Wills
3 Richard II (1379-80)

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

R. R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1890

Pages

206-215

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'Wills: 3 Richard II (1379-80)', Calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting, London: Part 2: 1358-1688 (1890), pp. 206-215. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66921 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


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ANNO 3 RICHARD II.

Monday next before the Feast of S. Margaret, Virgin [20 July].

Beanner (William).—To be buried in the church of S. Botolph without Aldrichesgate. Bequests to the said church and ministers of the same, to divers orders of friars in London, the shrine of the altar of S. Alban, (fn. 1) the convent of Stretford atte Bowe, and the Hospital of S. Bartholomew in Smethefeld, &c. To Agnes his wife he leaves all his lands and tenements in the parish of S. Botolph aforesaid for life so long as she remain a widow, with remainder as to a certain brewhouse to Elena his daughter for life, so that they maintain a chantry priest therewith in the said parish church; remainder as to the residue to the rector of the same parish and to the Chamberlain of the Guildhall for the time being and their successors under the same conditions. Dated London, at his dwelling-house without Aldrichesgate in the parish of S. Botolph aforesaid, 8 June, A.D. 1377. Roll 108 (4).

Croydon (John), fishmonger.—To be buried in the churchyard of S. Sepulchre without Newegate in the tomb with Margery his late wife. Bequests to the church and ministers of the same, and for taking down the old wooden cross in the north part of the churchyard if the parishioners will set up a new one of stone in its place. To Thomas Croydon his brother, a friar of the Augustinian Order, he leaves a mazer cup called "God morwe," holding one gallon; after his death the same to go to the house of that order. Bequests to divers other orders of friars in London, to the work of the Hospital of S. Mary de Bedelem without Bysshopesgate that his name may be entered in its book to be had in remembrance, and to prisoners in Newegate, lazars, &c. To Elena his wife, in addition to the goods he received with her, he leaves three of his best beds, namely, a bed worked with dolphins in tapestry, a bed of Norffolk (fn. 2) and a bed of Wurstede (fn. 3) dyed and worked with figures, together with their appurtenances, two best feather beds with best bolsteris, a cuppeborde called "vesseller," three small cups of the measure of one pinty, a table with trestles, three chandeliers, and other household goods. His wife to have the custody of Elena his daughter and of her property, she giving security at the Chamber of the Guildhall. Also to his said wife and daughter he leaves a shop in Bruggestrete in the parish of S. Magnus, and his leasehold interest in tenements held under the Prior and Convent of Merton in Southwerk beyond London Bridge in the parish of S. George. Dated London, 10 April, A.D. 1378. Roll 108 (7).

Monday the Feast of S. James, Apostle [25 July].

Rous (Adam), surgeon.—To be buried in the place appointed by him in the monastery of S. Alban. (fn. 4) Bequests to the new work of S. Paul's, to the Abbey of S. Alban for a pittance, the church of S. Alphege within Crepulgate, and divers orders of friars in London. To Sir William Stodeleye he leaves a girdle with pouch and knife, which the Duke of Lancaster gave him. Directions as to burning of tapers at his funeral and their subsequent disposal. To Juliana his wife he leaves a certain tenement in the parish of All Hallows called "le Mechele" (fn. 5) for life; remainder to the Abbey of S. Alban on condition that his obit be observed as directed. Also to his said wife shops in la Roperye near a tenement called "le hood on the hoop" in the aforesaid parish for life; remainder to Abbess and Convent of the Minoresses of S. Clare without Algate; also the reversion for life of a tenement upon Cornhull after the decease of William his brother and of Johanna, wife of the same; remainder to house of the Salutation of the Mother of God of the Carthusian Order near London. To William Bowyer his son and to Lora, wife of the same, a certain tenement in the parish of S. Andrew upon Cornhull in tail; remainder to the aforesaid house of the Salutation. To the Prior and Convent of the church of S. Bartholomew de Westsmythefeld the reversions of certain tenements and rents in the parishes of S. Andrew de Holbourn, S. Mildred, S. Edmund the King in Lumbardestrete, and All Hallows the Great in the Ropery. Pecuniary bequests to the wife and children of Simon his brother, to Friar Thomas, son of his brother William, Cristina Harpesfeld, to his servants and others. Dated London, 27 April, A.D. 1379. Roll 108 (13).

