Middlesex Sessions Rolls
1681

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

John Cordy Jeaffreson (editor)

Year published

1892

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Pages

149-160

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'Middlesex Sessions Rolls: 1681', Middlesex county records: Volume 4: 1667-88 (1892), pp. 149-160. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66088 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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1681

7 January, 32 Charles II.—Informations against the following Catholic Recusants for remaining within ten miles of the city of London against the form of a certain Act of Parliament of 5 November, 3 James I.—to wit, against Patrick Trant gentleman, Jeremiah Goree yeoman, John Pittoe laborer, Bernard Gascoigne . . . ., John Gregson yeoman, John Wall yeoman, George Starsaire yeoman, the Lady Mary St. John widow, John Duvall esq., Christopher Carkill yeoman, James Coughland yeoman, Lewis Shampee yeoman, Christopher Collins . . . ., Thomas Short . . . ., John Tomithes (?) shoemaker, Andrew Mathews carpenter, Andrew Robinson distiller, John Goslyn apothecary, Francis Fanshaw yeoman, and Henry Constable yeoman, all twenty persons being described as late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields within the liberties &c. of Westminster. These twenty informations were laid before William the Earl Craven and other Justices of the Peace for Westminster assembled in General Quarter Session of the Peace, by Samuel Barrow, who on laying the informations claimed the one-half of the penalty of one hundred pounds, accruing to the Lord now King and the informer from each of the recusants, so informed against, and sought process of the law for the satisfaction of his claim. S. P. West. R., 6 Jan., 32 Charles II.

8 January, 32 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before Sir Clement Armiger knt. J.P., of Mounseir Jacob Jacmar of St. Martin's parish, in the sum of forty pounds: For the said Jacob Jacmar's appearance at the next Session of the Peace to be held at Hixis Hall, "then and there to give in evidence against Morice Comins for a suspition of beeing a Roman Preist." He did not appear. S. P. R., 14 Jan., 32 Charles II.

10 January, 32 Charles II—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, Theophilus Oglethorpe, Baldwin Laton and Charles Bolt, all three late of the said parish gentlemen, assaulted John Richardson gentleman, and that Theophilus Oglethorpe slew and murdered the said John Richardson by then and there giving him with a rapier a mortal wound near the navell, of which wound he died on the following day at St. Paul's, Covent Garden: And that Baldwin Laton and Charles Bolt were present at the said murder, arid aided and encouraged Theophilus Oglethorpe to commit it. Acquitted of murder, but 'Found Guilty' of manslaughter, Theophilus Oglethorpe asked for the book, read it and was branded. No clerical note touching subsequent proceedings against Baldwin Laton and Charles Bolt. G. D. R., 25 Feb., 33 Charles II.

11 January, 32 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before John Perry esq. J.P. on the said day, of Robert Baynes of St. Giles's-withoutCripplegate victualler and John Coale of St. demon's Deans (sic) clothworker, in the sum of twenty pounds each: For the appearance of Ursilla Key at the next Session of the Peace to be holden at Hicks Hall in St. John's Street, to answer &c. for "being suspected to be a papist." S. P. R., 14 Jan., 32 Charles II.

12 January, 32 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during three months beginning on the said day, against Margaret Salving spinster, Elizabeth Salving spinster, and Diana Salving spinster, all three late of the parish of St. Mary-le-Savoy co. Midd. Memorandum of proclamation; but no clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. R., 11 April, 33 Charles II.

12 January, 32 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during three months beginning on the said day, against William Lord Powis, . . . . his wife alias . . . . Lady Powis spinster, John Lord Arundle of Warder, . . . . the Countess Stafford widow, William Jarrett esq., Sir William Gallaway knt., Henry Blaston (sic) gentleman, Mary his wife alias Mary Blasden (sic) spinster, John Binge gentleman, Simon Foxe gentleman, Nevison Foxe alias Nevison Bushell gentleman, Peter Theodore yeoman, John Leforce alias John Grey yeoman, his wife Ruth Leforce alias Ruth Grey spinster, Thomas Rosson yeoman, his wife Katherine alias Katherine Rosson spinster, and Christofer Switerday yeoman, all seventeen late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. Clerical minutes show that William Jarrett appeared on 4 July, 1681, and pleaded a special plea, that on the same 4 July, 1681, Simon Foxe appeared and produced a certificate of conformity and of having taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper, and that on the same day Nevison Foxe alias Nevison Bushell also appeared and produced a certificate of conformity and of having taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. No other clerical minutes. S. P. R., 11 April, 33 Charles II.

