Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1677

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

Supporting documents

Pages

75-81

Citation Show another format:

'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1677', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 75-81. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66084 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

1677

10 January, 28 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Whitechappell co. Midd. on the said day, Gerald Boarne alias Gerald Byrne, late of the said parish yeoman, designing to bring the Most Noble James Duke of Ormond K.G. &c. to death, in the presence and hearing of very many of the lieges and subjects of the Lord the King uttered these malicious and diabolical words, to wit, "If I could handsomely or conveniently meet with or light off the Duke of Ormond, I would kill him." On 13th Jan., 1678, Gerald Boarne alias Byrne was declared 'Not Guilty.' S. P. R., 9 Dec, 30 Charles II.

7 February, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. in the night between 2 a.m. and 3 a.m. of the said day, Thomas Sadler alias Clarke, William Johnson alias Trueman and Thomas Reneger, all three late of the said parish laborers, broke burglariously into the dwellinghouse of Heneage Lord Finch the Lord Chancellor of the said Lord the King (Heneagii Dni Finch Dni Cancellar' d'c'i Dni Regis Anglie) and then and there stole and carried off "a Silver Mace gilt gold worth one hundred pounds, and two velvett purses imbroydered with gold and silver and sett with pearles, worth forty pounds, of the goods and chattels of the said Lord the King, Found 'Guilty,' all three burglars were sentenced to be hanged. No mention is made of the Great Seal. G. D. R., 7 March, 29 Charles II.

14 February, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martins-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, George Ward and Charles Michartey, both late of the said parish, assaulted a certain Ulick Mack-Elligott, and that the said George Ward then and there slew and murdered the said Ulick Mack-Elligott, by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound in the right part of his belly, of which wound the said Ulick Mack-Elligott then and there instantly died. Charles Michartey was acquitted. Acquitted of murder, but found 'Guilty' of manslaughter, George Ward pleaded his clergy effectually: 'cre' resp' usq' p'x'=the branding was deferred till the next Gaol Delivery. G. D. R., 7 March, 29 Charles II.

20 February, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Endfeild co. Midd. on the said day, Robert Dines alias Deans laborer, William Dines alias Deans laborer, and Margaret Dines alias Deans spinster, with the intention of maiming and deforming Jane King lay in wait for and assaulted the said Jane King; And That the said Margaret Dines alias Deanes with a knife cut and disabled the right eye of the said Jane King, with the design of disfiguring her, and that the aforesaid Robert and William Dines alias Deans were present at the perpetration of the said felony, and encouraged and aided the said Margaret Dines alias Deans to commit it. Found 'Guilty,' the said Robert, William and Margaret were all three sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 25 April, 29 Charles II.

15 April, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, William Mayes alias Mace esquire and Thomas Witherley gentleman, both late of the said parish, assaulted one Gilbert Ward, and that the said William Mayes alias Mace slew and murdered the same Gilbert, by giving him with a rapier a mortal wound on the left side of his breast, of which wound he then and there instantly died; And That the said Thomas Witherley was present at the perpetration of the said felony, and encouraged and aided William Mayes to commit it. On 10th Oct., 29 Charles II., William Mayes and Thomas Witherley "po se" = put themselves Not Guilty on a jury. The bill exhibits no clerical note touching later proceedings in the case. G. D. R., 25 April, 29 Charles II.

4 May, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. James's Clerkenwell co. Midd., on the said day, Roger Minsher late of the said parish stole and carried off an English Bible worth eight shillings, a black silke hood worth two shillings, and a cambrick handkerchief worth two shillings, of the goods and chattels of Daniel Lathberry. Roger Minsher confessed the indictment, and was sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 29 Charles II.

5 June, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Mary's Savoy co. Midd. on the said day, Alice Chilton spinster and Elizabeth Gibson spinster, both late of the said parish, stole, took and carried away four gold rings worth fifty shillings, a silver ring worth eighteen pence, a gold crucifix worth eighteen shillings, a silver thimble worth twelve pence, two silver cups worth three pounds, three silver spoons worth twenty shillings, a serge pettycoate worth twelve shillings, a white sarsnet hood worth three shillings, a damask napkin worth eighteen pence, an eleven shilling peece of gold worth eleven shillings, and a piece of coined gold called a Spanish double-pistall worth twenty-three shillings, and nine pounds and nineteen shillings in numbered money, of the goods chattels and moneys of a certain Anne Burton. Found 'Guilty,' Alice Chilton and Elizabeth Gibson were both sentenced to be hanged. G. D. R., 11 July, 29 Charles II.

