Protestant Nonconformity

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Victoria County History

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K. J. Allison (editor)

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1969

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311-330

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'Protestant Nonconformity', A History of the County of York East Riding: Volume 1: The City of Kingston upon Hull (1969), pp. 311-330. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66778 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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PROTESTANT NONCONFORMITY

Early nonconformity in and around Hull took its strength from an active group of Puritan clergy within the Established Church. (fn. 1) By 1643 this dissenting movement had already produced a separated congregation, and among its 7 members was Robert Luddington, the intruded Vicar of Sculcoates. Five members were added during 1643 and 11 in 1644. (fn. 2) In the 1650s John Canne preached to this Independent congregation in the chancel of Holy Trinity Church, while the nave was used by John Shawe, a Presbyterian preacher who was lecturer at the church. Canne continued preaching until 1656, when Parliament removed him, and Shawe was ejected in 1662. (fn. 3) Up to 1660 the Independent congregation had attracted 134 members since its inception. (fn. 4)

At about this time, too, Quakers were already holding meetings in the district. (fn. 5) John Holmes, William Garbutt, and Edward Crowther, all of Hull, are said to have been among the earliest Quaker converts in the East Riding. (fn. 6) They and their families, together with the Staveleys and Netletons, formed the nucleus of the Hull meeting. In Sutton the Ellerkers were the most prominent Quaker family, and in Marfleet a leading Quaker was John Lyth. The Hull Quakers were treated severely in the early 1660s. Six were expelled from the town in 1660 and imprisoned for fifteen weeks when they returned. In 1661 a crowd abused women arrested at the Hull meeting 'like a company of brutes who had been killing some dog or cat'. In the same year Hull Quakers were told that they might meet undisturbed outside the town, but when they met at Drypool they were arrested and imprisoned once more. Although no regular meetingplace in the town is recorded at this time, meetings are known to have taken place in the houses of at least two Hull Quakers. (fn. 7) In 1666 George Fox addressed a meeting 'near Hull'. (fn. 8) By 1669 Hull and Sutton meetings were part of Owstwick Monthly Meeting, and Hull meeting included both Marfleet and Newland. From 1683 onwards Sutton seems to have been combined with Hornsea meeting. (fn. 9) The size of the Hull meeting is uncertain but by the end of the 17th century it probably numbered about twenty.

The Independent congregation received a new pastor in 1669 when Richard Astley came to Hull, and there were then 55 members. (fn. 10) The fate of the Presbyterians after Shawe's departure is uncertain, but they doubtless continued to meet. A Mr. Anderson, a minister described as 'a dangerous person and a concealed Presbyterian', was reported to be in Hull in 1664; (fn. 11) and a Presbyterian preacher named Thornberry is said to have been in the town. (fn. 12)

After the Declaration of Indulgence in 1672 both congregations registered meeting-houses. Joseph Wilson, who had been ejected from the living at Hessle, was licensed to preach in Hull and Newland —at Richard Barnes's house and at a new meetinghouse built in Blackfriargate. He was minister of the Presbyterian congregation until his death seven years later. (fn. 13) For the Independents, Richard Astley, who had been ejected from Blackrode (Lancs.), was licensed to preach at John Robinson's house, (fn. 14) and Thomas Oliver at John Marr's house at Newland. (fn. 15) The withdrawal of the Declaration of Indulgence in 1673 had a depressing effect on at least Astley's congregation: 25 new members had been added in 1671, 24 in 1672, and 31 in 1673, but in 1674 there were only 16, in 1675 8, in 1676 10, and in 1677 only one. (fn. 16)

After Wilson's death in 1679 the Presbyterian minister was Samuel Charles, ejected in 1662 from Mickleover (Derbys.). Under Charles there was only one meeting-place, possibly already in Bowlalley Lane. (fn. 17) Late in 1682 the governor, the Earl of Plymouth, ordered the suppression of both congregations and, though Astley escaped, Charles was caught in 1683 and imprisoned for six months. Several members of the congregations were called before the corporation, including John Robinson, the elder of the Independents, and Christopher Fawthorp, on whose land the Bowlalley Lane Presbyterian chapel was later to be built. After his imprisonment Charles was despatched to Welton under the Five Mile Act. (fn. 18) During the next few years dissenters were pursued for not attending their parish church and for keeping conventicles, (fn. 19) and few new members were added to the Independent congregation: after 12 had been gained in 1679 there were only 10 all told from 1680 to 1685. (fn. 20)

More favourable conditions were once again created by the Declaration of Indulgence in 1687 and the Toleration Act of 1689. The Independents gained 12 new members in 1686 and 10 or 11 in 1687; the Presbyterians began regular lectures under Charles, back in Hull, and two patens at their chapel were acquired at this time. (fn. 21) A major step forward was made soon after when, probably in 1691 or 1692, the Bowlalley Lane Presbyterian chapel was built. (fn. 22) Charles died in 1693 and Astley followed him in 1696, just failing to see a new chapel built for the Independents, in Dagger Lane, in 1698. (fn. 23) The Independent congregation then had 113 members. (fn. 24)

By the end of the century, then, the two congregations were strongly established and housed in new chapels. In the early years of the 18th century several new meeting-places were registered: for the Independents they included Thomas Wallis's house, for Jonathon Bielby as preacher, in 1705, Joseph Sutton's and Sarah Jackson's houses in 1709, and George Bielby's house in 1713. (fn. 25) Outside the town itself several other houses were registered: Margaret Dent's at Newland in 1709, John Peacock's at Stoneferry and Robert Plaxton's at Sculcoates in 1713, Thomas Rogers's at Sutton in 1719, and John Spivy's, also at Sutton, in 1722. (fn. 26) Most of these were no doubt Independent or Presbyterian, but at about this time a Baptist church also seems to have been forming in Hull. A Baptist meeting-place is said to have been registered in 1717, (fn. 27) and in 1736 the Baptists began to meet in a tower of the former Pole family manor-house in Manor Alley (fn. 28) with a congregation of eighteen. (fn. 29)

Some indication of the numbers of nonconformists in Hull is afforded in 1743. (fn. 30) Of a reported 679 families in Holy Trinity parish 38 were said to be Presbyterian, 29 Independent, and 5 Quaker. Of 330 families in St. Mary's 30 were dissenting, mostly Presbyterian. The Presbyterians met once a week with about 300 people attending: this was in Bowlalley Lane. The Independents, in Dagger Lane, met twice on Sundays with about 200 present, and once each alternate Wednesday with 100. The 'Anabaptists', in Manor Alley, had once-weekly meetings attended by about 60 people. The Quaker meeting—said to be in Holy Trinity though it was in Lowgate, in St. Mary's, by at least 1709 (fn. 31) — gathered twice on Sundays with 45 attending, and once on Thursdays with fifteen. In Sculcoates parish there were no meeting-houses, but of 88 families 9 were Independent, 5 Presbyterian, 4 Anabaptist, and 3 Quaker. In Sutton 7 families were Independent, out of a total of about 80, and they met in Hull. In Drypool, of 23 families 6 were Presbyterian and Independent. Only in Marfleet of the outlying parishes were there no dissenters at all.

It was not until after the middle of the century that the two chief congregations experienced significant doctrinal changes. The movement towards Arianism and Unitarianism among English Presbyterians, which had begun about 1712, seems to have reached Hull only with the ministry of John Beverley, beginning in 1757. Thenceforth Bowlalley Lane was Unitarian. (fn. 32) At Dagger Lane John Burnett, appointed as Independent minister in 1767, proved to be a Presbyterian and Arian, and part of the congregation, 11 in number, seceded in 1769 to build a chapel in Blanket Row. This was replaced in 1782 by Fish Street. It was from Blanket Row and Fish Street that several later Independent and Congregational churches were to spring. After Burnett left, Dagger Lane received a Swedenborgian minister, Robert Green, in 1783 and remained Swedenborgian for many years. (fn. 33)

At the same time the Baptists were having similar difficulties. The Manor Alley meeting-place had been replaced by a new chapel in Salthouse Lane in 1757. There internal disputes arose between the Arminians and Calvinists in the congregation, and about 1765 the Calvinists seceded with the minister, Robert Rutherford, and six years later opened a new chapel in Dagger Lane. Rutherford's successor, however, joined the Church of England and in 1781 the chapel fell into the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, (fn. 34) leaving Salthouse Lane as the town's sole Baptist chapel. Some Baptists may have been satisfied with neither Rutherford nor John Beatson at Salthouse Lane, for in 1772 a house was registered for worship by Samuel Lyon and 5 companions. (fn. 35)

Meanwhile the Methodists had for the first time established themselves in the town. In 1746 Elizabeth Blow, a convert of Wesley, from Grimsby, came to Hull and won over a couple called Medforth; meetings were at first held in their house in the Back Ropery, and later in Butchery. (fn. 36) John Wesley visited Hull for the first time in 1752, when he attended service at Holy Trinity Church and in the evening preached to a large crowd at Myton Carr. The meeting ended in disorder and Wesley was pursued by the mob into the town. In 1759, however, Wesley reported 'a far finer congregation' at Hull than at Pocklington; and in 1761, after the Methodists had moved into the King's Manor tower vacated by the Baptists, he found in Hull 'some witnesses of the great salvation'. Wesley preached in Hull again in 1764, 1766, and 1770, and in 1772 he was in the new Manor Alley chapel which he described as 'extremely well finished, and, upon the whole, one of the prettiest preaching-houses in England'. Two years later the chapel would not hold all who wanted to hear him. He was in the town again in 1777, 1779, 1781, 1782, 1784, and 1786. He preached in Holy Trinity Church in 1786, and again in 1788 when he was also at the new George Yard chapel, which he praised highly. At George Yard the congregation was 'larger than even that at Birmingham, which exceeded all the morning congregations I had then seen'. When Wesley paid his last visit, in 1790, Methodism was firmly established in Hull. (fn. 37)

In the closing years of the 18th century a significant development took place at Ebenezer Chapel, Dagger Lane. Lost by the Baptists to the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion in 1781, the chapel was subsequently led by a succession of Independent, Calvinistic, ministers. It was one of these men, Samuel Barnard, who in 1797 left to establish the Hope Street church, founding an important branch of local Congregationalism. (fn. 38) Though Ebenezer remained Independent (fn. 39) it had two ministers with Baptist sympathies in the early 19th century. (fn. 40)

The Baptists by the end of the century had added a second chapel to Salthouse Lane. The registration for worship of a room in High Street by William Clarkson and two others in 1788 (fn. 41) may indicate some dissatisfaction with the conduct of Salthouse Lane, and in 1794 the congregation there divided. Nineteen members left with the probationer-minister William Pendered and met in the Corn Exchange in North Church Side until 1796, when George Street chapel was opened. (fn. 42) There may still have been malcontents, for two 'Independent Baptist' meeting-places were soon registered: in Mill Street by Robert Stainton and two others in 1798, and in Garden Street by William Hornsey and three others in 1799. (fn. 43) Almost certainly Baptist, too, was a meeting-place in High Street registered by Robert Blake and five others in 1795. (fn. 44)

The last decade of the century also brought changes among the Methodists. Hull, indeed, played a significant part in the secession of Alexander Kilham to form the Methodist New Connexion in 1797, for it was the 'Signal Gun from Hull' that brought Kilham into the open. 'The Gun', a letter sent from Hull in 1791 to Methodists all over the country, prophesied that if Methodism parted from the Church of England it would 'dwindle away into a dry, dull, separate party'. (fn. 45) The main responsibility for the letter lay with Thomas Thompson, a local preacher and the first Methodist M.P., and it was also signed by Richard Terry, of Newland, who shared with Thompson the leadership of Methodism in Hull. (fn. 46) The group that seceded in Hull in 1797 is said to have met at first in Dagger Lane, (fn. 47) but in 1799 the first New Connexion chapel was opened, in North Street. (fn. 48)

Nonconformity made rapid strides in the earlier 19th century as the population of Hull increased and the town expanded. Chapels were beginning to be built in new housing areas away from the old town centre, sometimes to relieve overcrowding in older chapels. While much of the expansion took place from well-established congregations, there was also a proliferation of small meeting-places—in rooms, houses, and workshops—whose denomination and even location have not been identified. (fn. 49)

New chapels were founded during this half century by all three Congregational branches in Hull. From Fish Street were established Nile Street in 1827, Cogan Street in 1833, and Albion Street in 1842. (fn. 50) Nile Street and Cogan Street enjoyed for fifty years the services of a notable minister, James Sibree, (fn. 51) and at Albion Street Christopher Newman Hall, a well-known writer of popular religious works, was minister until 1854. (fn. 52) Fish Street itself had two noteworthy ministers: George Lambert (1769– 1816), prominent in East Riding Congregational affairs and a founder of the London Missionary Society, (fn. 53) and Thomas Stratten, who took a leading part in the ecclesiastical controversy in Hull in 1834. (fn. 54) Hope Street's part in the expansion of Congregationalism in this period was a personal one. It was for Ebenezer, son of Hope Street's long-serving minister John Morley (1801–50), that Holborn Street was built in 1830. (fn. 55) Finally, from the branch at Ebenezer Chapel or 'New' Dagger Lane, were founded Sykes Street in 1826 and Osborne Street in 1842, neither of them long-lived. Sykes Street was built by Samuel Lane, the minister at Ebenezer, which soon afterwards passed to the Mariners' Church Society (C. of E.). (fn. 56) First Nile Street (fn. 57) and then Osborne Street were also used by Lane. (fn. 58)

For the Presbyterians this was a period of nationwide revival, and Hull shared in the new movement. A meeting was formed in 1838, at first using makeshift premises, and in 1841 the United Presbyterians acquired the 'Old' Dagger Lane chapel where Hull Presbyterianism had come to an end in 1783. No further advances were made until after the midcentury. (fn. 59)