12 January, 32 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer, during three months beginning on the said 12 Jan., 32 Charles II., against the following persons, to wit, George Carsons esq., Henry Benedict Hall esq., Henry Jermyn esq., Thomas Markham esq., William Roper esq., George Freeman gentleman, John Cole gentleman, Austin Cockayn confectioner, Jasper Andrewes joyner, Peter Fountayne perfumer, James Brambourne taylor, Anthony Ashfeild taylor, Henry Brokes millener, Jervas Clifton gentleman, Alexander Walker distiller, Michael Stanley apothecary, Thomas Moore bookseller, Patrick Milton M.D., Peter Beckett goldsmith, John Watson gentleman, Samuel Chambers tobacconist, George Berrigood gunsmith, Ralph Smith shoemaker, Christopher Barton blacksmith, all twenty-four late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields; Edward the Lord Pawlett and Anthony Owen yeoman, both of St. James's Clerkenwell; Cornelius Doore M.D., of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate; . . . . the Lord Dunbarr, and Gabriel Coxe draper, both of St. Paul's Covent-Garden; Sir Thomas Bond knt., Edward Shelton esq., Edward Molineux gentleman, Lionel Throgmorton gentleman, Francis Perkins gentleman, all five late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd.; Bleam Milmon apothecary, Francis Revenhurst glassman, Paul Demanty glassman, John Williams glassman, all four late of the parish of St. Mary-le-Savoy; John Knapp, M.D., Robert Grigg apothecary, John Barton chirurgion, John Langham salesman, all four late of St. Clement's Danes'; Walter Gifford esq., Samuel Mortage M.D., Humphrey Painter innkeeper, all three late of Fulham; Bernard Smithson apothecary, Mathew Turner book-seller, James Prince goldsmith, all three late of St. Andrew's Holborne; Sir Charles Malgrave late of Southmyms co. Midd. knt.; Lewis Dehavior, of St. Margaret's Westminster co. Midd. gentleman; Stephen Walpoole apothecary and Raymond Fitzmaurice alias Fitzharris gentleman, both of St. Andrew's Holborne. Two clerical minutes on the bill show that William Roper esq. put himself on the country and "pleaded specially," that John Barton surgeon on 4 July, 1681, avoided the penal operation of the indictment by appearing and producing a certificate of having taken the sacrament of the Lord's supper, and Stephen Walpole on 4 July, 1681, put himself 'Not Guilty.' The bill exhibits no clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case of any other of the persons, charged with religious misdemeanour. S. P. R., 11 April, 33 Charles II.

28 January, 32 Charles II.—Recognizance, taken before James Dewey esq. J.P. on the said day, of one Prince of St. Martin's-in-the Fields "servus," in the sum of one hundred pounds; the condition of the recognizance being "that Prince a blackmore appear at the next Session of the Peace" for Middlesex, "to answer the assaulting and wounding John Langley." Prince did not appear. S. P. R., 23 Feb., 33 Charles II.

1 February, 33 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields within the Liberties &c. of Westminster on the said day, William Orpoole, late of the said parish laborer, maliciously envious of the most illustrious prince James the Duke of York, the royal brother of our most serene Lord Charles the Second &c. and heir-presumptive to the Imperial Crown of this kingdom of England, and designing to bring the said illustrious prince to death and final destruction, in the presence and hearing of divers of the aforesaid King's lieges and subjects maliciously and advisedly spoke these malicious and unlawful words, to wit, "If the Duke of Yorke was here, I would run my sword into the heart's blood of him, up to the hilt." No clerical minutes of subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R., 3 Oct., 33 Charles II.

