Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1667

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

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Pages

1-6

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1667', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 1-6. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66074 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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MIDDLESEX SESSIONS' FILES, ROLLS, BUNDLES & BOOKS:—

INDICTMENTS, RECOGNIZANCES, CORONERS' INQUISITIONS-POST-MORTEM, CERTIFICATES OF CONVICTIONS OF CONVENTICLERS, ORDERS AND MEMORANDA temp. 19–37 CHARLES II.

1667

6 April, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Robinson knt. and bart. Lieutenant of the Tower of London and J.P., of Israeli Munns and . . . ., both of Shadwell co. Midd. mariners, in the sum of forty pounds each, and of Thomas Barker of Shells near Newcastle marriner, in the sum of one hundred pounds: Also, on another parchment, Recognizances, taken on 5 April, 19 Charles II., before Sir Edmund Godfrey, knt. J.P., of William Dikes of Long Lane London upholsterer and Thomas Mason of St. Olave's Southwark salter, in the sum of fifty pounds each, and of Cuthbert Dikes of Wapping Wall in Stepney co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of one hundred pounds;— For the appearance of the said Thomas Barker and Cuthbert Dikes at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer for reporting "that there was one hundred sayle of Dutchmen, lying in length 10 miles neere Sunderland and Newcastle, and there had been several of them on shore at Sir Ralph Dallifeilds, and taken away many of his cowes." S. P. R., 15 April, 19 Charles II.

13 April, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Humphrey Weld esq. J.P., of William Wyld of St. Andrew's Holborn gentleman and George Hobson of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. gentleman, in the sum of five pounds each, and of Arthur Deacons of St. Giles's-inthe-Fields bookseller, in the sum of ten pounds: For the said Arthur's appearance at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer the complaint of the Countesse of Mounmouth, who accuses him of assaulting her footman John Elliot. S. P. R., 15 April, 19 Charles II.

2 May, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Chelsey co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Butler late of the said parish yeoman, whilst driving six horses that were drawing a coach, caused the hindmost pair of the said six horses (duos posteriores equos sex equorum) to come into collision with a certain James Porter, strike and cast him to the ground and then and there trample on him with their feet, so as to break the legs of the same James Porter, who died at Chelsey on 7 June, 19 Charles II, of the injuries thus done him by the same horses, and that in thus causing James Porter's death Thomas Butler killed and murdered him. Thomas Butler was "at large." G. D. R., 9 Oct., 19 Charles II.

5 May, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, on three several parchments, taken before George Farewell and Henry Pecke esqs. Justices of the Peace: For the appearance of John Dew, Alexander Parker, and Richard Tapping at the next G. Q. S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, to answer "for unlawfully assembling themselves with others on the Sabboath Day in the tyme of divine service, contrary to the lawes of this kingdome." S. P. West. R., 15 July, 19 Charles II.

6 May, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Bayles esq. J.P., of Samuel Smith junr of Davyes Inne co. Midd. gentleman and Richard Gerrard of the same Inne gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds each, and of Samuel Smith the Elder of Chelsey inholder, in the sum of twenty pounds: For the appearance of the said Samuel Smith the Elder at the next G. S. P. for Middlesex, to "to answeare the complaynt of Captaine Lawrence Vanhankerk, for saying hee had beene a traytor to his countrey, and for aught he knew might be so here.' S. P. R., 21 May, 19 Charles II.

30 May, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, on two several parchments, taken before Charles Pitfeild esq. J.P., for the appearance of Robert Heburne of Stepney laborer and Morgain Thomas of St. Butolph'swithout-Algate laborer, at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to answer the complaint of John Flower and Thomas Crooke, by whom they are charged for pretending to be pressmasters, and "under pretence of being press-masters" assaulting and falsely imprisoning the said John Flower and Thomas Crooke. S. P. R., 1 July, 19 Charles II.

17 June, 19 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Sir William Pulteney knt. J.P., of Peter Sharpeless of Martin's-in-the-Fields porter, in the sum of forty pounds: For the appearance of the said Peter Sharpeless at the next G. Q. S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, to prefer an indictment against one William Bracy . . . ., for "speaking certeyne seditious words against His Royal Highnesse the Duke of Yorke." S. P. West. R., 15 July, 19 Charles II.