Spark (William).—To be buried under the altar of S. Nicholas in the church of S. Mary le Bow. Bequests to the said church, to ministers and the Fraternity of S. Mary therein; also to divers orders of friars in London, and to the canons of Neuwerk (fn. 6) near Gildeford. To William his son all his tenements upon Cornhull in tail; remainder to pious uses for the good of his soul, the souls of Margery his wife and others; also a moiety of all his vessels of silver. Pecuniary bequests to Robert, son of Matilda de Flete, his bastard son, to Alice de Plukkele his servant, and others. Dated London, Friday the Feast of S. George, Martyr [23 April], A.D. 1361.


Whereupon the counterfeit and forged will which Andrew Smyth, "pyebaker," had delivered to William Cheyne, Recorder, and Henry Perot, Common Clerk, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, on Thursday next after the Feast of the Purification of V. Mary [2 Feb.], anno 2 Richard II. [A.D. 1378-9], in order to stay the enrolment of the above true will, was by order of the Court publicly cancelled and annulled, and the aforesaid Andrew fined one mark.

Roll 108 (15).

Haket (Adam), "bowyere."—To Margery his wife a moiety of all his tenements and quitrents situate near Bowyerrowe in the parish of S. Martin within Ludgate, also near Eldeneslane and Seintebrideslane in the parish of S. Brigid, by way of dower; the other moiety going to William his son in tail, with ultimate remainder in trust for sale, and the proceeds devoted to pious uses for the good of his soul. Bequests to the chaplain for the time being serving the Fraternity of S. Mary in the church of S. Martin aforesaid, and to the keepers of the lamp before the Holy Cross in the same. Dated London, 26 July, A.D. 1378. Roll 108 (16).

Monday next before the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.].

Gatesby (William).—To be buried in the church of All Hallows Stanyng with his feet towards the font. Bequests to the high altar and rood light in the said church, the lights also of S. Nicholas and S. Katherine in the same, the Fraternity of S. Katherine near the Tower, the Fraternity of All Hallows, London Wall, and the Fraternity of S. Mary de Crichirche. To William and John his sons he leaves sums of money. Sarah his wife appointed guardian of his said sons. Also to the said John he leaves for life, with the assent of his wife, a certain tenement in the parish of All Hallows which they had acquired from the executors of John Aldreton; remainder to the wardens of the Fraternity of All Saints in the church of Stanyng (in ecclesia de Stanyng) aforesaid. Dated London, 29 September, A.D. 1378. Roll 108 (42).

Monday next after the Feast of S. Leonard, Abbot [6 Nov.].

Barton (Beatrix, relict of John de, late vintner).—To be buried in the church of S. Dunstan near the Tower, under the marble slab sealed with her husband's seal. Bequests to the said church, comprising an iron-bound chest for keeping church ornaments therein. To her lord the venerable father the Bishop of St. Asaph (fn. 7) a silver cup called "Beker." To Sir Richard Spridlyngton twelve silver spoons with gilt acorns. To Richard Stokes a silvergilt salser. To John Morton a silver cup called "bolle" with silver covercle, a silver salser, a silver pear (fn. 8) (pirum), and an iron spit (veru) called "Gossespet." To Matilda Morton a pair of bedes of blakgett with gilt gaudes (fn. 9) (cum gaudiis) and a wire comb (pecten de Wy'n). To Walter Iklyngam a coverlet with tester of green, two sheets, a chest, chair, and an iron spit; and to Agnes, wife of the same, a Courbe (fn. 10) and a Kyrtel of Redsay. (fn. 11) To William de Barton, skinner, a feather bed and other chattels; and to Petronilla, wife of the same, a tunic of broune with fur (furrula) of Kyngges. To Sir Thomas de Wodhouus a portifory of Sarum use, a basin and ewer. Her leasehold interest in lands and tenements, garden, and dovecot upon le Touurhill, held under the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London, she leaves to her executors, one being Sir Richard Stokes, Baron of the Exchequer. Dated London, 8 September, A.D. 1379.

Roll 108 (46).

Cornewaille (John), "curreour."—To be buried at the Carmelite Friars. Bequests to the church of S. Augustine near the Gate and ministers in the same, to divers orders of friars, Nicholas Burle, Richard Lylye, and others. Alice his wife to have a life interest in certain tenements in the parish of S. Sepulchre without Newgate, and a moiety of beds, vessels, and other domestic chattels, all of which she is to accept in discharge of dower, otherwise she is to forego the same and take what she can recover by law. Dated London, 30 October, A.D. 1379. Roll 108 (47).

