Notes on the aldermen, 1502-1700

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Alfred P. Beaven

Year published

1908

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168-195

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'Notes on the aldermen, 1502-1700', The Aldermen of the City of London: Temp. Henry III - 1912 (1908), pp. 168-195. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=67247 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Notes on the aldermen, 1502-1700

1502.Henry Kebyll. He gave £1,000 for the rebuilding of St. Mary's Aldermary Church, where he was afterwards buried, but 'his bones were unkindly cast up' (Stow, i., 253). Two later Lord Mayors, Sir William Laxton (1544–5) and Sir Thomas Lodge (1562–3) were buried in his vault.
1504.Sir William Fitzwilliam. Son-in-law of John Hawes (Alderman, Sheriff 1500–1). His grandson, Sir William Fitzwilliam, Lord Deputy of Ireland in the time of Queen Elizabeth, was ancestor of the Earls Fitzwilliam. His elder daughter Anne married Sir Anthony Cooke (descended from Sir Thomas Cook, Mayor 1462–3), and was mother-in-law of William Cecil, Lord Burghley, and grandmother of Francis Bacon. From the Alderman's younger daughter, Elizabeth, who married Sir Thomas Brudenell, the Earls of Cardigan were descended.
1505.William Browne (ii.). Son of Sir John Browne (Mayor 1480–1). He married the daughter of Sir Edmund Shaa (Mayor 1482–3) and afterwards the daughter of Henry Kebyll (Mayor 1510–1), the latter of whom upon his death became the third wife of Lord Mountjoy, and the ancestress of the Lord Mountjoy who subdued Tyrone's rebellion and was created Earl of Devonshire. Browne's daughter by his first wife married Sir John Mundy (Mayor 1522–3). His daughter by his second wife married Sir William Petre, Secretary of State to Edward VI. and Mary, from which marriage the Lords Petre are descended.
1506.Robert Johnson. He was removed by the King (Henry VII.) from the Shrievalty within a few days of his election to that office, and it is stated in the Greyfriars Chronicle that in consequence he 'toke soche a thowthe that he dyde.' If so, the result of his vexation was not speedy, as he did not die till nearly or fully twelve months later, his election being in September 1506, and the date of his Will September 23, 1507 (proved October 12 following).
1506.Christopher Hawes. He also, like his contemporary Johnson, appears to have been a singularly sensitive person, as he is stated to have been imprisoned by Henry VII. for some imaginary crime and to have 'soon died from excess of grief.' [Sir J. Baddeley, Aldermen of Cripplegate Ward, p. 42.]
1507.George Monoux. Founded a school at Walthamstow.
1507.Sir William Boteler. Son-in-law of Roger Basford (Alderman, Sheriff 1514).
1508.John Rest. He lived at Crosby Place before Sir Thomas More.
1508.Sir Thomas Exmewe. He made the water conduit in London Wall by Moorgate.
1509.Thomas Mirfyn. He married the daughter of Aungel Don (Alderman 1506). One of his daughters married Sir Andrew Judde (Lord Mayor 1550–1), another married Sir Robert Cromwell, and was great-grandmother of the Protector and of John Hampden.
1509.Sir James Yarford. The first Welsh Lord Mayor.
1510.Sir John Brugge. His daughter Winifred married Sir Richard Sackville, by whom she was mother of Thomas Sackville, created Earl of Dorset (Lord High Treasurer and joint author of the first English tragedy, Gorboduc). After Sackville's death she married the old Marquess of Winchester (Lord High Treasurer to three sovereigns), whose first wife had been the daughter of Sir William Capel (Mayor 1503–4, 1510).
1512.John Dawes. His widow married (as her third husband) Richard (Grey) 3rd Earl of Kent.
1513.Sir John Mundy. Grandson of Sir Edmund Shaa (Mayor 1482–3) and son-in-law of William Browne (Mayor 1513–4). He was committed to prison in 1533 (after he had passed the Chair) for 'disobedyence to my Lorde the Mayer and my maisters the Aldermen.'
1514.Sir Thomas Baldry. His grand-daughter married the 2nd Lord Rich, by whom she was mother of the 3rd Lord, created Earl of Warwick, who was father of the Earls of Warwick and Holland, who were conspicuous in the Civil War period.
1515.Sir John Aleyn. One of the bachelor Aldermen who have held the Mayoralty. He gave a gold chain to be worn by successive Chief Magistrates, which was first worn by Sir William Laxton at the close of his Mayoralty, October 27, 1545. He is said to have been a member of Henry VIII.'s Privy Council.
1515.Sir Thomas Semer (Seymour). He is said to have been a member of the Protector Somerset's family, but I have failed to trace satisfactory evidence of the connexion which, in any case, was not very close.
1521.Sir John Rudstone. He married a daughter of Sir Robert Dymoke, Champion of England, who after his death married Sir Edward Wotton, one of Henry VIII.'s Privy Councillors. Rudstone's daughter married Thomas Wotton, son of Sir Edward by his first wife, by whom she was mother of Edward, created Lord Wotton.
1521.Sir John Skevynton. Probably of the same family as Sir William Skeffington, Lord Deputy of Ireland, who was ancestor of the Viscounts Massereene.
1521.Sir Ralph Dodmer. See vol. I., p. 33 of this work, for his refusal to accept translation to one of the greater Companies on his election as Alderman until he had been committed to the custody of one of the Sheriffs. His daughter married Sir Thomas Pope, founder of Trinity College, Oxford.
1523.Robert Amadas. He was goldsmith to Cardinal Wolsey, and married a grand-daughter of Sir Hugh Bryce (Mayor 1485–6).
1523.Nicholas Jenyns. His daughter married Sir Thomas Holcroft, and was mother of Isabel, wife of Edward, 3rd Earl of Rutland.
1525.John Nechyls. Son-in-law of Sir Stephen Jenyns (Mayor 1508–9).
1526.Henry Dacres. His daughter married John Pakington, from which marriage the Lords Hampton are descended. Her husband was brother of Robert Pakynton, M.P. for the City, and of Humphrey Pakington, who was father-in-law of four of its Aldermen.
1527.Sir John Champneys. Stow records that he 'was the first private man who in his house near Clothworkers Hall built a turret to oversee his neighbours in the City, which delight of his eye was punished with blindness some years before his death.' Fuller (Worthies, iii., 108) comments on this dictum of Stow thus: ' I dare not concur with so censorious an author, because every consequence of a fact is not the punishment of a fault therein.'
1528.Sir William Hollyes. Ancestor of Denzil Holles, the parliamentarian Colonel, and of the Dukes of Newcastle of the Holles, Pelham and PelhamClinton lines.
1528.Sir Ralph Warren. His daughter Joan married Sir Henry Cromwell, and was grandmother of the Protector and of John Hampden. His widow married Sir Thomas Whyte (Lord Mayor 1553–4).
1530.Sir William Roche. His second wife was widow of John Long (Alderman, Sheriff 1528–9). He was committed to the Fleet by the Privy Council in 1545 for protesting against the benevolence.
1531.Sir Michael Dormer. His brother, William Dormer, was ancestor of the Lords Dormer.
1532.Robert Pagett. His widow married Sir William Sherington, the confederate of Lord Seymour of Sudeley in the plot against Protector Somerset's government.
1534.Ralph Aleyn. Nephew of Sir John Aleyn (Lord Mayor 1525–6, 1535–6). His widow married Sir Roger Manwood, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer.
1534.Humphrey Monmouth. (fn. 1) Son-in-law of Sir William Denham (Alderman, Sheriff 1534–5). He was the earliest Protestant Alderman of London, and the friend of Tyndale the Reformer.
1534.Sir Thomas Kytson. His widow married successively Sir Richard Long and John Bourchier, Earl of Bath. The daughter by Kytson married Lord FitzWarine, eldest son of the Earl of Bath by an earlier wife. Another daughter of Sir Thomas married Sir John Spencer of Wormleighton, from which marriage are descended the Earls of Sunderland and Spencer and the later Dukes of Marlborough, Lord Randolph Churchill and Mr. Winston Churchill.
1534.Richard Fermor. A zealous Romanist who in 1540 was imprisoned and deprived of his property for denying the supremacy of the King (Henry VIII.). He was subsequently released and in the reign of Edward VI. his property was restored. He was son-in-law of William Browne (Mayor) and ancestor of the Earls of Pomfret.
1536.William Dauntsey. He married a daughter of Sir Thomas More.
1536.Sir William Laxton. The founder of Oundle School. His eldest daughter married John Machell (Alderman, Sheriff 1555–6), and a younger was second wife of Sir Thomas Lodge (Lord Mayor 1562–3).
1536.Sir Richard Gresham. Elder brother of Sir John Gresham (Lord Mayor 1547–8) and father of Sir Thomas, the founder of the Royal Exchange. His eldest son, Sir John, was father of Elizabeth, who married Sir Henry Neville of Braybrooke, from which marriage the Lords Braybrooke are descended, and his daughter Christian by her marriage with Sir John Thynne of Longleat was ancestress of the Marquesses of Bath. Sir Richard was elected Lord Mayor at the special desire of the King (Henry VIII.) when he had been an Alderman less than two years, twelve seniors below the Chair being passed over.
1536.Henry Amcotts. He refused to accept the office of Alderman until four months after his election, having in the interval been fined £40 and had his shops closed and his 'goodes and catalles' sequestered, and it was not until a week after he had been committed to Newgate that he finally surrendered. He retained his Aldermanry until his death, serving as Sheriff and Lord Mayor in due course.
1538.John Tolos. He also at first refused to accept office and was committed to Newgate, but was sworn nine days after his election, when the claim of his guild, that of the Clothworkers, to be regarded as one of the greater Companies was first admitted. (See vol. I. of this work, p. 330.)
1538.John Wylford. Son of John Wylford (Alderman, Sheriff 1499–1500).
1540.Sir John Gresham. Younger brother of Sir Richard Gresham (Lord Mayor 1537–8) during whose mayoralty he was Sheriff. He was founder of Gresham's School, Holt.
1541.Sir Andrew Judde. Founder of Tonbridge School. His first wife died soon after he entered on his Mayoralty, and he married again within three months a lady who had been a widow for even a shorter time (Wriothesley's Chronicle, ii., 44, 45). He took as his third wife the daughter of Thomas Mirfyn (Mayor 1518–9), by which marriage he was ancestor of the Viscounts Strangford and of the later Lords Teynham.
1542.Thomas Blanke. He suffered imprisonment for five days in the house of Sheriff Suckley for refusing to accept the office of Alderman (Wriothesley's Chronicle, i., 134). For his discharge see vol. I. of this work, p. 228. He was father of Sir Thomas Blanke, Lord Mayor 1582–3.