2 March, 33 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields co. Midd. on the said day, George Adams late of the said parish laborer stole and carried away a book entitled 'The Journall of the House of Commons' worth six shillings, another book entitled 'The Life of the Earle of Rochester' worth two shillings and six-pence, another book entitled 'Machiavell Redivivus' worth one shilling and six-pence, another book entitled 'The Life of Richard the Second' worth two shillings, another book entitled 'The Whole Duty of a Communicant' worth one shilling, and another book entitled 'The Earl of Castlehaven's Memoirs' worth one shilling, of the goods and chattels of William Cademan. Found 'Guilty,' George Adams asked for the book, read it and was branded. G. D. R., 13 April, 33 Charles II.

9 March, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before James Dewy esq. J.P. on the said day, of Richard Smart of Whitechappell victualler, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Henry Parks nailsmith and James Stacy tailor, both of the aforesaid parish, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the said Richard Smart's appearance at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, then and there "to answer for speaking scandalous words of the King." S. P. R., 11 April, 33 Charles II.

11 March, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances, takén before Roger Jenyns esq. J.P., of Sir Edward Bash knt., James Bradford, John Parker of Uxbridge co. Midd. victualler and Symon Snape of the same parish, in the sum of ten pounds each: For the appearance of the said Sir Edward Bash knt., James Bradford, John Parker and Symon Snape at the next S. P. and G. D. for Middlesex, then and there to prefer an indictment and give evidence "against Adam Hutchinson for seditious words by him spoken." S. P. R., 11 April, 33 Charles II.

12 March, 33 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Charles Macrak yeoman, Jane Thornbury spinster, Margaret Langley spinster, Dorothy Bondman spinster, all four late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd.; Richard Garbett yeoman, Jane Buckley the wife of Francis Buckley yeoman, Margaret Swindall the wife of Robert Swindall yeoman, all three late of St. Dunstan's-in-the-West co. Midd.; Mary Vandalus alias Mary Talbot widow, John Woodman yeoman and John Champion yeoman, all three late of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. Note of proclamation, but no clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. R., 11 April, 33 Charles II.

1 April, 33 Charles II.—Ignored Bill that, to incite and stir up the people, and bring the Lord now King into odium and contempt, John Groves late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields taylor, in the presence and hearing of divers of the said King's lieges and subjects, spoke at the said parish and on the said day these seditious words, to wit, "Wee should have noe more Parliament, and the King was as great a papist as the Duke of York, and I wonder the Parliament doth not chop off his head." S. P. R., 18 May, 33 Charles II.

13 April, 33 Charles II.—The Newgate Calendar of 13 April, 30 Charles II., contains this note, "Alice Raesteine, committed by Edward Warcupp esq., charged by her owne confession, for going to Newgate to Edward Fitz-Harris (prisoner there for High Treason) having about her a Chararter (sic) not to be understood but by herself, which is supposed might bee instrucions to the said Fitz-Harris what to answer about the Treason he stands committed for and Refusing to find sureties, Dated 7 March 1680." G. D. R., 13 April, 33 Charles II.

18 April, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Hariot . . . . J.P. on the said day, of John Grove of Pickadilly in St. Martin's-in-the-Fields taylor in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Henry Barringer of Windmill Yard of the same parish coachman and of William Halsey of the same parish tobacconist, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the appearance of the said John Grove at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answere for speaking of treasonable words." He came and was discharged. S. P. R., 18 May, 33 Charles II.

23 April, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances of Robert Wadsworth and John Ingram, both of St. Botolph's Allgate cutlers, in the sum of thirty shillings each, and of Matthew Newby apprentice of the said John Ingram, in the sum of forty shillings: For the appearance of the said Matthew at the next General Session of the Peace, to answer &c. "for assaulting the house of John Webster in the night tyme by raising a ladder against it, and defacing a table-board describing the wares and comodityes he sold, and fixing to it a scandalous libel to his great disgrace." S. P. R., 18 May, 33 Charles II.