22 June, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Tottenham co. Midd. on the said day, in a conversation which he was having with the King's faithful subject James Rosse of the said parish yeoman, a certain Henry Northit late of the said parish yeoman, a perverse and seditious man, in the presence and hearing of divers of the King's lieges, said "Soldiers were better paid in the days of Oliver," to wit, Oliver Cromwell &c., and Further that, when James Rosse answered that "Cromwell was a traitor," Henry Northit, with the purpose of causing the King's lieges to withdraw their affection from their said sovereign, uttered these scandalous and seditious words, to wit, "So is his Majestie the King a traytor to this land and nation." Henry Northit put himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury, who found him 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 9 Oct., 19 Charles II.

10 July, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir Edmund Godfrey knt. J.P., of Ralph Harwood of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, Leonard Sanders of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, and Abott Nevill alias Hunt of Piccadilly in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, all three brick-makers, in the sum of forty pounds each: For the appearance of the same three brick-makers at the next S. P. for the City and Liberty of Westminster, to answer &c. "for suffering their carts bound with iron-shod wheeles to pass along the street." S. P. West. R., 15 July, 19 Charles II.

28 July, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Paul's Covent Garden co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Porter late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Sir Henry Bellasis knt. and then and there with a rapier gave the said Sir Henry Bellasis on the right part of his breast a certain mortal wound, of which he languished from the said 28th July to the nth August then next following, on which last-named day he died of the same wound, being thus slain and murdered by the said Thomas Porter, who was at large at the time of the finding of the indictment. A clerical minute on the parchment certifies further, that failing to appear and put himself on trial, Thomas Porter was outlawed on 20 May, 20 Charles II. G. D. R., 9 Oct., 19 Charles II.

31 July, 19 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem, taken on the first day of August in the said year at the parish of St. Andrew in Holborne co. Midd., on view of the body of Thomas Danby esq. there lying dead: With verdict of Jurors that, in the night of the said 31st July about the eleventh hour, William Berridge, John Cole and Thomas Jenney, all three late of the said parish gentlemen, assaulted the said Thomas Danby esq. and that the said William Berridge with a sword wounded the said Thomas Danby on the throat, so that he then and there died instantly, and that by so doing the aforesaid William Berridge, John Cole and Thomas Jenney slew and murdered the said Thomas Danby. G. D. R., 9 Oct., 19 Charles II.

1 August, 19 Charles II.—Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem taken at St. Andrew's Holborn, on view of the body of Thomas Danby esq. there lying dead: With Verdict that, about eleven o'clock of the night of the last day of July last past, at the said parish, William Berridge, John Ogle and Thomas Jenney, all three late of the said parish gentlemen, assaulted the aforesaid Thomas Danby esq., and that William Berridge gave him with a sword a mortal wound on his throat, of which wound he then and there died, being thus killed and murdered by the said William Berridge, John Ogle and Thomas Jenney.—Also, a True Bill against the same three gentlemen for thus murdering Thomas Danby esq. The indictment exhibits no clerical minutes touching arraignment or consequences thereof. G. D. R., 9 Oct., 19 Charles II.

31 August, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St Andrew's-inHolborne co. Midd. on the said day, Margaret Mackarith wife of William Mackarith late of St. Andrew's-in-Holborn gentleman alias Margaret Mackarith late of the said parish spinster stole and carried off "decem fasciculos lign' anglice bavens" worth two shillings and sixpence, of the goods and chattels of Walter Humphreys. Margaret put herself upon a jury, who found her 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 11 Dec, 19 Charles II.

2 September, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Sir John Robinson knt. and bart. Lieutenant of the Tower of London J.P., of Mark Mortimer of the Tower of London gentleman and of . . . . gentleman in the sum of twenty pounds each, and of Jane Singleton in the sum of forty pounds: For the appearance of the said Jane Singleton at the next S. P. for Middlesex, to "answeare her being drunck and saying that she wished the King hanged on the highest tree in England, when she was told that the King's watch would take her in that condition." S. P. R., 7 Oct., 19 Charles II.