1542.Sir Rowland Hill. The first Protestant Lord Mayor; founder of Drayton School, co. Salop. He (as did Sir Richard Gresham) secured considerable grants of land from the spoils of the monasteries. He was described on a tablet in St. Stephen's Church, Walbrook, as 'A friend to Virtue, a Lover of Learning A prudent Person and worthy Counsellor A Lover of Wisdom, of Justice a Furtherer.' From his uncle, Ralph Hill, were descended the first Viscount Hill, the Peninsular general, and Rowland Hill, the celebrated preacher.
1542.Sir George Barne. His son, Sir George, was Lord Mayor 1586–7 ; his daughter Anne married Sir Francis Walsingham, the well-known Secretary of State to Queen Elizabeth, and another daughter Elizabeth was wife of Sir John Ryvers (Lord Mayor 1573–4).
1544.Richard Rede. He refused to pay the benevolence demanded by Henry VIII. in 1545, and was in consequence sent to serve with the army against the Scots, by whom he was taken prisoner.
1544.Sir Thomas Whyte. Founder of St. John's College, Oxford, and a benefactor to Bristol and Coventry and to Merchant Taylors' School. Fuller (Worthies, ii., 58) says of him that 'whithersoever he went he left the finger-marks of his charity behind him.' He did not accept office as Alderman until after committal to Newgate for refusing. He married the widow of Sir Ralph Warren (Lord Mayor 1536–7 and 1544).
1545.Robert Chertsey. His widow (of whom he was the second husband) married twice after his decease, her third partner being Sir David Broke, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and the fourth Edward, 1st Lord North.
1545.Sir William Lok. (fn. 2) Grandson of John Lok (Alderman, Sheriff 1461–2), father of Michael Lok the traveller, and grandfather of Henry Lok, a writer of religious sonnets and psalms whom Warton describes as 'the British Maevius.' He was married four times and left issue by the first two, 13 sons and 6 daughters.
1546.Augustine Hynde. His widow married Sir John Lyon (Lord Mayor 1554–5).
1547.John Lambarde. Father of William Lambarde, the antiquary.
1547.John Usshe. In his Will dated May 30th, proved June 21, 1554 [PCC 3 More] his name is written 'Wysse,' which is probably correct. In Wriothesley's Chronicle, i., 183, it is printed 'Wishe.' He was committed to Newgate for refusing to accept office on April 13, 1547, but was sworn and immediately discharged April 21. Wriothesley states that he was sworn previous to his discharge, which the entry in Repertory 11 (not ii. as printed vol. I., p. 11) omits, recording the discharge only.
1547.Sir William Garrarde. Father of Sir John Garrarde (Lord Mayor 1601–2) and father-in-law of Sir George Barne (Lord Mayor 1586–7). Stow describes him as 'a grave, sober, wise and discreet citizen equal with the best and inferior to none of our time.'
1548.David Woodroffe. His son, Sir Nicholas, was Lord Mayor 1579–80, and his daughter Mary was mother of Sir William Stonhouse, 1st Baronet of Radley.
1549.Sir Thomas Offley. One of the earliest pupils of Lily, the Greek scholar, at St. Paul's. He is described by Fuller (Worthies ed. Nuttall, i., 296) as the 'Zacchæus of London, not for his low stature but his high charity.' He was brother-in-law to Stephen Kyrton (Alderman 1549–53) and son-in-law of John Nechyll or Nichylls (Alderman 1525). To his son Sir John Offley of Madeley, Isaak Walton dedicated The Compleat Angler.
1549.Christopher Aleyn. Brother of Sir John Aleyn (Lord Mayor 1525–6, 1535–6).
1550.Sir John Ayliffe. Maternal grandson of Sir John Shaa (Lord Mayor 1501–2).
1553.Sir William Hewet. Son-in-law of Nicholas Leveson (Sheriff 1534–5) and father-in-law of Sir Edward Osborne (Lord Mayor 1583–4).
1551.Sir Thomas Curtes. See Sir John Baddeley's Aldermen of Cripplegate Ward, p. 145–7, for a full account of his prolonged resistance to the order of the Court of Aldermen that he should translate himself from the Pewterers to one of the 12 greater Companies.
1552.Sir Thomas Leigh. He married the niece of Sir Rowland Hill (Lord Mayor 1549–50). From his eldest son the Lords Leigh of the present creation, and from his second those of the earlier creation were descended; his third son was grandfather of Sir Francis Leigh, created Earl of Chichester, through whom he was ancestor of Chatham and the younger Pitt. His daughter Winifred married Sir George Bond (Lord Mayor 1587–8) and was ancestress of the Dukes of Marlborough, Viscount Melbourne (the Premier) and the later Dukes of Leeds.
1553.Sir William Chester. Stepson of Sir John Milbourne (Lord Mayor 1521–2). He married the widow of William Beswicke (Alderman 1564–5) and was ancestor of the Chester Baronets of Chicheley.
1553.Sir Thomas Lodge. Son-in-law of Sir William Laxton (Lord Mayor 1544–5) and father of Thomas Lodge, the poet, dramatist and writer of tales, from whose 'Rosalynde' Shakespeare derived the material for his play "As You Like It." Sir Thomas, who had ceased to be an Alderman, was committed to Newgate in 1576 for striking Alderman John Braunche on the face. He was the first Mayor 'to leave ye cumly aunsyent custom of shavynge theyr beards.' (Stow's Memoranda in Three Fifteenth Century Chronicles, p. 127). For an account of his quarrel with Queen Elizabeth's purveyor, Edward Skeggs, who carried off 12 capons provided for his table when Lord Mayor, see Strype's edition of Stow (1720), i., 289 quoted in Orridge The Citizens of London and their Rulers, pp. 127–130. His resignation was brought about by pressure. On Sept. 28, 1566, Aldermen Draper and Martyn were commissioned to 'move him to surrender.' (Rep. 16, fo. 114b.)
1553.Sir William Harper. Founder of the Grammar School at Bedford.
1554.Sir John Whyte. Brother of John Whyte, Bishop of Winchester, an instance of two brothers bearing the same baptismal name. He married the widow of Ralph Greneway (Alderman 1556–8). 'He wore a rownd cape' [i.e. cap] 'that wayed not iiii. ouncis, which semyd to all men in consyderation of ye auncient bonyt, to be very uncomly' [Stow's Memoranda in Three Fifteenth Century Chronicles, p. 127]. His son Robert's two daughters married respectively Sir Richard Tichborne, Bart., and his brother Sir Walter; from the latter marriage the present Baronet is descended, the personation of whose uncle by Arthur Orton was the origin of the celebrated 'Tichborne case.'
1556.James Altham. Son of Edward Altham, Sheriff 1531–2. His first wife was sister of Sir Thomas Blanke (Lord Mayor 1582–3) and his second was daughter of Sir Andrew Judde (Lord Mayor 1550–1). By the former he was father of James Altham, Baron of the Exchequer, whose daughter married Arthur Annesley, first Earl of Anglesey. Altham was fined 100 marks 'for his contemptuous disobedyence in not observynge the order of this Court' [Rep. 14. fo. 513b] July 24, 1561, and discharged from his Aldermanry a week later.
1556.Sir Richard Malorye. Son-in-law of Robert Pakynton, M.P. for London.
1556.Sir Christopher Draper. His daughters married respectively Sir William Webbe (Lord Mayor 1591–2) Sir Wolstan Dixie (Lord Mayor 1585–6) and Sir Nicholas Woodroffe (Lord Mayor 1579–80). Lady Woodroffe took a second Aldermanic husband, Sir Henry Billingsley (Lord Mayor 1596–7).
1556.Sir Roger Martin. Son-in-law of Humphrey Pakington (brother of Robert Pakynton, M.P. for London). His wife's sisters married Sir Lionel Duckett (Lord Mayor 1572–3) and Edward Jakman (Alderman, Sheriff 1564–5) respectively; the latter afterwards married James Bacon (Alderman, Sheriff 1568–9); the former had previously been the wife of Humphrey Baskerfeld (Alderman, Sheriff 1561–2).
1557.Sir Thomas Rowe. Son-in-law of Sir John Gresham (Lord Mayor 1547–8), first cousin of Sir William Rowe (Lord Mayor 1592–3), father of Sir Henry Rowe (Lord Mayor 1607–8), and grandfather of Sir Thomas Roe, the Ambassador.
1558.John Cowper. Grandfather of Sir William Cowper, 1st Baronet and ancestor of the Earls Cowper and of the poet William Cowper. Stow says that he was 'put by his term of Mayoralty upon some private displeasure of his brethren.' Mr. Kingsford in his edition of Stow says that Stow 'glosses over his shortcomings which lost him his term of Mayoralty.'
1558.Humphrey Baskerfeld. Son-in-law of Humphrey Pakington; his widow married Sir Lionel Duckett (Lord Mayor 1572–3).
1560.Richard Chamberlain. Father of John Chamberlain, the letter-writer.
1560.Edward Bankes. His widow married George Freville, Baron of the Exchequer.
1560.Sir Rowland Heywarde. He was the father of 16 children His second wife was grand-daughter of Sir Andrew Judde (Lord Mayor 1550–1). His daughter Elizabeth married Lord Knyvett; another daughter, Joan, married Sir John Thynne, ancestor of the Marquesses of Bath.
1561.Edward Gylbert. His grand-daughter married Philip, 3rd Lord Wharton.
1564.Richard Lambert. His brother Walter was father of the first Lord Cavan and ancestor of the Earls of Cavan.
1564.William Beswicke. His widow married Sir William Chester (Lord Mayor 1560–1).
1564.Sir Lionel Duckett. Partner of Sir Thomas Gresham, the founder of the Royal Exchange, of whose Will he was executor. He married the widow of Humphrey Baskerfeld (Alderman, Sheriff 1561–2).
1565.Sir John Ryvers. Son-in-law of Sir George Barne (Lord Mayor 1552–3) and brother-in-law of Sir George Barne (Lord Mayor 1586–7).
1565.Sir James Hawes. One of his daughters married Sir Robert Lee (Lord Mayor 1602–3), and another Sir John Watts (Lord Mayor 1606–7), and a third Thomas Wilford, Chamberlain of the City.
1566.Sir Ambrose Nicholas. One of his daughters married Sir Paul Tracy, Bart., another William Dutton, from which marriage the Lords Sherborne are descended.
1566.Sir Thomas Ramsey. His widow (daughter of William Dale, of Bristol), was a benefactress to Christ's Hospital and to Queen Elizabeth's Hospital, Bristol.
1567.William Bonde. Brother of Sir George Bonde (Lord Mayor, 1587–8) and father of Martin Bond, M.P. for the City 1624–5. He purchased Crosby Place in 1567.