3 May, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Edward Warcupp esq. J.P. on the said day, of James Maclanah of Lowth in Ireland yeoman, in the sum of one hundred pounds, and of Thomas Lightfoot of Aldergate Alley in Bishopsgate Street victualler and William Dale of Swan Yard in Aldersgate Street carpenter, in the sum of fifty pounds each: For the appearance of the said James Maclanah at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "touching his recusancy and refusall to take the Oath of Allegiance, and being in towne contrary to the lawes and proclamations, in this case made and provided." He appeared on 4 Aug., 1681, when the matter was deferred. S. P. R., 18 May, 33 Charles II.

6 May, 33 Charles II.— Recognizances of Thomas Vensome of St. Giles's-without-Cripplegate wyer-drawer, and James Roberts of the same parish labourer, in the sum of five pounds each; For the appearance of Anne Ellis spinster at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer "for unlawfully takeing away money and goods of a considerable value from her father-in-law Thomas Vensome." On 4 July, 1681, the matter was deferred, on evidence that Anne Ellis had been sent to Virginia with the consent of her parents. S. P. R., 18 May, 33 Charles II.

13 June, 33 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel, or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against William Lancaster yeoman, Mary Featherhalfe widow, Peregrine Featherhalfe spinster, Martin Couldron yeoman, and James Windeybanke yeoman, all five late of St. Margaret's Westminster. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R. 3 Oct., 33 Charles II.

13 June, 33 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Musgrave Bibby vintner, Helen Clarke widow, Peter Smith tayler, John Tuncks shoemaker, Thomas Walker yeoman, Lewis Shampee yeoman, Margaret Bignall the wife of Giles Bignall yeoman, Martha Gorey the wife of Jeremiah Gorey yeoman, John Martindall vintner, Richard Collett vintner, Edward Tardy yeoman, all eleven late of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields, and of Dorothy Turner the wife of Francis Turner late of St. Margaret's Westminster. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings. S. P. West. R., 3 Oct., 33 Charles II.

13 June, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances of Elisha Bennet of St. Laurence Lane London sailor, in the sum of forty pounds, and of Sampson Fenn of St. Botolph's-without-Algate cooper and Walter Georges of Wapping tallow-chandler, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Elisha Bennet at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer to what "shall be objected against him by Richard Arndell for selling at the Island of St. Christopher's the cooke of his shipp, and alsoe trappaning and endeavouring to sell him at the said Island, hee haveing sworn the same, and alsoe for refuseing to pay to him wages due to him." At the foot of the bill appears this clerical minute, to wit, "iiii Aug. '81 compar et respur producit relaxac'on.' " He appears on 4 Aug., 1681, and the matter is deferred: he produces a release. S. P. R., 4 July, 33 Charles II.

5 July 33 Charles II.—Recognizance of George Grantham of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields plumber, in the sum of twenty pounds; For the appearance of the said George Grantham at the present Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answere for not observeing the legall Rules and Orders of the Company of Plumbers, he being a member of the said company." S. P. R., 4 July, 33 Charles II.

15 August, 33 Charles II.—Recognizance of Mary Willson alias Powell of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd . . . . ., in the sum of forty pounds; For the appearance of the said Mary Willson alias Powell at the next Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "then and there to prosecute the lawe with effect against Joshua Willson for deluding of her under pretence of marriage in the Quakers Church." S. P. R., 24 Aug., 33 Charles II.

2 September, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances of Abraham Roberts bricklayer, Henry Elliott mealeman and Joseph Collins carpenter, all three of St. Giles's-in-the-Fields, and of William Gate of St. Margaret's Westminster gentleman, and John Tomlinson of St. Martin's-in-theFields victualler, all five being bound in the sum of one hundred pounds each; For the appearance of Thomas Flood at the next Quarter Session of the Peace for Westminster, "to answeare upon suspition of being a popish priest." S. P. West. R., 3 Oct., 33 Charles II.

