Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1655

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

231-241

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1655', Middlesex county records: Volume 3: 1625-67 (1888), pp. 231-241. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66051 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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1655

27 January, 1654/5.—True Bill that, at Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Gilman alias Gilmore alias Crosse, William Caske and Robert Rogers, all three late of the said parish laborers, stole and bore away twenty-seven silver spoones worth twelve pounds and six shillings, one silver cawdle cupp with a silver cover worth six pounds, one other silver cupp with silver cover worth forty-five shillings, one silver childes spoone worth four shillings, one silver tankard worth seven pounds and tenne shillings, two silver drinkingbowls worth five pounds, two silver tranchard (sic) plates worth eight pounds, three silver trenchard (sic) salts worth thirty shillings, one silver seale worth five shillings, one silver heart worth tenne shillings, one "silver booke" worth tene shillings, three plain gold rings worth four shillings, one enammeld gold ring sett with a Bristow stone worth forty shillings, one other enammelled gold ring sett with a Bristowe stone worth forty shillings, two enammeled gold rings worth fifty shillings, divers articles of wearing apparel duly and severally described in the indictment, and one hundred and seventy pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Humphrey Lowe gentleman. William Caske and Robert Rogers were "at large." The clerical" minute touching Thomas Gilman is no longer legible. G D.R., . . . ., 1654/5.

3 March, 1654/5.—True Bill, found by the Jurors for the Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England Scotland and Ireland &c., that at Katherine's precinct co. Midd. on the said day George Davies late of the same precinct yeoman, "fraudulently and deceitfully did forge write make and counterfeit and caused to be made written forged and counterfeit in the names of John Jeoffrye (sic) then captaine of the shippe called the Nightingale frigott, James Sharland then master of the same shippe, Thomas Parshar then boteson of the same shippe and Richard Washington then cheque in the same shipp a false fayned and counterfeit certificate in the wordes followinge ' Nightingell Frigett 1654 George Davies able seaman served aborde of the sayd frigett from the seaven and twentith of September '54 till the third daye of March followinge and by order of the Honorable Generall Loson was turned over into the Assistance Frigott as witnesseth our hands this third of March 1654—John Geffrey (sic) cap', James Sharland mast., Thomas Parshar boson, Richard Washington cheque.—To the Right Worshipfull the Treshurer of the Navye or their debities (sic) these.'"—At the bill's foot appears this clerical minute, "And the said George Davies confesseth this offence &c. Judgment respited as before."—Also, on the same file, two other True Bills against the same George Davies for forging two similar letters bearing the counterfeit signatures of the same captain, master, boatswain and cheque; each of the said bills bearing a similar clerical minute of the confession of the indictment and respite of judgment. G. D. R., . . . ., 1655.

26 March, 1655.—True Bill that, "at the parish of Covent Garden" co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Porter late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Thomas Salkeld gentleman, and with a sword gave the same Thomas Salkeld in the left side of his breast a certain mortal wound, of which he died on the 28th day of the same month, being thus killed and murdered by the same Thomas Porter.—Over Thomas Porter's name at the bill's head appears this clerical minute, " He putteth himselfe &c. not guiltie of the murder but guiltie of the manslaughter only, no goods &c. he praieth his booke and he readeth &c. he is burned in the hand &c." G. D. R., . . . ., 1655.

14 April, 1655.—Recognizance, taken before John Barkstead esq., "Lieutenant of the Tower of London" and J.P., of John Giare of the Liberty of the said Tower goldsmith, in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said John Giare at the next G. D. of Newgate, to "give such evidence as he knoweth against Sarah Parry for felonious taking one paire of silver snuffers to the value of fourty shillings, of the goods and chattells of His Highnesse the Lord Protector." Broken Files.

21 April, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of William Fell of Sepulchre's London gunsmith and Richard Gardiner of Gyles's Cripplegate joyner, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of Anne Shaddocke, "the wife of Robert Shaddocke of Christopher's Island in the partes of America," at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex and on the first day of the said Session "to answer John Collins and others who suspect her to be one that taketh up children to transport them to St. Christopher's Island." S. P. R., 23 April, 1655.

