Wills
8 Richard II (1384-5)

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

R. R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1890

Pages

241-248

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'Wills: 8 Richard II (1384-5)', Calendar of wills proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting, London: Part 2: 1358-1688 (1890), pp. 241-248. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=66926 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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ANNO 8 RICHARD II.

Monday next before the Feast of S. Margaret, Virgin [20 July].

Heylesdon (John de), mercer.—To be buried in the church of Heylesdon (fn. 1) near the tomb of his father and mother. Bequests to the said church of vestments and ornaments, the parishioners being bound to give security to the rector of the church for the time being for the safe custody of the same; also to the poor of the vill of Heylesdon and other vills adjoining, to every mendicant friar in the cities of London and Norwich, to the old work of S. Paul's, to every rector in London for inserting his name in mortuary roll (fn. 2) (in suis memoralibus), to the high altars of the churches of H. Trinity the Less and S. Michael de Paternostercherche, &c.; also to Robert his brother, Margaret his sister, Alice and Margaret his daughters, and others. To John Chircheman and Sir Richard Tasburgh, rector of the church of Heylesdon, he leaves twenty marks annual quitrent of lands and tenements in the parish of All Hallows de Graschirche, on condition that they maintain thereout two perpetual chantries in the church of Heylesdon for the good of his soul, the souls of Johanna his wife, Walter de Berneye, Edmund de Alderford, John Chircheman and Emma, wife of the same, Thomas de Aldeburgh, and others. Johanna his wife to enjoy a life interest in the above lands and tenements, subject to the said charge, by way of dower of all his other lands and tenements, and also to have the sum of two hundred pounds sterling by way of dower of all his movable goods, in addition to her entire chamber, ornaments, and personal clothing. His said wife to accept the above in the name of dower, or to have what the law adjudges her. After her decease the aforesaid lands and tenements to go to Margaret his daughter in tail; remainder in trust for sale for pious uses. To Alice his daughter lands and tenements in the city of Norwich in tail, with similar remainder; also, under certain conditions, she is to have his tenements in Westchepe, London, called the "Crowned Seld" (fn. 3) (la Selde coronata). To Agnes, wife of Bartholomew Marche, rents in the parishes of S. Alban de Wodestrete and S. Giles without Crepulgate. Bequests also to poor lepers within three miles of London; for the redemption of poor prisoners in Ludgate and Neugate; to his poor kinsfolk in Heylesdon and elsewhere, co. Norfolk; for putting poor scholars to school; for sending two pilgrims to Rome, there to remain in prayer throughout one Lent (fn. 4) (per unam quadragesimam); to the Carthusian monks near Westsmythfeld, the Nuns Minoresses without Algate, and the nuns of Shuldham; (fn. 5) to William Reve, rector of the church of Drayton, John and Thomas Tasburgh, Margaret, wife of Thomas Mounteneye, and others. Forty pounds, more or less, to be expended on his funeral. Dated London, 14 April, A.D. 1384.—By a codicil annexed he varies former bequests made in the case of either of his daughters dying under age. Roll 113 (1).


Note.—The above will was made an exhibit in Chancery, re Attorney-General v. Fishmongers' Company.

Monday next after the Feast of S. Luke, Evangelist [18 Oct.].

Mordon (Simon de), "stokfisshmonger."—To be buried in the church of S. Michael in la Crokedlane. Bequests to divers orders of friars, to the brethren and sisters of the hospitals of S. Katherine near the Tower and S. Mary without Bisshopesgate, the Abbot and Convent of Graces near the Tower, the hospitals of S. Mary de Bethlem, of Elsyng within Crepulgate, and S. Bartholomew in Smethfeld, the church of S. Thomas de Acris, &c. All his lands, tenements, &c., within the liberty of London, to be sold after the decease of Alice his wife, and the proceeds devoted to pious and charitable uses. Dated London, 7 April, A.D. 1383.

Roll 113 (24).