13 September, 19 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Patrick Carey esq. J.P., of John Anderton and John Stevens, both of Clifford's Inn London gentlemen, in the sum of five pounds each, and of Adrian Scroope of the same Inn gentleman, in the sum of ten pounds: For the said Adrian Scroope's appearance at the next S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, to answer "for casting a burninge linck in the face" of William Reeves, whilst the said William Reeves "stood in his shopp." S. P. R., 7 Oct., 19 Charles II.

21 September, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Dorothy Palmer widow and Margaret Palmer, wife of James Palmer carpenter, both late of the said parish, stole and carried off "duas mitellas sericales anglice silke scarffs" worth twenty shillings, of the goods and chattels of John Bedford. Both culprits were "at large." G. D. R., 9 Oct. 19 Charles II.

19 October, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Fenne late of the said parish laborer stole and carried off four gold ringes set with onyx stones worth three pounds, three gold ringes (each of them sett with an aggett) worth thirty shillings, two gold ringes (each of them sett with an aggett) worth thirty shillings, one gold ring sett with seven diamonds worth three pounds, and divers other articles of jewellery fully described in the indictment, of the goods and chattels of a certain Henry Dryden. Thomas Fenne put himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury, but the bill exhibits no clerical minute touching subsequent stages of the affair. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 Charles II.

31 October, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, George Wright late of the said parish maryner murdered his son George Wright, an infant of the age of eighteen months, by throwing him into the river Thames, so that he was drowned and died instantly in the said river. Found 'Guilty,' George Wright was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 Charles II.

13 November, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at the parish of St. Mary-le-Savoy on the said day, Richard Phillipps late of the said parish gentleman assaulted a certain Jonathan Corker, and with both his fists struck and bruised the same Jonathan Corker on and upon the left side of his head, giving him near the left ear a mortal bruise of which Jonathan Corker languished at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields from the said 13th November to the 18th day. of the same month, on which lastnamed day he died at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields of the said mortal bruise: And that in so giving him a mortal bruise in the aforesaid manner, Richard Phillipps slew and murdered the said Jonathan Corker. Putting himself on trial Richard Phillipps was found 'Not Guilty.' G. D. R., 11 Dec, 19 Charles II.

13 November, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Heston co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Dudley and John Withington, both late of the said parish gentlemen, assaulted William Davis and stole from his person and carried off four hundred yards of broad-cloth worth two hundred pounds. John Withington was "at large." Richard Dudley confessed the indictment; but there is no clerical minute touching judgment upon him. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 Charles II.

16 November, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, Abigail Jones late of the said parish spinster stole and carried off four yards of Dutch searge worth fifty-one shillings, a holland shirt worth twenty shillings, and twenty-five yards "panni lanei anglice vocati Barratine stuffe" worth three pounds and six shillings, ten yards of worsted chamblet worth nineteen shillings, and ten yards and halfe a yard of woollen cloth called "Tamarine stuffes" worth twenty-two shillings, of the goods and chattels of Robert Summers. Found Guilty' of stealing to the value of ten-pence, Abigail Jones was sentenced to be whipt. G. D. R., 11 Dec, 19 Charles II.

20 November, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's Savoy co. Midd. on the said day, Richard Warburton late of the said parish gentleman assaulted Peircy Palmer esq. and with a certaine glasse bottle, which he threw at him, gave the said Peircy Palmer esq. on the left side of his head near the left ear a mortal wound, of which he died on the following day, being thus slain and murdered by the said Richard Warburton. When the bill was found, Richard Warburton was "at large"—Also, Coroner's Inquisition-post-mortem for the cause of the death of the said Peircy Palmer esq. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 Charles II.

25 December, 19 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, between five and six o'clock p.m. in the night of the said day, Jonathan Hacke late of the said parish laborer broke burglariously into the dwelling-house of Lionel Fletcher, and stole and carried off a perrywigg worth ten shillings, and a blacke hatt worth two shillings and sixpence, of the goods and chattels of the aforesaid Lionel Fletcher. Acquitted of the burglary, Jonathan Hacke was found 'Guilty' of the felonious stealing, whereupon he pleaded his clergy, read the book and was branded (Po se non cul de bur cul fel ca nl pe li le cre). G. D. R., 16 Jan., 19 Charles II.



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