4 September, 33 Charles II.—True Bill for not going to church, chapel or any other usual place of common prayer, during one month beginning on the said day, against Henry Constable late of St. Martin'sin-the-Fields within the Liberties &c. of Westminster linen-draper. No clerical minutes touching subsequent proceedings in the case. S. P. West. R., 3 Oct, 33 Charles II.

21 September, 33 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-inthe-Fields co. Midd. on the said day, Diana Middleton late of the said parish widow assaulted Mary Hartley spinster and conveyed her against her will on board a certain ship called "a Virginia shipp" then lying in the river Thames, with the intention of transporting the same Mary to parts beyond sea and there selling her for the profit of the same Diana Middleton.—Also, on the same file, another True Bill against the same Diana Middleton widow for assaulting Margaret Towers on the same 21st September, and carrying her on board "a Virginia shipp" then lying in the river Thames, with the intention of transporting her to parts beyond sea, and there selling her. No minutes of subsequent proceedings on either of these indictments. S. P. West. R., 3 Oct., 33 Charles II.

10 October, 33 Charles II.—True Bills, on several parchments, for not going to church, chapel or any usual place of common prayer for three months, beginning on the said day, against Sir Robert Frogmorton bart., Lady Anne Frogmorton widow, Robert Dulton esq., Richard Townley . . . ., . . . . Gerrard esq., Charles Ingleby esq., . . . . Braithwaite esq., Francis Braithwaite gentleman, . . . . Osbaldeston gentleman, William Money gentleman, Thomas Barton gentleman, Philip Draycott esq., Richard Biddolph esq., Bazill Brooke esq., Richard Reaton esq., James Palmer esq., Richard Compton gentleman, Richard Bayly gentleman, John Bond gentleman, Robert Thorold esq., William Thorold gentleman, John Thorold gentleman, Charles Thorold gentleman, David Fogerby alias Foberby gentleman, Henry Wilhard esq., John Thimbleby esq., John Thimbleby gentleman, William Barlow gentleman, Edward Willoughby gentleman, the Lady Mary Smith widow, Lewis Smith gentleman, Thomas Holder esq., Robert Smith gentleman, all thirty-three of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields co. Midd. It is worthy of remark that Robert Smith gentleman and Thomas Barton gentleman are especially described as 'persons professing the popish religion.' At the foot of each bill appears the note, that proclamation of the indicted persons was made according to the statute. G. D. R., 10 Oct., 33 Charles II.

15 November, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances of Henry Langley of St. Katharine's near the Tower of London mariner, in the sum of twenty pounds, and of John Yeo mariner and Robert Hicks bricklayer, both of Wapping co. Midd., in the sum of ten pounds each; For the appearance of the said Henry Langley at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answer &c. for defrauding and cheating Ann Bradgate and others of five shillings, under pretence of getting in and collecting money for the relief of the poor captives in Algeirs." S. P. R., 2 Dec., 33 Charles II.

30 November, 33 Charles II.—True Bill that, at St. Martin's-in-theFields on the said day, Edward Wilkinson late of the said parish laborer, a man of ill name and fame, designing to defraud a certain Musgrave Bibby of his money, came to the said Musgrave Bibby, and in speaking to him pretended to be an officer pertaining to the Court of the Bishop of London, and then and there served the same Musgrave Bibby with a false writing, pretending that the same was a true process issuing from the Court of the aforesaid Bishop, whereby the same Musgrave Bibby was required to appear before the same Bishop at his Prerogative Court held at Doctors Commons Hall, within three days after service, then and there to answer on oath to certain matters: And that further the same Edward Wilkinson required the same Musgrave Bibby to pay him the sum of thirty-one pounds fifteen shillings and sixpence, and promised in consideration of the payment to stay the further prosecution of the said process. S. P. West. R., 9 Jan., 33 Charles II.