The Baptists were still at this time experiencing internal difficulties. Both Salthouse Lane and George Street were Particular Baptist congregations, and it seems that small groups of General Baptists were meeting elsewhere. Robert Blake's group, (fn. 60) for example, was admitted to the General Assembly of General Baptist Churches in 1808. (fn. 61) The General Baptists were by now virtually Unitarian, and it was the Unitarian Society which reported in 1811 that Blake's congregation had dispersed. (fn. 62) Two other 'Unitarian Baptist' congregations were meeting in the early years of the century, one of them in 'New Dock Street': this was Ebenezer, Dagger Lane, Congregational chapel. (fn. 63) The George Street church was itself twice divided by its ministers' views. In 1807 James Lyons announced his movement towards Unitarianism, and he left together with some of the congregation. (fn. 64) And in 1845 John Pulsford left with 70 members of the church to meet in Nile Street and then South Street. (fn. 65) Salthouse Lane, however, was strengthened when William Arbon's congregation agreed to unite with it in 1816. Arbon had been trained as a minister for the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion and he was at Ebenezer, Dagger Lane, when in 1811 he became a Baptist; his followers are then said to have met in Princess Street. (fn. 66) At Ebenezer a subsequent minister, Samuel Lane, has been described as a true Independent although also inclining to Baptist views. (fn. 67) Finally, two new though short-lived Baptist chapels were opened—Mason Street in 1822, with William Arbon as minister, (fn. 68) and Osborne Street in 1823. (fn. 69)

For the Methodists, whether the Wesleyans or the several seceding branches of Methodism, this was a half century of marked expansion. Some fifteen chapels were opened by the Wesleyans, beginning with Scott Street in 1804 (fn. 70) and ending with Great Thornton Street in 1842. (fn. 71) The latter was their largest chapel so far and one of the most impressive architectural features of 19th-century Hull. The New Connexion Methodists added to their existing chapel only one other, Beverley Road in 1849. (fn. 72) The Independent Methodists, who seceded in 1806, had a single chapel in Hull, the former Baptist building in Osborne Street, acquired in 1826. (fn. 73) Towards the middle of the century two other small groups emerged: the Wesleyan Association, which seceded in 1836, acquired a meeting-place in Hull in 1846 (the Sykes Street Congregational chapel); (fn. 74) and the Wesleyan Reformers, who seceded in 1849, were soon meeting in three or four places. (fn. 75)

Of much greater significance than these small Methodist secessions was the establishment of Primitive Methodism. (fn. 76) William Clowes, who had worked in a local pottery fifteen years earlier, returned to Hull as a missioner in 1819. A warehouse in North Street belonging to a local preacher, Richard Woolhouse, (fn. 77) was used at first but later in 1819 a new chapel was built in Mill Street. By the end of the year its membership had more than doubled, and the Primitive Methodist Conference was held in Hull in 1820. (fn. 78) The town was soon a mission centre
for the south as well as the north of England. (fn. 79) A second meeting-place had been opened in 1819, in a building in Wincolmlee belonging to Edward Taylor, (fn. 80) and half-a-dozen chapels were taken over or built by the mid-century. In 1849 a chapel was built in Great Thornton Street to challenge that of the Wesleyans there, and in 1851, just after Clowes had been buried in the town, Jarratt Street chapel was opened in his memory: it was even larger than Great Thornton Street Wesleyan. (fn. 81)

Table 1. Church and Chapel Attendances, 1834 (fn. 106)

DenominationNumber of churches and chapelsNumber of sittingsAverage Sunday attendanceNumber of regular communicantsNumber of Sunday-school children
Parish churches44,3002,4002481,200
Chapels-of-ease45,5004,000520
Total C. of E.89,8006,4007681,200
Independents65,7503,100783666
Baptists31,7001,000320199
Wesleyan Methodists75,5304,7602,4501,339
Primitive Methodists11,2501,000300126
Independent Methodists1750350100
New Connexion Methodists11,000700300220
Quakers1300150
Roman Catholics160045035090
Unitarians150030060120
Swedenborgians1500250?
Sailors' chapel1600350
Jews110040
Total nonconformist and others2518,63012,4504,6632,760

On two occasions during the early 19th century the nonconformists of Hull briefly united to defend their common interests. The first was in 1811 when Lord Sidmouth unsuccessfully introduced into Parliament a Bill which sought to oblige all dissenting ministers to be licensed. Ministers of all denominations attended meetings in the town to protest against the measure. (fn. 82) The second occasion was in 1834 during the so-called 'Hull Ecclesiastical Controversy'. The dissenting ministers petitioned the House of Commons for the removal of discrimination against them and for freedom from the Church of England in such matters as the registration of baptisms, marriages, and burials, the celebration of marriage, the use of burial grounds, and the payment of church-rates. (fn. 83)

It was part of the dissenters' intention in 1834 to show that, collectively, they exerted a greater influence in the town than did the Established Church. The statistics which they prepared (see Table 1), although not including some of the smaller nonconformist meeting-places, give some impression of the strength of nonconformity at this time. They were anxious not to overstate their case and when it was objected that the number of regular Church of England communicants was 1,200 rather than 768 they were ready to concede that this might be so. The relative strength of the various churches can be examined again in 1851, from the returns of the 'Religious Census' (see Table 2). The accuracy of these returns depended on the care taken by individual ministers and this was highly variable: some in Hull, as elsewhere, returned precise figures, presumably obtained by a counting of heads, while others sent in round figures which can only have been estimates. The returns nevertheless furnish a useful guide to attendances. In both 1834 and 1851 the nonconformists appear to have been attracting over twice as many people to their services as was the Church of England, and both sets of figures underline the dominance of the Methodists among the nonconformist groups.

The 'Religious Census' also shows that several smaller denominations had established themselves in Hull. The Free Church of England congregation was that led by the Revd. Andrew Jukes, who was baptized at George Street Baptist chapel and left the Established Church in 1843. (fn. 84) Jukes joined the
Plymouth Brethren, probably after a visit to Hull planned by J. N. Darby late in 1843, after he had heard of Jukes's secession. (fn. 85) Jukes remained with the Brethren until the controversy which in 1848 produced the Open and Exclusive branches. (fn. 86) In 1851 he described his congregation as 'independent', though 'not what is commonly so called, or connected with the Congregational body'. (fn. 87) It often gained the description of 'Baptist'. (fn. 88) The Lutherans were meeting in the former Osborne Street Congregational chapel. (fn. 89) The 'Sailors' chapel' had been conducted by the Port of Hull Society for the Religious Instruction of Seamen since 1821 and was inter-denominational. (fn. 90) The Census provides the earliest mention of two American sects, the Latter Day Saints and the Disciples of Christ, but the first subsequently appears only intermittently and the second is not heard of again. One other small sect had come and gone by 1851: a group of Millenarians, for whom Joseph Rodley's house was licensed in 1818. (fn. 91)

Table 2. Church and Chapel Attendances, 30 March 1851, in the Area of the Modern Borough (fn. 107)

DenominationNumber of churches and chapelsNumber of sittingsAttendance
morningafternoonevening
Church of England18 (fn. 108) 14,0205,9331,1825,114
Roman Catholics16481,050600
Jews195741721
Protestant Nonconformists3823,9689,5911,83612,965
Independents6 (fn. 109) 4,9661,517802,083
Baptists4 (fn. 110) 1,140425501
Wesleyan Methodists108,2123,222714,113
Primitive Methodists52,8382,1802,782
Independent Methodists1682450350500
New Connexion Methodists21,080410380
Wesleyan Reform Methodists1 (fn. 111) 1,0002005001,000
Lutherans1500200
Unitarians1490155130
Presbyterians160011789
Friends138611161
Free Church of England1330150300
Latter Day Saints15007090150
Sailors' Chapel150074278130
Disciples of Christ1341067
Undenominational1710300400800

The rapid rise in the population of Hull after the mid-19th century and the wide-spreading growth of the town, were met by a great increase in the number of nonconformist congregations and by strenuous efforts to evangelize the new suburbs. (fn. 92) While these developments can be readily traced in terms of new buildings it is difficult to gauge their success in terms of attendances for no comprehensive statistics are available. For one limited period, 1851 to 1881, some calculations have been made, (fn. 93) and these reveal significant variations in the fortunes of the leading denominations. Total church attendance is said to have increased by 57 per cent., with the Church of England gaining 12 and the Roman Catholics 17 per cent. The Methodists had substantial increases, 54 per cent. for the Wesleyans and 75 per cent. for the Primitives, and it was certainly these two which fought the main sectarian battle in Hull. The Presbyterian increase is put at 900 per cent., perhaps an exaggeration by a Presbyterian writer, but the actual numbers involved were small compared with Methodist congregations. Other denominations experienced decreased attendances: 12 per cent. each for the New Connexion and Free Church Methodists, 25 per cent. for the Baptists, 32 per cent. for the Independents, and 86 per cent. for the Brethren.

It was during the second half of the 19th century that the nonconformists made their greatest contribution to the provision of educational facilities. Five day-schools were opened by the Wesleyans and two by the Congregationalists. The first appeared as early as 1837, and a second in 1850, but five were added in the 1860s and 1870s. (fn. 94) For their own congregations many of the chapels also provided libraries. Some were no doubt of long standing, such as that at Bowlalley Lane Presbyterian chapel which had received a bequest of books in 1716. And some had comparatively large collections, Waltham Street Wesleyan, for example, containing 1,800 books in 1866. (fn. 95)

The Congregationalists opened several new chapels and one or two mission rooms in the suburbs between 1868 and 1882, but it was not until 1898 that they finally abandoned the old town centre. Fish Street was then closed, to be replaced in the following year by Fish Street Memorial, Prince's Avenue, on the edge of the growing town. Five years later a similar outward move saw Hope Street replaced by Newland, Beverley Road. Other chapels in the older suburbs were given up in the early 20th century—Cogan Street to the Jews in 1914, Latimer, Williamson Street, in 1919, and eventually Wycliffe, Anlaby Road, in 1935. The closure of Williamson Street was followed by the establishment of a congregation in the newer suburbs of east Hull. By 1939 the Congregational effort was centred on five remaining churches: at Albion Street, alone in the inner suburbs but drawing its congregations from a wide area, Beverley Road and Prince's Avenue in the north, Hessle Road in the west, and the Reckitt Garden Village in the east.

Presbyterian development followed a similar pattern. A new congregation formed in 1866 moved two years later into the former Free Church of England church in Prospect Street: Andrew Jukes had built it early in 1866 but was forced by ill-health and financial difficulties to give it up. (fn. 96) Dagger Lane, in the old town centre, was finally replaced in 1875 by a chapel in Spring Bank, and other suburban churches were founded in Holderness Road to the east and Anlaby Road to the west. A further outward move was made in 1931 when St. Ninian's, Chanterlands Avenue, took the place of Spring Bank, and there were thus four chapels remaining in 1939.

The Baptists' remaining chapel in the old town, Salthouse Lane, was replaced by South Street in 1866. The other long-standing congregation, at George Street, was torn by dissension about this time, during F. W. Smith's ministry (1866–8). One group seceded to meet at the Protestant Hall and other members left to join the new Prospect Street Presbyterian church. Smith himself left to become a Unitarian minister in 1868. (fn. 97) In 1903 South Street moved out westwards to Boulevard, and in north Hull George Street went to unite with Beverley Road, which had seceded from it in 1890, to form the new Central Church there. Central Church closed in 1938 but by then a new church had been established at Chanterlands Avenue. In east Hull four churches were founded between 1899 and 1929, and of these Courtney Street and Holderness Road remained in 1939, together with a mission at Marfleet, opened in 1938.

For the Methodists the second half of the 19th century was their period of greatest expansion. Nearly 30 Wesleyan and about 20 Primitive chapels and halls were either built or taken over. In the 20th century the Wesleyans added only six more and the Primitives the same number. The Primitives showed more concern for evangelism than for the character of their buildings, but each branch was quick to react to the other's attack upon a new locality and Primitive and Wesleyan buildings often followed one another at short intervals. Much of this competitive building was without adequate financial resources, and in 1920 it was said that only 13 out of 38 Primitive chapels built in the previous hundred years had been completely paid for. (fn. 98)

Although the Methodists followed population into the developing suburbs they nevertheless showed a tendency to keep open causes which were becoming redundant in the old inner districts. The Wesleyans went further and built three large central halls in the early 20th century, in an attempt, it is said, to win back those who did not like the respectability of the suburban chapels. (fn. 99) In 1905 Queen's Hall was built in the newly-cut Alfred Gelder Street, near the site of the old George Yard chapel. Thornton Hall was built in 1909 on the site of the splendid Great Thornton Street chapel, destroyed by fire two years earlier. And King's Hall was built in Fountain Road in 1910. Each had 2,000 sittings. In the suburbs in the 20th century Methodist policy was often to build school-chapels with the intention of adding separate chapels later on: only in this way was it possible to keep pace with the growth of the city.

The smaller Methodist branches made comparatively little impact after the mid-19th century and were eventually re-united with the main stream of Methodism. The Wesleyan Association and the Wesleyan Reformers joined forces in 1857 as the United Methodist Free Churches, and in Hull their main chapel was Campbell Street, built in 1866. The New Connexion Methodists for their part rebuilt Zion, Beverley Road, their chief meetingplace, in 1869. The Free Churches and the New Connexion were the chief constituents of the United Methodist Church, formed in 1907; Boulevard, built in that year, became their headquarters. The Independent Methodists maintained their existence, briefly using various chapels, and are last heard of in Goodwin Street from 1934 to 1938.

After the United Methodists joined with the Primitives and the Wesleyans in 1932, the Methodist Church built four chapels in Hull before the Second World War. In all there were in 1939 about 50 Methodist chapels as well as the three central halls.

