Nathaniel Binckes was sentenced to be hung. G. D. R., 4 Sept., 20 James I.

27 September, 20 James I.—Coroner's Inqusition-post-mortem, taken at Harrow co. Midd. on view of the body of James Barnett, there lying dead and slain; With Verdict of Jurors, that on the 19th inst. William Page late of Harrowe aforesaid yoman, and master of the said James Barnett, sent him and another man, named Richard Redman, also a servant of the same William Page, to cart dung from a place called "the Weild" across the common field to another place called Sudburrie in Harrowe, and that on going to overlook his said servants at their labour, he perceaved their cart to stick fast in the mire of the same common field out of which the horses thereof were unable to draw the same cart, and also saw the two men to have taken the horses out of the cart, and to be returning home leaving the loaded cart so sticking fast in the mire, whereupon he said to the two men "Lubberly fellows are you that cannot shoote your loade and fill it againe," to which words they replied by saying, "But you keepe such jades and if you will have it filled againe you shall doe it yourselfe;" and That thereupon, intending to turne back the horses and putte them into the carte again, the said William Page took the forehorse by the head, and the better to lead the horse threwe from him a handbill which he had in his hand, That the handbill thus thrown away with no malicious purpose by mischance struck James Barnett on the back of his head, breaking his skull, and giving a mortal wound, of which he died on the 25th inst.; and That so by misfortune and against his will William Page thus killed the said James Barnett; the Jurors further saying that, at the time of perpetrating this involuntary homicide William Page had goods and chattels to the value of ninety-nine pounds, now in the keeping of the inhabitants of Harrowe.—Also, on the same file, the True Bill that, at Harrowe co. Midd. on the said 19th day of September, 20 James I., William Page killed and slew James Barnett by giving him on the back of his head with a handbill a mortal blow, of which he died on the 25th of the same month. At the bill's head appears the memorandum that he was found 'Guilty' at the Old Bailey of homicide by mischance; the note ending with these words, "Ca' pbt' patet p[er] inquis'io'" = Catallorum probatum patet per Inquisicionem = Probate of Chattels appears by Inquisition. G. D. R., . . . ., 20 James I.

3 October, 20 James I.—Order touching the highways near the Red Bull in Clarkenwell.—Whereas Christofer Beeston, Thomas Hayward, Richard Perkins, Thomas Drew, Richard Harrison and Ellis Worth have bene heretofore presented at severall Sessions of the Peace for not repayringe the Highwayes neere the Red Bull in the parishe of Clarkenwell, and afterwards upon their peticion, at the Sessions of the Peace holden secundo die Octobris anno Regni Regis Jacobi decimo quinto (viz. 2 Oct. 15 James I.), the Court taking notice of the great charge they had bene at in repayringe the said waies, It was ordered that further proces shold be staied upon those presentmentes, But forasmuch as the footewaies neere the said Red Bull, which ought to be repaired by the persons aforenamed are nowe very farre out of repayre, and they doe obstinatelie refuse to amende the same, It is therefore Ordered that Proces de Novo be awarded against them upon the former presentments. S. P. Reg.

26 October, 20 James I.—True Bill that, at Goldinglane in St. Giles's-without-Creplegate co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Connoway late of the said lane spinster feloniously exposed and uttered a certain piece of false money, made of tynne and other false metals in the likeness of the money called Queen Elizabeth Halfe-Shillinges, she knowing the said piece of bad money to be false and counterfeit, when she uttered it. Alice Connoway was found 'Guilty.' No mention of sentence.— Also, on the same file, a True Bill for making and coining on the same aforesaid 26th of October, at Goldinglane co. Midd., eight pieces of false and counterfeit money made in the likeness of Queene Elizabethes shillinges, against Richard Price late of Golding lane aforesaid and his wife Mary. Putting themselves 'Not Guilty,' Richard and Mary were acquitted; Richard however being required to find sureties for his good behaviour. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 20 James I.

4 November, 20 James I.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's-in-Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Erasmus Brooke late of Westminster aforesaid labourer stole one silver trencher plate worthy thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of the Reverend Father in Christ John Bishop of Lincoln, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal. Found 'Guilty,' Erasmus Brooke asked for the book, read like a clerk and was branded. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 20 James I.

8 November, 20 James I.—True Bill that, in the highway at Hackney co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Halleley late of the said parish gentleman assaulted William Clarke, and killed and murdered him with "a knife," by giving him with the said weapon on the left breast a mortal wound, of which he then and there died instantly. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, Edward Halleley asked for the book and read it. No mention is made of branding. G. D. R., 4 Dec, 20 James I.

24 November, 20 James I.—True Bill that, at Rattcliffe co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Thomas Slater late of Rattcliffe aforesaid yoman broke into the dwelling-house of John Dod, and stole therefrom "duas tunicas anglice mandillians" worth five shillings, a paire of sheeres worth two shillings, "et unum colobium anglice one jerkin" worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of the aforesaid John Dod. At the foot of this bill appears a clerical memorandum that at the Gaol Delivery for Middlesex made on 12 Jan. next to come, the said Thomas Slater was indicted by the name of Robert Johns. G. D. R., 19 Feb., 20 James I.