Sebarn (Robert), "ferrour." (fn. 6) —To be buried in the church or churchyard of S. Andrew at Castle Baynard, and for burial there he leaves three shillings and fourpence to the fabric of the belfry, and other sums to the ministers. To Alianora his wife all his tenements and rents in the City of London for life; remainder to William his son and Philippa his daughter in several tail. Also to his said wife his leasehold interest in a tenement in the parish of S. Andrew aforesaid by demise of the Abbot and Convent of Berlynges. (fn. 7) Dated London, 13 August, A.D. 1384.

Roll 113 (25).

Kelleshull (William de), fishmonger.—To be buried in the churchyard of the conventual church of the Abbey of Lesnes, (fn. 8) to the abbot, prior, and canons of which he leaves sums of money. Bequests to the rector and churchwardens of the church of S. Nicholas Coldabbeye of certain rents in Oldefisshstrete for the maintenance of tapers to burn for the souls of John de Triple, Katherine, Katherine, and Alice, wives of the said John, and others. To Agnes his wife he leaves one third part of all his chattels and her chamber; and to Katherine his daughter a sum of money, silver spoons, and other household goods. Sir Laurence his brother appointed one of his executors. Dated at his mansion house in the Abbey of Lesnes, Monday the Feast of S. Matthew, Apostle [21 Sept.], A.D. 1383. Roll 113 (28).

Walsshe (John), goldsmith.—To be buried in the church of S. Swithun de Candelwykestrete near Margaret his late wife. Bequests to the church of S. Swithun, the light of the beam, its ministers, &c., the work of the belfry of the church of S. John Zacary and ministers of the same church, and to the mendicant friars in London for saying Placebo and Dirige on the eve of his burial, and for a trental of masses by each order on the day following. To Sir William Salesbury, chaplain, he leaves his leasehold interest in a shop in Westchepe in the parish of S. Matthew in Fridaystrete. To Agnes his wife a tenement in the parish of S. Swithun aforesaid for life; remainder to John, son of John Prentice and of Amicia, wife of the same, daughter of the aforesaid Margaret, in tail; remainder to the Fraternity of H. Trinity in the church of S. Mary de Abbecherche for the good of his soul, and the souls of Margaret his late wife and others. Also to John Prentice, draper, houses and a shop in the parish of S. Swithun, charged with the maintenance of a chantry priest in the said parish church for the space of ten years next after his decease. Also to Agnes his wife he leaves a tenement called "le belle on the hop" in the parish of S. Botolph without Bisshoppesgate for life; remainder to John Woleward and Johanna, wife of the same, daughter of Thomas Poyntel, late goldsmith; also rents issuing from the manor of Lachele, co. Essex, all goods appertaining to his (sic) chamber, and one half of all his other goods. Dated London, Saturday, 20 August, A.D. 1384.


And be it remembered that although Adam Stedeman, scrivener, is named executor in the above will, the testator declared it was not his wish that the said Adam should be so named; and Adam himself voluntarily acknowledged this in full Husting, and further said that he would not administer any of the testator's goods, nor intermeddle, but he altogether renounced administration.

Roll 113 (32).

Bydyk (John), goldsmith.—To be buried in the church of S. Peter de Westchepe. To Alice his wife he leaves all the tenements descending to him upon the decease of Juliana his mother, situate in the parish of All Hallows de Fanchirche, (fn. 9) for life; remainder to Thomas his son in tail; remainder to Agnes his daughter for life; remainder in trust for sale by the wardens of the Goldsmiths for pious uses. Also to his aforesaid son he leaves a primer (fn. 10) of matins of the Blessed Mary. Dated London, 3 September, A.D. 1384. Roll 113 (34).

Monday next after the Feast of S. Leonard, Abbot [6 Nov.].