1567.James Bacon. Brother of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, and uncle of Francis Bacon, Viscount St. Albans ('Lord Bacon' as he is generally but erroneously styled), Lord Chancellor and philosopher. He married the widow of Edward Jakman (Alderman, Sheriff 1564–5).
1571.Sir Nicholas Woodroffe. Son of David Woodroffe (Alderman, Sheriff 1554–5), and son-in-law of Stephen Kyrton (Alderman 1549–53).
1571.Sir John Branche. Grandson of John Wylkynson (Alderman, Sheriff 1519–20). For his fracas with Sir Thomas Lodge see Sir J. Baddeley's Aldermen of Cripplegate Ward, p. 231.
1573.Sir Edward Osborne. Apprentice to Sir William Hewet (Lord Mayor 1559–60), whose daughter he rescued from drowning at London Bridge, and afterwards married. He was great-grandfather of the first Duke of Leeds (the Lord Treasurer Danby of Charles II.'s reign) and ancestor of the present Duke.
1573.Sir Thomas Pullyson. He lived to a great age and fell on evil days; the Court of Aldermen granted him a pension of £40 for life which was continued to his widow. In April, 1616, 28 years after his retirement from the Court of Aldermen, he was reported to be very sick and speechless. His daughter married Richard Wilbraham, Common Serjeant, from which marriage the Earls of Lathom are descended.
1574.Sir Wolstan Dixie. Son-in-law of Sir Christopher Draper (Lord Mayor 1566–7) and founder of Market Bosworth Grammar School.
1574.William Kympton. He was imprisoned and fined 500 marks for misprision of treason in concealing a letter from the Vicar of Hadley informing him of a riot.
1574.Gerard Gore. Father of Sir John Gore (Lord Mayor 1624–5), William Gore (Alderman, Sheriff 1615–6) and Richard Gore, M.P. for the City 1604–11.
1574.Sir George Barne. Son of Sir George Barne (Lord Mayor 1552–3) and brother-in-law of Sir Francis Walsingham, Secretary of State to Queen Elizabeth. His daughter married the first Lord Aungier of Longford.
1576.Francis Bowyer. His daughter married Sir William Spencer of Yarnton, and their daughter married Sir Henry Montagu, Lord Chief Justice and Lord High Treasurer, created Earl of Manchester, and was mother of the 2nd Earl (the celebrated Parliamentarian General) from whom the Dukes of Manchester are descended.
1576.Thomas Starkye. His first wife was daughter of Sir Alexander Avenon (Lord Mayor 1569–70) and his second of Sir William Alleyn (Lord Mayor 1571–2).
1578.Sir George Bonde. Son-in-law of Sir Thomas Leigh (Lord Mayor 1558–9). Through one daughter he was ancestor of Viscount Melbourne, the first Prime Minister of Queen Victoria, and through another of the Dukes of Marlborough, Lord Randolph Churchill, Mr. Winston Churchill and the later Dukes of Leeds.
1578.Sir Richard Martin. His daughter married Sir Julius Cæsar (Chancellor of the Exchequer and Master of the Rolls, temp. King James I.). He was removed from his Aldermanry in 1602 on account of his 'unfitting demeanour and carriage.' See Overall Remembrancia, p. 4.
1580.Sir John Harte. One of the chief founders of the East India Company. His eldest daughter married Sir George Bolles (Lord Mayor 1617–8) and his second Humphrey Smith (Alderman, Sheriff 1629–30).
1581.Sir William Webbe. Son-in-law of Sir Christopher Draper (Lord Mayor 1566–7) and uncle of Archbishop Laud.
1583.Sir John Spencer. He bought Crosby Place from the heirs of William Bonde (Alderman, Sheriff 1567–8). His daughter (his only child) eloped with Lord Compton, afterwards Earl of Northampton. According to the legend she escaped from her father's house, secreted in a baker's basket. From her marriage the Marquesses of Northampton, Bishop Compton of London and two Prime Ministers (the Earl of Wilmington and Spencer Perceval) were descended.
1584.Sir Stephen Slanye. His daughter was mother of Sir Stephen Lennard, 1st Baronet of West Wickham.
1585.Sir Henry Billingsley. The first translator of Euclid's Elements of Geometry into English. His second wife was daughter of Sir Christopher Draper (Lord Mayor 1556–7).
1586.Henry Prannell. His widow, daughter of the 3rd Viscount Bindon, was married after his death to the Earl of Hertford (son of the Protector Somerset) and later to the 1st Duke of Richmond and Lennox.
1586.William Elkyn. Son-in-law of Thomas Wylkes (Alderman 1538–9).
1588.Hugh Offley. Brother of Sir Thomas Offley (Lord Mayor 1556–7) and son-inlaw of Robert Hardyng (Alderman, Sheriff 1568).
1588.Sir Richard Saltonstall. He had a family of 7 sons and 9 daughters. His eldest son was ancestor of the Earls of Guilford; one of his daughters married Sir Thomas Myddelton (Lord Mayor 1613–14), another was mother of Sir Peter Wyche, Ambassador to Constantinople.
1589.John Dent. His widow married Sir Julius Cæsar, Chancellor of the Exchequer and Master of the Rolls, whose first wife was daughter of Sir Richard Martin (Lord Mayor 1589, 1594). His daughter married Sir Henry Savile, Bart., of Methley, whose half-brother was ancestor of the Earls of Mexborough.
1589.Sir Stephen Soame. His eldest son, Sir William, was grandfather of Sir William, created a baronet in 1685. He was also father of Sir Stephen (Alderman 1626–7) and Sir Thomas (Alderman, Sheriff 1635–6). His daughter married Sir Anthony Abdy, Bart., son of Anthony Abdy (Alderman, Sheriff 1630–1).
1589.Sir Nicholas Mosley. Father of Sir Edward Mosley, Attorney of the Court of Wards, and of Rowland Mosley, whose son Edward was created a Baronet. The present Sir Oswald Mosley, Bart., of Ancoats, is descended from the Alderman's brother Anthony. The Alderman was also ancestor of the Earls of Buckinghamshire and of Stamford.
1590.Robert Wythens. Ancestor of Sir Francis Wythens, Judge of the King's Bench in the reigns of Charles II. and James II.
1591.Sir William Ryder. He is said to have made the first pair of stockings knitted of woollen yarn in England. His eldest daughter married Sir Thomas Lake, Secretary of State to James I., from which marriage Viscount Lake, the Indian General, and the 2nd and 3rd Dukes of Chandos were descended.
1591.Benedict Barnham. Son of Francis Barnham (Alderman, Sheriff 1570–1). His second daughter married Francis Bacon ('Lord Bacon') her elder sister being the first wife of the infamous Mervin, Earl of Castlehaven. Barnham's widow married successively after his death Sir John Pakington, K.B., the 1st Viscount Kilmorey and the 1st Earl of Kellie, being the fourth wife of each of the two peers.
1592.John Robinson. His grandson, Luke Robinson, was a prominent member of the 'Rump' Parliament, and one of the Council of State in the early part of 1660.
1592.Sir John Garrarde. Son of Sir William Garrarde (Lord Mayor 1555–6). His son Sir John was created a Baronet and was father of Sir Samuel (Lord Mayor 1709–10).
1593.Paul Bayning. Brother of Andrew Bayning (Alderman 1605) and father of Paul, created Viscount Bayning.
1593.Sir Robert Lee. Son-in-law of Sir James Hawes (Lord Mayor 1574–5). His widow married Sir Thomas Gerard, Bart., of Bryn, ancestor by his former wife of the Lords Gerard. He was father of Sir Henry Lee (Alderman 1614) and father-in-law of William Gore (Alderman, Sheriff 1615–6).
1594.Sir Thomas Bennett. Father of Sir Simon Bennett, Bart. His elder brother Richard was father of Thomas Bennett (Alderman, Sheriff 1613–4).
1594.Sir Thomas Lowe. His eldest daughter married Sir Robert Lee, son of Sir Robert Lee (Lord Mayor 1602–3). Their daughter married Lord Seymour of Trowbridge. A younger daughter of Sir Thomas married Sir John Garrarde, 1st Bart., son of Sir John (Lord Mayor 1601–2), and a niece was second wife of Lord Keeper Coventry.
1594.Sir Leonard Halliday. His widow became the second wife of Sir Henry Montagu, Recorder of London, afterwards Earl of Manchester, Lord Chief Justice and Lord High Treasurer.
1594.Richard Staper. He is described on his monument in St. Helen's, Bishopsgate, as 'the greatest merchant in his tyme, the chiefest actor in discoveri of the trades of Turkey and East India.'
1594.Sir John Watts. Son-in-law of Sir James Hawes (Lord Mayor 1574–5). He served as a volunteer in the fleet against the Spanish Armada. His youngest daughter married Sir Henry Appleton, Bart.
1595.Sir Richard Goddard. He married the widow of Giles Garton (Alderman 1588–9); she, after his death, married William Walthall (Alderman, Sheriff 1606–7).
1590.Sir Henry Rowe. Son of Sir Thomas Rowe (Lord Mayor 1568–9) and grandson of Sir John Gresham (Lord Mayor 1547–8), ancestor of the Marquesses of Downshire through the marriage of his great-great-granddaughter to the 1st Viscount Hillsborough. His daughter married William Hollidaie (Alderman, Sheriff 1617–8).
1596.Robert Chamberlain. His widow married the 1st Viscount Wenman.
1596.Oliver Style. Grandson of Sir Thomas Baldry (Lord Mayor 1523–4), father of Sir Thomas Style, created a Baronet (ancestor of the present Baronet) and brother of Nicholas Style (Alderman, Sheriff 1607–8).
1597.Sir Robert Hampson. Father of Thomas Hampson, created a Baronet, from whom the present Baronet descends.
1598.Sir Humphrey Weld. Son-in-law of Sir Stephen Slanye (Lord Mayor 1595–6), and ancestor of the Welds of Lulworth.
1598.Sir Christopher Hoddesdon. His wife was step-daughter of Sir Francis Walsingham, Queen Elizabeth's Secretary of State, and grand-daughter of Sir George Barne (Lord Mayor 1552–3). His daughter married Sir John Leigh of Stoneleigh, and was mother of the first Lord Leigh. He accompanied Chancellor in his two voyages to Russia.
1599.William Quarles. Brother-in-law of Sir John Allott (Lord Mayor 1590–1). His widow married Sir Henry Lee (Alderman 1614).