Several of the smaller churches already existing in or before 1851 continued without notable expansion. The Unitarians shared in the movement to the suburbs when Park Street replaced Bowlalley Lane in 1881, but they built no other chapels. The Friends, whose history in Hull seems remarkably uneventful, (fn. 100) moved from Lowgate to Mason Street in 1852, and thence to Percy Street c. 1920. Their membership of 102 in 1887 (fn. 101) suggests little advance from their position in 1851. The Danish Lutherans kept Osborne Street until the Second World War, and the German Lutherans had their own chapel from 1859 to 1924; both Swedish and Finnish seamen's missions were also established. The Swedenborgians seem to have continued with little or no interruption until the Second World War, while the Latter Day Saints, after meeting in existing premises, built their own church in 1934. The Free Church of England, however, died out in 1868.

The later 19th and early 20th centuries also saw the flowering of many new denominations, some of them short-lived, which attracted those workingclass people to whom the older congregations seemed exclusive and opulent. The Brethren, after Jukes's brief association with them, (fn. 102) are first mentioned in 1866, but they had few meeting-places until the 1920s and 1930s. The Catholic Apostolic Church established a congregation in 1877. The Salvation Army made its appearance in 1881 and used a succession of buildings from then onwards. In 1881 William Booth himself helped to conduct well-attended meetings at a disused ice-house in Cambridge Street and at Hengler's Circus near by. (fn. 103) The Spiritualists registered their first meeting-place in 1897, opened several others during the next 20 years, and had more than a dozen at different times in the 1930s. The Churches of Christ, the Christadelphians, the Seventh Day Adventists, and the Christian Scientists all appeared before the First World War, and the Pentecostal Churches, later known as the Assemblies of God, in 1918. In the 1920s the Elim Church was established in the city, and the Apostolic Church and the Jehovah's Witnesses both appeared in the 1930s; a forerunner of the Witnesses, the International Bible Students' Association, had arrived in 1916. A number of missions was also at work, using a variety of halls, rooms, and former chapels. Prominent among them was the Hull City Mission, (fn. 104) and several were working among seamen, including the Port of Hull Society. Of some 80 meeting-places used by the missions between 1851 and 1939 a dozen were seamen's mission halls.

The Second World War disrupted the work of many of the churches and left some congregations without a building. A dozen Methodist chapels, including Thornton Hall, were destroyed or irreparably damaged by bombing. The Congregationalists and Presbyterians each lost two, and the Danish Lutheran church was also destroyed. After the war the rebuilding programme of the Methodists concentrated on the newer suburbs, but a new central hall was opened in a more convenient location in 1960 to take over the work of the overlarge Queen's Hall. (fn. 105) Eight new buildings were erected, in addition to Central Hall, and in 1964 more than 30 chapels and halls were still in use. The Congregationalists put up one new building and still had five congregations in 1964; the Baptists opened one new church and had six congregations; and the Presbyterians replaced their two losses, in one case with a new church, and so still had four congregations.

Among the smaller churches, the two Lutheran congregations were revived after the war, the Danish in a newly-erected building. A notable addition to nonconformist buildings was the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, built in 1965 in Holderness Road, and one new denomination to become established was the Churches of God in 1962.

Places of Worship

The list is arranged alphabetically by denominations, except that 'Other Churches and Missions', many of which are doubtless undenominational or interdenominational, are placed at the end. Spiritualist meetings are all placed together regardless of whether or not they were Christian. Within denominations, the arrangement is alphabetical by streets. The list was compiled in 1964, with some additions up to 1966.

Figures for the cost of buildings and the number of sittings they contain have been given where possible, as an indication of the size and vigour of a congregation. It should be realized, however, that the exact scope of the expenditure is often obscure and that the figure is sometimes only an estimate. Numbers of sittings may also be estimates, and they of course varied over a period of time as alterations were made to a building; the earliest available number has therefore been selected, though the effect of large-scale alterations is sometimes also indicated.

The sources of information used are for the most part cited by numbers which refer to the following list. In a few cases little-used sources are given in brackets in the text.

1. Charity Commission files.

2. Dr. Williams's Library, Wilson MSS.

3. General Register Office, Somerset House, Worship Register.

4. Ibid. Worship Returns.

5. Public Record Office, H.O. 129/24/519–20.

6. York Diocesan Registry, St. Anthony's Hall, certificates and registers of dissenting meetinghouses.

7. B. W. Blanchard, 'Nonconformist Churches in the Hull District' (Hull School of Architecture thesis, 1955).

8. I. N. Goldthorpe, 'Architecture of the Victorian Era of Kingston upon Hull' (Hull School of Architecture thesis, 1955).

9. Anon., History of the First Church of Christ Scientist, Hull (1933).

10. Anon., Thirty Years' Work in connection with Prospect Street Church, Hull, 1868–98 (n.d.).

11. Anon., Where Our Fathers Praised Thee, Chapters towards a History of Prospect Street Church (1923).

12. F. Baker, Story of Methodism in Newland (1958).

13. Baptist Handbook, 1964.

14. Baptists of Yorkshire (centenary memorial volume of the Yorkshire Baptist Association, 1912).

15. Charity Commission, 9th Report, H.C. 258 (1823), ix.

16. Congregational Handbook, 1922.

17. Congregational Year Book, 1963–4.

18. C. E. Darwent, Story of Fish Street Church, Hull (1899).

19. Directories of Hull.

20. Jane Garbutt, Reminiscences of the Early Days of Primitive Methodism in Hull (1886).

21. Hull and East Riding Congregational Magazine.

22. S. Marriott, Outline of Methodist History in Hull (1906).

23. Methodist Conference Handbook, Hull, 1938.

24. J. G. Miall, Congregationalism in Yorkshire (1868).

25. [J. O'Dell], Century's Story of Baptist Church, George Street, Hull (1904).

26. Ordnance Survey maps (various edns.).

27. J. G. Patton, Story of Hope Street, Newland Congregational Church, Hull (1942).

28. Plan of Services in connection with the Wesleyan Methodist Conference, Hull, 1883.

29. Sheahan, Hist. Hull.

30. W. H. Thompson, Early Chapters in Hull Methodism, 1746–1800 (1895).

31. W. H. Thompson, as no. 30, copy annotated by A. E. Trout (in Hull Pub. Libr.).

32. A. E. Trout, 'Nonconformity in Hull', in Transactions of the Congregational Historical Society, vol. ix (1924–6).

33. W. Whitaker, One Line of the Puritan Tradition in Hull: Bowl Alley Lane Chapel (1910).

34. S. B. Whitby, Hull Worthies (c. 1906).

APOSTOLIC CHURCH

Chapel Lane: used at least in 1936–7. (19)

Spring Bank, Spring Bank Hall: registered in 1953.(3)

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD (3)

Beverley Road, Glad Tidings Hall: the former Salvation Army hall, registered in 1926.

Beverley Road: registered from 1918 to 1926 when it was replaced by Beverley Road, Glad Tidings Hall.

Caroline Place, Fig Tree Gospel Mission Room: registered in 1924; it ceased to be used in 1930.

Charles Street, Fig Tree Gospel Mission Hall: registered in 1952.

Sykes Street, Fig Tree Hall: registered from 1930 to 1939 when it was replaced by Waltham Street.

Waltham Street, Fig Tree Hall: registered from 1939 to 1952 when it was replaced by Charles Street.

BAPTISTS

Beverley Road, Trafalgar Street or Central Church: opened in 1906, after the union of Trafalgar Street and George Street in 1903;(14) 850 sittings. It was designed by G. Baines & Son of London in a simplified Gothic style,(7) and built with a flint facade and red-brick dressings at a cost of £9,000.(14) The chapel was closed in 1938 and became an undenominational church; it was still so used in 1964.

Chanterlands Avenue North, Cottingham Road Church: a school-chapel registered in 1927;(3) 300 sittings.(13) It was designed by W. F. Wills of Skegness.(7)

Charles Street: had 'just been opened' in 1851 by the 'Reformed Baptist Evangelising Church'.(5) No more is known of it.

Charlotte Street (Foresters' Hall): a congregation of Particular Baptists was meeting there in 1866.(29) It is also mentioned in 1882.(19)

Coronation Road, Priory Road Church: a mission church, registered in 1956.(3)

Dagger Lane, Ebenezer Chapel: opened in 1771, after secession from Salthouse Lane c. 1765, and enlarged in 1776. It passed to the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion in 1781.(14, 27) In the early 19th century it had ministers with Baptist sympathies (see Congregationalists).

Dagger Lane, Old Dagger Lane Chapel: said to have been used for some years by the Baptists before it became Swedenborgian(29) (see Congregationalists).

Dansom Lane: registered in 1920, in an existing Methodist chapel which it shared with the Wesleyans.(3) It had ceased to be used by 1929 (see Methodists).

Dansom Lane, Courtney Street Church: a mission hall, opened in 1899;(25) 500 sittings. It became a separate church in 1916.(13)

Dock Street: a mission hall, mentioned in 1899– 1900 and 1906–7.(19)

Garden Street: licensed in 1799 for 'Independent Baptist' worship.(4)

George Street: built in 1796 after secession from Salthouse Lane; 600 sittings.(25) It was built at a cost of £1,200. The chapel was refronted in 1842 and the interior altered in 1854 and 1860;(29) it was repaired in the 1880s and 1890s. After being united with Trafalgar Street in 1903, to form Beverley Road (Central),(25) it became a cinema and later a shop.(7)

George Street (Mechanics' Institute): a congregation was meeting here in 1851.(5)

Gordon Street, Boulevard Church: built in 1903 to replace South Street;(14) 800 sittings. It was designed by T. B. Thompson in a Gothic style, and built in yellow brick with red-brick dressings at a cost of £12,000. The chapel was damaged during the Second World War but restored.(7)

High Street: a room, licensed in 1788.(4)

High Street: a house, licensed in 1795 by Robert Blake, whose congregation lasted until between 1808 and 1811 (see p. 313).

Holderness Road, East Park Church: opened in a temporary building in 1909;(13) a new building was registered in 1914;(3) 400 sittings. It was designed by J. Illingworth of Leeds.(7)

Kingston Square (Protestant Institute): used after secession from George Street between 1866 and 1868.(25)

Manor Alley: a congregation founded in 1736 met in the former Pole manor-house(14) until the Methodists moved there in 1757(30) and it was replaced by Salthouse Lane.

Marfleet Lane: a temporary building,(7) registered in 1938.(3)

Mason Street, Jehovah Jireh Chapel: built by the Particular Baptists in 1822.(19) It was sold to the Methodist Association in 1837 and was probably demolished soon after. (7)

Mill Street: licensed in 1798 for 'Independent Baptist' worship.(4)

Nile Street: after secession from George Street in 1845 a congregation met in the former Independent chapel here until South Street opened in 1847. (25) It then passed to the Primitive Methodists.

North Church Side (Corn Exchange): used after secession from Salthouse Lane in 1794 and before George Street was built in 1796. The room had 200 sittings. (25)

Osborne Street: built in 1823 but taken over by the Independent Methodists in 1826. (29)

Princess Street: used from 1811 to 1816 by a congregation deriving from Ebenezer, Dagger Lane.(2)

Pryme Street (Central Hall), Tabernacle: a congregation formed by secession from George Street in 1885 met here in 1889 but moved to Beverley Road in 1890. (14, 19)

Roper's Row (now Roper Street): used in 1822 and was perhaps replaced by Osborne Street. (7, 19)

Salthouse Lane: built in 1757, replacing Manor Alley; it was enlarged in 1790; (29) 550 sittings. (5) It moved to South Street in 1866(14) and has since been demolished.

South Street: opened in 1847 after secession from George Street in 1845; it had been built in 1840 privately; 650 sittings. The congregation in 1851 professed to be of no definite denomination.(5) It dissolved in or about 1857(25) but the chapel was registered in 1858(3) and renovated in 1863.(29) Salthouse Lane moved here in 1866. It was replaced by Gordon Street in 1903(14) and has since been demolished.

Trafalgar Street, Tabernacle: registered in 1892(3) to replace Pryme Street. It was united with George Street in 1903 and replaced by the adjacent Beverley Road in 1906.(14) The chapel was used in conjunction with Beverley Road in 1964.

BRETHREN (3)

Baker Street (see Free Church of England): a meeting of the Brethren used a room here at least from 1844 to 1848 (see p. 316).

Beverley Road: registered from 1937 to 1938 when it was replaced by Cottingham Road.

Bricknell Avenue: registered in 1965 (see also Hull Daily Mail, 19 July 1963).

Campbell Street, Wycliffe Hall: registered in 1935. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Charlotte Street (Mews), (Grimston Hall): used from 1911 (19) and registered in 1927.

Cottingham Road: registered in 1938, replacing Beverley Road.

Dock Street: in use in 1866(29) and until at least 1882.(19)

Grey Street: used at least from 1885 to 1895. (19)

Holderness Road: registered from 1922 to 1947.

Holderness Road: registered in 1938. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Mason Street: registered in 1899. It had ceased to be used by 1925.

Pearson Street, Prospect Hall: registered from 1928 to 1930; it replaced Spring Street.

Silvester Street: used from at least 1885 until 1903.(19)

Spring Bank, Spring Bank Hall: registered in 1948.

Spring Street: registered from 1927 to 1928 when it was replaced by Pearson Street.

Waterloo Street, Gospel Hall: registered in 1912. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH (3)

Day Street: registered from 1877 to 1903 when it was replaced by Wellington Lane.

Wellington Lane: registered in 1903.

CHRISTADELPHIANS (3)

Albion Street: registered in 1938. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Chanterlands Avenue: registered in 1957.

Charlotte Street, Hesketh Hall: registered from 1929 to 1938.

Story Street: used from 1912 to 1914. (19)

CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS (9)

Albion Street (Co-operative Educational Institute): used in 1906–7; it was replaced by Baker Street.