Blanket (John), skinner, of the parish of S. Swithin.—To be buried in the churchyard of S. Swithin's in Candelwikstret, in his tomb situate "in banco," to the north of the same. Bequests to the said parish church and ministers of the same, and directions as to tapers at his funeral and subsequent disposal of them. Bequests for the maintenance of two chantries in the aforesaid church for the good of his soul, the souls of Walter his father, Cecilia his mother, and others; also to the new and old work of S. Paul's, to various orders of friars in London, to the inmates of hospitals, to prisoners in Neugate and the Marshalsea of Suthwerk, to every anchorite in London and the suburbs, &c. To Thomas Joce, son of Margery his sister, he leaves a coat and hood, but without the fur belonging to them, in place of which he leaves a furrour of lambs-wool. The reversion of a tenement in Oldechaunge in the parish of S. Augustine near S. Paul's Gate to be sold, and one moiety of the proceeds to go to Sabine his wife, and the other to be devoted to pious uses. Dated London, 26 January, A.D. 1382. Roll 113 (42).

Monday next after the Feast of S. Katherine, Virgin [25 Nov.].

Coleman (Reginald, son of Robert, senior).—To be buried in the chancel of the church of S. Margaret de Lothebury at the foot of the image of S. Margaret. Bequests to the said church, its ministers, &c., and to divers orders of friars for their prayers; also to John Coleman, son of Robert his brother, and Sir Walter his brother, a monk of Bury St. Edmunds. Provision made for chantries in the aforesaid church for the good of his soul, the souls of Robert his father, Matilda his mother, his brothers, sisters, and others. To Matilda Hillary his niece he leaves forty shillings for the purchase of kerchiefs (flamiola). To the fabric of the church of Tolyton in co. Norfolk, where his father and mother lie buried, he leaves ten pounds, besides other sums to the vicar, and a gilt coupe for the Host to hang over the high altar. (fn. 11) To John his son two hundred pounds and four pieces of silver platte with two covercles, the said money to remain in the custody of Cristina his wife to assist in putting the said John to school during minority, without any account being rendered when his said son shall come of age. Bequests also to the Fraternity of the Resurrection of S. Paul for assisting poor brethren, to his apprentices and others. Also to his said wife he leaves a tenement in the parishes of S. Margaret de Lothebury and S. Stephen de Colemanstrete in fee, and another tenement in the first-named parish for life, with remainder to John his son in tail; remainder to pious uses. Dated London, Wednesday next after the Feast of S. Martin, Bishop [11 Nov.], A.D. 1383. Roll 113 (54).

Monday next before the Feast of S. Lucia, Virgin [13 Dec.].

Coggere (Cristina), of the parish of S. Botolph near Billyngesgate.—To be buried in the tomb of Roger Coggere her late husband in the said parish church. Bequests to Sir John Wolde, rector, and other ministers of the said church; to the fraternities of S. Mary and S. Katherine therein; to the Friars of the Holy Cross; to the poor in divers hospitals, the lepers living at Hakeney, at le loke, and near the Hospital of S. Giles; to poor prisoners in Neugate, the King's Marshalsea and King's Bench, &c. To John Denver and Cristina his wife she leaves a tenement in the parish of S. Botolph aforesaid. To Thomas her brother, Margery Coggere, Agnes, daughter of Simon Coggere, Alice her sister, and others, she leaves sums of money and chattels, comprising silver cups and spoons. Dated London, 21 November, A.D. 1384.

Roll 113 (58).

Monday next before the Feast of Conversion of S. Paul [25 Jan.].

Horewode (William).—His testament concerning his freeholds (liberis tenementis) in London. First, he leaves the tenement wherein he dwells in the parish of S. Michael le Quern to Johanna his wife for life; remainder to William his son and Agnes his daughter in successive tail; remainder over. To his executors and the churchwardens of the church of S. Michael he leaves an annual rent of six shillings and eightpence for the purpose of keeping his obit and other pious uses for the souls of Agnes his former wife, Johanna his wife, and others. Dated London, 16 November, A.D. 1382. Roll 113 (70).

Monday next after the Feast of S. Agatha, Virgin [5 Feb.].

Spray (Clement), mercer.—To be buried in the churchyard of S. Michael de Bassyngeshawe. Bequests to the said church and ministers therein. His tenements in the parishes of S. Botolph without Aldresgate and S. Nicholas at the Shambles to be divided equally between Margaret and Elizabeth his daughters, who are to remain under the care of Isabella his wife during minority. The residue of his goods and chattels he leaves to his said wife without any inventory. Dated London, Wednesday the Feast of S. Thomas, Apostle [21 Dec.], A.D. 1384. Roll 113 (79).

