Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1651

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

200-207

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1651', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 200-207. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66047 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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1651

1 January, 1650/1.—True Bill that, at the parish of Edmonton co. Midd. on the said day, Joan Haynes late of the said parish spinster alias Joan Haynes wife of John Haynes of the said parish . . . . stole and carried off "quindecim uteres vini Hispanici anglice fifteene bottles of canary wyne valor quindecim solidor' tria librat' fructus hispanice (sic) anglice three poundes of currentes valor' duodecim denar', dimid' quarter' modii frument' anglice halfe a pecke of flower valor' duodecim denar' et duodecim panes anglice cakes valor' duodecim denar'" of the goods and chattels of Thomas Hoddesdon. Found 'Guilty' of stealing to the value of nine shillings, Joan Haynes was branded. G. D. R., . . . ., 1650/1.

6 January, 1650/1.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of George Richardson of Martin's parish in the liberty of Westminster co. Midd. gentleman and Edmund Menell of Andrew's parish in Holborne co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and James Looker of Giles's parish co. Midd. schoolmaster in the sum of forty pounds; For the said James Looker's appearance at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex held at Hicks Hall, to answer &c. "for being taken hearinge of Masse and for keepinge a schoole being a recusant which hee himself confesseth."—Also, similar recognizances, taken before the same J.P., for the appearance of Elizabeth Bowker of Slipton co. Northampton at the same next G. S. P., to answer &c. "for beinge taken hearinge of Masse." S. P. R., 14 Jan., 1650/1.

6 January, 1650/1.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of Isatus Thomas barbor and Elizabeth Thomas "virgo," both of Giles parish co. Midd. (de parochia Giles co. Midd.) in the sum of twenty pounds each, and Elinor Griffine of the same parish . . . . in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Elinor Griffine's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for beinge taken a-hearinge of Masse." S. P.R., 14 Jan., 1650/1.

6 January, 1650/1.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of Thomas Abden taylor and Mary Pottinger "virgo," both of Giles parish co. Midd. in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Elizabeth Pottinger of the same parish widdow, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Elizabeth Pottinger's appearance at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c "for beinge taken a-hearinge of Masse."—Also, similar recognizances, for Mary Pottinger's appearance at the same G. S. P. to answer &c. "for beinge taken a-hearinge of Masse." S. P. R., 14 Jan., 1650/1.

22 January, 1650/1.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Jennings, Henry Spencer and William Young, all three late of the said parish laborers, stole and carried off two gold rings worth twenty shillings each, two silver tankards worth three pounds and ten shillings each, two silver wyne bolles worth ten shillings each, one silver beere boll worth three pounds, two silver saltes worth thirty shillings each, one silver cawdle cupp worth fifty shillings, two dozen and foure silver spoones worth ten pounds, and divers articles of wearing-apparel, severally described, and fifty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Francis Pellatt gentleman. All three culprits were at large. G. D. R., 9 April, 1651.

27 January, 1650/1.—True Bill that, at the parish of Bottolph-without-Aldersgate in the afternoon of the said day John Nash late of London laborer broke into the dwelling-house of Henry Wollaston esq., and stole therefrom and carried away a silver tankard worth four pounds, five gilt spoons worth fifty shillings, one silver spoon worth ten shillings, a watch worth three pounds, one gold ring worth twenty shillings, a cabinet of mother-of-pearle worth three pounds, and eight pounds and eleven shillings in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Henry Wollaston esq. No clerical minutes on the bill touching arraignment or the consequences thereof. G. D. R., . . . ., 1651.

17 February, 1650/1.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, William Johnson late of the said parish laborer stole and carried off a dunne gelding worth fourteen pounds of the goods and chattels of William Pett, and a light-gray gelding worth eight pounds, of the goods and chattels of John Merricke. William Johnson stood mute, and was therefore sentenced to the peine forte ei dure. G. D. R., . . . ., 1650/1

18 February, 1650/1.—Information, laid by William Lippiatt before Justices of the Peace assembled in S. P. at Hicks Hall in St. John's Street co. Midd. on the said day, against Thomas Leichfeild late of the parish of St. James Clarkenwell, for keeping in the said parish a common gaming-house for dice, tables, and cardes, and a certain unlawful game called Shovegroate alias Slidethrift, and a bowling-alley, and a certain unlawful game called Ninepins alias Cloiscailes against the form of the statute. S. P. R., 18 Feb., 1650/1.—N.B. In the informations of this period against keepers of gaming-houses Shovegroate and Ninepins are usually described with these aliases of Slidethrift and Cloiscailes.