Baker Street: used in 1908; it was replaced by Field Street.

Beverley Road: a Sunday school building was erected in 1909; 200 sittings. It was designed by M. Lenham and cost £387. An auditorium built in front of the school was opened in 1921; 400 sittings. The vestibule and frontage were added in 1923. The building is in red brick with a stone facade and cost £10,000.

Charlotte Street: used in 1905; it was replaced by Albion Street.

Field Street: in use in 1908; it was replaced by Beverley Road.

Holderness Road: registered in 1934. (3)

Queen's Road: used in 1904; it was replaced by Charlotte Street.

Story Street (St. George's Hall): used in 1902–3; it was replaced by Queen's Road.

CHURCHES OF CHRIST

Clarendon Street: used from 1909 to 1919.(19)

Holderness Road: registered from 1906 to 1913.(3)

CHURCHES OF GOD

Wheeler Street: the former Methodist chapel, taken over in or about 1962 (local information).

CONGREGATIONALISTS AND INDEPENDDENTS

Albion Street, Albion Chapel: opened in 1842; (29) 1,500 sittings.(5) It was designed by H. F. Lockwood in the Greek Revival style, and built with a stone front (including a fine Doric portico) at a cost of £8,000. The chapel was destroyed by bombing in 1941 and the adjoining church hall was subsequently used for worship, (7) seating 150.(17)

Anlaby Road, Wycliffe Chapel: opened in 1868; 1,100 sittings.(21) It was designed by W. H. Kitching(29) in the Gothic style, (7, 8) and it cost £8,000.(21) The chapel was closed in 1935 and used as showrooms until destroyed by bombing in 1941.(7)

Beverley Road, Newland Church: replaced Hope Street in 1903; a temporary building was used until the church opened in 1906;(27) 820 sittings.(7) It was designed by Moulds and Porritt of Bury, Manchester, and London(27) in a simplified Gothic style, and built in red and yellow brick with terracotta dressings at a cost of £9,000.(7, 8)

Blanket Row (Barker's Court): built in 1769 by secession from Old Dagger Lane and enlarged in 1773. It was burnt c. 1775, sold in 1783,(18) and used as a workshop in 1866.(29)

Broadley Street: a mission room, built c. 1865 and registered until 1896;(3) 150 sittings.(19)

Clifford Avenue, East Hull Church: built in 1953 to replace Westcott Street; 250 sittings. It was designed by A. P. Taylor, of Belper (Derbys.), and cost about £16,000.(7)

Cogan Street, Salem Chapel: built in 1833 for the congregation from Nile Street;(24) 950 sittings.(5) It was in the Classical style and cost £3,000.(7) The chapel was taken over by the Jews in 1914.

Dagger Lane, New Dagger Lane or Ebenezer Chapel: taken over from the Baptists by the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion in 1781. Though it became Independent, the chapel had ministers with Baptist sympathies in the early 19th century (see p. 314). It was sometimes called New Dock Street or Myton Walls Chapel, (27) and was named New Dagger Lane in 1826.(7) It passed to the Mariners' Church Society (C. of E.) and was used from 1828 until 1834,(29) when a new Mariners' Church was built on the site.

Dagger Lane, Old Dagger Lane Chapel: opened in 1698(29) and built in the meeting-house tradition.(7) It was much altered in 1783 when it became Swedenborgian.(24)

Fish Street: built in 1782 by the Blanket Row congregation at a cost of £1,575. It was enlarged in 1802 to contain 1,050 sittings, and was restored and modernized in 1869. The chapel was sold in 1898 and replaced by Prince's Avenue. It was subsequently used as a telephone exchange(18, 24) and in 1964 was a storehouse.

Hessle Road: registered in 1877;(3) 900 sittings. It was designed by S. Musgrave in the Gothic style. The chapel was used as a theatre from 1949 to 1954 and subsequently as a warehouse.(7, 8) It had been demolished by 1964.

Holderness Road: opened in 1841 and used until 1843.(24)

Hope Street, Providence Chapel: founded in 1797; 1,150 sittings.(5) It was restored in the 1850s, 1862,(29) and 1876. It was replaced by Beverley Road in 1903 and was subsequently used as a warehouse.(27) It was destroyed by bombing in 1941.(7)

James Reckitt Avenue: opened in a temporary building on the corner of Summergangs Road after Williamson Street had closed in 1919. It later moved to Reckitt Garden Village Hall and, after war damage, to Westcott Street.(7)

Jarratt Street: in use by the Calvinists in 1930(19) and registered in 1933; it had ceased to be used by 1954.(3)

Moxon Street: said to have been opened in 1839. (22) It was in use in 1851 under the minister of Albion Street; 250 sittings.(5) It later became the Hope Street Congregational schoolroom and in 1860 was taken over by the Methodists.(27)

Mytongate: a house, licensed in 1709.(32) No more is known of it.

Nile Street, Trinity Chapel: opened in 1827 and used until 1842.(7) It was taken over by the Baptists in 1845.(25)

Osborne Street, Bethesda Chapel: opened in 1842; (29) 500 sittings.(5) It was used by the Danish Lutherans from 1850.

Porter Street: built by the Independents by 1851(19) but used by the Methodists and the C. of E. until 1862. It was then an Independent chapel until Hessle Road replaced it in 1877 and it became a music hall.(7)

Prince's Avenue, Memorial Church: built in 1899 to replace Fish Street; 700 sittings. It was designed by W. H. Bingley in a simplified Gothic style, and it cost £7,000.(7, 29)

St. Luke Street: registered from 1882 to 1896.(3)

Scale Lane: a house, licensed in 1709.(32)

Sykes Street, Tabernacle: registered in 1826(4) but taken over by the Methodists in 1835;(31) 720 sittings in 1851.(5) It is said to have become Congregational again in 1867(21) and was so described in 1872–4,(19) but it was subsequently once more Methodist.

Walker Street, Zion Chapel: the former Methodist chapel, used from at least 1882 to 1930; 250 sittings.(19)

Westcott Street: registered in 1944 and replaced by Clifford Avenue in 1953.(3)

Williamson Street, Latimer Chapel: opened in a temporary building in 1869(21) and in the new chapel in 1874;(11) 570 sittings. It was designed by S. Musgrave in the Gothic style(7) and cost £2,500. The chapel was registered by the Port of Hull Society in 1923.(3)

Witham (or Holborn Street): built in 1830;(27) 640 sittings.(26) It was taken over by the Primitive Methodists in 1860.(7)

ELIM CHURCH (3)

Hessle Road, City Temple: the former Primitive Methodist chapel, registered in 1934.

Jameson Street: registered from 1923 to 1926 when it was replaced by Mason Street.

Mason Street: registered from 1926 to 1934, when it was replaced by Hessle Road. It was reopened in 1935 (ex inf. Revd. I. R. Moore).

Spring Bank: registered during 1923 and replaced by Jameson Street.

FREE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

Baker Street: the 'New Room', opened in 1844;(6) 330 sittings.(5) At least from 1844 to 1848 the congregation belonged to the Brethren (see p. 316). It was replaced by Prospect Street.

Prospect Street: St. John the Evangelist's Church: registered in 1866.(3) It was designed by A. D. Gough of London in the Gothic style and built entirely of stone. It was acquired by the Presbyterians in 1868.(11)

St. John's Street: the 'Wilberforce Room', used in 1843(6) by Andrew Jukes and replaced by Baker Street.

FRIENDS

Bromley Street: used from 1908 to 1910.(19)

Lee Smith Street: a mission hall, in use in 1900.(19)

Lowgate: a house, acquired for meetings in 1709 but perhaps used before that. A larger meeting-house was built on the garden behind in 1780;(1) 390 sittings in 1851.(5) It was replaced by Mason Street in 1852(1) and had been demolished by 1964.

Mason Street: the former Wesleyan school, acquired in 1851 and opened in 1852 after enlargement and conversion for a meeting-house; (1, 29) 600 sittings.(26) It was rebuilt in 1880 and replaced c. 1920 by Percy Street.(19) It was used as a warehouse in 1964.

Percy Street: opened c. 1920 in converted premises, replacing Mason Street.(19)

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES (3)

Anlaby Road, Kingdom Hall: registered from 1940 to 1946 when it was replaced by St. George's Road.

Beverley Road, Kingdom Hall: registered from 1940 to 1945 and, in different premises, from 1945 to 1957 when it was replaced by Grafton Street.

Grafton Street, Kingdom Hall: registered in 1957, replacing Beverley Road.

Holderness Road: used by the International Bible Students' Association from 1916 until at least 1919.(19)

Holderness Road, Kingdom Hall: registered from 1940 to 1941, 1941 to 1946, and in 1958, each time in different premises, on the last occasion a new building being erected.

King Street, St. David's Hall: registered in 1934. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Plane Street, Kingdom Hall: registered in 1955.

St. George's Road, Kingdom Hall: registered in 1946, replacing Anlaby Road. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Witham: registered in 1937. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

LATTER DAY SAINTS

Berkeley Street: built in 1933 (date on building).

Blanket Row: in use in 1867 and 1874.(19)

Charlotte Street (Foresters' Hall): used from 1922 to 1929.(19)

Holderness Road: built in 1965.

Paragon Street: in use in 1851.(5)

LUTHERANS

Charlotte Street: a German seamen's mission, used from at least 1892 to 1900.(19)

Church Street (Drypool): used by the Swedish Lutherans at least from 1929 to 1939.(19)

Hedon Road: a Finnish seamen's mission, in use in 1964.

High Street (Oriental Buildings): a Finnish seamen's mission, used from 1897 until at least 1939.(19)

Lee Smith Street (or Hedon Road): taken over from the Methodists in 1910(3) and used as a Swedish mission until at least 1926,(19) when it was apparently replaced by Church Street. A Roman Catholic mission was built on the site.

Nile Street: the former St. Luke's Church (Church of England) (see Methodists), acquired in 1859 by the German Lutherans.(29) It was rebuilt in 1911 in a simplified Gothic style, but was deregistered in 1924. It was registered again in 1949, after being used as an undenominational mission.(3, 8) It probably housed the German seamen's mission mentioned in 1939.(19)

Osborne Street: meetings were held in Bethesda Congregational chapel in 1850–1.(5, 29) It was rebuilt by the Danish Lutherans in 1871 and named St. Nicholai's Church;(1, 3) 300 sittings. It was built in the Gothic style.(19) The chapel was deregistered in 1941(3) and destroyed by bombing. A new building was erected on the other side of the street and was registered in 1955.(1)

Waterhouse Lane (Sailor's Institute): meetings were held here in 1848.(29)

METHODISTS

Alexandra Road: registered by the Primitives in 1899.(3) This is perhaps the meeting-place in St. John's Wood, mentioned in 1888 and 1897.(19)

Alexandra Street: a mission room, used by the Primitives from 1888 onwards;(19) 80 sittings.(7) It was demolished in 1964 and replaced by Spring Bank.

Alfred Street: registered by the Wesleyans in 1831(4) to replace English Street.(31) It is believed to have been absorbed into Great Thornton Street soon after 1851.(7)

Alfred Gelder Street, Queen's Hall: registered by the Wesleyans in 1905(3) near the site of George Yard Chapel,(1) and replacing also Humber Street; 2,000 sittings.(31) It was designed by Sir Alfred Gelder in a simplified Gothic style, and was built of stone at a cost of £20,000.(7, 8) The hall was replaced by Central Hall in 1960(3) (see King Edward Street) and was demolished in 1965.

Anlaby Road (Anlaby Park Church): a school building, used as a chapel, opened by the Wesleyans in 1914; 250 sittings.(7) It was replaced by a new chapel, designed by B. W. Blanchard and opened in 1959 (date in building).

Anlaby Road, Bourne Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1871; 1,420 sittings. It was designed by J. Wright in the Gothic style, and it cost £7,600.(7, 34) The chapel was deregistered in 1960(3) and had been demolished by 1964, when rooms in a house near by were used for worship.

Anlaby Road (or Plane Street): a school-chapel, opened by the Wesleyans in 1895;(3) 800 sittings. Designed by Gelder and Kitchen in the Tudor style and built at a cost of £2,900. It was replaced in 1910 by a new chapel by the same architects, built at a cost of £9,500.(7)

Argyle Street: registered by the Wesleyans in 1872 (3) and replaced by Willow Grove in 1886 (Jubilee Commem. Stepney Church, copy in Hull Pub. Libr.). A new chapel was built here in 1895;(3) 1,000 sittings.(31) It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen in the Romanesque style, and was built of red brick with terracotta dressings at a cost of £5,500.(7) It was deregistered in 1959(3) when Spring Bank was built and had been demolished by 1964.

Askew Avenue: a hall opened by the Wesleyans in 1930 was replaced by a chapel in 1934;(3) 400 sittings. It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen.(7)

Back Ropery: a house, used c. 1750.(30)

Barnsley Street: a mission hall, first mentioned in 1892(19) and registered by the Wesleyans in 1895; (3) 340 sittings. It was extended, under Gelder and Kitchen, in 1914, and destroyed by bombing in 1941.(7)

Beverley Road: opened by the Wesleyans in 1862;(29) 1,000 sittings. It was designed by W. Botterill in the Gothic style, and built at a cost of £5,900. The chapel was closed in 1941, subsequently used as a printing works, and burnt down in 1954.(7)

Beverley Road (or Cave Street), Stepney or Zion Chapel: opened by the New Connexion Methodists in 1849;(29) 150 sittings.(5) It was in the Classical style, with a stucco front, and cost £400. It was replaced by a new building in 1869. The old chapel was sold in 1878(12) and has subsequently been used by the Salvation Army and the Assemblies of God.