23 April, 1655.—Record of a decree of nullification of the marriage, made and had between Susanna Graunt alias Chappell and Thomas Reynolds the Younger in disregard and contravention of an Act of Parliament lately made at Westminster for the regulation of marriages; the said decree being delivered by the Justices of the Peace for Middlesex, assembled in General Quarter Sessions at Westminster, on the petition of Thomas Reynolds the Elder of Colchester co. Essex clothier, in which petition it is set forth—how the petitioner placed his son Thomas as an apprentice with one Master Faborne of St. Gregories near Paul's Church London woollen-draper, and how whilst the said Thomas Reynolds the younger was still an apprentice to the same Master Faborne and under nineteen years of age, he was inveigled into a marriage with one Susanna Chappell alias Graunt, who was aided in accomplishing her purpose on the youth by one Edy James and one Thomazine Webb, who "gott him" the same Thomas Reynolds the Younger "out of his said Master's house, and (haveinge a coach ready to hurry him away) did cause him to bee carryed to the house of Anthony Dodd a Minister at Padington co. Midd. and Register of the said parish, as hee pretended, where hee the said Dodd did, as hee pretended, marry the said Peticioners said sonne and the said Susanna." Further, in the same petition, it is set forth how "the said Dodd, the better to countenance the said wicked designe, did promise the said petitioner's said sonne, and the rest of the said confederates, that, if they would give unto him the said Dodd tenne shillings, and five shillings for the Cryer and Clarke of Westminster, that hee would make the same a firme marriage, whereupon the said Dodd had the said petitioner's said sonne and the rest of the said confederates to the White Harte in Westminster, from whence the said Dodd did send for the said Cryer, who said hee was the Clarke alsoe, and hee cryed the said peticioners said sonne and the said Susanna in the Markett at Westminster but once, but the said Dodd did insert into a certificate that the said partyes were cryed three severall dayes in three severall weekes, and upon the last day beinge in the month of August last past they went with the same certificate to Colonell Grosvenor, a Justice of the Peace of the said county of Middlesex, and presented him with the said false certificate, desiringe him to marry them according to the late Act of Parliament in that behalfe made"; it being further set forth in the same petition, that, though he at first refused to marry the said parties, to wit Thomas Reynolds the Younger and Susanna Chappell alias Graunt, they were on the following monday irregularly and unlawfully married by the same Colonel Grosvenor, who was misled by the false certificate and the false statements made to him by the aforesaid Edy James and Thomazine Webb, the former of whom affirmed that she was the mother of Thomas Reynolds the younger, whilst Thomazine Webb declared herself the guardian of the said Susannah. G. S. P. Book.

7 May, 1655.—True Bill (found by the Jurors for the Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland &c.) that, at Martyn's-in-the-Feildes co. Midd. on the said day, Daniell Connell late of the said parish porter assaulted Anne Allen and did kill and slay her by shooting her with a pistol, charged with gunpowder and a leaden bullet, thereby giving her a mortal bullet-wound in her right breast, of which she died on the eleventh day of the said May. At the bill's head, over Daniell Connell's name, appears this clerical minute, "He putteth himselfe &c. no goods &c. he prayeth his booke &c. he readeth &c." = Found 'Guilty' by a Jury, he having no chattels for forfeiture pleaded his clergy and read his neck-verse, whereupon he was branded according to the statute. G. D. R., 11 July, 1655.

10 May, 1655.—True Bill that, with the intention and purpose of defrauding her master William Viscount Mounson of divers valuable goods and chattels—to wit, two-and-twenty silver plates worth one hundred pounds, one silver bason and ewre worth thirty pounds, one silver salt-celler worth six pounds, four silver candlesticks worth fiveand-thirty pounds—which articles, being of his goods and chattels, the said Viscount Mounson had given into her custody at his dwellinghouse in Paul's parish Covent Garden co. Midd., there to hold and keep for him, Elizabeth Pollard late of the said parish spinster, otherwise called Elizabeth Enderby the wife of William Enderby late of the said parish labourer, being the servant and not the apprentice of the said Viscount, and being above the age of eighteen years, did on the aforesaid day withdraw herself and the said goods and chattels from her said master, the said Viscount Mounson.—Over the culprit's name in the bill appears the clerical minute " Puse Not Guilty nor did fly" = She puts herself on a jury, who find her 'Not Guilty' and do not fly (i.e. withdraw) frqm their verdict. G. D. R., . . . ., 1655.

