Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1640

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

72-75

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1640', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 72-75. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66032 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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1640

18 January, 15 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields, co. Midd. on the said day, Jenkin Dickson late of the said parish yoman, made, coined and uttered a piece of false money like the money of England called "a Kinge Charles shillinge," and three other pieces of false money like the money called "Kinge Charles two pences." Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' Jenkin Dickson was found 'Not Guilty,' by a jury who did not retract. G. D. R., 20 Feb., 15 Charles I.

20 January, 15 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's Savoy in the Strand on the said day, Francis Middlefeild late of the said parish laborer stole and carried away three silver trenchers worth nine pounds of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble the Earl of Corke, and a pair of gloves worth twenty shillings of the goods and chattels of the Most Noble the Viscount Dungarven, and a hat "unum galerum anglice a demycaster" worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Charles Waldron. Confessing the indictment and pleading his clergy, Francis Middlefeild was branded "in London." G. D. R., 20 Feb., 15 Charles I.

28 August, 16 Charles I.—True Bill that, at Clement's Inne in St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. in the night of the said day, John Godden late of the said parish blacksmith broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Gabriell Evenell gentleman, and stole therefrom a doublet worth ten shillings, a riding coat worth ten shillings, "unam clamidem anglice vocatam a Rockett" worth ten shillings, and a hat called "a demie-caster" worth eight shillings. Putting himself on trial, John Godden was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, who did not retract. G. D. R., 25 Feb., 16 Charles I.

30 August, 16 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's Savoye co. Midd. on the said day, John Goodman late of the said parish clerk, endeavoured and practised traitorously to seduce and withdraw divers of his Majesty lieges and subjects from the religion, established in her dominions by Queen Elizabeth in the twenty-third year of her reign, to the religion of Rome (ad Romanam Religionem). Putting himself on trial, John Goodman was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, who did not retract. G. D. R., 15 January, 16 Charles I.

30 August, 16 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, John Goodman late of the said parish clerk, born after the Feast of St. John the Baptist, 1 Eliz., and before the aforesaid 30th Aug., 16 Charles, made and ordained a, priest by authority derived and pretended from the See of Rome, was and remained traitorously and as a false traitor of the said King &c. Putting himself 'Not Guilty,' John Goodman was found 'Guilty' by a jury, and sentenced to be drawn on a hurdle to the gallows of Tiborne, and there be executed, in the manner of execution appointed for felons convicted of high treason. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 16 Charles I.

9 November, 16 Charles I.—True Bill that, at the Strand co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Shipley late of the Strand spinster, to stir the people to rebellion and insurrection and the praise of the religion of Rome (religionis Romane) openly spoke and said these words "That those which doe professe the true religion established in the Church of England are hereticke dogges," and further on the same day and in the same place spoke these words, to wit, "Though I and many others were gone out of the Towne, yet there would bee Papistes enough lefte to hange the Protestantes and Puritanes." Elizabeth Shipley was remanded to next Gaol Delivery, as the Court wished to take counsel. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 16 Charles I.

24 November, 16 Charles I.—True Bill against Elizabeth Stewkley late of St. Andrew's Holborne co. Midd. widow alias Elizabeth Stewkley late of Bray co. Berks widow, for not going to church &c. on the said 24th Nov., nor during three months next following the said day. G. D. R., 25 Feb., 16 Charles I.

24 November, 16 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day Joan Worrall late of the said parish spinster published certain "false newes and tales" in these English words, to wit, that "She hoped ere longe there would be crucifixes in all houses, and that the Kinges Majesty had one crucifixe in his chamber and did bowe to it," whereby scandal may arise between the said Lord the King and the people of this kingdom. At the bill's head appears this clerical note "Respectuatur usque prox' quia cur' advisari vult" = Respited to next Gaol Delivery, because the Court wishes to take counsel. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 16 Charles I.

1 December, 16 Charles I.—True Bill that, in the highway of St. Pancras on the said day, Arthur Downes yoman and George Wright yoman and his wife Jane Wright assaulted a certain John Trahane and with violence then and there robbed him of "a crucifixe inambled with five pretious stones" worth thirteen pounds six shillings and eight pence, two gold rings worth seven pounds, a sword worth forty shillings, and ten shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said John Trahane. Found 'Guilty,' Arthur Downes and George Wright were sentenced to be hung. Jane Wright was at large. G. D. R., 15 Jan., 16 Charles I.

14 December, 16 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Gardiner recorder of the City of London, of William Forrest of HatchBeucham (sic) co. Somerset shoemaker, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Christopher Downeham of St. Giles's-without-Criplegate whitebaker and Baldwin Allin of St. Bridget's London taylor, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said William Forrest at the next Gaol Delivery of Middlesex, he being formerly "committed for running away from his captaine beinge a preste souldier."—Also, on the same file, a similar set of recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of John Davies of Long Sutton co. Somerset laborer, he being "committed for running away from his Captaine, being a preste souldier." G. D. R., 15 Jan., 16 Charles I.