Kyng (Stephen), "gurdeler."—To be buried in the churchyard of S. Laurence in the Jewry. His tenement in Phelippeslane within Crepulgate, which he and Alice his wife acquired from John Cavendissh, "draper," to them and the heirs and assigns of the testator, is to be sold after the decease of his said wife, and sixty shillings of the proceeds divided among the children of John Batour, and the residue devoted to pious uses. Dated London, 1 August, A.D. 1375. Roll 108 (48).

Monday next before the Feast of S. Andrew, Apostle [30 Nov.].

Burgh (Thomas).—To be buried in S. Mary's Chapel within the close of the Hospital of S. Thomas the Martyr in Suthwerk. Bequests to the said hospital. To Agnes his daughter the reversion of a gold ring with a dyamant and a large mazer, and also of certain lands, tenements, rents, and services at Bilyngesgate in the parish of S. Mary at Hull, after the decease of Isabella his wife, to hold the same in tail, with remainder in trust for pious uses within the aforesaid chapel. Dated in his chamber within the close of the hospital aforesaid, Tuesday next after the Feast of S. Barnabas, Apostle [11 June], A.D. 1379. Roll 108 (52).

Monday next before the Feast of S. Valentine [14 Feb.].

Nichole (Frank).—Is about to take a long journey and so makes his will. Immediately on hearing of his decease those who stand seised of his property in the City of London and suburbs, as also in the vill of Suthwerk and the counties of Middlesex and Essex, are to convey the same to his heirs (if any) to hold in fee tail; remainder to Thomas Vynent and Paul Gisors, son of Peter Spicer, his kinsmen, as joint tenants in tail, with remainders over. Dated London, Friday the Feast of S. Martin in Yeme [11 Nov.], A.D. 1379. Roll 108 (70).

Lovel (William), called "Whatelee," cordwainer, who was admitted into the freedom of the City of London and sworn temp. Simon Franceys, Mayor, and Thomas Maryns, Chamberlain of the City, and is entered in the Green Book of Redemptions of Freedoms and Apprentices, viz., Friday next after the Feast of S. Luke, Evangelist [18 Oct.], 17 Edward III. [A.D. 1343].—Bequests to the church of S. Peter in Westchepe. His leasehold interest in certain lands and tenements in the parishes of S. Peter aforesaid and S. Margaret Moysi in Fridaystret he leaves to his executors, subject to an annual charge in aid of a chantry founded in the church of S. Peter aforesaid for the soul of Simon de Parys, and to the payment of certain pecuniary bequests to Friar Richard Lovel his brother, Master Dionisius Lopham, Henry Perot, and others. To Cecilia his daughter he also leaves lands and tenements in the aforesaid parish of S. Peter, held for a term under the Abbot and Convent of Westminster; remainder to his executors; remainder to the wardens of his craft in Chepe for the time being. To the Hospital of S. Bartholomew near Smethefeld lands and tenements in Watlingstret in the parish of S. Augustine at S. Paul's Gate, charged with an annual payment of six shillings and eightpence to the Mayors or Wardens of the City of London, and of thirty shillings to two brethren of the said hospital perpetually to celebrate for the good of his soul, the souls of Stephen his father, Matilda his mother, Agnes his wife, and others. Dated London, Monday, 12 December, A.D. 1379. Roll 108 (72).

Monday next before the Feast of S. Peter in Cathedrâ [22 Feb.].

Cornerthe (Thomas de), mercer.—To be buried in the church of S. Mildred in Bredestrete. His goods and chattels in silver and gold, merchandise, and the profits of his share of Chastelec (sic) to be divided into three parts, whereof one part is to be devoted to the good of his soul, a second part to go to Elena his wife by way of dower, and a third part to Thomas and Isabella his children in equal portions. Also to his said wife he leaves all his tablecloths and household utensils, together with his (sic) entire chamber, except his personal apparel. Out of his own portion of goods he makes divers bequests to the aforesaid church of S. Mildred, to the high altars of Bow, London, and of the church of S. Michael in Basyngeshawe, the works of S. Paul's, Cricherche, and the church of S. Thomas de Aquino; to various orders of friars, the nuns of S. Elena, London, and of Stretford and Halywell; the prisoners in Neugate; to Clement and William Spraye, John Madour, Lora his sister, his apprentices, and others. To Sir John de Elford, parson of the church of Wode Norton, co. Norfolk, he leaves ten marks; and to George, the parson of the church of Little Cornerthe, (fn. 12) a like sum. Provision made for chantries in the said church of Little Cornerthe as well as in the church of S. Mildred aforesaid. His tenement in Bredstret he leaves to his wife for life; remainder to Thomas his son and Isabella his daughter in successive tail. Dated London, 10 May, A.D. 1361. Roll 108 (75).