1599.Sir Thomas Smythe (or Smith). Grandson of Sir Andrew Judde (Lord Mayor 1550–1), and uncle of the first Viscount Strangford. His widow married the first Earl of Leicester of the Sydney line. His name is written 'Smith' on his monument at Sutton-at-Hone, Kent, but the Strangford family preferred 'Smythe.' His grandson, Robert, married the Dowager Countess of Sunderland, Waller's 'Saccharissa.' His last male descendant was Sir Sidney Stafford Smythe, Baron of the Exchequer in George III.'s reign.
1599.Sir Thomas Cambell. Brother of Robert Cambell (Alderman 1597), and father of Sir James Cambell (Lord Mayor 1629–30) and Robert Cambell (Sheriff 1630–1). Three of his seven daughters married Aldermen, viz: Sir John Gore (Lord Mayor 1624–5), Sir Christopher Clitherow (Lord Mayor 1635–6), and Anthony Abdy (Sheriff 1630–1).
1600.Sir William Craven. Brother-in-law of Sir George Whitmore (Lord Mayor 1631–2) and father of the first Earl Craven and of Lord Craven of Ryton, the founder of the Craven Scholarships at Oxford and Cambridge. His daughters married respectively Lord Powis, father of the Jacobite Marquis of Powis and the second Lord Coventry, by whom she was mother of the first and fourth Earls of Coventry.
1601.Sir Henry Anderson. Son-in-law of Francis Bowyer (Alderman, Sheriff 1577–8), and grandfather of Henry Anderson, created a Baronet. His eldest daughter was mother of Sir Thomas Dereham, Bart., the third married the second Viscount Kilmorey, but died before he succeeded to the title, the fourth was wife of Sir Charles Wilmot, created Viscount Wilmot, by which marriage she was grandmother of the profligate Earl of Rochester, the youngest married Sir John Spencer, Bart., of Offley.
1602.Sir James Pemberton. He founded a free school at Eccleston.
1602.Sir John Swynnerton. His grand-daughter married Sir William Dyer, 1st Baronet, and was ancestress of the succeeding Baronets of the family.
1602.Sir William Romeney. Son-in-law of Robert Taylor (Alderman, Sheriff 1592–3). His elder daughter married John Weld, Town Clerk of London (nephew of Sir Humphrey Weld, Lord Mayor 1608–9).
1603.Sir Thomas Middleton (or Myddelton). He did not accept the Aldermanry until after committal to Newgate for refusing. The third Welsh Lord Mayor. Brother of Sir Hugh Myddelton, Bart., the designer of the New River, and son-in-law of Sir Richard Saltonstall (Lord Mayor 1597–8). His son, Sir Thomas, was the well-known parliamentary commander in the Civil War.
1603.Sir Thomas Hayes. Son-in-law of Robert Howse (Alderman, Sheriff 1586–7). His daughter married Sir Henry Boothby, 1st Baronet, and was ancestress of the succeeding Baronets.
1604.John Eldred. The well-known traveller, father of Sir Rivett Eldred, Bart.
1604.Sir Roger Jones. Brother of Thomas Jones, Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor of Ireland, who was father of the first Viscount Ranelagh. He married a sister of Sir Cuthbert Hacket (Lord Mayor 1626–7).
1604.Sir James Deane. Son-in-law of Hugh Offley (Alderman, Sheriff 1588–9).
1605.Sir William Herrick. Uncle of Robert Herrick, the poet. His wife was a sister of Sir Humphrey May, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and also of the wives of Sir Baptist Hicks (Alderman 1611), afterwards Viscount Campden, and of Thomas Bennett (Alderman, Sheriff 1613–4).
1605.William Walthall. Brother of Thomas Walthall (Alderman 1611). His fourth and last wife had previously been married to two Aldermen, Giles Garton (1588–9), and Sir Richard Goddard (Sheriff 1596–7).
1605.Sir John Leman. One of the few bachelor Lord Mayors, uncle of William Leman (Alderman 1649, 1653), who was created a Baronet. He founded a free school at Beccles.
1605.Sir William Bond. Son of Sir George Bond (Lord Mayor 1587–8). He refused at first to accept his Aldermanry and was committed to Newgate 'till he conform himself.'
1605.Geoffrey Elwes. Cousin of Sir Gervase Elwes, Lieutenant of the Tower, who was executed for his complicity in the murder of Sir Thomas Overbury. Father of Sir Gervase (Alderman 1629), whose son Gervase was created a Baronet, and of Jeremy (Alderman 1651).
1607.Sir George Bolles. Son-in-law of Sir John Harte (Lord Mayor 1589–90), father of Sir John Bolles, 1st Baronet and father-in-law of Humphrey Smith (Alderman, Sheriff 1629–30). He is said, when Lord Mayor, to have stopped the royal carriages in their progress through the City during divine service on a Sunday, to the amazement of James I. who remarked that he had thought there was no king in England besides himself. He was a native of Gosberton in Lincolnshire, which was also the birthplace of Sir T. B. Crosby (Lord Mayor 1911–2).
1607.Richard Farrington. Brother-in-law of Sir Stephen Soame (Lord Mayor 1598–9).
1609.Henry Smith (or Smyth). He left sums for the relief of the poor in Croydon, Kingston, Guildford, Dorking, Farnham, Reigate and Wandsworth. Fuller writes of him: 'Being now to relate the bounty of this worthy person, I am afraid that an infidel age will not give credit thereunto, as conceiving it rather a romance or fiction than a thing really performed.'
1609.Sir Sebastian Harvey. Son of Sir James Harvye (Lord Mayor 1581–2).
1609.Sir William Cokayne. See his funeral sermon by Dr. Donne in Wilford's Memorials, pp. 292, 293. His widow married the first Earl of Dover. His son was created Viscount Cullen. His eldest surviving daughter married the second Earl of Nottingham of the Howard line; his second, Sir Hatton Fermor, Bart., by which marriage she was ancestress of the Earls of Pomfret; the third, the Earl of Holdernesse and afterwards the second Earl of Lindsey, by whom she was ancestress of the Dukes and Earls of Ancaster; the fourth, Viscount Fanshawe, and the fifth, the second Earl of Dover, her mother's stepson. Payne Fisher (Tombs in St. Paul's Cathedral) says of Cokayne that 'his spreading boughs and fair branches have given both shade and shelter to some of the goodliest families in England.'
1610.Richard Pyot. Father-in-law of Sir Robert Ducye (Lord Mayor 1630–1).
1610.Sir Edward Barkham. Father of Sir Edward Barkham, first Baronet of Southacre, and grandfather of Sir Edward Barkham, first Baronet of Wainfleet. His daughter Susanna, by her marriage with Robert Walpole, was great-grandmother of Sir Robert Walpole, the Prime Minister, first Earl of Orford; another daughter, Margaret, married Sir Anthony Irby, ancestor by another wife of the Lord Boston.
1611.George Smythes. His widow married Sir Arthur Savage.
1611.Sir Baptist Hicks. Created Viscount Campden, ancestor of the Earl of Gainsborough. He built Hicks Hall (the Session House for the Middlesex Magistrates). His brother, Sir Michael Hicks, was ancestor of Viscount St. Aldwyn. His second daughter was grandmother of the first Earl of Essex of the present line.
1611.Brian Ianson. Father of Sir Brian Ianson, first Baronet.
1611.George Huxley. His widow married the first Viscount Kilmorey.
1612.Alexander Prescott. He married a niece of Sir James Pemberton (Lord Mayor 1611–2). A grand-daughter married Sir William Leman, first Baronet (Alderman 1649, 1653).
1613.Thomas Bennet. Nephew of Sir Thomas Bennet (Lord Mayor 1603–4), and brother-in-law of Sir Humphrey May, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. His son Thomas was created a Baronet, one of his daughters married Henry Rolle (Chief Justice), and another was the first wife of Bulstrode Whitelocke, the writer of the Memorials. His elder brother was ancestor of the Earls of Tankerville, the Earl of Arlington of the 'Cabal' and the second and succeeding Dukes of Grafton.
1613.Henry Jeye. Father-in-law of Sir Edward Nicholas, Secretary of State to Charles II.
1614.Sir Henry Lee. Son of Sir Robert Lee (Lord Mayor 1602–3). His first wife was daughter of Richard Gourney (Alderman, Sheriff 1589–90); his second was sister of Sir John Allott (Lord Mayor 1590–1), and widow of William Quarles (Alderman 1599).
1614.Sir Peter Proby. Ancestor of the Earls of Carysfort. Chamberlain, in a letter to Alice Carleton, says he had been 'Secretary Walsingham's barber.' He owed his rise to the patronage of Sir Thomas Heneage, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.
1614.Sir Martin Lumley. Grandson of a Genoese who settled in England temp. Henry VIII. Father of Sir Martin Lumley, first Baronet.
1615.William Gore. 5th son of Gerard Gore (Alderman 1574), younger brother of Sir John Gore (Lord Mayor 1624–5), and son-in-law of Sir Robert Lee (Lord Mayor 1602–3). His widow married Sir John Coke, Secretary of State.
1615.Sir John Gore. 4th son of Gerard Gore (see preceding note). By his second wife, a daughter of Sir Thomas Cambell (Lord Mayor 1609–10), he was ancestor of the Gore-Langton family, represented by the present Earl Temple. His eldest daughter married John Cotton (Alderman 1649).
1616.Sir Allan Cotton. Brother of William Cotton (Alderman 1607), and father of John Cotton (Alderman 1649).
1616.Sir Cuthbert Hacket. Brother-in-law of Sir Roger Jones (Alderman, Sheriff 1604–5). His daughter, by her marriage with Sir Thomas Dawes, was grandmother of Sir William Dawes, Bart., Archbishop of York. His son, Roger, an eloquent divine, is the subject of a notice in the Dictionary of National Biography.
1617.William Halliday (rectius Hollidaie). Son-in-law of Sir Henry Rowe (Lord Mayor 1607–8). His widow married the second Earl of Warwick of the Rich line. His daughters married respectively Sir Henry Mildmay, Master of the Jewel Office, and Sir Edward Hungerford, K.B.
1618.Richard Herne. Grandfather of Nicholas Herne (Alderman 1657), Sir Nathaniel Herne (Alderman, Sheriff 1674–5), and Sir Joseph Herne (Alderman 1686–7).
1620.Sir Richard Deane. Father-in-law of William Methold (Alderman 1647) and Robert Myldmay (Alderman 1626).
1620.Sir James Cambell. Son of Sir Thomas Cambell (Lord Mayor 1609–10), brother of Robert Cambell (Alderman 1597).
1620.Sir Robert Ducye. Son-in-law of Richard Pyot (Alderman, Sheriff 1610–1). His son was created Viscount Downe and his grand-daughter, by her marriage with Edward Moreton, was mother of Matthew Ducie-Moreton, created Lord Ducie, and of Elizabeth, ancestress by her marriage with Francis Reynolds of the Earls of Ducie.