. . . . February (?), 1650/1.—The Jurors for the Keepers of the Liberty of England by the authority of Parliament present that on 1 January, 18 James I., at the parish of St. Andrew's in Holborne co. Midd., George Baker late of the said parish clerk voluntarily said used and celebrated a private masse, against the form of a statute in a case of this kind published and provided and as well against the said lord late the King's peace his crown and dignity, as against the public peace. Endorsed 'Billa Vera.' Over George Baker's name at the bill's head this clerical minute, 'Po' se cul' fin' et imprison' juxta formam statuti' = He put himself &c.; and the jurors say 'Guilty'; he is adjudged to pay a fine and be imprisoned according to the form of the statute. G. D. R., . . . ., 1650/1.

24 March, 1650/1.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Elizabeth Lanam, wife of James Lanam of the said parish laborer, practised witchcraft upon and against John Cooke, so that he languished and wasted in his body from the said day till the day of the taking of this inquisition. G. D. R., 9 April, 1651.

28 March, 1651.—True Bill that, at Graye's Inn in the parish of St. Andrew in Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, William Ardington yeoman and his wife Mary Ardington, both late of the said parish, assaulted Thomas Tisdale esq., and that Mary Ardington with a knife cut the neck and throat of the said Thomas Tisdale esq., so that he then and there died instantly, being thus murdered by the said William and Mary Ardington. Over the name of each culprit, at the bill's head, appears this clerical minute, "Puse guilty noe goodes therefore to be hanged by the neck untill &c." G. D. R., . . . ., 1655/6.

2 April, 1651.—Recognizances, taken before Josias Berners esq. J.P., of Francis Bramston of the Middle Temple London esq., and William Turner of Paules Churchyard wollendraper, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Sir Edward Norton of Sibsey co. Lincolne barronet, in the sum of one hundred pounds; For the said Sir Edward Norton's-appearance at the next Gaol Delivery for London and Middlesex, to answer &c. "he being suspected to have lived in adultery with Mary the wife of Edward Mogges late of Newgate Market poulterer, now a soldyer in Captain Disher's troope in the Lord Generall Cromwell's regiment of horse for about the space of twelve moneths last past." G. D. R., 9 April, 1651.

3 April, 1651.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. and in the hearing of very many persons on the said day, Anne Watson wife of Francis Watson of the said parish laborer spoke these malicious words, in depravation and to the contempt of the Parliament, to wit, "That they that sitt att the Parliament are all the sonnes of whores, and that shee could find in her heart to blow them up with gun-powder." Anne Watson put herself on a jury of the country and was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 9 April, 1651.

5 May, 1651.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Feildes co. Midd. in the night of the said day, George Stanley late of the aforesaid parish gentleman broke burglariously into the mansion house of Dame Mary Armyn widow, and stole and carried off therefrom three silver voyders of the value of one hundred and fifty pounds, five silver plates worth ten pounds, a silver tankard worth six pounds, one silver sugar-box worth sixty shillings, one silver candlestick worth thirty shillings, four silver "tunnes" worth six pounds, five silver porringers worth five pounds, three silver sawcers worth thirty shillings, one silver spoon worth ten shillings, one silver cawdle cup worth six pounds, a silver "medicen pott" worth thirty shillings, and forty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Dame Mary Armyn, one gold jewel set with seventeen diamonds worth twenty pounds, one gold ring set with three diamonds worth ten pounds, one gold ring set with five diamonds worth five pounds, one gold ring worth twenty shillings, one enamelled gold ring worth eight shillings, one gold ring set with red stones worth eight shillings, one gold ring worth three shillings, one silver bodkin worth two shillings and six-pence, . . . ., one silver watch with a cristal case worth eight . . . ., one Emerodd seale worth two shillings, one "cornelion" seale worth two shillings and six-pence, one bible with two clasps worth sixteen shillings, one psalm-book worth two shillings, and divers articles of wearing apparel described severally in the indictment, and twenty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Elizabeth Armyn singlewoman. At the bill's foot appears this clerical minute,—"And thaforesaide George Stanley putteth himself upon his countrey which findeth him Guiltie, no goodes or chattels, to bee hanged." G. D. R., . . . ., 1651.

