Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1654

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

220-231

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1654', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 220-231. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66050 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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1654

11 January, 1653/4.—Order (made at S. P. held at Hicks Hall in St. John's Streete co. Midd. before Sir John Thorowgood knt., Robert Lewright, Richard Powell and Francis Blome esqrs.) for the maintenance of the grand-children of Lady Thorowgood, wife of Sir John Thorowgood knt.—Whereas it appeareth to this Court, upon the mocion of Mr. Walter, councell for the Churchwardens and Overseers of the Poore of the parish of St. Andrewes-in Holborne in the said county, That Elizabeth, Philippa and Mary Lunsford, the daughters of Sir Thomas Lunsford knt., are setled in the said parish, and are very younge impotent and unable to provyde for themselves, and destitute of meanes to releive themselves, but are likely to become chargeable to the said parish, And That the said Sir Thomas Lunsford was married to Katherine Nevill, the daughter of Dame Elizabeth nowe wife of Sir John Thorowgood of the parish of St. James Clerkenwell in the said county knight, by Sir Henry Nevill knt. deceased her former husband, by whom the said Sir Thomas Lunsford had the said three children, and that the said children were carried away with their said father and mother to Virginia, and there remayned untill the decease of their said parents, after whose decease the said children were sent backe to the said parish of St. Andrewesin-Holborne in the said county, where they now remayne as aforesaid, And Whereas it appeareth to this Court That the said Sir John Thorowgood enjoyeth a great estate by his said Lady, the grandmother of the said children, and therefore ought by lawe to provyde for, relieve and maynteyne her said grand-children, It is thought fitt by this Court, that the said Sir John Thorowgood be assessed, and the said Sir J. Thorowgood is assessed by this Court for and towards the releife and mainteynaunce of the said children from this tyme forth in manner followinge, that is to say, for and towards the releife and mainteynaunce of the said Elizabeth Lunsford the somme of fyve shillinges weekely, and for and towards the releife and mainteynaunce of the said Philippa Lunsford the somme of fyve shillings weekly, and also for and towards the releife and mainteynaunce of the said Mary Lunsford the summe of fyve shillinges weekely, And it is Ordered by this Court that the said Sir John Thorowgood shall from weeke to weeke make payment of the said severall summes of money into the hands of the Churchwardens and Overseers of the poore of the said parish of St. Andrewesin-Holborne in the said county for the purpose aforesaid, according to the statute in that case made and provided, untill the said children shalbe respectively able to provide for themselves, or otherwise that he may be legally discharged of the said charge.—By the Court. S. P. Book.

31 January, 1653/4.—True Bill that, at Paull's Covent Garden co. Midd. on the said day, Simon Parry late of the said parish gentleman assaulted James Medici gentleman, and with a dagger gave the same James Medici in the left side of his throat a mortal wound, of which he died on the 3rd of February then next following, being thus slain and killed by the said Simon Parry. The said Simon Parry gentleman was 'at large.' G. D. R., . . . ., 1654.

4 February, 1653/4.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken at the parish of St. Mary Savoy co. Midd., on view of the body of James Medici gentleman there lying dead and slayne; With verdict that, on 31 January last past in the parish of St. Paul's Covent Garden, Symon Parry late of the last-named parish gentleman assaulted the said James Medici gentleman and with a dagger gave him on the left side of his throat a mortal wound, of which he died on the 3rd inst. at the said parish of St. Paul Covent Garden. G. D. R., . . ., 1654.

4 March, 1653/4.—True Bill that, at Giles's-without-Cripplegate co. Midd. on the said day, Peter Greene alias Pettygreene late of the said parish laborer assaulted Elizabeth Herbert and with a dagger-knife gave her in the right side of her back a mortal wound, of which she then and there died instantly, being thus slain and murdered by the said Peter Greene. Found 'Not Guilty' of murder, but 'Guilty ' of manslaughter, Peter Greene prayed for the book, which was not allowed to him because he had had it before, whereupon he was forthwith sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., . . . ., 1654.