1621.Sir George Whitmore. Grandson of William Bond (Alderman, Sheriff 1567–8) brother-in-law of Sir William Craven (Lord Mayor 1610–1) and father-in-law of Sir John Robinson (Lord Mayor 1662–3). His elder brother, Sir William, was ancestor of the Whitmores of Apley. He was a strong supporter of Charles I. against the Parliamentarians and was imprisoned as a 'delinquent.'
1621.Sir William Tirrey. Son-in-law of Henry Wollaston (Alderman 1612).
1621.Sir Nicholas Rainton. He was one of the four Aldermen (the others being J. Gayre, T. Soame and T. Atkyn) who were committed to the Tower in May 1640 for refusing to make lists of the inhabitants of their Wards able to contribute £50 or more to a loan for the service of Charles I. Though opposed to the King on this occasion Soame and Gayre were subsequently ejected from their Aldermanries for their Royalist sympathies.
1621.Richard Cocks. His elder son was ancestor of the Earls Somers and of the present Lord Somers; the younger, Richard, was created a Baronet.
1622.William Ferrers. His daughter married Sir Arthur Ingram, and was mother of Sir Thomas Ingram, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.
1622.Henry Parkhurst. Elder brother of Sir Robert Parkhurst (Lord Mayor 1634–5).
1622.John Hodges. His widow married (being the 4th of his seven wives) Sir Gervase Clifton, Bart.
1622.Thomas Marsham. Father of Sir John Marsham, first Baronet and ancestor of the Earls of Romney.
1622.Ralph Freeman. His daughter married Lord Sondes, afterwards Earl of Feversham.
1623.Sir Thomas Moulson. Son-in-law of Anthony Ratclyffe (Alderman, Sheriff 1585–6), brother-in-law of Sir Nicholas Rainton (Lord Mayor 1632–3), and uncle of Sir Edward Turner, Speaker of the House of Commons.
1624.Thomas Overman. Brother-in-law of Sir Edward Bromfield (Lord Mayor 1636–7).
1624.Rowland Heylin. A Welshman. He caused the Bible to be printed in Welsh 'in a more portable bulk' (Stow, ed. Munday, 1633).
1625.George Chetham. Brother of Humphrey Chetham of Manchester, the founder of the Chetham Library there.
1625.Thomas Westrow. His daughter married Sir Norton Knatchbull, first Baronet, and was ancestress of the succeeding Baronets and of the Lords Brabourne.
1625.Ellis Crispe. Father (by his first wife) of Sir Nicholas Crisp, Bart. His nieces (daughters of his brother Nicholas) married respectively Sir Thomas Cullum (Alderman, Sheriff 1646–7) and Sir Abraham Reynardson (Lord Mayor 1648–9). His widow married Sir Walter Pye, Attorney of the Court of Wards.
1626.Sir Christopher Clitherow. Son-in-law of Sir Thomas Cambell (Lord Mayor 1609–10). His daughter married Sir Thomas Trollope, first Baronet, the ancestor by an earlier wife of the Lords Kesteven.
1626.Gideon Delaune. A native of Rheims. His relation, Thomas Delaune (Present State of London, Ed. 1681, p. 329) says that he had 'thirty-seven children by one wife,' and that 'his famous pill is in great request to this day,' The number of his children is here considerably exaggerated. He had only seventeen, few of whom lived to maturity.
1626.Sir John Hanbury. Ancestor of the Lords Bateman of the present creation.
1826.Sir Edward Bromfield. His eldest son John was created a Baronet, and his daughter married Sir Henry Hudson, first Baronet.
1626.Sir Richard Fenn. Son-in-law of James Collymore (Alderman 1610).
1626.George Buswell. Father of Sir George Buswell, Bart.
1626.Robert Myldmay. Son-in-law of Sir Richard Deane (Lord Mayor 1628–9).
1626.Sir Stephen Soame. Son of Sir Stephen Soame (Lord Mayor 1598–9) and brother of Sir Thomas Soame (Alderman, Sheriff 1635–6). His son Peter succeeded to his cousin's Baronetcy.
1626.Sir Morris Abbot. Brother of George Abbot, Archbishop of Canterbury, and of Robert Abbot, Bishop of Salisbury; son-in-law of Bartholomew Barnes (Alderman 1599).
1627.Sir Henry Garaway. Son of Sir William Garaway, Farmer of the Customs, nephew of Sir Henry Anderson (Alderman, Sheriff 1601–2) and ancestor, through his daughter, of Viscount Melbourne, the Prime Minister.
1627.Thomas Morley. Brother-in-law of William Sebright, Town Clerk.
1627.Sir Henry Rowe. Son of Sir Henry Rowe (Lord Mayor 1607–8) and grandson of Sir Thomas Rowe (Lord Mayor 1568–9).
1627.William Wollaston. Son of Henry Wollaston (Alderman 1612) and brother-in-law of Sir William Tirrey (Alderman 1621).
1627.Rowland Backhouse. Son of Nicholas Backhouse (Alderman, Sheriff 1577–8). His grandson, William Backhouse, was created a Baronet.
1627.John Chamberlain. He was fined £300 for neglecting his duties as Alderman after being sworn, January 7, 1628, and committed to Newgate in default of payment. The Court of King's Bench having declined to release him when brought before it on a writ of habeas corpus in May, he on November 11 following came before the Court of Aldermen and made submission, when his fine was reduced to 100 marks and 50 shillings in fees to officials.
1628.William Mott. Father-in-law of Sir Thomas Foot (Lord Mayor 1649–50).
1628.Sir William Acton. (fn. 3) His daughter and sole heiress married Sir Thomas Whitmore, Bart., nephew of Sir George Whitmore (Lord Mayor 1631–2).
1629.Humphrey Smith. Son-in-law of Sir George Bolles (Lord Mayor 1617–8).
1629.Sir Gervais Elwes. Son of Geoffrey Elwes (Alderman, Sheriff 1607–8) and father of Sir Gervais Elwes, created a Baronet, ancestor of the succeeding Baronets and of John Elwes, the miser. His wife was grand-daughter of Sir Robert Lee (Lord Mayor 1602–3).
1629.Robert Bateman. Father of four Aldermen—Richard (1648), Sir Anthony (Lord Mayor 1663–4), Sir William (1657), Sir Thomas (1662).
1629.Sir Edmund Wright. His three daughters married respectively Sir James Harrington, Bart., (one of the High Court of Justice before which Charles I. was tried), Sir Richard Atkyns, Bart., and Sir Robert Cordell, Bart.
1631.Anthony Abdy. Son-in-law of Sir Thomas Cambell (Lord Mayor 1609–10) and brother-in-law of Sir James Cambell (Lord Mayor 1629–30). Baronetcies were conferred on each of his three sons, Thomas, Robert and John, all of which have become extinct, but the present Sir Anthony Abdy, Bart., is descended through a female ancestor from Sir Thomas.
1631.Robert Cambell. Younger son of Sir Thomas Cambell (Lord Mayor 1609–10) and brother of Sir James Cambell (Lord Mayor 1629–30). His younger son Thomas Cambell was created a Baronet and a similar honour was conferred on John Cambell, son of his elder son James. Through a grand-daughter he was ancestor of Viscount St. Aldwyn.
1632.Samuel Cranmer. 'The last male heir of the eldest of Archbishop Cranmer's sons' [Sir J. Baddeley, Aldermen of Cripplegate Ward, p. 62]. His only daughter married Sir Anthony Chester, Bart., whose uncle, Sir Henry Chester, K.B., was the second husband of her mother, the Alderman's widow (a sister of Thomas Wood, Bishop of Lichfield).
1632.Hugh Perry. His widow married Lord Newburgh. Jane Perry, wife of the second Lord Fitzwilliam and mother of the first Earl Fitzwilliam and of Jane, who married Sir Christopher Wren, is 'generally said' to have been a daughter of the Alderman [G. E. C.'s Complete Peerage, iii., 380]. This, however, is doubtful. Three daughters, Mary, Catherine and Rebecca married respectively Sirs Edward Stradling, William Fermor and Robert Bindlosse, Baronets, the second being ancestress of the Earls of Pomfret.
1634.Sir Richard Gurney. A sturdy Cavalier, removed from the Mayoralty and impeached by the House of Commons for publishing the King's commission of array. He refused to give up the City's sword to anyone but the King. His daughter married the second Lord Cramond.
1635.John Cordell. His son Robert was created a Baronet. Both Cordell and Sir Thomas Soame were passed over for the Mayoralty on account of their Royalist sympathies.
1635.Sir Thomas Soame. Son of Sir Stephen Soame (Lord Mayor 1598–9). He was one of the six Aldermen restored to their seats at the Restoration, having been removed by the Parliamentarians. The others were Sirs T. Adams, A. Reynardson, J. Langham, J. Bunce, R. Browne.
1636.Sir John Gayer. Uncle of Sir John Gayer, Governor of Bombay. One of his daughters married Sir Robert Abdy, Bart. (son of Anthony Abdy, Alderman and Sheriff 1630–1), another Sir Andrew Henley, Bart. He instituted the 'Lion' sermon at St. Katherine Cree Church. See Wilford's Memorials, pp. 450–452.
1636.William Abell. He was specially obnoxious to the London Commons as a 'projector' of the 40s. duty on wine, and was attacked in many pamphlets and broadsides. He retired to Holland in 1655, and nothing later is known of him.
1638.Sir Thomas Atkyn. One of the leaders of the parliamentary party in the City, and the object of several Cavalier lampoons, many of them being very coarse, e.g., 'Upon Alderman Atkins . . . . on the great Training day,' (Rump Songs, i., 136). The unpleasant incident there related is frequently referred to in that collection (ii., 54, 58, 72, 103). Nothing is known of his history after the Restoration. He was nominated one of the Court for the trial of Charles I., but did not act.
1639.Isaac Penington. A leader of the parliamentary party in the City, and one of the Court for trying Charles I., but he absented himself from the final sitting and did not sign the death warrant. He resigned his Aldermanry on account of financial reverses. Of his three sons two were Quakers and one a Romanist Priest. (fn. 4)
1639.Sir Thomas Adams. See his funeral sermon by Nathaniel Hardy in Wilford's Memorials, where he is described as 'the Darling of the City: in the Court of Aldermen he was as an Oracle.' He endowed the Arabic professorship at Cambridge and founded a school at Wem. He was a sturdy cavalier and spent considerable sums in aid of the cause. Fuller (Worthies, iii., 67) says of him 'A man who hath drunk of the bitter waters of Meribah without making a bad face thereat, cheerfully submitting himself to God's pleasure in all conditions.'