5 May, 1651.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. in the night of the said day, William Arden gentleman, Thomas Browne gentleman, James Bever gentleman, John Sharpnes alias Sharpe laborer, and Richard Martin laborer, all five late of the said parish, broke burglariously into the mansion-house of Dame Mary Armyn and stole therefrom and carried away the several articles, set forth in the already noticed bill of the indictment of George Stanley gentleman, for the same burglary. Clerical minutes on the bill now under consideration show that William Arden gentleman, Thomas Browne gentleman, James Bever gentleman and Richard Martin laborer, were found 'Guilty' and sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., . . . ., 1651.

12 June, 1651.—Recognizances, taken before Laurence Whitaker esq. J.P., of Elizabeth Sorrell the elder widow and Elizabeth Sorrell the younger spinster, both of Brayntree co. Essex, and Thomas Atkyn and Thomas Baugh, both of Boston co. Lincolne gentlemen, all four in the sum of four-score pounds each; For the appearance of the said Elizabeth Sorrell the elder and Elizabeth Sorrell the younger at the next Quarter Sessions for the City and liberty of Westminster, "to answeare for averringe and meynteyneinge diverse erroneous damnable and blasphemouse opinions against the Holy Trinity."—Also, three sets of similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justices of the Peace, for the appearance of Thomas Tydford of Frome co. Somersett wyer-drawer, Margarett Dunlopp of Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. widow, Frances Bedwell of Brayntree co. Essex spinster, and Anne Burley of Margarett's Westminster co. Midd. at the next Q. S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, "to answer for averringe and meynteyninge diverse erroneous damnable and blasphemous opinions against the Holy Trinitie." S. P. (West.) R., 20 June, 1651.

23 July, 1651.—Two several Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of Leonard Peerson of Margaret's Westminster gentleman and John Sayres of Andrew's Holborne co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Leonard Peerson and John Sayres at the next Session of the Peace to be holden at Hickes Hall, then and there to give evidence "against John Rose and John Page for endevoringe to robb the States waggons on the highway beinge laden with money for the use of the army that is in Ireland." S. P. R., 12 Aug., 1651.

26 July, 1651.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of Thomas Willoughby esq. and John Willoughby gentleman, both of Grindon co. Northampton, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Thomas Coster of Brides parish London gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds; For said Thomas Coster's appearance at the next S. P. for the City and liberty of Westminster, to answer &c. "for wishinge confusion to the Parliament Army and for sayinge that some of the Com's had the pox." S. P. (West.) R., . . . ., 1651.

5 August, 1651.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of John Chapman and Thomas Baskevile, both of Margaret's Westminster gentlemen, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and James Afflack of Martin's-in-the-Fields gentleman, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said James Afflack's appearance at the next G. S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, to answer &c. "for dispersinge of false newes sayinge that Major-Generall Massey did with a party of horse take at Edinborough six-and-twenty of the Parliament's Commissioners, and sayd that none of the newes was to beeseene in the bookes." S. P. (West.), R., . . . ., 1651.

10 August, 1651.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of William Webb of Martin's-in-the-Fields carpenter, in the sum of twenty pounds, and Robert Webb of the parish of Andrew in Holborne co. Midd. carpenter, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Robert Webb's appearance at the next S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, to answer &c. "for sayinge the Kinge of Scots was noe traytor." S. P. (West, R., . . . ., 1651.

12 August, 1651.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of Richard Wood of James's Clerkenwell yeoman and Isaak Mills of Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. baker, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Richard Wood and Isaak Mills and also of Anne the wife of Richard Davis, at "this present Sessions of the Peace now holden for this county against Katherine Cottrell of Clerkenwell co. Middlesex widow for speaking treasonable words against the Parliament." S. P. R., 12 Aug., 1651.

5 October, 1651.—Bill (ignored) of indictment, that at Chelsea co. Midd. on the said day, Anne Leviston wife of Thomas Leviston late of the said parish gentleman and Jane Simpson late of the same parish spinster, by mixing a certain powder "to wit, mercury" with beer, composed a certain deadly and poisonous drink, and with the intention of killing her administered the same poisonous drink to Dame Mary Powell late the wife of Sir Edward Powell knt. and bart, and that the same Dame Mary Powell drank the same poisonous drink thus administered to her, and died thereof on the following day, being thus killed and murdered by the said Anne Leviston and Jane Simpson. G. D. R., 2 June, 1652.