14 March, 1653/4.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of Timothy Thorner of Andrew's Holborne gentleman in the sum of forty pounds, and of John Thorner of Barnard's Inn London gentleman and Emma Thorner of Andrew's Holborne singlewoman, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Timothy Thorner at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer to Anthony Hynde of London baker for cheating him by the new way called the Trepan."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day, for the appearance of Brace Wallwin of Gyles-in-the-Feildes barber at the same G. S. P., to answer to the same Anthony Hynde "for cheating him by the new way called the Trepan." S. P. R., 4 April, 1654.

23 March, 1653/4.—True Bill that, at Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day. Robert Larke late of the said parish laborer stole and carried away one silver tankard worth five pounds, four silver bowles worth twelve pounds, two silver porringers worth three pounds, one silver cup worth ten shillings, two silver dishes worth forty shillings, three silver "boates" worth twenty shillings, one portmantua worth two shillings, and seven pounds and fourteen shillings in numbered moneys. Over Robert Larke's name at the head of the bill appears this clerical minute, "He putteth himselfe &c. guiltie &c. no goods &c. to be hanged &c. because it appeareth by the evidence given at his triall that it is a burglary in the . . . ." G. D. R., . . . ., 1654.

1 April, 1654.—True Bill that, at Leonard's parish Shoreditch co. Midd. on the said day, Mary Pitman wife of Richard Pitman late of the said parish yeoman "then beinge a married woman and married unto the said Richard Pitman by her owne assent and not in case of ravishment unlawfully wickedly wilfully and feloniously then and there was carnally knowne by one James Bastine alias Bastian, the aforesaid Richard Pitman husband of the said Mary Pitman beinge then alive &c."—At the bill's head, over Mary Pitman's name, appears this noteworthy clerical minute, to wit, "Puse not guilty nor did fly." Puse (= pu' se=puts self) was devised by the clerks of the Commonwealth period as a convenient English substitute for the Latin 'po' se'; and having been introduced in the criminal records of the Old Bailey and Hicks Hall in the Commonwealth time it was re-introduced into the same records on the last and final abolition of Latin from such writings. As 'puse' has occasioned no little perplexity to legal antiquaries, this explanation of the English contraction for "puts himself or herself" should be borne in mind. G. D. R., . . . ., 1654.

4 April, 1654.—True Bill that, at Edmonton co. Midd. in the night of the said day, Robert Warren late of the said parish laborer broke into the dwelling-house of Ranulph Manninge gentleman, and stole therefrom and carried away two silver tankards worth ten pounds, one silver-gilt cupp worth six pounds, one silver cawdle-cupp with a silver cover worth six pounds, one silver cupp with a silver cover worth five pounds, one great silver salt worth three pounds, three little silver salts worth twenty shillings, five silver wine-cupps worth thirty shillings, one silver sugar dish worth twenty shillings, one silver standish worth fifty shillings, one silver porringer worth thirty shillings, one peece of silver worth four shillings, eleven silver spoones worth forty shillings, and one silver-gilt spoone worth fifteene shillings, one neck-lace of pearle containing two hundred and twelve pearles worth five-and-fifty pounds, one silver and gilt beaker worth thirty shillings, six silver spoones worth forty shillings, one silver porringer worth fifty shillings, one silver wine-cupp worth eight shillings, and divers other articles of plate and jewellery and divers articles of wearing apparel described severally and fully in the indictment, and twenty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of the said Ranulph Manninge gentleman. Over Robert Warren's name at the bill's head appears this clerical minute,—"He standeth mute, he hath judgment of payne fort and hard." G. D. R., . . . ., 1654.

15 April, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of George Fullwood alias Fuller of Gravell Laine in Stepney stationer and Thomas Sidney of Ratcliff Highwaye victualler, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Sarah Busshey, servant of the said George Fullwood alias Fuller, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, then and there "to answer, for that she is accused by one Avis Mascall to be a whore, the which is likely so to bee, for that it was proved upon oath, that the said Busshey shewed eighteen pence in money, and said she had gott it within one quarter of an howre by playing of the whore." S. P. R., 9 May, 1654.