Monday next after the Feast of S. Mathias, Apostle [24 Feb.].

Foot alias Maryns (John), apothecary.—To be buried in S. Paul's churchyard commonly called "Pardounchirchehawe." Bequests to the old and new work of S. Paul's, to the Fraternity of S. John of the Tailors of London, the Fraternity of S. Antonin of the Pepperers of London, the church of S. Mary Magdalen in Milkstrete and ministers therein, the fabric of the church of All Hallows in Honylane, to divers orders of friars in London, the poor inmates of hospitals and of the prison of Neugate, &c. Provision made for chantries in the church of S. Mary Magdalen aforesaid. To Christina atte Bowe he leaves a cup called "calixcoppe" with silver covercle standing upon lions silver-gilt, and one hundred shillings. To Mary his wife all his lands and tenements in London and suburbs for life; remainder, as to tenements in the parishes of All Hallows de Stanyngchirche and Fanchirche, to Edward his son in tail. To John his son the reversion of tenements in the parish of S. Giles without Crepulgate in tail. To his child en ventre sa mère lands and tenements in the parishes of S. Margaret in Briggestrete, in the lane called "Puddynglane," of S. Martin in the Vintry, and of S. Nicholas Acon in the lane called "Seint Nicholaslane." Also to Mary his wife he leaves his leasehold interest in a tenement held under the Wardens of London Bridge in the parish of All Hallows de Honylane, and the terms of his apprentices; also lands and tenements in the parish of Cotenham, co. Cambridge, for life; remainder to John his son in tail; remainder to Edward his son in fee. Dated London, 14 March, A.D. 1381. Roll 113 (87).

Footnotes

1 4 Hellesdon, co. Norfolk.
2 1 It was customary to keep a book containing the names of benefactors in a church or religious house, for the purpose of remembering them in prayers. The register of names so preserved was sometimes called the Album, but more often the Book of Life.
3 2 Probably a seld or warehouse so called from its being the property of the Crown, for Stow records a grant by King Henry IV. to certain mercers of a shed or building with shops, &c., called "Crownsild," situate in the Mercery in Westcheap, to be held by them in burgage, as all the City of London is held. The same chronicler further states that it was also known as "Tamersilde," not improbably a corruption of "Tanners' Seld," which at the beginning of the fourteenth century was situate near S. Laurence Lane in the Jewry, but at a later date is mentioned as being in Friday Street (Stow's 'Survey,' Thoms's ed., 1876, pp. 97, 102; Riley's 'Memorials,' Introd., p. xii).
4 1 Or for forty days.
5 2 Shouldham, co. Norfolk, where there was a Gilbertine monastery for canons and nuns under the government of a prior.
6 3 Ironmonger.
7 1 Barlings, co. Linc. The abbey was originally situate at Barling Grange; afterwards removed to a place called Oxeney, in another part of the town. Hence the abbey was sometimes called the Abbey of Oxeney or De Oxeniaco, but generally Barlings.
8 2 Co. Kent.
9 1 Perhaps All Hallows Staining.
10 2 Or prymer; a service book containing the Little Office of Our Lady. The earliest trace of it is said to be about the fourteenth century. At the Reformation it was curtailed, and edited thenceforth only in English instead of both Latin and English.
11 1 There was a custom, says Dr. Rock ('Textile Fabrics,' p. 107), during the Middle Ages in England, as well as in France and several other parts of the Continent, of keeping the Eucharist hung up over the high altar beneath a canopy, within a pyx (here represented by a coupe) of gold, silver, ivory, or enamel, mantled with a fine linen cloth or veil. Among the goods and chattels of Richard II. in Haverford Castle forwarded by the Sheriff of Hereford to the Exchequer upon the accession of Henry IV. was "j coupe d'or pour le corps Jesu Christi."