14 October, 1651.—True Bill that, at Andrewes parish in Holborne co. Midd. on the said day, "thinking and intending to proclayme declare publish and promote Charles Stuart son of Charles Stuart late King of England to be King of England and Ireland without the consent of the people in parliament first had and obtained" &c, Robert Vaughan of the said parish engraver made and engraved a certain "picture of the sayd Charles Stuart son to the sayd Charles late King of England with the trayterous inscription . . . . following underneath the sayd picture in mettal advisedly maliciously and with a trayterous minde and intencion did . . . . engraved (to wit) "Charles the Second (sonne to Charles I. the Martyr) King of England Scotland France and . . . . defendor of the faith &c. Nowe in the head of a gallant and numerous army of the valliant and faithfull Scottes and . . . . marching by the power and mightines of his maker, towards the possession of the rest of his fathers Crownes with . . . . emblem of victory peace and mercy to restore to the Loyall their religion lawes and libertyes, To shew pitty and compassion to all the seduced and sorrowfull, retorning to their obedience, But to execut vengeance on the impenitent malitious and implacable murtherers of his Royall Father" and that having so made and engraved the said paper and inscription the same Robert Vaughan on the day aforesaid "did print or caused to be printed" the same picture and inscription on paper and "advisedly malitiously and trayterously did disperse and publish" at the aforesaid parish the papers so imprinted with the said paper and inscription.—Over Robert Vaughan's name at the bill's head appears this clerical minute, "He putteth himselfe &c. not guiltie &c. no flienge," showing that Robert Vaughan put himself on trial and was found 'Not Guilty' by a jury, who did not withdraw from their verdict. This parchment is so defaced and injured by rot as to be illegible in places. G. D. R., . . . ., 1652.

14 October, 1651.—Bill of indictment against Robert Vaughan late of Holbourne co. Midd. engraver, for making and publishing a certain engraved "picture of the said Charles Stuart sonne of the said Charles late King of England with a traiterous . . . . words following underneath the said . . . . and engraved, to witt, 'Charles the Second sonne of Charles the Martyr King of England Scotland . . . . and Ireland defendor of the faith &c.'," the rest of the inscription being illegible. No endorsement of 'Billa vera' now apparent. This parchment is so diminished and defaced by rot and dirt as to be decypherable only in places. G. D. R., . . . ., 1651.

15 October, 1651.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of Thomas Gaywood of Gyles Chriplegate (sic) engraver and of . . . ., in the sum of twenty pounds each; the condition of the said recognizances being that the said Thomas Gaywood and . . . . "preferr and prosecute with effect a bill of indictment at the next S. P. for this county against Robert Vaughan engraver now prisoner whom they doe accuse upon oath for engraving in copper the figure of the King of Scotts by which many printed coppyes hath been vented there being a treasonable subscription thereunto engraven. This parchment is much decayed. G. D. R., . . . ., 1651.

11 November, 1651.—True Bill that, at the parish of Martin-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Brewer, wife of Roger Brewer late of the said parish yoman, "wickedly unlawfully wilfully and feloniously was carnally knowne by one John Hume gentleman hee the said Roger Brewer the husband of her the said Mary Brewer then being alive and in full life, and soe shee the said Mary Brewer the detestable crime of adultery with thaforesaid John Hume then and there wickedly unlawfully wilfully and feloniously did committ to the greate displeasure of Almighty God, against the forme of the statute in this case provided, and against the publicke peace &c."— Mary Brewer was found 'Not Guilty.'—N.B. In the "Further Matters taken from the Gaol Delivery Register temp. Commonwealth," notice is taken of all the arraignments and trials for adultery, that occurred during the Commonwealth under the statute referred to in this extract from the bill of indictment against Mary Brewer. G. D. R., . . . ., 1652.

10 December, 1651.—Wheras Robert French of Gosfield in the county of Essex gentleman is charged by Mr. Underwood upon suspicion to be one of the persons that feloniously and burglarily (sic) did break the dwelling-house of the Master of the Rols, and did steale out of the same one thousand nyne hundred pounds in money, Now on the behalf of the said Robert French, by the affidavits of Jonas Stubbins and Edward Til it appearing that the sayd French is so dangerously sick that through his inability of body hee is not able at this tyme to attend the court, It is therfore Ordered, That it be referred to Justices of the Peace of the county of Essex, recyding near to the place where the sayd French inhabits, to take sufficient bayle of the sayd French to appear at the next Sessions to be holden for the county of Middlesex, the sayd French and his sureties to be bound by recognizance in the sum of 1,000£ a-peece, or upon the default or refusal of the sayd French heerin the sayd Justices are to commit him to the Gaole of the County, there to remayne til further Order or otherwise until hee shalbe discharged by due Cours of Law.—By the Court. G. D. Reg.