17 April, 1654.—Record, in the S. P. Book of 9 October, 1654, running thus,—"Midd. ss: These are to certify all whom it may concerne that Paul Barrett gentleman and Mary Stanley gentlewoman bothe of the parish of Andrews Holborne were marryed before me Tobias Lisle esqr one of the Justices of the Peace assigned for this county according to an Act of Parliament intituled an Act for Marriages Births and Buryalls and in the presence of these witnesses Mary Knot and Anne Barret In witnes whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seale this seaventeenth day of April 1654.—Toby Lisle." S. P. Book.

28 April, 1654.—True Bill that, at Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Agnes Gale late of the said parish spinster stole and bore away one silver porenger worth forty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Joan Gardiner spinster. "She putteth herself &c. Not Guilty nor fled &c." G. D. R., . . . ., 1654.

30 April, 1654.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Grace Boxe alias Cherry late of the said parish widow practised witchcraft upon and against one Richard Cooke so that he forthwith languished of the same witchcraft until he died thereof at Stepney co. Midd. on the 29th January then next following, being thus murdered by the said Grace.—Also, three other True Bills against the same Grace Boxe alias Cherry for practising witchcraft at Whitechappell, to wit, (1) for bewitching Adam Isgare on 31st May, 1654, so that he died thereof on the 6th August then next following, being thus murdered by the said Grace Boxe, (2) for bewitching Mary Pettyman, daughter of William Pettyman, on 20 May, 1654, so that from the said day even to the day of the taking of the present inquisition, the same Mary, "in her body was wasted consumed pined and lamed," and (3) for bewitching Mary Isgare on 30th April, 1654, so that from that day till the taking of this inquisition, the said Mary has been "wasted consumed pined and lamed." Grace Boxe alias Cherry was found 'Not Guilty ' in respect to each of these indictments. G. D. R., 2 July, 1656.

12 May, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of . . . . Polehampton and Alice Rivers, both of Katherin Tower parish victuallers, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of John Chacret of the same parish . . . ., in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of John Chacret and his wife Katherin Chacret at the next S. P. to be holden at Hicks Hall, to answer &c. "for that they did not only hinder the execution of the Lord Rolls his warrant, which was a warrant of search for a child, that was lost and suspected to be taken up by some person that is called by the name of a Spiritt, but also gott and kept away the said warrant from the Headborough, and would not retourne it again, but said it was burnt." S. P. R., 20 June, 1654.

13 May, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. J.P., of Edmond Johnson victualler and Robert Roades waterman, both of the Liberty of the Tower of London, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Edward Harwood at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for being with a company of tumultuous seamen who rescued from the Prestmasters several seamen who were imprest for the service of the Commonwealth at sea." S. P. R., 20 June, 1654.

22 May, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of John Deane of Ludgate London haberdasher, in the sum of ten pounds, and of Thomas Follett tobacco-pipe-maker and Calebb Platt heele-maker, both of Gyles's Chriplegate, in the sum of five pounds each; For the appearance of the said John Deane at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer unto George Jackson of Gyles Chriplegate for seducing his daughter Mary to have him, he being a married man, and for writing to her and sending messages to her, tending to a lewd love." S. P. R., 20 June, 1654.

29 May, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Worsley esq. J P., of Richard Need (or Neve) of St. Andrewes Holborne . . . ., in the sum of forty pounds, and of Thomas Rose barber-surgeon and Nicholas Fouley vintener alias victualler, both of . . . . Garden, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the said Richard's appearance at the next S. P. to be held at Hixes Hall, to answer &c. "for drinkeinge a health to the Confusion of Oliver Lord Protector and the Cittie of London." S. P. R., 20 June, 1654.

29 May, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before Charles Worsley esq. J.P., of Francis Langford of Ely House in Holborne in the sum of twenty pounds, and Elizabeth Rout of Darke House in Whitefriers and Mary Vaughan of Margarett's Westminster, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of the said Francis, Elizabeth and Mary at the next S. P. at Hixes Hall, to give evidence against Richard Need (or Neve), "for drinkinge a health to the Confusion of Olliver Lord Protector and to the Cittie of London." S. P. R., 20 June, 1654.