Beverley Road, Queen's Road Church: opened by the Wesleyans in 1878, replacing temporary premises;(12) 1,200 sittings.(19) It was designed by S. Musgrave in a Renaissance style, and was built at a cost of £9,000. It was damaged during the Second World War(7) and the adjoining schoolroom was subsequently used for worship. The old church was used as a warehouse in 1964.

Beverley Road, Stepney Chapel: opened by the New Connexion Methodists in 1869 to replace the old chapel on the corner of Cave Street; 600 sittings. The cost was £2,500 (Jubilee Commem. Stepney Church, copy in Hull Pub. Libr.). It was designed by W. Hill of Leeds in the Gothic style, and was built in red and white brick with stone dressings.(7)

Boulevard: opened by the Free Methodists, later the United Methodists, in 1907 to replace Osborne Street.(3) It was designed by W. H. Bingley.(7)

Bricknell Avenue: after meetings had been held for some time in a farm-house, a temporary building was opened in 1944.(13) This was replaced by a school-chapel in 1953, designed by Fisher and Hollingsworth and built at a cost of £26,000. This in turn was replaced by a chapel in 1957, built at an estimated cost of £17,000.(7)

Brighton Street: a mission hall, built by the Primitives in 1889; 440 sittings. It cost £550.(34)

Butchery: a house, used c. 1750.(30)

Campbell Street: built by the Free Methodists in 1866(29) to replace Walker Street; 560 sittings. It was designed by W. H. Kitching in the Gothic style, and was built at a cost of £2,600. Accommodation was increased c. 1875. The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941(7) and closed in 1943,(3) subsequently becoming a storehouse.(7) It had been demolished by 1964.

Carlton Street: built by the Wesleyans in 1865. It was designed by W. Botterill in the Gothic style and cost £500.(29) This was replaced by a larger chapel, seating 300,(7) in 1886.(3) It was deregistered in 1962(3) and was derelict in 1964.

Church Street (Sutton): replaced a Wesleyan chapel said to have been built about 1812 and having 160 sittings in 1851.(5) The new chapel, on a different site,(26) was registered in 1860.(3)

College Street (Sutton): replaced a Primitive chapel said to have been built in 1832, having 90 sittings in 1851,(5) which stood in the present Chamberlain Street.(26) The new chapel was registered in 1893(3) and built of grey brick with red-brick and stone dressings. It was deregistered in 1933 and subsequently used for various purposes.

Coltman Street, Trinity Chapel: built by the Wesleyans in 1872;(31) 1,250 sittings. It was designed by W. Botterill in the Gothic style,(7) and built at a cost of £8,000.(31) It was damaged by bombing in 1941 and closed, and was demolished in 1953.(7)

Cottingham Road, Newland Chapel: opened by the Wesleyans in 1858 after meetings had for some time been held in a barn; 160 sittings.(12) It was designed by W. Botterill in the Gothic style, and built at a cost of £600.(7) The chapel was enlarged in 1867 and 1873, but it was replaced by a new building, on the opposite side of Newland Avenue, in 1901(12), and was subsequently used by the Port of Hull Society(7) until c. 1962 (Hull Daily Mail, 18 Dec. 1964). It was demolished in 1966.

Cottingham Road, Newland Church: a schoolchapel, opened by the Wesleyans in 1901; 850 sittings.(7) The cost was £7,700.(12) A church was opened alongside in 1928; 700 sittings. It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen, and built at a cost of about £10,000. It was damaged during the Second World War but repaired.(7)

Dansom Lane: opened by the Wesleyans in 1876; (31) 340 sittings.(19) After 1920 it was used jointly with the Baptists.(3) It was closed in 1929,(31) was later a warehouse,(7) and was used as offices in 1964.

Derringham Street: used by the Wesleyans in 1872.(19)

Dock Street: used by the New Connexion Methodists at least from 1885 to 1900.(19)

Durham Street: a temporary school-chapel built by the Wesleyans in 1874 and replaced by Brunswick Chapel, Holderness Road, in 1877 (Brunswick Jubilee Booklet, in Hull Pub. Libr.).

Edgar Street (or Mechanics' Lane): built by the Primitives in 1891; 220 sittings. It was adapted from existing Primitive premises, first mentioned in 1885, at a cost of £400.(5, 29) It had ceased to be used by 1954.(3)

Endike Lane: a hall, designed by Horth and Andrew(7) and opened in 1934.(3)

English Street: believed to have replaced St. Mark's Square Wesleyan by 1818. It was replaced by Alfred Street in 1831. (1, 31)

Evans Square (or Lees Walk, Beetonville): opened by the Wesleyans in 1867;(3) 300 sittings. It was built in the Gothic style. The chapel was closed in 1954(7) and was demolished c. 1960.

Fountain Road: adapted by the Wesleyans from premises first mentioned in 1888,(19) the new mission being registered in 1895;(3) 400 sittings.(7) It was replaced by King's Hall, built on the same site in 1910.(31) A building in Waterloo Street was temporarily used during 1910.(19)

Fountain Road, King's Hall: built by the Wesleyans in 1910 on the site of Fountain Road mission chapel, and replacing also Scott Street and Oxford Street;(31) 2,000 sittings. It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen, and built at a cost of £18,000.(7) An extension was registered in 1915.(3)

Fountain Road, Zion Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1877; 800 sittings.(34) It was in the Italian Romanesque style(7) and cost £6,400.(34) The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941(7) but was again registered from 1957 to 1959,(3) when Spring Bank was built. It had been demolished by 1964.

George Street (Mechanics' Institute): a room here was used by the Wesleyan Reformers in 1851.(5)

George Yard: registered by the Wesleyans in 1791 (4) and said to have been built 5 or 6 years before; (22, 29) 1,060 sittings in 1851.(5) It was built in the Classical style and cost £4,000.(7, 29) The chapel was replaced by Queen's Hall, built on an adjoining site in 1905(3) (see Alfred Gelder Street).

Goodwin Street: a mission room, registered by the Independent Methodists from 1934 to 1938.(3)

Great Thornton Street: built by the Primitives in 1849;(29) 625 sittings.(5) It was burnt down and rebuilt in 1856.(20) It was designed by W. Sissons in the Italianate style, and built at a cost of £5,200. The chapel was deregistered in 1937(3) and destroyed by bombing in 1941.(7)

Great Thornton Street: opened by the Wesleyans in 1842;(29) 1,300 sittings.(5) It was designed by H. F. Lockwood in the Greek Revival style, and built with a stone facade and brick sides and back (7) at a cost of £7,000.(31) This was one of Hull's outstanding buildings (see plate facing p. 315). It was largely destroyed by fire in 1907,(31) though one small wing survived until c. 1950,(8) and it was replaced by Thornton Hall in 1909.(3)

Great Thornton Street, Thornton Hall: opened by the Wesleyans in 1909 on the site of the earlier chapel;(3) 2,000 sittings.(31) It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen and cost £18,250. The hall was destroyed during the Second World War.(7)

Greenwood Avenue, Clowes Memorial Church: after meetings had been held in a private house and then a school since 1942, a temporary building was opened in 1947. A new chapel was opened in 1957.(3, 12)

Hawthorn Avenue, Norman Memorial Church: built by the Primitives in 1905; 500 sittings.(34) It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen and built in multi-coloured brick(7) at a cost of £4,900.(34) After bomb-damage in 1941 services were held in the schoolroom, but this was closed in 1955 and subsequently demolished.(7)

Hedon Road: built by the Primitives in 1894; 380 sittings.(34) It replaced smaller premises in a lane to the rear,(26) built in 1877.(19, 20) The new chapel was built at a cost of £1,100.(34) It was destroyed by bombing in 1941 and temporary accommodation was used(7) until Southcoates Lane was built.

Hedon Road (Marfleet): opened by the Wesleyans in 1873, and built of red brick with yellow-brick and stone dressings. It perhaps replaced another Wesleyan meeting-place in Marfleet, registered from 1861 to 1876. Hedon Road was deregistered in 1906 (3) and replaced by Marfleet Avenue; it was later used as a workshop(7) and was apparently unused in 1964.

Hessle Road: built by the Primitives in 1881; 1,000 sittings.(34) It is predominantly Romanesque in style,(7) built at a cost of £8,200.(34) The chapel was deregistered in 1933(3) and registered by the Elim Church in 1934.

Hessle Road (or St. George's Road): registered by the Wesleyans in 1877 and replaced by a new building in 1883;(3) 750 sittings.(31) It was designed by T. B. Thompson in a Renaissance style,(7) and built in red brick with terracotta dressings at a cost of £4,000.(31) It was enlarged in 1904 by Gelder and Kitchen.(7) The chapel in 1942(3) became the Thornton Hall (St. George's) Mission.

Hodgson Street: built by the Primitives in 1884; 260 sittings.(34) It was built, partly in the Gothic style,(7) at a cost of £1,450.(34) The chapel was apparently closed in 1940, when its accounts cease (papers in Hull Pub. Libr.). It was damaged by bombing during the Second World War (local information) and was used as part of a factory in 1964.

Holderness Road (or Bright Street): opened by the Primitives in 1864;(29) 1,100 sittings.(34) It was designed by J. Wright in the Italianate style, and built in red and white brick with stone dressings(7) at a cost of £5,100.(34) The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941(7) and had been demolished by 1964.

Holderness Road, Brunswick Chapel: registered by the Wesleyans in 1877(3) to replace Durham Street. An assembly hall, added by W. A. Gelder in 1886, increased the accommodation to 800 sittings.(19) A new building was opened on the site of the old chapel in 1962 (date in building). The assembly hall was used by the National Assistance Board in 1964.

Holderness Road, Wesley Chapel: registered by the Wesleyans in 1913;(3) 550 sittings. It was designed by Runton and Barry. The chapel was renamed Kingston Wesley after some of the fittings had been transferred from the destroyed Kingston Chapel.(7)

Holland Street, Bethesda Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1902; 550 sittings.(34) It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen(7) and was built at a cost of £6,400.(34) It was deregistered in 1962,(3) when Brunswick, Holderness Road, was rebuilt, and was unused in 1964.

Humber Street, Wesley Chapel: built by the Wesleyans in 1833(5) and registered in 1835;(4) 800 sittings.(5) It was designed by W. Sissons in the Classical style, and built at a cost of £3,600.(7) The chapel was remodelled in 1887 and named Wesley Hall. It was replaced by Queen's Hall in 1905 and used as an auction room(31) before being destroyed during the Second World War.(7) A Wesleyan mission in 1907(19) may have been in the old chapel.

Jarratt Street (or Kingston Square), Clowes Chapel: opened by the Primitives in 1851;(29) 1,400 sittings.(34) It was designed by W. Sissons(29) in a Renaissance style, and built of red and grey brick with stone dressings at a cost of £7,400.(34) The chapel was deregistered in 1932(3) and was used as a storehouse before being demolished in 1965.

Jenning Street (or Hood Street): opened by the Wesleyans by 1818; it was amalgamated with Lime Street in 1834(31) and demolished in 1941.(7)

Jenning Street, Groves Chapel: a Wesleyan mission is first mentioned in 1885;(19) it was presumably followed by the chapel opened in 1897,(3) replacing Lime Street from which many fittings were transferred; 600 sittings.(31) It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen in the Gothic style. The chapel was damaged by bombing in 1941 and not restored.(7)

King Edward Street, Central Hall: opened in 1960, (3) on the site of Waltham Street chapel. It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen.

Lambert Street, Lamb Memorial Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1894,(34) replacing a schoolroom which in 1888 had replaced Willow Grove;(12) 850 sittings.(34) It was designed by Thompson and Gelder in a Renaissance style,(7, 8) and was built at a cost of £6,000.(34)

Lee Smith Street (or Hedon Road): opened by the Wesleyans in 1866;(3) 160 sittings.(19) It was taken over by the Lutherans in 1910.(3)

Lime Street: built by the Wesleyans in 1826; 340 sittings.(19) Its place was taken by Kingston Chapel, Witham, opened in 1841, and Lime Street later passed to the Wesleyan Reformers. In 1853 it was used as a Sunday school.(26) It was used by the Free Methodists in the 1860s, 1870s, and 1880s.(19) The chapel was replaced by Jenning Street in 1897; (7, 31) in 1964 it was a storehouse.

Lincoln Street: built by the Primitives in 1872; 950 sittings.(34) It was possibly designed by W. Freeman, is in the Gothic style,(7) and was built at a cost of £5,300.(34) The chapel was deregistered in 1935.(3) It had been partially demolished by 1964 and the remainder was used as a workshop.

Lockwood Street: a mission room, registered by the Primitives from 1897 to 1906.(3)

Lower Union Street: built by the Wesleyans in 1820 or 1828;(31) 280 sittings.(19) It was given up shortly after Great Thornton Street opened in 1842.(7) By 1851 it was used by the Independent Methodists. It was Wesleyan again in 1885 and they apparently used it until 1900.(19) It later became a warehouse,(31) a Jewish mission hall in 1916, and finally a synagogue in 1928.

Lower Union Street: a mission room, registered by the Wesleyans in 1882.(3) It was apparently this one of the two Wesleyan buildings in the street which remained in use until 1910. It was then used by the Independent Methodists from 1911 to c. 1930, (19) and in 1933 was registered as St. Victor's undenominational chapel.(3)

Manor Alley: the tower of the King's Manor was taken over from the Baptists in 1757. It was demolished and a new meeting-house built in 1771;(30) this was replaced by George Yard, registered in 1791.(4) It was used as a warehouse in 1866(29) and demolished in the early 20th century.

Marfleet Avenue: built by the Wesleyans in 1908 (date on building) and registered in 1913, replacing Hedon Road.(3) It is in the Gothic style.

Marmaduke Street: a meeting room, used by the Wesleyans at least from 1883 to 1893.(19, 28)

Mason Street (later Little Mason Street): built by the Wesleyans in 1826; 450 sittings. It was used until Kingston Chapel, Witham, was opened in 1841 (7) and then passed to the Primitives.(5) It was later used exclusively as a school, and had been demolished by 1964.