Monday next before F. of SS. Perpetua and Felicitas [7 March].

Wynter (Thomas), tanner.—To be buried in the churchyard of S. Giles without Crepulgate. His house in lamorestrete in the parish of S. Giles aforesaid to be sold by Alice his wife, she to retain one half of the proceeds by way of her share of his goods and tenements, the other half being devoted to payment of his debts and pious and charitable uses. Dated London, Wednesday the Feast of S. Thomas, Apostle [21 Dec.], A.D. 1379.

Roll 108 (101).

Monday the Feast of S. George [23 April].

Rothyng (Richard), "stokfisshmongere."—To be buried at the entrance to the church of S. Michael de la Crokedlane near Radegunda his late wife. To the Abbot of the new Monastery of Graces near the Tower, and his successors, he leaves a certain tenement in Stokfisshmongerrewe near Crokedlane, which he had by deed and feoffment of Katherine Moigne, enrolled at the Husting for Pleas of Land held on Monday next after the Feast of S. Gregory, Pope [12 March], 30 Edward III. [A.D. 1355-6], (fn. 13) so that the said abbot provide a perpetual chantry priest to celebrate for the good of his soul, the souls of Radegunda his late wife and others; and in default the same to go to the Mayor, Recorder, and Sheriffs of the City of London for similar purpose in the Guildhall chapel. Also to Friar John Bures, Prior of the House of the Holy Cross near the Tower of London, and his successors, he leaves a tenement situate in the parish of All Hallows the Great near Douegate, and others in Syvedenlane, (fn. 14) for similar pious uses, with like remainder in case of default. To Richard Grace he leaves certain tenements acquired under the will of Henry Gubbe, situate near Crokedlane, for life, in trust for the maintenance of a chantry in the church of S. Michael aforesaid. Dated London, 5 October, A.D. 1379.

Roll 108 (127).

Monday next after F. of S. John ante portam Latinam [6 May].

Tonk (Margaret, late wife of John de la).—To be buried in the church of Paternostercherche in the Riole near her late husband. Bequests to the said church and ministers of the same; also to Nicholas Cornewaille and Floria his wife, Isabella Patrik, Alice Haltoft, Alice Newecastel, and others. To Juliana her sister she leaves a feather bed, a best cannevasshe, a pair of best sheets, a tester of green colour, tablecloth, a long towayle, a brass pot with leaden cover called "Tyvell" and leaden syphon (fistula), and a fatt; (fn. 15) also, among other things, a robe of green colour with fur of bysshes, (fn. 16) a hood furred with menyver, (fn. 17) a fermail of gold having the Royal Arms of England, with a pair of paternostres of silver attached thereto called "langettis," and a cup of silver of Parys work imitating leaves. To Margery her sister and John Brampton, glazier, husband of the same, among other things, a tester ornamented with boars' heads, a fermail of gold made to represent four points of the compass (ad modum quatre mye compays), a pair of paternostrers of aumbre, a silk girdle with imitation roses in silver, a silver cup of Parys workmanship similar to that bequeathed to her sister Juliana, and a red robe furred with bysshes having a hood of Taunay furred with mennever. To John, son of Henry Grene, Ydonea her niece, Isabella Drury, and Margery Basyng she leaves similar chattels, comprising a mazer cup made like a ship, primers, cloaks of medley, gowns furred with Grys, (fn. 18) and a tester ornamented with heads of conies (cuniculorum). Also to the aforesaid Ydonea her niece and Margery Basyng her servant she leaves two mansion houses situate in the parish of Fenchirche for their respective lives; remainder in trust for sale for pious and charitable uses. Other mansions in the same parish she devises for sale for the maintenance of a chantry priest in the church of S. Michael [Paternoster-church] aforesaid. To the monks of Bermundesey thirteen shillings and fourpence. Dated 21 October, A.D. 1378.

Roll 108 (129).