29 May, 1654.—Recognizance, taken before John Waterton esq. J.P., of William Hopkins of . . . . in Stepney co. Midd., in the sum of forty pounds; For the said William Hopkins's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to give evidence &c. "against William Yeape concerninge his being an abetter with the Mutineers at the last rising of the seamen at Tower Hill, lending them broome-sticks &c." S. P. R., 20 June, 1654.

29 May, 1654.—True Bill that, at Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, John Oliver and Thomas Stayres, both late of the said parish laborers, stole and bore away four Corle Hoods worth twenty-three shillings, five Corle Peaks worth two shillings and sixpence, five necklaces of glasse beades worth twenty pence, four papers of pinnes worth eightpence, five pairs of blacke silke bandstringes worth six shillinges and eight pence, six Corle Whiskes worth seventeen shillings, six Corle Gorgetts worth fourteen shillings, six pairs of Corle Cuffes worth nine shillings, six Corle Girdles worth nine shillings, six knotts of Corle worth five shillings, four Corle Necke-clothes worth two shillings and four pence, of the goods and chattels of Bridget Stephens widow, seventy yards of silke galowne lace worth eight shillings of the goods and chattels of John Hicks, seventy yards of ribbaning worth thirty shillings of the goods and chattels of Isaac Burges, and forty yards of silke ribbaning worth four pounds, of the goods and chattels of Samuel Northcott. Found 'Guilty,' both culprits pleaded their clergy effectually and were branded. G. D. R., . . . ., 1654.

19 June, 1654.—The Jurors for the Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England Scotland and Ireland &c. upon their oath doe present that John Southworth late of the parish of Giles-in-the-Feilds in the county of Middlesex clerke was borne within England, And after the feast of the Nativity of St. John Baptist in the first yeare of the raigne of Elizabeth late Queene of England &c., And before the nineteenth day of June in the yeare of oure Lord one thousand six hundred fifty fower in the parts beyond the seas was made and ordayned a Preist by authority derived and pretended from the Sea of Rome And that the aforesayd John Southworth the lawes and statutes of England little weighinge, nor the paine in theym conteyned anie waies fearinge the aforesaid nineteenth day of June in the said yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred fifty fower from the parts beyond the seas aforesaid unto the Common Wealth of England to witt att the said parish of Giles-in-the-Feilds in the county aforesayd came And there to was at the parish aforesaid in the county aforesaid on the said nineteenth day of June in the yeare aforesaid traiterously and as a false traitor to this Commonwealth of England did stay was and did remayne Against the forme of the statute in such case made and provided and against the publique peace.—The bill exhibits this clerical minute, to wit, "He putteth himselfe &c. guiltie &c. no goods &c. The said John Southworth adjudged to be drawne hanged and quartered to witt &c." G. D. R., . . ., 1654.

20 June, 1654.—Record of the ratification and confirmation, by the Justices of the Peace for the county of Middlesex assembled in Session at Hicks Hall in St. John's Streete, of

Certaine By-Lawes made by the Inhabitants and Surveyors of the Highwaies of St. Giles-in-the-Feilds, to be presented at the Publicke Sessions for the better avoydinge of such abuses and annuzances as are destructive to the Highwaies and prejudiciall to the inhabitants, the 16th day of June 1654, In Pursuance of an Ordinance made by His Highnes the Lord Protector &c. bearing date the 31st of March, 1654.

(1.) Imprimis, That upon defecte of paveinge the streets and lanes, upon warning given to pave and amend the said defects, That then he or they who ought to pave and amend doe forthwith pave and amend the same, within tenn dayes after warninge given, upon penalty of xiid. per yeare.

(2.) That if there be no inhabitant in a house, then the lanlord to pave and amend before his dore or ground, upon the same penalty of xiid.