2 December, 33 Charles II.—A lengthy and interesting memorandum touching the office, functions and emoluments of the Raker or General Undertaker for the cleansing of the streets lanes and other open passages of each ward and division within the parishes of St. Giles-in-the-Fields and St. Martin-in-the-Fields co. Middlesex: comprising (1) the Petition made by "Thomas Rowe esq." to the Justices of the Peace assembled at G. Q. S. P. on 14 January 32 Charles II., (2) the Order of the said Court referring the said Petition to a special committee of the same Justices of the Peace, to consider and report thereon, (3) the Report of the committee so appointed to consider examine into and report upon the said Petition of Thomas Rowe esq., and (4) the Final Order made by the Court after due consideration and on deliberate approval of the report of the select committee.—1. Setting forth that, in pursuance of an Act of Parliament of 13 & 14 Charles II., the Commissioners of Scotland Yard by deed poll disposed to Winsor Sandys esq. his executors and administrators the imployment of Raker or General Undertaker for cleansing the streetes lanes and other open passages of the afore-mentioned two parishes for the terme of one-andtwenty years, and that since the determination of the said Act the aforesaid parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields, on experience of the benefit of the said contract made between Winsor Sandys esq. and the commissioners of Scotland Yard, did at general vestry assent unto and continue the same contract for the whole number of the unexpired years of the same agreement, the Petition sets forth how, on the death of the same Winsor Sandys esq., his interest in the said office of Raker or General Undertaker devolved upon his widow, "who did enjoy the same and received salaryes thereuppon from the said parishes." Further the Petition sets forth, how at the invitation of the said Mistress Sandys, and with consent of the two parishes, the Petitioner purchased the widow's interest in the said office, and entered upon the enjoyment of it, and in order to do the work of the same office bought the goods and horses of the same widow, and so laid out above a thousand pounds, and since having entered upon it laid out near upon another thousand pounds on the work of the undertaking, and moreover how the parish of St. Giles-in-the-Fields wrongfully with-holds the money due to him the petitioner for good service and work rendered and done to the said parish, in cleansing its streets lanes and other open passages.—2. The report made by the select committee of Justices of the Peace to the Court of G. Q. S. P. held on 2 December, 33 Charles II., ran in the ensuing words, to wit, "That the right honoble William Earle of Craven and other Commissioners appointed by Act of Parliament intituled An Act &c. for repairing the highwayes and sewers and paving and keeping cleane of the streetes &c. made in the 13 & 14th of King Charles the Second, constituted and appointed Winsor Sandys esq. Scavenger or Raker of the said parishes of St. Martin and St. Giles and other parishes for one and twenty yeares, and granted the said office to him his executors and administrators for the said terme; That afterwards for the avoiding of controversies and all disputes Mr Sandys applyed himselfe to the Vestryes of St. Martin and St. Giles, who made an order and agreed at their vestryes that Mr Sandys should have and continue the said office and performe the said imployment for that time soe as aforesaid to him granted, as by the said Lease and Vestry Orders may more fully appeare: That after the death of Winsor Sandys, his widdow and executrix as his executrix continues the said imployment, and the severall parishes sent to her soe to doe, and did declare shee should have consideracion, and that those that came into it should buy her stocke, whereuppon she offered to assigne her interest to Capt. Whitcombe, who refused it, and afterwards proposed to assigne the said Office to the said Thomas Rowe, who enters into a Treaty with her about the same: That pending that Treaty Mr. Rowe made application to the said Vestreys of the said parishes of St. Martin and St. Giles, and acquaints them with his intencions to conclude with Mrs. Sandys, if hee may have the concurrence and consent. And thereuppon the severall Vestryes doe declare their concurrence therein, and doe agree with the said Mr. Rowe that he shall have the said Office at the same rates formerly made with Mr. Sandys: That William Whitcombe was actually one of the vestry for the parish of St. Giles and gave his consent thereunto, and the said imployment beeing there proposed to him hee refused to meddle therewith: That thereuppon Mr. Rowe concluded with Mrs. Sandys, tooke