1640.Sir Abraham Reynardson. A leading Royalist. He was deprived of the Mayoralty and of his Aldermanry for refusing to proclaim the abolition of the Monarchy and the House of Lords.
1641.Sir Thomas Lawley. His widow married Chief Justice Glynne.
1641.Sir George Clarke. Son-in-law of Robert Palmer (Alderman 1625), father of Sir George Clarke, Bart., and father-in-law of Lord Chief Baron Sir Robert Atkyns.
1642.Sir John Langham. Brother-in-law of Sir James Bunce (Alderman, Sheriff 1643-4). His daughter married Sir Martin Lumley, 2nd Baronet (grandson of Sir Martin Lumley, Lord Mayor 1623–4). He was deprived of his Aldermanry, together with the other Cavalier Aldermen, Reynardson, Adams, Bunce and Gayer, in 1649, after the execution of Charles I. He had refused to accept election when first chosen Alderman until after imprisonment in Newgate for contumacy.
1642.Sir Thomas Andrewes. One of the leaders of the parliamentarian party in the City. He sat on the Court which tried Charles I., and was present when sentence was pronounced, but did not sign the warrant.
1642.Sir Hugh Wyndham. Grandson of Richard Chamberlain (Alderman, Sheriff 1562-3).
1642.John Fowke. A leading civic parliamentarian who had been imprisoned for refusing to pay tunnage and poundage. He was named a member of the Court of Justice for trying Charles I., but did not act.
1642.Sir James Bunce. Brother-in-law of Sir John Langham (Alderman, Sheriff 1642-3). For an anecdote illustrating his conscientiousness see Fuller's Worthies (ed. Nuttall), i., 522. He was a staunch Royalist.
1642.Richard Chambers. He was imprisoned by the Star Chamber for refusing to pay tunnage and poundage, and later refused to pay ship money until after commitment. He appears to have been a cantankerous person, as he subsequently became a martyr on the other side, being deprived of his Aldermanry, together with Sir Thomas Soame, for refusing to attend the proclamation of the establishment of the Commonwealth. Like the proverbial Irishman he was usually 'agin the Government.'
1643.Samuel Warner. He was committed to Newgate for refusing to accept election as Alderman, but surrendered the following day.
1643.Sir Thomas Foot. His three daughters married respectively Sir John Cutler, Arthur Onslow and John Lewys, Baronets, of whom the first and third were Aldermen. His wife was daughter of William Mott (Alderman 1628). His Baronetcy descended under special limitation to his son-in-law, Arthur Onslow, father of the first Lord Onslow (who was Speaker of the House of Commons), grandfather of the more celebrated Speaker, Arthur Onslow, and ancestor of the Earls Onslow.
1646.Sir Thomas Vyner. Uncle of Sir Robert Vyner (Lord Mayor 1674–5). His first wife was sister of the wife of Sir Frances Bickley (Alderman 1649), the second was sister of Sir William Humble (Alderman 1651), and the third was widow of John Perryn (Alderman 1657).
1647.William Methold. Nephew of Sir William Methold, Lord Chief Baron of Exchequer (Ireland) and son-in-law of Sir Richard Deane (Lord Mayor 1628–9). He was the first Englishman to visit the diamond mines of Golconda.
1617.Sir Christopher Pack. He was the proposer of the Humble Petition and Advice, urging Cromwell to accept the Kingship. His second wife was daughter of Simon Edmonds (Alderman, Sheriff 1646-7) and his third the widow of Michael Herring (Alderman 1651).
1648.Gilbert Morewood. Father-in-law of Sir Thomas Rich (Alderman 1650).
1648.Sir Richard Browne. The well-known Presbyterian General who fought at first for the Parliament and later became an ardent Royalist.
1648.Richard Bateman. Son of Robert Bateman (Alderman 1629, and Chamberlain of the City) and half-brother of Sir William, Sir Anthony and Sir Thomas (all Aldermen). He with his half-brothers failed in business, and in April, 1667, he was granted a pension of 20 shillings per week by the Court of Common Council, being then 'very poor and 74 years of age.' (Journal 46, fo. 152.)
1648.Rowland Wilson. He was nominated one of the Court for the trial of Charles I. but did not act. His widow was the third wife of Bulstrode Whitelock, who has written in appreciative terms of his character (Memorials, i., 223, iii., 158).
1649.Sir John Dethick. His daughter married Sir John Banks, Bart., and his grand-daughter was wife of the 1st Earl of Aylesford.
1649.Nathan Wright. Father of Sir Benjamin Wright, Bart., and uncle of Sir Nathan Wright, Lord Keeper.
1649.John Massingberd. His eldest daughter married the first Earl of Berkely, the second was wife of the third Earl of Lindsey.
1649.Eliab Harvey. Brother of William Harvey, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, and ancestor of Admiral Sir Eliab Harvey, one of Nelson's Captains at Trafalgar.
1649.John Cotton. Second son of Sir Allen Cotton (Lord Mayor 1625–6).
1649.Abraham Chambers. Brother of Richard Chambers (Alderman, Sheriff 1644-5).
1649.William Adams. Brother of Sir Thomas Adams (Lord Mayor 1645–6). He founded a school at Newport, co. Salop. Fuller says of him 'God hath given him a heart and hand proportionable to-his estate.'
1649.John Oldfield. His daughter married George Cooper, brother of the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury (Dryden's 'Achitophel').
1649.Robert Cheslyn (rectius Cheslen). Father-in-law of Sir William Bateman (Alderman 1657).
1649.George Hadley. Son-in-law of Gilbert Harrison, Chamberlain of the City (Alderman, Sheriff 1633–4). His daughter married Admiral Herbert, created Earl of Torrington.
1649.Sir Hugh Smithson. Ancestor of the Dukes of Northumberland.
1649.Sir Robert Tichborne. One of the regicides. He and Sir John Ireton are described in a Royalist pamphlet as 'the two City Jugglers' [Harleian Miscellany, iii., 484]. There is a memoir of him by C. Dalton in the Antiquary, vol. 15, pp. 191-194. After the Restoration he was imprisoned for life, and died in the Tower. He is referred to in Rump Songs (i., 341) as having 'a beardless chin,' and (ii., 82) 'Titchborn could preach, pray and prate by the Spirit.'
1649.Sir Richard Chiverton. He is described in a MS. written between January and April, 1672, when he was the senior Alderman, and first printed in Gentleman's Magazine for November, 1769, pp. 515-517, as 'old, capable of doeing neither much goode nor hurt.'
1649.Thomas Witherings. For his work at the Post Office see Hyde's Early History of the Post Office, chapters 1-6, where it is justly said of him (p. 214) that 'from the point of view of work done, he has some claim to be regarded as an early Rowland Hill: it was he who first organized the inland posts generally in Britain for the use of the public.' It is surprising that the Dictionary of National Biography has no notice of him.
1649.Mark Hildesley. Great-grandfather of Mark Hildesley, the successor of Bishop Wilson in the see of Sodor and Man.
1649.Francis Allen. One of the regicides. He is referred to in Rump Songs, i., 306, ('Upon Oliver dissolving the Parliament in 1653.')—
'Allen, the Coppersmith, was in great fear, He did much harm since the war began: A broken citizen many a year, And now he's a broken Parliament-man.'
1649.John Langley. He became poor in his old age and had a pension of £20 per annum granted him by the Court of Common Council, October 10th, 1679 (Journal 49, fo. 68b.). He was son-in-law of Richard Middleton (Alderman 1649), and his daughter married Sir Hans Sloane, the celebrated Physician, whose collections formed the nucleus of the British Museum.
1650.Joseph Brand. Father-in-law of Sir John Morden, the founder of Morden College, Blackheath.
1650.John Mayo. He refused to accept the office of Alderman and was committed to Newgate for contumacy.
1650.Edmund Harvey. He was partner in business with Edmund Sleigh (Alderman, Sheriff 1654–5), a Colonel in the parliamentarian army and a member of the Court which tried Charles I., but though present at every meeting did not sign the death warrant. After the Restoration he was imprisoned in Pendennis Castle. See 'case of Edmund Harvey' in Somers Tracts, vii., 454.
1650.Henry Box. Was committed to Newgate, March 21, 1650 (Rep. 60, fo. 93), for refusing to accept office as Alderman. He was not sworn till August 15.
1650.James Smith. Father of Sir John Smith (Alderman, Sheriff 1669–70).
1650.Sir George Wynn. Brother of Rowland Wynn (Alderman 1656), son-in-law of Robert Jeffereyes (Alderman 1629) and ancestor of the Lords Headley and St. Oswald.
1650.Robert Lowther. Grandfather of Sir William Lowther, 1st Bart. of Marske, and brother of Sir John Lowther, ancestor of the Earls of Lonsdale.
1650.Sir Thomas Rich. Son-in-law of Gilbert Morewood (Alderman 1648). The King (Charles II.) recommended him (May 5, 1662) for election to succeed one of the two Aldermen removed by the Commissioners for regulating the Corporation, but he was not chosen and probably declined nomination. [Overall Remembrancia, p. 64.]
1650.Sir Robert Smyth. His second son was Sir James Smyth (Lord Mayor 1684-5).
1651.Thomas Bromfield. His daughter was second wife of Sir Andrew Henley, Bart., whose first wife was daughter of Sir John Gayer (Lord Mayor 1646–7).
1651.Sir Theophilus Biddulph. Son-in-law of Zachary Highlord (Alderman 1648).
1651.Thomas Hodges. Son of John Hodges (Alderman, Sheriff 1622–3) and son-in-law of Alexander Prescott (Alderman, Sheriff 1612–3).
1651.Sir John Cutler. The celebrated miser, pilloried (perhaps rather unjustly) in Pope's Moral Essays, Epistle iii. He was son-in-law of Sir Thomas Foot (Lord Mayor 1649–50.) (fn. 5) One of his daughters married the second Earl of Radnor of the Robartes line, and another Sir William Portman, Bart. It is of him that Arbuthnot relates the anecdote that his black worsted stockings were darned so often with silk that they became a pair of silk stockings.
1651.Sir William Cowper. Grandson (fn. 6) of John Cowper (Alderman, Sheriff 1551–2), great-grandfather of the first Earl Cowper (Lord Chancellor) and ancestor of the succeeding Earls and of William Cowper the poet.
1651.Philip Holman. Father of Sir John Holman, Bart.
1651.John Ianson. Son of Brian Ianson (Alderman 1611) and brother of Sir Brian Ianson, 1st Bart.
1651.Thomas Essington. Grandson of Sir Thomas Hayes (Lord Mayor 1614–5).
1651.William Barker. Younger son of Sir Robert Barker, K.B., and father of Sir William Barker, Bart.
1651.Robert Johnson. Nephew of Robert Johnson (Alderman, Sheriff 1617–8).