Mill Street (later West Street): opened by the Primitives in 1819;(4, 34) 790 sittings.(5) It cost £1,700.(34) The chapel was replaced by Perth Street and deregistered in 1912.(3) It was subsequently used as a dance hall and was destroyed by bombing in 1941.

Moxon (later Spencer) Street (or Hamilton Place): registered by the Free Methodists in 1860;(3) it had been a Congregational schoolroom.(27) It was deregistered in 1876(3) but it was presumably the same building that was used by the Wesleyans at least from 1885 onwards.(19) It was demolished in 1930.(7)

Nestor Grove, Bilton Grange, or Kingston Memorial Church: registered in 1957.(3)

New George Street: a mission room, registered by the Primitives in 1884(3) and used at least until 1922.(19)

Nile Street: taken over by the Primitives from the Baptists in 1847. It was replaced by Great Thornton Street in 1849(7) and was unoccupied in 1851.(5) The Wesleyan Reformers may have used it before moving to Porter Street by 1853.(7) It became St. Luke's Church (C. of E.) for a period in 1856.(29)

North Street: a warehouse, used by the Primitives in 1819 and replaced by Mill Street later that year. (3, 29)

North Street (later Charlotte Street), Bethel Chapel: built in 1799 by the New Connexion Methodists; (29) 925 sittings in 1851.(5) It was renovated in 1865(29) and enlarged in 1875. The chapel was destroyed by bombing in 1941.(7)

Osborne Street: taken over by the Independent Methodists from the Baptists in 1826;(29) 680 sittings.(5) It was Gothic in style, altered c. 1865. (29) It was subsequently used by the New Connexion Methodists,(19) and was replaced by Boulevard in 1907.

Oxford Street: opened by the Wesleyans in 1870 to replace York Street;(22) 300 sittings.(19) It was closed when King's Hall was opened in 1910 and subsequently used as a cinema and as offices;(31) it had been demolished by 1964.

Pease Street: in use as an Independent Methodist mission in 1908–10.(19)

Perth Street, West Street Memorial Church: a temporary building, opened by the Primitives in 1908(19) to replace West Street.(7) A new church was built in 1931;(12) 350 sittings.(7)

Porter Street: built by the Independents by 1851 (19) and taken over by the Wesleyan Reformers by 1853.(26) In 1855 it was replaced by Walker Street (23) and from 1856 to 1862 was used as St. Luke's Church (C. of E.).(29) It was lent to the Primitives for a period in 1856 while Great Thornton Street was being rebuilt.(20) It became a music-hall in 1864.

Portobello Street: built by the Primitives in 1906; 610 sittings.(34) It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen,(7) and was built at a cost of £4,500.(34)

Preston Road: registered in 1937;(3) 300 sittings. It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen, and was built at a cost of £5,500.(7) It was perhaps a temporary building, replaced by this one, that was registered in 1934.(3)

Prince's Avenue: built by the Wesleyans in 1905; (31) 850 sittings. It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen in a Gothic style, and was built at a cost of £8,000.(7, 8)

Providence Row: a mission, used by the Wesleyans from at least 1895 to 1900, and from 1913 until at least 1937.(19)

Raikes Street (or Church Street) (Drypool): built by the Wesleyans in 1805 (22) and used as a Sunday school in 1853.(26) It was registered in 1877;(3) 250 sittings. The chapel was closed in 1930 because of the proximity of Kingston Chapel, Witham, but used for youth work for some years more.(7) It was a workshop in 1964.

Redbourne Street: a mission hall, registered by the Primitives in 1932(3) and used as a Continuing Primitive Methodist church.

St. George's Road (or Beecroft Street): built by the Primitives in 1873;(7, 23) 250 sittings.(19) It was designed by W. Freeman in the Gothic style and cost £850. It is now part of the Sunday school. (7) A new, adjoining, chapel was built in 1890; 650 sittings.(34) It was designed by Freeman and cost £3,646.(7)

St. Mark's Square (Pottery Ground), Potteries Chapel: opened by the Wesleyans by 1806. It was apparently replaced by English Street by 1818.(31) It was perhaps the same building that was used by the Primitives in the 1820s.(20)

Scott Street: built by the Wesleyans in 1804; 530 sittings.(4, 5) It was built of brick, in the Classical style,(7) but the front was stuccoed when the chapel was enlarged c. 1860.(29) It was closed when King's Hall was opened in 1910(3) and was used as part of a workshop in 1964.

Selby Street: built by the Primitives in 1901; 400 sittings.(34) There had been Primitive premises here in 1885, with 200 sittings.(19) The later chapel was designed by T. B. Thompson with Gothic features,(7) and was built at a cost of £1,650.(34)

South Street: the Baptist chapel, licensed by the 'Primitive Methodist New Connexion' in 1843(4) and used by a Wesleyan Reformers congregation in 1851.(5)

Southcoates Lane: after temporary accommodation had been used following the destruction of Hedon Road in 1941,(7) a new chapel was built in 1957.(3) It was designed by B. W. Blanchard.

Spring Bank, Ebenezer Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1878; 1,000 sittings.(34) It was designed by W. Freeman in a Renaissance style,(7) and was built of red and grey brick with stone dressings at a cost of £8,100.(34) The chapel was closed in 1946(7) and used as a warehouse in 1964.

Spring Bank, Jubilee Chapel: opened by the Primitives in 1864;(29) 1,030 sittings.(34) It was designed by J. Wright in the Italianate style, and was built of red and white brick with stone dressings (7) at a cost of £6,100.(34) The chapel was renovated in 1952(7) and replaced by a new building in 1959, (3) designed by B. W. Blanchard. It was then joined by Alexandra Street, Argyle Street, and Fountain Road.

Stoneferry Road, Bethel Chapel: built by the Wesleyans soon after 1820,(31) altered in 1826,(7) and rebuilt in 1839; 90 sittings.(5) It was enlarged in 1881(7) and closed in 1892 when a new chapel was opened in this road. Part of the old building is incorporated in Stoneferry Road School.(31)

Stoneferry Road, Emmanuel Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1871; 210 sittings.(34) It is in the Gothic style(7) and cost £800.(34) It was used at least until 1939(19) but was unused in 1964.

Stoneferry Road, St. John's Chapel: registered by the Wesleyans in 1892,(3) replacing Bethel Chapel in the same road; 100 sittings. It was designed, perhaps by Gelder and Kitchen, in the Gothic style.(7)

Sykes Street, Tabernacle: an Independent chapel, taken over by the Wesleyans in 1835. After being used by the Presbyterians from 1838 until 1840, it was acquired by the Weslevan Association in 1846. (31) It was Wesleyan in 1851,(5) Methodist Free Church for at least part of the period from 1864 (31) to 1882, and New Connexion in 1889 and 1899–1900. The Primitives also had a mission in Sykes Street from 1892 to 1900(19) and may have used the same building. The chapel was destroyed during the Second World War.(7)

Walker Street: used by the Wesleyan Reformers, replacing Porter Street, from 1855(23) until Campbell Street took its place in 1866.(29) It was registered by the Independent Methodists from 1871 to 1876.(3) It later became Zion Calvinist Chapel (see Congregationalists).

Waller Street: a mission, used by the Wesleyans from 1908 to 1911.(19)

Waltham Street: opened by the Wesleyans in 1814;(31) 1,500 sittings.(5) It was designed by W. Jenkins in the Classical style,(7) and built of cement-rendered brick(29) at a cost of £9,000.(7) It was deregistered in 1933(3) and subsequently used for administrative purposes, as well as by the Mildmay Mission.(23) The chapel was damaged during the Second World War(7) and was later demolished for Central Hall to be built on the site (see King Edward Street).

West Parade (Spring Bank): opened by the Wesleyans in 1874;(22) 350 sittings.(19) It was replaced by Argyle Street in 1895 and used as a Sunday school until 1910.(7) It later became a cinema(31) and in 1964 was a warehouse.

Westcott Street: a mission, used by the Wesleyans in 1910.(19)

Wheeler Street: a Wesleyan mission room, in use by 1883.(28) A new building was erected in 1900 (date on building). It was given up c. 1960 and taken over by the Churches of God a year or two later (local information).

Wilde Street: opened by the Free Methodists in 1876 (date on building); 200 sittings.(19) The chapel was closed in 1911(19) and was used as a warehouse in 1964.

Willerby Road, Derringham Bank Church: a school-chapel, registered in 1933;(3, 12) 400 sittings. It was designed by Gelder and Kitchen.(7) A separate chapel was built in 1958;(3, 12) 450 sittings. It was designed by B. W. Blanchard.

Williamson Street, Hodge Memorial Chapel: built by the Primitives in 1873 (date on building) and registered in 1875;(3) 1,300 sittings.(34) It was designed by F. N. Pettingell in the Gothic style,(7) and built in red brick with blue- and yellow-brick and stone dressings at a cost of £7,900.(34) The chapel was closed in 1940(7) and was used as a warehouse in 1964, when meetings were held in Williamson Street School (local information).

Willow Grove: a mission room, opened by the Wesleyans in 1886 to replace Argyle Street. It was replaced in 1888 by a schoolroom and in 1894 by Lambert Street.(12)

Wincolmlee (formerly Church Street): opened by the Primitives in 1819(4) in a building called the 'Old Penitentiary'.(29) Two houses near by were subsequently used, and on or near the site of one of them Wincolmlee chapel was built in 1842.(20)

Wincolmlee (formerly Church Street): registered by the Primitives in 1842(6) and enlarged or rebuilt in 1846.(20, 29) It was replaced by Lincoln Street in 1872 but may have been used until 1882.(19) It was later used as a storehouse, (7) and still stood in 1964.

Witham (or Holborn Street): the Congregational chapel, taken over by the Primitives in 1860, replacing a farm-house on Holderness Road.(20) It was itself replaced by Holderness Road chapel in 1864. It was a Temperance Hall in 1866,(29) was later used by the Salvation Army and the Spiritualists,(7) and was a storehouse in 1964.

Witham (Holderness Court): a mission room, used by the Wesleyans at least from 1883 to 1893.(19, 28) This is perhaps the room in Witham that was registered from 1898 to 1906.(3)

Witham, Kingston Chapel: opened by the Wesleyans in 1841;(29) 2,000 sittings.(5) It was designed by J. Simpson in the Greek Revival style, and built in brick with a stone facade (including a fine Ionic portico)(7) at a cost of £8,000.(29) It was damaged by bombing in 1941 and later demolished.(7)

Woodhouse Street: a mission room, used by the Primitives at least from 1889 to 1893.(19)

York Street: a mission room, opened by the Wesleyans in 1835 and replaced by Oxford Street in 1870.(7)

PRESBYTERIANS

These congregations are Presbyterian Church of England or United Presbyterian.

Albion Street (Royal Institution): replaced Kingston Square in 1867 but was itself replaced by Prospect Street in 1868.(11)

Anlaby Road: built in 1893, replacing Walton Street; 750 sittings. It was designed by T. B. Thompson in the Italianate style.(7) Its sale was authorized in 1961(1) and the adjoining chapel hall was subsequently adapted for worship. The chapel itself was demolished in 1964.

Baker Street: hall and vestry, registered in 1941 after the destruction of Prospect Street and used until 1960 when the latter was rebuilt.(3)

Chanterlands Avenue, St. Ninian's Church: a school-hall, built in 1931 to replace Spring Bank;(3) 250 sittings. It was designed by J. F. Parkinson with Gothic features.(7)

Dagger Lane (or Prince Street), Bethel Chapel: opened in 1841 after the Swedenborgians left;(10) 600 sittings in 1851.(5) It was replaced by Spring Bank in 1875.(3) It was subsequently used as a synagogue, and in 1964 was a warehouse.

George Street (Mechanics' Institute): meetings were held here in 1838 before Sykes Street was used. (10)

Holderness Road: registered in 1874.(3) It was designed by W. H. Kitching in the Gothic style, and built in red brick with yellow-brick and stone dressings. It was damaged by bombing in 1941 and services were held in the Sunday school until 1949, when two houses in the same road were converted for a chapel.(3, 7) The old building was used as a workshop in 1964.

Kingston Square (Protestant Institute): used for the first meetings of a new congregation in 1866, but replaced by Albion Street in 1867.(11)

Prospect Street, St. Andrew's Church: the former St. John's Free Church of England building, acquired by the Presbyterians in 1868(11) but not registered until 1877.(3) It was destroyed by bombing in 1941 and replaced by the church hall near by in Baker Street.(7) The church was rebuilt in 1960; (3) it was designed by Gelder and Kitchen.

Spring Bank: opened in 1875 to replace Dagger Lane;(3) 450 sittings. The chapel was designed by W. H. Kitching, is in the Gothic style, and was built at a cost of £3,300. It was replaced by Chanterlands Avenue in 1931 and was used as a warehouse in 1955;(7) it was demolished in 1966.

Sykes Street, Bethesda: in use in 1902(11) (see Other Churches and Missions).

Sykes Street, Tabernacle: used by the Presbyterians in 1838–40;(3) it was previously and subsequently Methodist.

Walton Street: a hall, used for 10 years before Anlaby Road was opened in 1893;(7, 10) 320 sittings. It was last mentioned in 1900.(19)

PRESBYTERIAN MEETINGS AND UNITARIANS

Blackfriargate: a meeting-house newly built in 1672 and used until c. 1680.(33)

Bowlalley Lane: perhaps first used c. 1680; it was rebuilt probably in 1691 or 1692. A new chapel was built on the site in 1802;(33) 490 sittings.(5) It was replaced by Park Street Unitarian Church, registered in 1881.(3) The old chapel was later used as offices and was demolished in 1936.(7)

Park Street: a Unitarian church, registered in 1881(3) and replacing Bowlalley Lane. It was designed by W. H. Kitching in the Gothic style. (7, 8)

SALVATION ARMY (3)

Anlaby Road, Ice House Citadel: registered in 1902, replacing Cambridge Street. It was perhaps the same building as the New Citadel, first mentioned in 1897.(19)

Beverley Road: the former Zion Methodist chapel, registered in 1906; it had ceased to be used by 1925.