28 May, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Swalowe esq. J.P., of Ralph Darbie and Jonathan Edmiston, both of Gunn Alley in Wapping in the parish of Stepney co. Midd. tailors, in the sum of forty pounds each; For the appearance of Mary Todd at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answere all such matters as shalbe objected against her by Anne Goffe, for that she the said Mary Todd doth, notwithstanding one William Goffe was accused indited and arraigned for haveing two wives, to witt, the foresaid Mary Todd and Anne Goffe and thereto he pleaded Guilty but mercy was shewed to him, so that his life was saved, and both he and his second wife were admonished that they should never associat together anie more, but he to live with his first wife, Yet the said Mary Todd doth keepe the said William Goffe companie day and night, he havinge been seen to come out of her house at fowre of the clock in the morning, though it cannot be proved (yet suspected) to live incontinently together." S. P. R., 29 May, 1655.

30 May, 1655.—Ordered that Robert Legge of Abbington inkeeper shall have of the Sheriffe of Middlesex xx li. for apprehending Tobias Baxter and John Scarse (elsewhere spelt ' Scrase '), being convicted in Middlesex of several felonies and burglaryes :—By the Court. G. D. Reg.

1 June, 1655.—True Bill that, at Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Ashton, William Frauncis and Robert Leivsey, all three late of the said parish gentlemen, stole and bore away one necklace of pearle worth five hundred pounds, one gold bodkin set with diamonds worth one hundred pounds, one gold knott sett with diamonds worth fifty pounds, one pair of gold taggs set with diamonds worth twenty pounds, one gold crosse set with [an] emerauld with three pendants of gold set with diamonds thereunto fastened worth fifty pounds, one jewell of gold set with little diamonds with a pendant of gold set with diamonds thereunto fastened worth twenty pounds, one gold case enamelled with a picture therein worth ten pounds, one gold watch with a gold case worth ten pounds, one other gold watch worth five pounds, one silver tankard worth five pounds, one silver-gilt porringer worth fifty shillings, one other silver porringer worth fifty shillings, one silver forke worth ten shillings, one silver box with old silver coyne in it worth forty shillings, one gold seale set with a cornelian engraven worth ten shillings, one other gold seale set with a saphir engraven worth ten shillings, and fifty pounds in numbered moneys, of the goods chattels and moneys of Conyers Darcy esq. Edward Ashton and William Frauncis were tried and found 'Not Guilty.' Robert Leivsey was "at large." G. D. R., 2 July, 1656.

8 June, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of Edward Boles taylor and Richard Munday cordweynor, both of Bartholomew's-the-Great, in the sum of five pounds each, and of Elizabeth Durham of the aforesaid parish singlewoman, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said Elizabeth Durham's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex "to answer Judeth Kiffener, the wife of Andrew Kiffener, who took her and her husband late in the night in a cellour in a verie uncivill posture." S. P. R., 17 July, 1655.

22 June, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before John Hoxton esq. J.P., of James Pritchett . . . . and John Spittlehurst . . . ., both of Stepney co. Midd. in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Thomas Moore of Mile End in the said parish turkie-driver, in the sum of forty pounds; For the said Thomas Moore's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex at Hicks Hall, to answer &c. he "beeing charged by an officer to ayd and assist him, with his prisoner beeing then in custodie, to carrie him before some Justices of the Peace, beeinge informed that he had spoken words against the Lord Protector, and hee refusinge." S. P. R., 17 July, 1655.

28 June, 1655.—True Bill that, at Margarett's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Bridgett Bathurst late of the said parish spinster stole and took away a silver beere-bowle worth thirty shillings, two silver tankerds worth seven pounds and six silver spoones worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of Richard Hatter gentleman. At the bill's head over her name appears the clerical minute "She putteth herselfe &c.," and at the bottom of the bill, this note—"She will not be tried." As she put herself on trial, this second minute seems to indicate that the prosecution of the indictment was stayed. G. D. R., 11 July, 1655.

2 July, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Powell esq. J.P., of William Dayborne of Gyles Cripplegate poulterer, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of Thomas Creeshaw weaver and Joan Clarke widdow and William Love weaver, all three of the aforesaid parish, in the sum of ten pounds each; For the sayd William Dayborne's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer for being suspitiously taken late in the night with his shoes off setting on a bedside with Frances Nuby the wife of Richard Nuby of Grubstreete, and the inhabitants of Cripplegate suspect him to live incontinently with the widdowe Tompson." S. P. R., 17 July, 1655.