(3.) That the inhabitants from tyme to tyme sweepe their dores, keepe the kennell cleane, and rake his or their soile and dirt upon theire owne ground, before their dores, upon penalty of vid. for every default.

(4.) That he or they, that shall cast any rubbish or dirt in the streetes or lanes, or dead carrion into the highwaies or ditches, to the offence of passengers, and doe not forthwith carry or cause to be carried away the same, upon notice given by some of the Surveyours or any other by them appointed, shall forfeit xiid.

(5.) That the inhabitants cast not out their Seacole Ashes into the streetes, but keepe them until the raker comes and cries dust, upon penalty of vid. for each offence.

(6.) That noe raker, that undertakes for any division or precincte, shall fill his cart so full as to run over or slabber in any division or precinct or highwaies, through or over which he goes to any laiestall wheresover, upon penaltie of vs. for each offence.

(7.) And that each person soe offending with night cartes, upon penalty of xs. for each offence.

(8.) That noe carman, brewer, brick-maker or water-carrier goe with or use wheeles shodd with iron, but sluggs only, wheeles shodd with iron and bearing so greate a weight being a great destruccion to pavements, charge to the inhabitants, upon penalty (after a monethes warning) of xs. for each offence.

(9.) That noe swine be suffered to wander up and downe the streetes and lanes, nor to be kept within the same limitts, upon penalty of 4d. for each hogge, for each offence.

(10.) That noe Hackney Coachman stand in the streetes within three yeards of any man's dore, nor feede their horses in the streetes before men's dores to their great annuzance, upon penalty of xiid.

(11.) That every inhabitant adjoyning on both sides to the new paveminge from the lower end of the Pound and soe upwards towards the church shall pave repaire and amend the same for the future from tyme to tyme at their own cost and charge, It being now new paven at the parish-charge.

(12.) That the Earle of Southampton, being Lord of the Mannor, doe make good the paveinge about the Pound three yeards broad at his owne cost and charges, the parish haveinge done their partes.

(13.) That noe brewers [nor] water-carriers set their drayes or watercarriages in the streetes day or night as usually they have done, Nor coachmakers, wheelewrights or any others block up the streetes with coaches, carriages, timber or blockes, to the prejudice of travailers and the inhabitants, upon penalty of vs. for each offence.

At the foot of these by-laws appear the names of the eighteen chief and most discreet inhabitants of the parish, who had agreed upon and drawn up the rules; the names being followed by this certificate,—

The By-Lawes aforesaid have beene read and perused by the said Justices in open Court, and have beene alle and every of them approved of, ratifyed and confirmed by the said Justices.—By the Court. S. P. Book.

N.B.—The Sessions Books of this year and of following years contain similar sets of certified by-laws for other parishes. For example, the S. P. Book, containing the afore-transcribed by-laws of St. Giles'sin-the-Fields, exhibit the by-laws for the parish of Shoreditch, which comprise this order touching Hollowell Street, to wit, "That, whereas Hollowell Streete is a greate thorow fare for a greate part of the soile of the Citty, and they, that doe undertake the carryinge awaye of the same, doe very much annoy the said place by scatteringe much of the soyle in the said streetes, by reason of the overfillinge of their carts or rashnes of driveinge, therefore the owner of every such teeme or cart for every such offence shall forfeit and pay iiis. iiiid."—The S. P. Book of the Session of Peace held at Hicks Hall on 14 August, 1654, contains copies of the three several sets of by-laws, made for the parishes of St. James Clerkenwell, Sepulchre, and St. Giles-withoutCripple-gate, by inhabitants and highway-surveyors of their respective parishes.—The G. S. P. Book of 1 July, 1655, preserves the By-Laws and Orders, made on 17 April, 1655, for Whitechappell co. Midd., by the inhabitants and high-way surveyors of that parish;—one of which by-laws shows that in Whitechapel it was the practice of the dustman to announce his arrival at a street by sounding a horn, instead of crying "dust, ho!"—S. P. Books. At the present date these sets of parochial orders are chiefly valuable for their evidence, (1) that every householder was responsible for the soundness and sufficient cleanliness of the pavement and gutters before and about his habitation, (2) that whilst the first paving of a new quarter was usually, or at least sometimes, made by the parish and paid for by a general parochial rate, the occupier or in the case of an unoccupied house the owner was required at his own charges and by his own labour or by the labour of his own workman to do the needful repairs to the pavements and kennels thereof, (3) that for dealing with such soil, as is now-a-days swept by water from the house to the nearest main sewer, the inhabitants of the several Middlesex parishes contiguous to the city relied on cess-pools and night-carts, and (4) that the inhabitants of Shoreditch, and probably of other parishes, sometimes suffered from the carelessness with which 'the soil of the city' was carted through their bounds to laystalls and other places of the rural suburbs.

