Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1647

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

98-102

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1647', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 98-102. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66039 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1647

4 January, 22 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Laurence Whitaker esq. J.P., of Lucy Betts of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. spinster, in the sum of forty pounds, and of John Hockin cabinetmaker and James Sadler sea-faring-man, both of the aforesaid parish, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Lucy Betts at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for reviling and abusing the constable of the parish of St. Gilesin-the-Fields, and for telling him in a scornfull manner that shee, having formerly bin a popish recusant, did now go to church to please knaves." S. P. R., 24 Jan., 22 Charles I.

7 January, 22 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before John Trenchard esq. J.P., of Francis Tindall of Brotherton co. York gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of William Ramsden of Longley . . . . and William Hammond of Scarlingwell co. York gentlemen, in the sum of fifty pounds each; For the said Francis Tindall's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for harboring a Preist." S. P. West. R. 14 Jan., 22 Charles I.

1 March, 22 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Solomon Smith esq. J.P., of John Voysey of Dartmouth co. Devon merchant and James Rescemer of Covent garden gentleman, and Arthur Creswell of St. Dunstan's West London barber, and John Ley of Trinity Minorites co. Midd. taylor, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the said John Voysey's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "There to answer for speakinge certeine scandalous and disgracefull wordes . . . . this present Parliament, in his drinke, vizt. That some of the Parliament men had the pox and were whoremasters, and some of them were rogues and rebells." S. P. R, . . . ., 22 Charles I.

19 March, 22 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of Thomas Bickerdike of Wapping co. Midd. . . . ., in the sum of two hundred pounds, and of . . . . of Alhollowes Barkan (sic) London habberdasher and Thomas Hill of the same parish ship-chaundler, in the sum of one hundred pounds each; For the said Thomas Bickerdike's appearance at the next Session of Peace for Middlesex, "to answere for sending a barrell of powder of a hundred weight into the shop of one Lewis Coxe a smith dwelling in Wappinge without givinge notice unto him or any of his servants what it was, which powder taking fier not only blew up the said shopp but much shattered and spoiled the howse of the said Coxe, and the howse of Thomas Awsten, and of many others of the neighbours whereby the porter that brought the sayd powder, and a servant of the said Lewis Coxe were killed &c." S. P. R., . . . ., 22 Charles I.

23 March, 22 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Wollaston esq. knt. J.P., of William Wilkinson of St. Peter's Cornehill London, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Thomas Childe of the same parish boxe-maker and William Ireland of St. Mary's-leBowe London boxemaker, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said William Wilkinson's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for being a rioter in Morefeilds when Mr. Hubbert's howse was pulled downe."—Also, similar sets of recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace, for the appearance of William Wade of St. Mary's Woolnoth London, and Richard Lake of St. Giles's Cripplegate, both laborers, and John Crane of St. Benet's Finke London joyner, at the same next Session of the Peace, to answer for rioting "in Morefields when Mr. Hubbert's house was pulled downe." S. P. R., . . . ., 22 Charles I.

24 March, 22 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Hubbert esq. J.P., of Thomas Sampson of Spittlefeilds turner in the sum of forty pounds, and of John Sampson of Eastsmithfield turner and Richard Sampson of Wapping turner, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Thomas Sampson at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "To answer for speaking these slanderous words against the State, vizt. that the letters that were taken in the King's Cabinet were not of the Kinges owne hand-writinge, but that the State did counterfeit his hand." S. P. R., . . . ., 22 Charles I.

28 July, 23 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Josias Berners esq. J.P., of John Chetrost alias Chatred weaver, in the sum of thirty pounds, and Richard Willoughby cordwayner and Thomas Lowden painter-stayner, in the sum of ten pounds each, all three being of St. Katherine's Tower co. Midd,; For the appearance at the next Session of the Peace for co. Midd. of the said John Chetrost and his wife Christiana Chetrost, "they standing accused before me, by Thomas Smithe of Oldstreete co. Midd. milkeman, to be common spirrittes, inticeing away his servant, Katherine Penn, the said Christiana promising her to helpe her to a service, where she should have six pounds sterling per annum, but hee and his wife conveyed her into a shipp, to sell her to a merchant, to be transported beyond Sea, as the said Katherine affirmeth. I am credibly informed that they subsist by this lewd course, and have beene often questioned for the like." S. P. R., 31 Aug., 23 Charles I.