17 July, 1655.—Judgment, delivered by the Justices of the Peace for Middlesex assembled in Generall Quarter Sessions at Hicks Hall in St. John's Street, declaring null and void a certain contract of marriage between Thomas Porter gentleman and Anne Blount, daughter of the Rt. Hon. Mountjoy, Earl of Newport; the said decree and judgment being made on the petition of the said Earl of Newport, setting forth that his said daughter was still only eighteen years old, and that the said Thomas Porter on the 24th of February last, about nine o'clock in the evening of the said day lured and withdrew the said Anne Blount from the petitioner's custody and from the same petitioner's house in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. and conveyed her or caused her to be conveyed "into the borough of Southwarke in the county of Surrey and then in the Inne there called The Katherine Wheele without the privity consent and knowledge of the said petitioner, and against his will and to his greate greife and sorrowe of hart, did unlawfully contract marriage with" the same Anne Blount "to the intent that a marriage might afterwards be had and solempnized betweene Thomas Porter and Anne in the parish church of St. Georges in Southwarke, in which parish neither of the said partyes did dwell," against the provisions and requirement of "an Act of Parliament late made at Westminster in the county of Middlesex, intituled 'An Act touching marriages and the registringe thereof and also touchinge births and burialls,'" by which "said Act of Parliament the hearinge and determyninge of all matters and controversies touchinge contract and marriage and the lawfullnes and unlawfullnes thereof . . . . are in the power and referred to the determinacion of the Justices of the Peace of each county &c. &c." G. S. P. Book.

10 September, 1655.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Covent Garden co. Midd. on the said day, Francis Hanmer late of the said parish clerke, born within the kingdome of England, and after the Feast of the Nativity of St. John Baptist and before the aforesaid 10 Sept., 1655, made and ordayned a Seminary Preist by authority derived and pretended from the Sea of Rome, trayterously and as a false traytor was and remayned. At the bill's foot a clerical minute certifies that Francis Hanmer was found 'Not Guilty,' at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate held on 21 May, 1656. G. D. R., 6 Oct., 1655.

8 October, 1655.—Copy, in S. P. Book of the General Session of Peace held at Westminster, of this letter (signed He: Lawrence) addressed to the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, to wit, "After our harty commendacions, Whereas His Highnesse hath taken notice that his proclamacion, lately published for puttinge the lawes in execucion against the preists and Jesuits, and the speedy conviccion of Popish Recusants, is not likely to produce that good effect, as was intended, for that the certificates, thereby directed to be made, may probably want such formality as in this behalf is requisite, It is therefore His Highnesse pleasure, that the certificates of the Justices of Peace throwout England and Wales shalbe made in the premisses after the forme herewith sent you, which is approved of by His Highnesse with the advice of his Councell, And therefore it is commaunded that His Highnesse Justices of the Peace resident within your county be speedily advertised of this His Highnesse pleasure, by sendinge unto them the printed coppies of the said forme of certificates, accordinge to which forme the certificates concerninge the premisses already sent up by some Justices of Peace are to be made anewe, And that this service may be the better and more easily performed, It is further required that his Highnes pleasure be openly declared at the next Generall Sessions of the Peace to be holden for your county, And that the Clerke of the Peace there doe enter in the Sessions Rolls the said forme of certificate, with these letters to remayne of Record,— And herein His Highness doth and will expect readie obedience and a due accompt, as the importance of the service requires, And soe wee bid you hartily farewell.—From Whitehall the third day of September 1655." Signed in the name and by the Order of the Councell—He: Lawrence Cler'.

This letter is followed by a copy of "The forme of a certificate to be used by Justices of Peace and others through England and Wales, in the case of Popish Recusants refusinge to take the Oath of Abjuration, and neglectinge to appeare before the Justices to take the said Oath," which form of abjuration, set forth in the 'Forme of a Certificate' runs in these words, to wit—"I, A. B., doe abjure and renounce the Pope's supremacy, and authority over the Catholique Church in generall, and over myselfe in particular, And I doe believe that there is not any Transubstantiacion in the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, or in the Elements of bread and wine after consecracion thereof by any person whatsoever, And I doe alsoe believe that there is not any purgatory, and [that] the consecrated Hoast, Crucifixes or Images ought not to be worshipped, neither that any worshipp is due unto any of them, And I doe alsoe believe that salvacion cannot be merited by works, and all doctrines in affirmation of the said points I doe abjure and renounce, without any equivocation, mentall reservacion or secret evasion whatsoever, taking these words as by me spoken, according to the common and usuall meaning of them; Soe helpe me God."—The form of certificate and schedules being followed by this "Memorandum: This Certificate and Schedules to be made in Parchment, and to be sent sealed up to the Barons of the Exchequer, delivered upon oath, that they are as they were receaved from the hands of the Justices that signe the same."—S. P. Book.