14 July, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Hugh Stothart of Anne Blackfriers London taylor and James Wilcox of Dunston's-inthe-West London combemaker, in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of John Lock of Pulchres London stacioner, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said John Lock's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for printing and publishing scandalous libellous and unlicenced pamphletts."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J.P., for the appearance of George Horton of Giles's Cripplegate London stacioner at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for printing and publishing scandalous libellous and unlicenced pamphletts." S. P. R., 14 Aug., 1654.

17 July, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Richard Cotes joyner and Michaell Arnold silkeweaver, both of "the parishe of Katherine Tower", in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Avis Furnace, wife of William Furnace of the same "parishe" musicioner, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for deludeing and enticeing Priscilla Tompson from the service of her mistress and endeavouring to transport her beyond the seas." S. P. R., 14 Aug., 1654.

7 August, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Thomas Barker of Whitechappell berebrewer and John Daniell of Stepney whitebaker, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of William Seywell at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for haveing in his custody a scandalous and trayterous paper of verses against his Highnesse the Lord Protector, and beinge suspected to be the authour thereof." S. P. R., 14 August, 1654.

9 October, 1654.—Order, made at G. S. P. held at Westminster, touching highways. On information given to the Court that, in pursuance of a certain ordinance made on 26th March last past by the Protector of the Commonwealth of England &c. by and with the advice and consent of his Council, entitled 'An Ordinance for better Amendinge and Keepinge in repayre the Common Highwayes within this Nation,' the Surveyors of the Highwayes and others of the inhabitants of St. Gyles's-in-the-Fieldes co. Midd. amongst certain by-laws, confirmed by the Justices of Peace for the said county on the 20th of June last past, agreed and ordained "that noe carman, brewer, brickmaker or water-carrier should goe with or use wheeles shodd with iron, but sluggs only, upon penalty of tenne shillings for each offence, after a monthes warning," And on further information that William Whetcome, John Hooker, Thomas Blyth and William Baylie, inhabitants of the aforesaid parish, have been duly adjudged to pay certain penalties for breaches of the aforesaid by-law, and have neglected to pay and refuse to pay the moneys so forfeited by them, "It is therefore ordered by this Court, That the Surveyours of the Highwayes of the said parish or some of them shall forthwith upon sight hereof levie by way of distresse and sale of the goods and chattells of every of the said persons the said severall sommes of money by them respectively forfeited for their said offences, &c." S. P. Book.

6 November, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before John Hooker esq. J.P., of Phillipp Peirson of St. Bride's London gentleman and Thomas Milburne of St. Botolph's Aldersgate London stacioner, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Mary Keeling of St. Andrewes Holborne spinster, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Mary Keeling's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for inticeing Mary Hetherhall (sic) to goe beyond the seas to the Barbadoes without her friendes consent and against her will by bringing her to one Jane Marsh, who brought her to Joan Hawkins att an Alehouse, who sent her away on shipboard against her will and sold her for 40s. to Captaine Cole in the shipp called the 'John' in the night time." S. P. R., 11 Dec, 1654.