Beverley Road: registered from 1941 to 1952 when it was replaced by St. Paul Street.

Beverley Road, Central Corps Hall: registered in 1963.

Boulevard, Goodwill Centre: registered in 1958.

Cambridge Street, The Ice House: registered from 1881 to 1902 when it was replaced by Anlaby Road.

Charlotte Street (Mews) (Grimston Hall):(19) registered from 1927 to 1928.

Church Street, The Temple: registered in 1882 and 1885. It had ceased to be used by 1896.

Cogan Street, Little Fort: in use in 1892.(19)

Franklin Street: registered in 1908, replacing Naylor's Row.

Hawthorn Avenue: registered in 1908.

Hedon Road: registered in 1915 and used until at least 1939.(19)

Holderness Road: registered in 1942. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

King Street, Jubilee Hall: registered in 1930.

Madeley Street: used from 1888(19) and registered in 1900.

Mytongate, Temperance Hall: registered in 1881. It had ceased to be used by 1896.

Naylor's Row: registered from 1883 to 1908 when it was replaced by Franklin Street.

Newland Avenue: registered in 1937.

Prospect Street: registered from 1928 to 1930.

Providence Row: registered in 1930 and used until at least 1937.(19)

Pryme Street: registered in 1894 and used until at least 1926.(19)

Queen Street (Victoria Rooms): registered from 1888 to 1895.

St. Mark's Square: in use in 1885.(19)

St. Paul Street: registered in 1952. It had ceased to be used by 1964.

Southcoates Lane: registered in 1939. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Waller Street: used at least from 1933 to 1939.(19)

Westmorland Street: registered in 1882. This was the Army's central hall, accommodating 1,800; it was destroyed by bombing in 1941 (Hull Daily Mail, 8 Jan. 1963).

Wincolmlee, Little Soldier Barracks: used at least from 1892 to 1895.(19)

Witham: Holborn Street Methodist Chapel is said to have been used by the Army.(7)

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTISTS

Clarendon Street, Clarendon Hall: registered from 1925 to 1938 when it was replaced by Spring Bank.(3)

Grey Street: used from 1909 to 1937.(19)

Spring Bank: registered in 1938.(3)

SPIRITUALISTS (3)

Albion Street, Hull Psychic Centre: registered from 1945 to 1957 when it was replaced by The Park.

Anlaby Road, St. John's Spiritualist Church: registered from 1941 to 1942 when it was replaced by Anlaby Road, Guild of Fellowship.

Anlaby Road, Guild of Fellowship: registered in 1942. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Anlaby Road, Christian Spiritualist Sanctuary: registered from 1942 to 1947.

Anlaby Road, Gospel Hall: registered from 1943 to 1948 when it was replaced by Linnaeus Street, Gospel Hall.

Beaumont Street: registered in 1937. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Beverley Road, Brunswick Christian Spiritualist Church: registered during 1934, from 1934 to 1936, and in 1936, each time in different premises.

Beverley Road: registered from 1937 to 1938 and, in different premises, from 1938 to 1941.

Beverley Road: registered in 1943. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Beverley Road, Pioneer Christian Spiritualist Church: registered in 1956.

Boulevard, Gypsyville Spiritualist Church: registered in 1936.

Campbell Street, Wycliffe Christian Spiritualist Church: registered from 1932 to 1933 and, in different premises, from 1933 to 1935.

Charlotte Street (Foresters' Hall): used from 1912 to 1929.(19)

Charlotte Street, Bethel Spiritual Church: registered from 1929 to 1931 and, in different premises, from 1931 to 1934.

Church Street, Christian Spiritual Church: in use in 1933.(19)

Clarendon Street, Clarendon Hall: registered in 1902. It had ceased to be used by 1925.

Eastbourne Street: in use by 1915;(19) registered from 1918 to 1924 and, as Dairycoates Spiritualist Mission Hall, in 1924.

Freehold Street, Bethel Spiritualist Church: registered from 1937 to 1938 and, in different premises, in 1938.

George Street, Bethel Spiritualist Church: in use in 1933, (19) and registered from 1935 to 1936 when it was replaced by Pryme Street.

Goodwin Street, Gospel Hall: registered from 1934 to 1943, when it was replaced by Anlaby Road, Gospel Hall.

Hessle Road, The Good Shepherd Christian Spiritualist Church: registered in 1941. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Holborn Street, Holborn Hall: the former Methodist chapel, registered in 1914 and used until at least 1939.(19)

Holderness Road, Spiritualist Temple of Truth: used at least from 1933 to 1939.(19) Registered in 1947.

Lime Street: registered from 1903 to 1913.

Linnaeus Street, Lister Spiritualist Church: registered from 1937 to 1944 when it was replaced by Woodcock Street.

Linnaeus Street, Gospel Hall: registered in 1948.

Newland Avenue, Newland Christian Spiritualist Church: registered in 1939. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Newland Avenue, Christian Spiritualist Services Church: registered in 1940. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Pryme Street, Bethel Spiritualist Church: registered from 1936 to 1937 when it was replaced by Freehold Street.

Pryme Street: registered during 1945 and replaced by Spring Bank.

Regent Street, Assam House: registered during 1934 and during 1941 and replaced by Anlaby Road, St. John's Spiritualist Church.

St. George's Road, Progressive Spiritualist Church: registered from 1940 to 1948 and, in different premises, in 1948.

St. George's Road: registered in 1941. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Saner Street, Spiritualist Welcome Church: registered in 1939.

Silvester Street, Granville Hall: registered from 1897 to 1903 when it was replaced by Lime Street.

South Street: registered in 1932. It ceased to be used between 1936 and 1954.

Spring Bank: registered from 1945 to 1950.

Story Street, United Spiritualist Church: registered from 1926 to 1929.

The Park, Hull Psychic Centre: registered in 1957.

West Street, Kingston Christian Spiritualist Church: registered in 1939. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Williamson Street: registered from 1932 to 1934 when it was replaced by Witham.

Witham: registered from 1934 to 1937 when it was replaced by Beaumont Street.

Woodcock Street, Lister Spiritualist Church: registered in 1944. It had ceased to be used by 1954.

Wright Street, Hull Spiritual Hall: registered from 1909 to 1912.

SWEDENBORGIANS (NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH)

Dagger Lane, Old Dagger Lane Chapel: the former Independent chapel taken over by the Swedenborgians in 1783 and used until 1840.(32) It then became Presbyterian.

St. Luke Street (Temperance Hall): meetings were held here in 1866.(29) Its use is last mentioned in 1874.(19)

Spring Bank: registered from 1875 to 1948.(3)

UNITARIANS—see Presbyterian Meetings and Unitarians

OTHER CHURCHES AND MISSIONS

Adelaide Street: used by the Lord's Gospel Mission from 1922 to 1925.(19)

Albert Dock: in use in 1885.(19)

Albion Street, Albion House: registered from 1930 to 1938.(3)

Alexandra Dock: in use by the Port of Hull Society from 1887 to 1914 (W. Mawer, Adventures in Sympathy, 22).

Anlaby Road: registered by the Salvation Mission from 1883 to 1889 and in 1892;(3) it was used until 1895.(19)

Anlaby Road, Wilberforce Mission Hall: in use in 1892 and 1899–1900.(19)

Beaumont Street: in use in 1936.(19)

Beverley Road: used by the Pentecostal Church at least from 1919 to 1926.(19)

Beverley Road, People's Mission Hall: registered in 1930(3) and used until at least 1939.(19)

Beverley Road: the former Baptist church, registered in 1938.(3)

Caroline Place, Bethshan Mission Room: in use in 1892.(19)

Carr Lane (Ginnett's Circus): registered by the People's Mission in 1884; it had ceased to be used by 1896.(3)

Carr Lane (Gipsey's Tent): registered by the Salvation Mission during 1883.(3)

Carr Street: registered by the Progressive Christians in 1909(3) and used until 1919.(19)

Castle Street, Temperance Hall: used from 1908 to 1915.(19)

Charlotte Street: in use in 1899 by the Open Air and Theatre Mission.(19)

Charlotte Street (Mews), Hesketh Hall: registered by the Bible Pattern Church Fellowship from 1943 to 1948, and by the Hull Pentecostal Free Church from 1948 to 1955 when it was replaced by Charlotte Street, Rehoboth.(3)

Charlotte Street (Mews), Rehoboth: registered in 1955.(3)

Charlotte Street (Mews), The Welcome: registered from 1904 to 1927 when it was taken over by the Salvation Army.(3)

Church Street (Sculcoates), The Temple: registered by the Blue Ribbon Gospel Army in 1883(3) and used until at least 1889.(19)

Clarendon Street, Clarendon Hall Meeting Room: used from 1926 until at least 1933.(19)

Coltman Street: registered by the Holiness Church Society in 1916; it became the Church of the Nazarene in 1959.(3)

Coltman Street, Coltman Mission: registered in 1940.(3)

Courtney Street: used by the Hull City Mission in 1911.(19)

Craven Street: registered by the Seamen's and Boatmen's Friend Society from 1909 to 1928.(3)

Day Street: used from 1908 to 1922.(19)

Division Road, Zion Mission Room: in use in 1899– 1900.(19)

Dock Street: in use in 1906.(19)

Eastbourne Street: used from 1908 to 1914.(19)

Field Street, Ripon Hall: used from 1908 to 1912. (19)

Fountain Road, Gospel Mission: used from 1907 to 1914.(19)

George Street, Christian Assembly: in use in 1939.(19)

George Street, Joyful News Gospel Mission Hall: registered in 1934;(3) it had ceased to be used by 1941.

Goodwin Street, Gospel Hall: in use from 1908 until at least 1939.(19)

Goulton Street, Queen Mary Hostel: registered by the Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen in 1957.(3)

Grey Street: registered by 'Christians' in 1882; it had ceased to be used by 1925.(3)

Grimston Street, Christian Assembly: registered from 1941 to 1946,(3) replacing George Street, Joyful News mission.

Harrow Street, Hull Children's Mission Church: in use in 1900.(19)

Hedon Road, Sailors' and Boatmen's Mission: registered in 1927(3) and used until at least 1939. (19)

Hedon Road, Seamen's Bethel: registered by the Mariners' Friend Society from 1895 to 1903, when it was replaced by Holderness Road Seamen's Bethel.(3)

Hedon Road: used by the Port of Hull Society in 1939.(19)

Hedon Road, N.E. Railwaymen's Gospel Temperance Union: used from 1910 to 1930.(19)

Hessle Road, Sailors' and Fishermen's Bethel: opened in 1892 (W. Mawer, Adventures in Sympathy, 22) and used at least in 1899–1900 (West End Bethel) and from 1905 onwards.(19) It was registered in 1925(3) and still used by the Port of Hull Society in 1964.

Holborn Street, True Gospel Mission: registered and in use in 1933.(3, 19)

Holderness Road, Christian Assembly Hall: used from 1926 to at least 1930.(19)

Holderness Road (Garden Village Hall): registered from 1922 to 1944.(3)

Holderness Road, Gospel Mission Room: registered from 1910 to 1911 and, as the Hull City Mission Room, from 1911 to 1920.(3)

Holderness Road, Holiness Meeting Room: registered in 1936; it had ceased to be used by 1954.(3)

Holderness Road, Pentecostal Mission: registered from 1908 to 1910, when it was replaced by Holderness Road, Gospel Mission Room.(3)

Holderness Road, Seamen's Bethel: registered by the Mariners' Friend Society in 1903(3) and used until at least 1939.(19)

Jameson Street (Purdon Chambers): registered by the Society of Practical Christianity from 1944 to 1945.(3)

Kingston Square: in use in 1908.(19)

Lee Smith Street, Gospel Mission: used from 1908 onwards.(19)

Liddell Street: used in 1899–1900 (Free Church Mission Room) and from 1908 to 1914.(19)

Lockwood Street: in use in 1899–1900.(19)

Lower Union Street, Evangelical Mission Hall: in use from 1889 to 1900.(19)

Lower Union Street, St. Victor's Chapel: the former Methodist chapel, registered in 1933.(3)

Marlborough Terrace, Christian Assembly: registered from 1949 to 1963,(3) replacing Grimston Street.

Marmaduke Street, Hull Young People's Christian Mission Church: in use in 1899.(19)

Mason Street, Good Intent Gospel Temperance Society: used from 1910 to 1912.(19)

Merrick Street: used by the Victory Christian Army in 1882.(19)

Merrick Street, Seamen's Bethel: registered by the Mariners' Friend Society in 1895; it had ceased to be used by 1897.(3)

Naylor's Row: registered by the Gospel Mission Army in 1882; it had ceased to be used by 1896.(3)

Nile Street, Osborne Gospel Mission Church: registered from 1924 to 1949 during an interval in the building's use by the Lutherans.(3)

Osborne Street, Gospel Mission Room: in use in 1895 and 1899–1900.(19)

Osborne Street, Gospel Temperance Hall: used from 1908 to at least 1922.(19)

Paragon Street (Queen's Theatre): registered from 1861 to 1866.(3)

Peel Street: in use in 1899.(19)

Percy Street: used by the Mildmay Mission at least in 1925–6.(19)

Prince Street, Seamen's Home Mission: in use in 1907.(19)

Prince's Road, Bethshan: registered from 1903 to 1958.(3)

Prince's Road, Holiness Hall: registered by the Independent Holiness Movement in 1958.(3)

Princess Street, Unity Hall Mission Room: in use n 1906.(19)

Providence Row, People's Mission Hall: in use by 1913,(19) and registered from 1916 to 1930, when it was replaced by Beverley Road.(3)

Pryme Street, Holiness Hall: in use in 1889.(19)

Queen's Dock, Floating Chapel: used by the Port of Hull Society from 1821(29) until replaced by Waterhouse Lane by which time it was in Prince's Dock (W. Mawer, Adventures in Sympathy, 3, 8).