8 October, 1655.—Order, made at G. S. P. held at Westminster, for the discharge of Mathewe Nicholas from the bond of his apprenticeship to William Lovejoy of Uxbridge co. Midd. edged-tool-maker, the said order being made on the complaint of the said Mathewe's father, complaining that "the said William Lovejoy employed his said apprentice on the Lord's Day at severall tymes in goeinge for money due to the said master, sometymes two, three, four, fyve or sixe myles from home, in gatheringe of wood and fewell upon the same day, and that the said master did very much misuse his said apprentice by fasteninge of a lock with a chaine to it, and tyinge and fetteringe him to the shoppe, and that the said master his wife and mother did most cruelly and inhumanely beate his said apprentice, and also whip'd him until he was very blooddy and his flesh rawe over a great part of his body, and then salted him, and held him naked to the fyre, beinge soe salted to add to his paine." S. P. Book.

7 November, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before Tobias Lisle esq. J.P., of Henry Cox brewer and Richard Hickman carpenter, both of Oulstreete, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of Christian Chacrett alias Sacrett at the next S. P. to be held for Middlesex at Hicks Hall "to answeare the complaint of Dorothy Perkins whoe accuseth her for a spirit one that takes upp men woemen and children and sells them a-shipp to bee conveyed beyond the sea, having intised and inveagled one Edward Furnifull and Anne his wife with her infant to the waterside and put them aboard the shipp called The Planter to bee conveyed to Virginia."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on 9 November, 1655, before the same J.P., for the appearance of Thomas Orpitt alias Allpitt at the same S. P. at Hicks Hall to answer the charge of Dorothy Perkins, who accuses him in like manner of being "a spirit," and of having inveigled the same Edward Furnifull, his wife and her infant, and put them on board the ship The Planter, for transportation to Virginia. S. P. R., 10 Dec., 1655.

13 November, 1655.—True Bill that, at Paul's parish Covent Garden co. Midd. on the said day, John Harris late of the said parish laborer, stole and bore away one silver beaker worth thirty shillings, of the goods and chattels of a man unknowne. Over John Harris's name at the bill's head appears this clerical minute, to wit, "Puse not guilty and he did not flye." G. D. R., . . . ., 1655/6.

25 November, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before James Hawley esq. J.P., of Thomas Perrot of Gyles's Cripplegate London baker and Hugh Cotton of Eling co. Midd. cheesemonger, in the sum of five pounds each, and of John Smith of Eling aforesaid waterman, in the sum of ten pounds; For the said John Smith's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for questioning and disturbing the Minister of Eling aforesaid in the time of publique and divine service." S. P. R., 10 Dec, 1655.

29 November, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of James House of Peter's Hill in Bennett's Paul's Wharfe London stacioner and John Watson of Little Bartholomew's London joiner, in the sum of one hundred pounds each, and of Phillip Waterworth of Peter's Hill aforesaid stacioner, in the sum of two hundred pounds; For the said Phillip Waterworth's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, "to answer what shall be objected against him for printing a Popishe Booke in English entituled 'Devotions for Masse for every day in the weeke' with the popish Letany and other scandalous and popish prayers."—Also, the Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same J.P., of Samuell Tompson and John Martin and Timothy Garthwaite, all three of Faith's parish London stacioners, in the sum of two hundred pounds each, and of Michaell Barges of the same aforesaid parish stacioner, in the sum of four hundred pounds; For the appearance of the said Michaell Barges at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for printing a popish booke in English entituled 'Devotions for Masse for every day in the weeke' with the popish Letany and other scandalous and popish prayers." S. P. R., 10 Dec, 1655.

27 December, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Thomas Rudkin victualler and William Houlding bricklayer, both of Whitechappell co. Midd., in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of John Tyne of the said parish smith at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for uttering scandalous and daungerous speeches tending to the prejudice of His Highnesse and the Commonwealth." S. P. R., 10 Jan., 1655/6.

27 December, 1655.—Recognizances, taken before John Barkstead esq. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Christopher Wheeler . . . . and William Downe merchaunt-taylor, both of Gyles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd., in the sum of one hundred pounds each; For the appearance of Jasper Leech of the same parish . . . . at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer &c. for that, when he was asked of what religion he was by the Constable and officers of the said parish, he "said he was of the Lord Protectour's religion and 'the devil take him that is not,' and then clapt his hand on his backside and said that was Hocus-pocus." S. P. R., 10 Jan., 1655/6.