8 November, 1654.—Recognizance, taken before Edward Rich esq. J.P., of William Peere of St. Martyn's-in-the-Feilds coatchman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said William Peere's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "then and there to answeare the enticeing and carrying away of Mary Hethersall (sic) daughter in lawe of Lawrence Bidgood (sic) of Wansworth (sic) in the county of Surrey yeoman, with intent to carry her beyound the seas."—Also, the Recognizance, taken before Solomon Smith esq. J.P., on 27 Oct., 1654, of Lawrence Bigworth (sic) of Wandsworth yeoman, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the said Lawrence Bigworth's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to prefer and prosecute an indictment against Joane Higgens for enticeing away Mary Ethersell (sic) and sending her on board the ship called the 'John.'—And Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same last-named J.P., for the appearance of Joane Higgens at the next S. P., to answer for carrying away Mary Ethersell (sic) to the shipp called 'John.' S. P. R., 11 Dec., 1654.

7 December, 1654.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Byde esq. J.P., of John Mews farrier and Richard Elflicke oatmealman, both of Shorditch, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of John Billins at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer for stopping the coach of Thomas Langham esq. with his cart on the road, and assaulting and whipping Shedrach Crew his servant with his whipp, and assaulting and frighting the gentlewomen in the coach being bigg with child by casting dirt upon them into the coach." S. P. R., 11 Dec., 1654.

11 December, 1654.—Order, made at S. P. held at Hicks Hall in St. John's Streete co. Midd., touching a bridge in Shoreditch.—On information given to the Court that a certain bridge, near the parish church of Leonard's Shoreditch, and being in the common highway leading from the said church to Kingsland is decayed ruinous and broken &c., and that during the work of repairing the same bridge "the course of . . . . passengers and travellers with their cattell and goods and carriages must be diverted into and over some of the inclosed lands neere the said bridge, . . . . It is therefore Ordered by this Court, That the said Surveyors of the said highwayes of the said parish shall breake open the fence of Thomas Robinson of his lands in some convenient place neere to the said bridge in twoe severall places, that passengers may with their horses goods and carriages passe and travell to and from over his said inclosed lands by the space of two dayes and two nights, that in the meane tyme the sayd bridge may be amended and repayred, and that afterwards the said Surveyors cause the said fences (so to be broken open as aforesaid) to be sufficiently made up and amended.—By the Court." S. P. Book.

11 December, 1654.—Memorandum:—John Webster stands committed to the House of Correccion there to remaine untill he finds very good Suretyes for his personall appearance at the next Sessions of the Peace to be held for the said county, and that in the meane tyme he be of the good behaviour as well for his misdemeanour here in open Court saying in an uncivill manner that he is and was as good a man as his landlord Barnes, meaninge John Barnes esq. one of the Justices of the Peace of this county then sitting in Court, the said Webster being a carter, and for being often druncke and having confessed to the said Mr. Barnes, that hee is soe often druncke in a yeare that it would trouble the said Mr. Barnes to finde pen inke and paper to sett downe the severall times that hee the sayd Webster is druncke in a yeare, And alsoe that keepes a Bull to be commonly bayted, whereby a multitude of disorderly persons are often thereby drawne together and will not be reclaymed of his said disorderly and lewd courses. S. P. Book.

11 December, 1654.—Order, made at S. P. held at Hicks Hall in St. John's Streete co. Midd., for discharging John Barton from the bonds of his apprenticeship to John Yates of St. Sepulchre's parish co. Midd. glover, as it appeareth to this Court by the sworn information of divers persons that the "aforesaid glover did much misuse John Barton his apprentice by hanginge a horselocke with a chayne to it to his said apprentice his legge and fasteninge him thereby to a post in his house, and not provydinge for his said apprentice convenient clothes and shirts to shift himself, by reason whereof the said apprentice was soe full of vermyn that his mother was enforced to sweepe them off his clothes, and to bake his clothes in a hott oven, thereby to kill and destroy the rest of the vermyn that were left in the clothes of the said apprentice." S. P. Book.

13 December, 1654.—Ordered that Edward Fletcher shall have a certificate for tenne pounds, for apprehending John Ovenall Page whoe was convicted of robbery :—By the Court. G. D. Reg.