Queen's Road, Bethshan Mission Room: in use in 1899–1900.(19)

Regent Street, Covenant Mission: registered from 1934 to 1935.(3)

Regent Street, Soldiers of the Cross Mission: in use in 1899–1900.(19)

St. Mark's Square, Salvation Temple: registered by the Christian Pioneers in 1881;(3) it is mentioned in 1882(19) but had ceased to be used by 1896.(3)

Salthouse Lane: used in 1865 by the United Bands Church for a congregation formed in 1858.(29) It is last mentioned in 1882.(19)

Scale Lane, Watermen's Club: registered by the Seamen's and Boatmen's Friend Society in 1920; it had ceased to be used by 1925.(3)

Sculcoates Lane, Rose Cottage Mission Hall: in use from 1907 to 1916.(19)

Silvester Street, Granville Hall: registered from 1882 to 1897, when it was taken over by the Spiritualists.(3)

Silvester Street, Meeting House Mission Room: in use in 1899.(19)

Sitwell Street, Evangelical Mission Room: in use by 1889(19) and until 1935.(1)

South Street, Gospel Mission Room: in use in 1899–1900.(19)

Story Street, St. George's Hall: used by the Welsh Church at least in 1897, 1901, and 1903.(19)

Sykes Street, Bethesda Mission: registered in 1894;(3) the Presbyterians were using it in 1902 and the Medical Mission in 1903.(11) It remained in use until at least 1919.(19)

Tadman Street: registered by the Holiness Church Society from 1905 to 1916, when it was apparently replaced by Coltman Street.(3)

Vincent Street: in use by the Disciples of Christ in 1851 and for about 10 years previously.(5)

Walker Street: used from 1912 until at least 1916.(19)

Waltham Street: the former Methodist chapel, registered by the Mildmay Mission from 1936 to 1938, when it was replaced by Beverley Road.(3)

Waltham Street (Methodist Institute): registered by the Independent Holiness Movement from 1946 to 1958, when it was replaced by Prince's Road.(3)

Walton Street: registered in 1931.(3) The hall was extended in 1961 by the Christian Brothers.(1)

Wassand Street, Seamen's Bethel: registered by the Mariners' Friend Society from 1893 to 1896.(3)

Waterhouse Lane, Sailors' Institute: opened by the Port of Hull Society in 1842; 500 sittings.(5) It was used until at least 1939.(19)

Waterloo Street: in use at least from 1892 to 1895.(19)

Williamson Street: the former Congregational chapel, taken over in 1919 (W. Mawer, Adventures in Sympathy, 22) and registered by the Port of Hull Society from 1923 to 1937.(3) It was used as a storehouse in 1964.

Wincolmlee, Lord's Gospel Mission Room: registered in 1927(3) and used until 1930.(19)

Wright Street, Hull City Mission: in use from 1908 to at least 1919.(19) The headquarters of the Mission (founded in 1903) was in Wright Street in 1930 (Social Services in Hull (1930), 59).

Wright Street: registered from 1924 to 1959 by the Mildmay Mission, and in 1959 by an unspecified body.(3)

Wright Street, Bethshan Mission Room: in use in 1893 and 1895.(19)

Wyke Street, Craven Hall: registered in 1928; it had ceased to be used by 1954.(3)

Wyke Street, Ebenezer Mission Hall: used between 1906 and 1909.(19)

Footnotes

1 See pp. 107, 289.
2 A. E. Trout, 'Nonconformity in Hull', Congregational Hist. Soc. Trans. ix. 4–5; W. Whitaker, Bowl Alley Lane Chapel, 8–10. The first register of the Dagger Lane chapel is now at St. Ninian's Church, Chanterlands Ave.
3 See pp. 108–10, 289.
4 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 10.
5 Cal. S.P. Dom. 1658–9, 149; 1660–1, 481.
6 E.R.R.O., DDQR/18, p. 150.
7 E.R.R.O., DDQR/25, passim; T. Blashill, Sutton in Holderness, 175–80.
8 Jnl. of Geo. Fox, ed. N. Penney, ii. 107.
9 Jnl. Friends Hist. Soc. ii. 103; E.R.R.O., DDQR/18, pp. 76–79.
10 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 35.
11 Cal. S.P. Dom. 1663–4, 637.
12 Trout, art. cit. 11.
13 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 41; Cal. S.P. Dom. 1672, 398; G. L. Turner, Original Records of Early Nonconf. ii. 645; A. Gordon, Freedom After Ejection, 289.
14 Cal. S.P. Dom. 1672, 236; Trout, art. cit. 11; Turner op. cit. ii. 645.
15 Turner, op. cit. ii. 645–6.
16 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 45–46.
17 Ibid. 48, 51–53.
18 Trout, art. cit. 14–15; Hull Corp. Rec., B.B. 8, pp. 40, 54.
19 Trout, art. cit. 16; Hull Corp. Rec., B.B. 8, p. 44.
20 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 62.
21 Ibid. 67–68.
22 Ibid. 75.
23 Trout, art. cit. 17.
24 J. G. Miall, Congregationalism in Yorks. 290.
25 Trout, art. cit. 18–19; Hull Corp. Rec., B.B. 8, p. 543.
26 Somerset House, Worship Returns, vol. vii, E.R. Quarter Sessions, nos. 3, 19, 22, 34, 38; also at E.R.R.O. QSV/1/14 (A), pp. 9, 37, 39, 75.
27 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 104.
28 Bapts. of Yorks. (1912), 66.
29 Abp. Herring's Visitation Rets. iv (Y.A.S. Rec. Ser. 77), 242.
30 Ibid. i (Rec. Ser. 71), 176; ii (Rec. Ser. 72), 76–78, 195; iii (Rec. Ser. 75), 114, 130.
31 Charity Commission, file 656.
32 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 109 sqq.
33 Trout, art. cit. 21–23; C. E. Darwent, Story of Fish St. Church, Hull, 10.
34 J. G. Patton, Story of Hope St., Newland, Congreg. Church, 3–4.
35 Somerset Ho., Worship Rets., vol. v, Dioc. York, no. 359.
36 W. H. Thompson, Early Chapters in Hull Methodism 1746–1800, 14–18.
37 Jnl. of John Wesley, ed. N. Curnock, iv. 20–22, 331, 466; v. 57, 176, 372, 474; vi. 30, 148, 241, 329, 353, 519; vii. 170, 404–5, 450–1; viii. 75–76.
38 Patton, Story of Hope St. 4–6. Wilberforce Ho., 'Rules to be observed for the regulation and government of Providence Chapel, Hull' (MS. book, 1798), gives details of the founding of Hope St.
39 Ebenezer drew up new Rules of fellowship for the regulation of the society (Hull, 1797) (copy in Hull Pub. Libr.): it was to be Trinitarian.
40 See p. 314.
41 Somerset Ho., Worship Rets., vol. viii, Hull Quarter Sessions (2), no. 1.
42 [J. O'Dell], Century's Story of Baptist Church, George St., Hull (2nd edn. 1904), 10–14.
43 Somerset Ho., Worship Rets., vol. viii, Hull Quarter Sessions (2), nos. 6, 7.
44 Ibid. vol. v, Dioc. York, no. 1092; York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), R. IV. O (un-numbered certificates); see p. 319.
45 Thompson, Early Chaps. Hull Meth. 65–66.
46 F. Baker, Story of Methodism in Newland (Hull, 1958), 8–11.
47 Meth. Conference Handbk. (Hull, 1938), 103.
48 Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 556. The 'Church Party' is also said to have left the Hull Wesleyan church as a result of this dispute: Meth. Conference Handbk. (1938), 103; it may be represented by the registration of a room for Methodist worship by Jas. Brazier and five others in 1802: Somerset Ho., Worship Rets., vol. v, Dioc. York, no. 1691; and this group may be connected with the Independent Methodists who moved into Osborne St. chapel in 1826: see below and f.n. 73.
49 Some thirty such places were licensed: Somerset Ho., Worship Rets.; York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), R. IV. O and Registers of Meeting-houses 1816–34, 1834–52.
50 Trout, art. cit. 23.
51 See J. Sibree, Fifty Years' Recollections of Hull (1884).
52 N. Hall, Autobiography, 62, 119.
53 Cong. Union, Autumnal Assembly Handbk. (Hull, 1922), p. xiii.
54 Miall, Cong. in Yorks. 293; see p. 315.
55 Patton, Story of Hope St. 7, 11, 12, 14.
56 Miall, op. cit. 294.
57 B. W. Blanchard, 'Nonconf. Churches in the Hull District' (unpubl. thesis, Hull Sch. of Archit., 1955), App. p. iii.
58 Sibree, Fifty Years' Recollections, 66.
59 Anon. Thirty Years' Work in connection with Prospect St. Church, Hull, 1868–98 (Hull, n.d.), 3; Trout, art. cit. 23.
60 See p. 313.
61 Mins. Gen. Ass. of Gen. Bapt. Churches (Bapt. Hist. Soc.), ed. W. T. Whitley, ii. 287.
62 Dr. Williams's Library, Wilson MSS.
63 Whitaker, Bowl Alley Chapel, 134.
64 Dr. Williams's Libr., Wilson MSS.
65 [O'Dell], Story of George St. 25–26.
66 Dr. Williams's Libr., Wilson MSS.
67 Patton, Story of Hope St. 6.
68 York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), Register of Meetinghouses 1816–34, p. 358.
69 Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 562; W. White, Dir. Hull (1826).
70 H.O. 129/24/519–20, followed by various authors. Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 550, and Thompson, Early Chaps. Hull Meth. 68, give 1793.
71 S. Marriott, Outline of Meth. Hist. in Hull, 6.
72 Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 557.
73 Ibid. 562. W. White, Dir. Hull (1826) calls them 'Church Methodists'.
74 Miall, Cong. in Yorks. 294.
75 See George, Lime, South, and Walker Streets.
76 See Jane Garbutt, Reminiscences of the Early Days of Prim. Meth. in Hull (Hull, 1886); Jnls. of Wm. Clowes (1844).
77 Woolhouse licensed a house and a factory early in 1819: Somerset Ho., Worship Rets., vol. v, Dioc. York, nos. 3269, 3273.
78 S. B. Whitby, Hull Worthies, 2–4; Meth. Conference Handbk. (1938), 107–8; Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 557–8.
79 Procs. Wesley Hist. Soc. xxx. 174.
80 Blanchard, 'Nonconf. Churches in the Hull District', App. p. xviii; Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 557. Taylor licensed a factory and two chapels (Mill Street and Wincolmlee) in 1819: Somerset Ho., Worship Rets., vol. v, Dioc. York, nos. 3275, 3319, 3331; York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), Register of Meeting-houses 1816–34, p. 105.
81 Whitby, Hull Worthies, 3–4.
82 Procs. of the Dissenters in Hull, on the Introd. into Parlt. by Lord Sidmouth of a Bill purporting to amend and explain the Toleration Act (Hull, 1811) (copy in Hull Pub. Libr.).
83 T. Stratten, Review of the Hull Eccles. Controversy (Hull, 1834); Rep. of the Procs. at the Public Meeting of Dissenters held at Fish St. Chapel, Mar. 18, 1834 (copies of both in Hull Pub. Libr.).
84 [O'Dell], Story of George St. 24.
85 Ex inf. Mr. P. L. Embley, who kindly supplied these references to Jukes's Brethrenism.
86 Revd. A. Jukes, Miscell. items on separation from the Established Church (in Hull Pub. Libr.).
87 H.O. 129/24/519–20.
88 Directories of Hull.
89 H.O. 129/24/519–20.
90 Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 612.
91 Somerset Ho., Worship Rets., vol. v, Dioc. York, no. 3223; York Dioc. Regy. (St. Ant. Hall), Register of Meeting-houses 1816–34, pp. 71–72.
92 Unless otherwise stated, details given on pp. 316–18. are taken from the List of Places of Worship following this introduction.
93 Anon. Thirty Years' Work, 3–4.
94 See p. 352.
95 Sheahan, Hist. Hull, 541, 542, 545, 546, 548, 550, 558, 564, 565.
96 See p. 316.
97 [O'Dell], Story of George St. 31.
98 Blanchard, 'Nonconf. Chs. in Hull Dist.' 34–35.
99 Ibid. 74, 80.
100 It was reported in 1779 that their houses had been attacked: Hull Corp. Rec., B.B. 9, p. 486.
101 List of Members &c. in Yorks. Q.M. 1887 (copy in York Pub. Libr.).
102 See p. 316.
103 Booth had been ordained in 1858 at Bethel Chapel, North St.: Hull Daily Mail, 23 June 1965.
104 See p. 278.
105 Hull Daily Mail, 25 Jan. 1960.
106 T. Stratten, Review of the Hull Eccles. Controversy, 44.
107 H.O. 129/24/519–20. Attendances at Sunday schools have been excluded. The Jews were enumerated on 29 March.
108 There were no returns for St. Mark's and the Charterhouse chapel. St. Mark's had 1,135 sittings and these have been included.
109 No services were held that day, because of repairs, at Hope St. The average size of the 'general congregation' for the previous 6 months has been included in the morning and evening totals.
110 The average for the previous 12 months at Salthouse Lane has been included in the morning and evening totals No sittings or attendances were given for another chapel, and no sittings for a third.
111 The services had to be held elsewhere that day.


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