1651.Thomas Smithsby. Saddler to Charles I.
1651.Maximilian Bard. Brother of the first Viscount Buttevant.
1651.Leonard Hamond. Son-in-law of Randall Manning (Alderman 1604).
1651.Sir Jasper Clayton. Father-in-law of the first Earl of Yarmouth.
1651.William Ridges. Father-in-law of Sir Thomas Davies (Lord Mayor 1676–7).
1651.Thomas Browne. Commonly called 'Ruff Browne.' He died three days after entering his new house in Watling Street to which he had removed from 'Old Street without Cripplegate.' [Smyth's Obituary, p. 98.]
1651.John Ramsey. His daughter married the first Lord Herbert of Cherbury of the second creation.
1651.Sir Henry Pickering. Son-in-law of Sir Thomas Vyner (Lord Mayor 1653–4). He had been a Colonel in the parliamentary army.
1651.John Barker. Son-in-law of Thomas Westrow (Alderman, Sheriff 1625).
1651.Sir William Humble. Brother-in-law of Sir Thomas Vyner (Lord Mayor 1653–4).
1651.John Beresford. Grandson of Ralph Woodcock (Alderman, Sheriff 1580–1).
1651.Thomas Russell. Father-in-law of Sir Anthony Bateman (Lord Mayor 1663–4).
1651.Sir John Ireton. Brother of Henry Ireton, the Parliamentary General, who was Cromwell's son-in-law.
1651.John Ellis. One of the civic leaders of the party in opposition to the Court in Charles II.'s reign.
1651.Jeremy Elwes. Youngest son of Geoffrey Elwes (Alderman, Sheriff 1607–8) and brother of Sir Gervase Elwes (Alderman 1629).
1651.Sir Andrew Riccard. His daughter married successively Lord Kensington, son of the second Earl of Holland, and the first Lord Berkeley of Stratton, by whom she was ancestress of the succeeding Lords.
1651.Michael Herring. His widow became the third wife of Sir Christopher Pack (Lord Mayor 1654–5).
1651.Thomas Heryott. Was committed to Newgate for refusing to accept election as Alderman, Oct. 14, 1651, but was sworn and discharged a week later.
1651.William Gore. Fourth son of Sir John Gore (Lord Mayor 1624–5) and ancestor of the Gore-Langton family, now represented by Earl Temple.
1652.Walter Boothby. Son-in-law of George Witham (Alderman 1645–8) and father-in-law of John Jolliffe (Alderman 1658).
1652.John Lorymer. His daughter married Sir Edwin Sadleir, second and last Baronet.
1652.Martin Browne. Father-in-law of Sir Humphrey Winch, Bart.
1652.Richard Turner. Father of Richard Turner (Alderman 1653) and father-inlaw of Tempest Milner (Alderman, Sheriff 1656–7).
1653.Samuel Moyer. Father of Sir Samuel Moyer, Bart.
1653.Sir Thomas Alleyn. Son of William Alleyn (Alderman 1651). He was Lord Mayor at the time of the Restoration, which he took part in furthering, but he was not regarded as a whole-hearted royalist and he was one of the Aldermen superseded in 1683, when the Charter was suspended. The account of the Aldermen in 1672 (printed in The Gentleman's Magazine for 1769), says of him that 'the ill principles he had before that happie time, it is to be feared he retains still; in the late times he was no great enemy to the renouncing the familie of Stuarts.'
1653.Henry Hunter. Ancestor of Sir Claudius Hunter (Lord Mayor 1811–2).
1653.Sir William Thomson. Son-in-law of Samuel Warner (Alderman 1643–5), father of Sir Samuel Thomson (Alderman, Sheriff 1688), and uncle of the first Lord Haversham.
1653.Edward Ashe. Son-in-law of Christopher Woodward (Alderman 1622), uncle of John Ashe (Alderman 1672), brother of Sir Joseph Ashe, Bart., and ancestor (through the marriage of his grand-daughter to Pierce A'Court) of the Lords Heytesbury.
1653.Sir William Leman. Nephew of Sir John Leman (Lord Mayor 1616–7).
1653.John Pierce. He at first refused to accept election as Alderman but 'obscured himself and refused to be spoken with.' The Serjeant-at-Arms was sent to him Sept. 27, 1653 (Rep. 62, fo. 390b).
1653.Daniel Waldoe. Brother-in-law of Edward Claxton (Alderman 1648). His daughter married John Dubois, one of the Whig candidates at the great contest for the Shrievalty in 1682.
1653.Sir John Frederick. Father of Thomas Frederick (Alderman 1687), whose son John was created a Baronet and was ancestor of the succeeding Baronets. His two daughters married respectively Sir Nathaniel Herne (Alderman, Sheriff 1674–5), and Sir Joseph Herne (Alderman 1686–7). He was a strong supporter of the Restoration, but, like Sir Thomas Alleyn, was regarded as not a firm adherent of the Court and so was superseded with the Whig Aldermen in 1683. The MS. account of the Aldermen in 1672 says of him that 'by reason of his age, he is apt to be ledd by others, especially by Sir John Lawrence: he hates a souldier and cannot endure to see any of the King's guards.'
1653.Tempest Milner. Son-in-law of Richard Turner (Alderman 1652). He was one of the two Aldermen removed by the Commissioners for regulating the Corporation in 1662.
1653.Richard Turner. Son of Richard Turner (Alderman 1652) and brother-in-law of Tempest Milner (Alderman, Sheriff 1656–7).
1653.Sir Samuel Micoe. Son-in-law of Henry Andrewes (Alderman, Sheriff 1632–3).
1654.Charles Thorold. He had a family of seven sons and seven daughters. Among the former were Sir Charles Thorold (Sheriff 1705–6) and Sir George Thorold (Lord Mayor 1719–20).
1654.Isaac Lee. He became poor in his later years and was granted a pension of £3 per month by the Court of Common Council, October 26, 1663, being then 74 years of age and a prisoner in the King's Bench (Journal 45, fo. 325).
1654.John Perryn. His widow married Sir Thomas Vyner (Lord Mayor 1653–4).
1655.Sir John Robinson. Son of Archdeacon Robinson who was half-brother of Archbishop Laud and nephew of Sir William Webbe (Lord Mayor 1591–2). The MS. account of the Aldermen in 1672 says of him that 'he hath been most industrious in the civill government of the cittie, watchfull to prevent anything that might reflect any prejudice or dishonour upon the King's government, happy in dispatch of businesse, to the great contentment of the people.' Pepys writes very contemptuously of him as 'a talking bragging bufflehead . . . . as very a coxcomb as I would have thought had been in the City . . . . nor hath he brains to outwit any ordinary tradesman' (March 17, 1662-3): again, after recording 'a very great noble dinner' at which he (Pepys) was a guest during Robinson's Mayoralty, he adds 'this Mayor is good for nothing else' (October 20, 1663), and in another place he says of him that 'he makes it his work to praise himself, and all he says and do, like a heavy-headed coxcomb.'
1656.Sir John Lewys. A son-in-law of Sir T. Foot (Lord Mayor 1649–50): his elder daughter married the 7th Earl of Huntingdon and the younger the 3rd Earl of Scarsdale.
1656.Robert Burdett. Son-in-law of Nathan Wright (Alderman 1649).
1656.Robert Holt. His daughter married Sir William Roberts, Bart.
1656.Rowland Wynn. Brother of Sir George Wynn (Alderman 1650) and son-inlaw of Anthony Biddulph (Alderman 1651).
1656.George Chetham. Nephew of George Chetham (Alderman 1625).
1656.Gerard Gore. Probably the son of William Gore (Alderman, Sheriff 1615–6) who bore that baptismal name.
1656.Hugh Wood. Son-in-law of Simon Edmunds (Alderman, Sheriff 1646–7): his wife was sister-in-law of Sir Christopher Pack (Lord Mayor 1654–5).
1657.Sir William Bateman. Son of Robert Bateman, Chamberlain of the City (Alderman 1629), brother of Sir Anthony Bateman (Lord Mayor 1663–4) and two other Aldermen, and son-in-law of Robert Cheslen (Alderman 1649).
1657.Ambrose Bronskill. Brother-in-law of Sir William Humble (Alderman 1651) and father-in-law of Francis Asty (Alderman 1667).
1657.Nicholas Herne. Grandson of Richard Herne (Alderman, Sheriff 1618–9) and half-brother of Sir Nathaniel Herne (Alderman, Sheriff 1674–5) and Sir Joseph Herne (Alderman 1686–7).
1657.Erasmus Smith. Well known for his bequests for the foundation of schools in Ireland. He was son-in-law of the first Lord Coleraine, and the marriage of his grand-daughter to Lord Strange, son of the 4th Earl of Derby, from which the later Earls are descended, brought the name of Smith into that family.
1657.Samuel Langham. Brother of Sir John Langham (Alderman, Sheriff 1642–3).
1657.Sir Anthony Bateman. Son of Robert Bateman, Chamberlain of the City and brother of Sir William, Richard and Sir Thomas (all elected Aldermen). He failed in business and was voted a pension of 30 shillings per week, being then a prisoner in the King's Bench, July 2, 1675 (Journal 48, fo. 172).
1657.David Davidson. Though a member of the Grocers' Company, he was by trade a ropemaker in Wapping,
1657.Sir Martin Noell. Pepys describes him in his diary (September 5, 1662) as 'certainly a very useful man.' He was one of the victims of the Plague in 1665, his wife dying of grief very shortly afterwards.
1658.Sir John Lawrence. The leader of the party in opposition to the Court in civic affairs. The writer of the MS. account of the Aldermen in 1672, says that 'he hath put all the affronts and indignities imaginable upon all those persons that have been willing to venture their lives and estates in any military employment for His Majesty,' and that he 'hath always had three or four busie turbulent followers to crye him up in all parts of the cittie, and to assist him in all popular elections.' He goes on to say of Lawrence and of Sir William Turner, who had co-operated with him in favouring the Dissenters, that 'what they gained by their treacherous complieing with that party, that they have lost by their impious and insolent behaviour towards almost all persons they have had to doe with.' One daughter married Sir George Vyner, Bart., son of Sir Thomas Vyner (Lord Mayor 1653–4), and another Charles Chamberlain (Alderman 1687–8).
1658.Sir John Barkstead. One of the regicides.
1658.Francis Dashwood. He married a sister of Edmund Sleigh (Alderman, Sheriff 1654–5). His eldest son Sir Samuel was Lord Mayor 1702–3; the second, Francis, was created a Baronet and was father of Lord le Despencer, well known as the head of the 'monks' of Medmenham Abbey and as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Lord Bute's ministry. His daughter married the 5th Lord Brooke, from which marriage the Earls of Warwick of the present creation are descended.