all her laystalls, bought all her horses, carts and utensils, which cost him neare one thousand pounds out of purse, That after concurrence of the said vestryes whereby the said Thomas Rowe was induced to come to a final conclusion with Mrs. Sandys and after the said Thomas Rowe entred uppon the said Imployment, the said William Whitcombe, notwithstanding hee was one of the vestry of St. Giles that did consent with Mr. Rowe's undertaking thereof, did sette on cartes and workemen and tooke uppon him to execute the imployment of scavenger with an intencion, as appeares to the Justices last-named to prejudice the said Mr. Rowe, for that it is proved to the same Justices that hee declared and said, 'If I can but difficult Mr. Rowe in his imployment, I will buy all the horses and cartes and other things I have occasion for at my owne price': And that by the said Mr. Whitcombes meanes the said Mr. Rowe is obstructed in receiving the salary agreed uppon whereby the said Mr. Rowe will be dampnified neare one thousand pounds, hee haveing disbursed a great deale of money in buying horses and utensills for the said imployment and laid out a great deale more in performing the said worke; And that the said Justices further find that the said Thomas Rowe hath performed the said worke from Michaelmas to Lady Day past, and hath carryed away out of the parish of St. Giles this last quarter betweene Christmas and Lady Day neare twoe thousand loades of dirt and ashes, And that the truth of the aforesaid matters is evidenced to the said Justices last-named by the deeds and writeings relateing thereunto, and by the oathes of severall credible persons, who alledge they are well acquainted with the said transactions and have proved the same to them, from whence they are induced to believe that the business of the scavenger is more conveniently and properly put into the management of one person or interest then many, For that by the same rule that Mr. Whitcombe setts upp against Mr. Rowe, others may sett upp against Mr. Whitcombe, which will tend to confusion and bee a prejudice to the worke, besides it appears very injurious to Mr. Rowe, for that he proceeded with all possible prudence in concluding with Mrs. Sandys till hee had the concurrence of the Vestryes, and considering the great charge and expence hee was at, whereinto he was induced by the Vestryes concurrence, And the said Justices do conceive it is highly unjust that the said Rowe should receive any obstruccion in his said imployment, or be debarred of the salary or benefit thereof, And that the said Justices last named doe further find that the scavengers have raised severall summes of money into the Vestrys and to Mr. Whitcombe, which the same Justices conceive ought in reason and justice to bee paid to Mr. Rowe, as in and by the said Report whereunto relacion being had more fully appeareth."—Adopting this report and its recommendations in every particular, The Court ordered that Thomas Rowe should continue to enjoy the office of Raker or General Undertaker &c. for the two parishes, that all moneys due to him from St. Giles's should be forthwith paid, and that hence he should be punctually paid for his labour in cleansing the streets &c. out of the moneys raised for that purpose within the parishes by the collectors of the Rate or Duty commonly called the Scavengers Rate." S. P. R., 2 Dec., 33 Charles II.

6 December, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances, taken before Thomas Harriot esq. J.P., of Alexander Mason of Islington cordweynor, in the sum of ten pounds, and of . . . . Cole yeoman and Christopher Binckes victualler, both of the aforesaid parish, in the sum of five pounds each; For the said Alexander Mason's appearance at the next G. Q. Session of the Peace for Middlesex, "to answer the complaint of George Little his master, for running away several tymes being his apprentice, and refusing to doe the worke of his trade, and disobeying his master's commands, and instead of soe doeing for calling his master foole, cursing and swearing at him; but especially for prophanation of the Lord's Day by fighting, swearing and drunkenes and other debaucherie." He appeared and was committed to the House of Correction. S. P. R., 13 Jan., 33 Charles II.

12 December, 33 Charles II.—Recognizances of Thomas Hoss of Stepney co. Midd. cook, in the sum of forty pounds, and of William Wythe weaver and Robert Hooper barber-surgeon, both of the aforesaid parish, in the sum of twenty pounds each; For the appearance of the said Thomas Hoss at the next General Session of the Peace for Middlesex, to answer &c. "for speaking dangerous and scandalous words of his Majestie, vizt., that they were all rogues that wore the King's cloth." S. P. R., 13 Jan., 33 Charles II.