31 July, 23 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Edward Carter esq. J.P. for Westminster, of James Carr of St. Martin's-in-theFields esq., and Symon Davis of St. Paul's Covent Garden apothecary, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Thomas Trayle of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields at the next Session of the Peace for Westminster to answer &c. "for being a Papist which he confessed." S. P. West. R., 30 Sept., 23 Charles I.

5 August, 23 Charles I.—The Information of Peter Stubbes of the parishe of St. Michaell Bassieshawe London, taken upon oath before Sir John Wollaston knt. J.P. within the city of London.—This informante sayeth that on Monday last past was a seavenighte hee this Informante being at Westminster when the tumult was; hee heard Thomas Ellis then being there one of the tumult did say that hee with the rest there tumultuously gathered togeather would force the Parliament by shutting them upp untill they should graunte what they peticioned for or wordes to that effect and soe continued instigating others by the space of twoe howers to disturb the Howses of Lordes and Commons. Signed, Peter Stubbes. S. P. West. R., 30 Sept., 23 Charles I.

6 September, 23 Charles I.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Hubbert esq. J.P., of Humphrey Hill of Whitechappell nailer, in the sum of forty pounds, and of John Monke needlemaker and Laurence Baker silke-throwster, both of Whitechappell, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Humphrey Hill at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "To answer for being accused to be a Spirritt and for seducing and taking up one John Prescott and conveighing him against his will and knowledge upon shipp-board, where he was detained by vertue of a note he sent by him on purpose to bin" (sic) "sent beyond sea." S. P. R., 1 Oct., 23 Charles I.

30 September, 23 Charles I.—The Humble Peticion of the four Scavengers and Raker of the High Street from Charing Cross to the Savoy, to the Justices of the Peace for Westminster, assembled in Quarter Sessions:—Shewing "That whereas it pleased this Right Worshipfull Bench (in regard of great aboundance of Hackney Coaches plyeing against the Exchainge from Covent Garden which tended to the great lett of clensing the streetes and fowling thereof in that place) to order, that there should be noe more then 6 coaches at a tyme standing there, and if any more should bee they to bee bound over to the Sessions, which they slight, beeing only 10 groates, and abuse your Worshipps' Commandes, makeing a multitude of 20 or 30 coaches at a tyme, whereby the soyle much encreaseth and the scavenger greatly hindred not being able to clense that place for them, and besides hee is not able to performe the place at the rate hee hath taken it by reason of the much soyle there made,"—and Praying their said Worships "to give warrant or order directed to the Constable or Constables that every one shall pay in present payment to the use of the poore" some certain fine, who "exceede the number of six in that plase." S. P. West. R., 30 Sept., 23 Charles I.

30 September, 23 Charles I.—The Petition of the Poor Prisoners in the Gatehouse of Westminster to the Justices of the Peace for Westminster:—Shewing "that anciently a basketman hath ben allowed to collect victualles for the relief of the poore Prisoners throughout the said citie whose wages weekely hath ben anciently iis. which was weekely paid unto him for many yeres together by Sir Randol Crew knt. and Lady Burraes deceased," and Praying the said Justices of the Peace "to take some speedy course for the payment of the said wages with the arrearages unpaid for a yere and a halfe, or else the petitioners must needes perish." S. P. West. R., 30 Sept., 23 Charles I.

10 December, 23 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Beres late of the said parish yeoman, designing and maliciously intending to deprave and bring into contempt our Lady Mary the beloved Queen and faithful consort of the said lord King Charles (dominam nostram Mariam Reginam amantissimam et fidelem consortem dicti domini nostri Caroli) maliciously spoke these scandalous words in the presence and hearing of very many of the king's lieges and subjects, to wit, "The Queene is a whore, and that shee left a bastard at Newarke-uponTrent." Found 'Guilty,' Thomas Beres was fined in the sum of one hundred marks, and sentenced to be imprisoned until &c., and should put in good sureties for his good behaviour. (Po se cul' fin' C mercas imprisonand' quousq' &c. Et. b. m. pro b. g.) G. D. R., 14 Jan., 23 Charles I.

28 December, 23 Charles I.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Rawlyns labourer and Oliver Langley yeoman, stole and carried away a pair of gloves worth ten shillings, of the goods and chattels of Thomas Moreton, Professor of Sacred Theology and late the Bishop of Durham. Found 'Guilty, Robert Rawlyns and Oliver Langley pleaded their clergy effectually, and after reading the book were branded. G. D. R., 14 Jan. 23 Charles I.