Pole (John de la).—To be buried in the church of Crysteshale (fn. 19) between the tomb of Margaret his mother and Johanna his late wife. To John Lealham, goldsmith, and Hawisa, wife of the same, he leaves his hostel in Sharmonereslane in the parish of S. Mary Magdalen. To Robert Antoigne, William Lyndesele, John Lyndesele, William Drayton, and others, divers sums of money. Dated at Asshby David, (fn. 20) Thursday, 1 March, A.D. 1379.

Roll 108 (131).

Lot (John), called "Foxton," fishmonger.—To be buried in the church of S. Andrew at Castle Baynard, to which church and to certain parishioners thereof, being the best and most trustworthy men of the crafts of Woodmongers and Brewers, he leaves the reversion of a brewery situate in the parish of S. Andrew, and of a bakehouse in the parish of S. Mary de Aldermariechirch, after the decease of Margaret his wife, charged with the maintenance of a chantry in the said parish church and other pious and charitable uses; and in default the property is to go to the Mayor and Commonalty of London and their successors on like condition. Dated London, Easter Sunday [25 March], 3 Richard II. [A.D. 1380]. Roll 108 (133).

Footnotes

1 2 In the abbey called after his name. At the time of the Danish invasion the monks of St. Alban's sent the body of the saint for safety to Ely, demanding the same again when all fear was over. The monks of Ely, however, refused to restore it, whereupon it was given out that the true body had never been sent, but another, and that the real relics were buried in a secret place at St. Alban's. The monks of the latter place proceeded at once to dig these up and enshrine them. There is little doubt, however, that the body was actually removed to Ely.
2 1 Norfolk generally, and more especially Norwich, was famous for weaving stuffs for costly household furniture. Sir John Cobham in 1394 bequeathed "a bed of Norwich stuff embroidered with butterflies."
3 2 Worsted, co. Norfolk, by a new method of its own for carding wool with combs of iron well heated, and then twisting the thread harder than usual in the spinning, enabled weavers to produce a woollen stuff of peculiar quality, to which the name itself of "worsted" was given (Rock's 'Textile Fabrics,' p. 65).
4 1 Co. Herts.
5 2 Generally known as All Hallows "upon the Cellar" (or Cellars) or "the Less."
6 3 Aldebury in the manor and parish of Sende, afterwards called Newark, New Place, or De Novo loco juxta Guildford.
7 1 William de Spridlington, formerly Dean of St. Asaph. Ob. 9 April, 1382.
8 2 I.e. a cup in the same shape as a pear.
9 3 See note supra, p. 25.
10 4 A courtby or courtpy, a short cloak of coarse cloth.
11 5 A serge or other woollen cloth of a red colour, or possibly it means "rayed," i.e. striped, say.
12 1 Little Cornard, co. Suffolk.
13 2 No such deed appears on the Husting Roll of deeds and wills for that date; but a deed was enrolled at the Husting for Pleas of Land held on Monday next before the Feast of S. Barnabas [11 June] in the year mentioned, whereby Katherine, relict and executrix of John le Moigne, whose will was enrolled 5 Edward II. (Calendar, Part I. p. 228), conveys to Richard de Rothyngge, citizen and "stokfisshmongere," and Redegund his wife, all her late husband's tenements in Thames Street in the parish of S. Michael de Candelwikstret. Roll 84 (60).
14 1 Or Synedenlane, corrupted into Sydon Lane, now Seething Lane.
15 2 Vat.
16 3 According to Riley a fur made from the skin of the hind or female deer. In Alexander Neckam's vocabulary the Lat. bissus = Fr. cheysil (Wright's 'Vocab.,' vol. i. p. 99). On the other hand, we find mention made of bys of rabbits and hares ('Memorials,' p. 267) and of squirrels.
17 4 According to a marginal note on 'Liber Horn' (fol. 249 b) of the City's Records, menever was the name given to the fur on the belly of the squirrel during winter, whilst the same authority states that the furs known as gris and bis or bisshe were manufactured from the back of the same animal at the same season:—Gris "et bis" (inserted) est le dos en yver desquirell et la ventre en yver est menever.
18 1 Lat. griseus, one of the richest furs used in the Middle Ages, but it seems to be uncertain from what animal it was obtained. Riley is inclined to think it might have been the skin of the badger; but see the preceding note.
19 2 Chrishall (?), co. Essex.
20 3 Co. Northampton.