10 June, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. on the said day, Edward Warren late of the said parish apothecary, a man diabolically affected towards our most serene Lord Charles the Second and also towards the said King's brother James Duke of York, maliciously and seditiously spoke and uttered in a high voice these wicked and scandalous words, to wit, "He would drink damnation to the King and the Duke, and also, if Charles were there, he would fling the beer in his face;" and that in answer to a question the said Edward Clarke said he meant "Charles the Second." No clerical minute on the bill, touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. West. R., 9 July, 29 Charles II.

19 June, 29 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Thomas Povey esq., J.P. and James Dewy esq. J.P., of John Forbuck of St. Laurence Pountney of London priest (sacerdos), in the sum of forty pounds: For the said John Forbuck's appearance at the next Quarter Session of the Peace for the city and liberties of Westminster, "then and there to prefer &c. one Byll of Indictment against Dame Katherin Grandison and Dame Hester Webb, for that the said John Forbuck suspects they have conveyed away John Clarke his nephew to Saint Omer's in France, there to be brought up in the popish religion." S. P. West. R., 9 July, 29 Charles II.

5 July, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Clement's Danes' co. Midd. on the said day, Samuel Reynolds late of the said parish gentleman assaulted a certain James Button, and with a rapier gave him on the left part of his breast a serious wound, half-an-inch broad and six inches deep, of which wound the said James Button has languished from the aforesaid 5 th July to the day of the taking of this inquisition, to wit, the 4th of September, 29 Charles II. On 4th Oct., 1677, Samuel Reynolds confessed the indictment, and was fined in the sum of thirteen shillings and four pence, which he paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 4 Sept., 29 Charles II.

7 July, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Giles's-in-the-Fields on the said day, Cornelius Crouch and William Leader, both late of the said parish yeomen, with the intention of defrauding William Freeman esq. of his money, came to the dwelling house of the said William Freeman esq. in the said parish, and told Elizabeth Goodwin spinster, one of the servants of the said William Freeman, that they were Letter Carryers in the service of Henry Earl of Arlington then being the Post-MasterGenerall, and delivered to her nine false and counterfeit letters marked with a marke resembling the marke of the Post Office, and declared that the said letters had been brought from parts beyond sea, and that the Post-Master-Generall's fee for delivering the said letters was thirty-six shillings and six-pence, whereupon the said Elizabeth Goodwin paid to the said Cornelius Crouch and William Leader thirty-six shillings and sixpence of her master's money; Whereas the letters were false and spurious and had not been brought from parts beyond sea, and were not marked with the genuine mark of the Generall Post Office, and the two confederates, Cornelius Crouch and William Leader were not Letter Carryers in the service of the Post-Master-General. Each rogue confessed the indictment and was fined forty shillings. S. P. R., 4 Sept., 29 Charles II.

30 July, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Thomas Walker late of the said parish yeoman, a man diabolically affected towards our most serene Lord Charles the Second, in the presence and hearing of divers of the said king's lieges and subjects, spoke in a high voice these seditious and scandalous words, to wit, "Hee hoped to see the Prince of Orange King of England, and that the King (meaning our most serene Lord Charles the Second &c.) should live no longer then hee being born under one planet, and that if hee (meaning himself Thomas Walker) were one of the States of Holland, hee would fight to the last drop of his blood against all Kings." No clerical minute touching any subsequent proceeding in the case. S. P. West. R., 1 Oct., 29 Charles II.

2 October, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Stepney co. Midd. on the said day, James Buckle late of the said parish yeoman, assaulted Hester Lambert and unlawfully conveyed her to a ship called The Augustine, then lying in the river Thames, with the intention of transporting her in the said ship to a certain place beyond the sea, called Virginia, without her consent and against her will, and selling her in Virginia to the gain and profit of himself James Buckle. James Buckle put himself 'Not Guilty' on a jury of the country. No clerical minute touching any subsequent proceeding in the case. S. P. R., 4 Oct., 29 Charles II.