4 December, 20 James I.—Order touching Disorderly Houses in Saffron Hill.—And Whereas also in the said Peticion (i.e. the petition against the butchers of the same locality) Complainte is made that the next Lane adjoininge Fieldlane commonly called Saffronhill hath of longe time beene and still is much pestered with divers immodest lascivious and shamles weomen generally reputed for notorious and common whores, Who are entertained into divers houses for base and filthy lucre sake akreweing to the private benefett of the Landlords and Tenauntes of such houses by the meanes of such women, Who doe usually sitt at the doores of the said houses, And by their wanton and impudent behaviour doe allure and shamefully call in unto them such as passe by that way, to the great corruption of youth and others in their manners and conversacions, and to the intollerable terrour and disquiett of all the Inhabitauntes dwelling thereaboutes, by reason of the manifold riottes routes affaires and breaches of the Kinges peace aswell by night as by day committed and done by such dangerous and insolent persons as frequent the companies of such women, Itt is also Ordered by this Courte and so Commaunded,—That the said officers shall informe themselves of all such Landlordes and Tenauntes who for the respecte aforesaid do harbour or sufferre to bee abidinge in their houses such kinde of women, and the Names of such Landlordes and Tenauntes together with their professions and dwellingplaces to present at the next Sessions of the Peace to bee holden for the Countie of Middlesex soe made, And if it shall happen any Alehousekeepers to bee offendours in this kinde, That the said officers doe at the same Sessions likewise present their names with the names of the women they soe entertaine, That aswell the one as the other may in Lawe bee proceeded withall as to Justice shall appertaine, As they will answere the contrary at their perill, And for prevencion of Connivance and partiallity by the said officers in this behalfe, Itt is Further Required by this Courte that the said Inhabitauntes bee Overseers of the said officers from tyme to tyme in the Execucion of this service, and not only stirre them upp to the carefull performance thereof, but also bee (as occasion shall serve) aideinge councellinge and directing them in the same, And to informe the Courte at the said Sessions of any the premises or other necessary circumstances conducing to the same, which shalbe omitted by the said officers, As also of any neglect, connivence, or corrupcion committed or suffered by them or any of them. By the Court. G. D. Reg.

4 December, 20 James I.—Order touching butchers trading on the Lord's Day.—Whereas a peticion hath bene exhibited vnto this Courte by the most sufficient and substantiall inhabitantes of Feildlane and Saffron hill shewed [? shewing] the great disorder used and committed by the butchers dwellinge there by keeping open markettes selling and uttering their flesh upon the Sabaoth, both before and in the time of divine service to ye high displeasure of Almightie God, the great scandall of government and the generall and common Annoyaunce aswell of the Inhabitantes there as of all other his Majesties subjectes to and fro that way and especially to the church passinge, which annoyaunce doth arise by reason of the narrownes and streightnes of the place, in which respect and for divers other inconveniencyes it is held altogether to bee unfitt for a shambles or markett-place:—For the Reformacion whereof it is by this Courte ordered and straightly commaunde[d] that the Constables and other officers of that place shall give streight charge, and particular warninge to euerye butcher there dwellinge that from henceforth none of them within that Lane or place doe open his shoppes windowes or hang out any flesh att his stall on the Sabboath Day to bee sould; And if any butcher his wife or servauntes shall after warninge given therein offend against this Order, That the said Constables or other officers shall apprehend such offendors and bringe them before some of His Majesties Justices of Peace of this Countye to enter into recognisance to his Majesties use to appeare at the then next Gaole Deliuerye to be holden for this Countie of Midd., Then and there to answere there contemptes and further to bee dealt withall as to Justice shall apperteine. G. D. Reg.

13 December, 20 James I.—Recognizance, taken before William Duckett esq. J.P., of Francis Bowles of St. Botolph's Aldersgate London skinner, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Francis Bowles's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to give evidence against Alexander Whettstone, "suspected to steale from the Earle of Lincolne one gould cupp and two pound of tobacco." G. D .R., . . . ., 20 James I.

18 December, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before William Duckett esq. J.P., of George Foster of St. Andrew's Holborne inholder and Gregory Hilliard of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields victualler, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Robert Freeman of Alisburie co. Bucks caryer in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Robert Freeman's appearance at the next Session of the Peace, to answer "for driving a waggon with fower wheeles and seven horses."—Also, on the same file, three similar set of Recognizances, for the appearance of John Caryer of the city of Oxford caryer, and two other common carriers, for driving horses or horses and oxen in numbers forbidden by the King's proclamation. G. D. R., . . . .,20 James I.

30 December, 20 James I.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Lowther esq. J.P., of Ronald Maddox of Salsbery Court in Fleete Street in the city of London taylor and John Thompsone of Bowlane in St. Aldermary in London taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Richard Peagott bodymaker at the next Session of the Peace, "to aunswer the complaint of Mr. Gunnell the Player." G. D. R., . . . ., 20 James I.