3 October, 29 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Richard Downton J.P. on the said day, of Edward Furniss of Istleworth co. Midd. carpenter, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Thomas Vincent of Istleworth shoemaker and John Cole of Twickenham shepherd, in the sum of twenty pounds: For the appearance of the said Edward Furniss at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there "to answeare the assaulting and beateing of George Beaste of East Bedfont constable, who executed his office against the said Edward Furniss, for driveing of sheep upon the Lordes day."—Also, similar Recognizances, taken on the same day before the same Justice of the Peace: For the appearance of John Smallbone of Twickenham husbandman at the same next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answeare the assaulting and beating of George Beast of East Bedfont constable, who executed his office against the said John Smallbone, for driveing of sheep on the Lordes day." S. P. R., 4 Oct., 29 Charles II.

23 October, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, on the said day, Eleanore Bonnett wife of William Bonnett late of St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. yeoman, a crafty woman intent on defrauding Alice Challenor of St. Clement's Danes co. Midd. spinster, and cheating her out of thirty yards of lace and two grey silke cornetts by color of a false statement, falsely and fraudulently averred to a certain Dorothy Challenor, servant of the aforesaid Alice Challenor, that a certain lady (quædam domina anglice a Lady) was residing in a house called St. James's House, situated in St. Martin's Fields, who wished to buy divers yards of lace and two silk caps, and that if she the aforesaid Eleanore should carry them to the Lady then living in the aforesaid house called St. James's House, she would either restore to the said Dorothy the aforesaid thirty yards of lace and two silk caps or pay her the money for them, whereupon Dorothy Challenor in reliance on Eleanore Bonnett's statement delivered to her thirty yards of lace worth fourteen pounds and five shillings, and two grey silke lace cornetts worth fifteen shillings, of the goods and chattels of the aforesaid Alice Challenor, whereas there was not any such Lady residing at St. James's House as the lady who had been spoken of by Eleanore Bonnett, who thus by a falsehood got possession of the afore-described goods, which she has since converted to her own use. Found 'Guilty' by a jury, Eleanor Bonnett was fined in the sum of twenty-six shillings and eight-pence, which she forthwith paid to the Sheriff in court. S. P. R., 10 Dec, 29 Charles II.

28 November, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, in the highway at St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Charles Fox late of the said parish yeoman and his wife Anne Fox, alias Anne late of the said parish spinster alias Anne Mooney late of the said parish spinster, assaulted Ellen Farrell spinster, and then and there beat wounded and maltreated her so that her life was despaired of, and then and there unlawfully took in the aforesaid highway from the person of the said Ellen Farrell forty shillings in numbered money, of the moneys of a certain Margaret Murthough spinster. On 8 April, 1678, Charles Fox and Anne Fox both pleaded 'Not Guilty,' and afterwards, to wit, on 14 May, 1678, they were both found 'Not Guilty' by a jury. S. P. R., 10 Dec., 29 Charles II.

21 December, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at Fryan Barnett co. Midd. on the said day, William King, Henry Clayton and John Sheppard, all three late of the said parish laborers, stole and carried off a silver comb-box worth six pounds, two silver powder boxes worth four pounds, "et duo ornamenta crin' pro capite muliebr' anglice vocat', women's Tewers" worth six shillings, of the goods and chattels of a' certain George Willoughby. At the bill's foot appears this note in the handwriting of the draughtsman of the indictment, to wit, 'Roberia super altam viam regiam in Com. Bucks' (sic). At the head of the bill appears in another handwriting this clerical note over the name of William King, to wit, 'Po se Cul ca nl' patet per evidenciam fore Roberiam alta regia via apud Maidenhead Thickett in Com. Berks' = "He puts himself: the jurors say that he is Guilty and has no chattels for forfeiture: It appears from the evidence there was a robbery on the King's highway at Maidenhead Thickett co. Berks.' The same note appears on the face of the indictment over Henry Clayton's name. Found 'Guilty,' William King and Henry Clayton were sentenced to be hanged. No clerical note touching John Sheppard. G. D. R., 16 Jan., 29 Charles II.

24 December, 29 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day and on divers other days between the said 24th Dec. and the day of the taking of this inquisition, John White late of the said parish butcher sold victuals, to wit, the dead bodies of two sheep, in the King's high-way and then and there kept market (no fair or open market being there at the said time).—Also, on the same file, three True Bills against three other butchers of the same parish, to wit, John Beasley, Roger Roofe, John Salter all three late of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields, for selling victuals and keeping market in the king's highway in the said parish, when there was no fair or open market there No clerical minute touching subsequent proceedings in the case appears on any one of the three bills. S. P. West. R., 3 April, 30 Charles II.