1658.John Jolliffe. Son-in-law of Walter Boothby (Alderman 1652): one of his daughters married Sir Samuel Moyer, Bart., and another Sir Edward Northey (Attorney-General to Queen Anne), whose daughter by her was wife of Lord Chief Justice Raymond.
1658.Sir William Vincent. Nephew of Sir John Langham (Alderman, Sheriff 1642–3).
1658.John Aleyn. His daughter married successively Sir John Tyrell, 1st Bart. of Springfield and Sir Thomas Stampe (Lord Mayor 1691–2).
1658.Sir Thomas Bludworth. Lord Mayor at the time of the Great Fire of 1666. His daughter married Lord Jeffreys, James II.'s Chief Justice and Lord Chancellor, and was ancestress of the Earls of Pomfret. Pepys writes of him as 'a silly man, I think' (June 30, 1666) and 'a very weak man he seems to be' (December 1, 1666). The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 credits him with being 'a zealous person in the King's concernments; willing though it may be not very able, to doe great things.' In his funeral sermon by Dr. Scott it is said that 'he had a mighty affection and zeal for the King and for the Church of England.'
1659.William Love. One of the two Aldermen displaced by the Commissioners for regulating the Corporation in 1662, as having been 'faulty in the late troubles.'
1659.Sir William Bolton. He was accused of cheating the poor of the City out of the collections made for the sufferers by the Great Fire, to the extent of £1,800, 'of which he can give no account, and in which he hath forsworn himself plainly' (Pepys' Diary, December 3, 1667). He was in consequence forbidden to attend the Court of Aldermen pending inquiry and was ultimately constrained to resign his seat. He became very poor and was voted a pension of £3 per week by the Court of Common Council, March 19, 1677 (Journal 48, fo. 293), which was subsequently continued to his widow. See Dr. Sharpe's London and the Kingdom, ii, 432n.
1659.Sir William Peake. Father of Sir John Peake (Lord Mayor 1686–7). The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 describes him as 'dilligent in the publique affaires, resolute for the King's interest and for the antient and orderly Government of the cittie.'
1659.William Crow. He was an upholsterer with whom Pepys had considerable dealings. (See Diary, December 15, 16, 1668). Pepys records (December 1, 1663) how Lord Chief Justice Hyde in a trial in which Crow's name was mentioned, 'would not suffer Mr. Crow, who hath fined for Alderman to be called so, but only Mister, and did eight or nine times fret at it, and stop every man that called him so.'
1659.John Blackwell. Father of Sir Lawrence Blackwell, Bart.
1659.Sir William Wale. Father-in-law of Sir Edward Seymour, Bart., Speaker of the House of Commons and ancestor of the later Dukes of Somerset.
1660.Edward Backwell. The eminent goldsmith of the time of the Commonwealth and Charles II. When the King closed tho Exchequer, Backwell was his creditor for nearly £300,000. See Hilton Price's London Banks. Pepys' Diary contains frequent references to him.
1660.Francis Meynell. Ancestor of the Meynell-Ingram family. Pepys (Diary, September 18, 1662) writes of him as 'the great money-man.'
1660.Sir William Turner. The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 says that he was 'esteemed zealous for the church untill the yeare of his Maioraltie; then he espouzed the interests of the Nonconformists'; it adds that towards the end of his year of office 'there were frequent consultations at his house with the heads of the Nonconformists about continuing him Lord Mayor another yeare.' He appears to have recovered favour with the Court party as he was not superseded with the Whig Aldermen in 1683. He was one of the few bachelor Lord Mayors.
1661.Sir Richard Ford. Pepys (Diary, March 17, 1663) describes him as 'a very able man of his brains and tongue, and a scholar,' but in a later entry (October 18, 1664) he records on the authority of a 'Mr. Gray' that 'among other faults, Sir Richard Ford cannot keep a secret.' The MS. account of the Aldermen in 1672 says that he is ' a man of excellent parts, and may doe his majestie excellent service in the citty,' but notes that he suspended the execution of the laws against Nonconformists when Lord Mayor, 'by which he gained the applause of all that partie.'
1661.Samuel Foote. First cousin of Sir Thomas Foot (Lord Mayor 1649–50).
1661.Sir Samuel Starling. His widow, daughter of Richard Garford (Alderman 1656), married the 4th Viscount Grandison. According to Pepys he was not liberal, as he records in his diary (September 8, 1666), during the progress of the fire, that 'Alderman Starling, a very rich man, without children, the fire at next door to him in our lane, after the men had saved his house, did give 2s. 6d. among thirty of them, and did quarrel with some that would remove the rubbish out of the way of the fire, saying that they came to steal.' As he 'put the law in execution vigorously against phanatics,' he is praised by the writer of the account of the Aldermen in 1672, who styles him 'a person of good learning, a solid judgment and great courage, contemning all danger for the safetie of his majestie's Government.'
1661.Thomas Turgis. He was one of the wealthiest commoners in England of his time, and proprietor of the pocket-borough of Gatton.
1661.Sir Henry Barnard. One of his daughters married Sir Josiah Child, Bart., the well-known writer on trade, another married the 8th Lord Chandos.
1661.George Hanger. Grandfather of the first Lord Coleraine of that family.
1661.Edward Chard. He is described in the notice of his burial in Smyth's Obituary, p. 55, as 'sometime City Smith.'
1661.Sir Richard Ryves. Nephew of Bruno Ryves, Dean of Windsor.
1662.Sir Thomas Bateman. Youngest son of Robert Bateman, Chamberlain of the City, and brother of Sir Anthony Bateman (Lord Mayor 1663–4), and Sir William Bateman (Alderman 1657). He, with his brothers, suffered heavy loss through the Great Fire.
1662.Sir William Warren. He is very frequently mentioned in Pepys' Diary. He was a shipbuilder at Wapping. Pepys records (June 3, 1662) that his fine on discharge from his Aldermanry was used to defray the cost of the Aldermen's present to the Queen (Catharine of Braganza).
1662.William Webb. His daughter married Sir John Oglander, 2nd Baronet.
1662.Richard Mills. Son-in-law of Walter Pritchett (Alderman 1625).
1663.Sir Hugh Parker. Ancestor of the two Admirals Sir Hyde Parker who commanded the British fleet at the battles of Dogger Bank and Copenhagen respectively.
1664.Sir Charles Doe. He preserved the Goldsmith Company's plate at his house in Edmonton during the Great Fire. Shortly after he failed in business and was "displaced" from his Aldermanry in consequence.
1664.Sir George Waterman. He is described in the MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 (at which time he was Lord Mayor), as 'a person almost voide of understanding, but not of will. He is very weake in the one, but most perverse in the other. He employes abundance of tyme, but does no businesse. He for a while was guided by Sir John Lawrence who ledd him astray.'
1664.Sir Robert Hanson. The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 describes him as 'a person (who) heartilie loves the King's interest,' and prophesies that he will make a better Lord Mayor than Waterman, 'having a better understanding and a better conscience.'
1664.Charles Everard. One of the victims of the Great Plague of 1665.
1664.Sir Willam Hooker. Pepys writes of him during his Shrievalty (Diary, December 13, 1665), that he 'keeps the poorest, mean, dirty table in a dirty house that ever I did see any Sheriff of London, and a plain, ordinary, silly man I think he is, but rich.' The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 says 'that he is fallen off from the party of Sir John Lawrence and Sir William Turner; he saith, he sees their jugling, and will have noe more to do with them. He is bold, and apt to reflect upon the Court, if things crosse his humour.' He was one of the three Aldermen who retained their seats throughout the changes of the period from 1683 to 1688 (see ante p. 115).
1664.Stephen Frewen. Brother of Accepted Frewen, Archbishop of York.
1664.Nicholas Bonfoy. Brother of Sir Thomas Bonfoy (Alderman 1664).
1664.James Hickson. He endowed an almshouse at South Mimms.
1664.John Bence. Son of Alexander Bence (Alderman 1653), and father-in-law of Vere, 4th Earl of Westmorland.
1666.Sir Robert Vyner. Nephew of Sir Thomas Vyner (Lord Mayor 1653–4). He and Edward Backwell (Alderman 1660–1) were the leading Goldsmiths of Charles II.'s time. He lost over £400,000 by the closing of the Exchequer in January, 1672, and became bankrupt towards the end of the reign. He is frequently mentioned by Pepys. Grammont's story of his fetching back the King to drink another bottle at his Mayoral dinner is well known. The writer of the account of the Aldermen of 1672 (at which time he was Sheriff and 'contracted an extraordinary friendship' with his colleague, Sir Joseph Sheldon), says that he 'hath as large a soule, and hath done and did design as great and charitable acts in London, as any person, if the necessary shutting up of the Exchequer had not restrained him.'
1666.Robert Aske. He married the widow of Nicholas Bonfoy (Alderman 1664), and was the founder of a school at Hatcham.
1666.Peter Ducane. Uncle of Sir John Houblon (Lord Mayor 1695–6), and Sir James Houblon (Alderman 1692–1700) and father-in-law of Sir Christopher Lethuillier (Alderman, Sheriff 1689–90).
1666.Sir Richard Piggott. Brother-in-law of Sir Thomas Vyner (Lord Mayor 1653–4).
1666.Sir Joseph Sheldon. Nephew of Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury; his daughter married Sir John Cotton, Bart, and was mother of Sir John Hinde Cotton, a leading Tory politician of the reigns of George I. and II. The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672, after recording his 'extraordinary friendship' with Sir Robert Vyner, asserts that 'the King hath noe two persons doe more passionately love his interest than these,' and that 'they are men of good abilities, and very sober and discreete in the management of businesse.'
1666.Sir John Moore. Originally a Nonconformist, he became the leader of the 'Church and King' party in the Court of Aldermen. The writer of the MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 records that his election as Alderman in 1671, after he had been discharged on payment of a fine in 1667, was due to Sir John Lawrence and Sir William Turner, 'apprehending him a person fitt for their turne,' but that he behaved himself 'with great honestie and integretie, refusing to side with Sir John Lawrence 'for which the latter used 'reproachfull words' to him. For the events of his Mayoralty see Dr. Sharpe's London and the Kingdom, ii., 476–491. He was the Ziloah of Tate's portion of Absalom and Achitophel, who, when he ruled 'Jerusalem' [i.e., London] did 'boldly all seditious surges stem.'
1667.Richard Spencer. His widow married Sir John Stonhouse, Bart., and his daughter was the second wife of Lord Chancellor Harcourt.
1667.John Jermyn. Brother-in-law of John Hoby (Alderman 1666).
1667.Richard Beckford. Brother of Sir Thomas Beckford (Alderman, Sheriff 1677-8).
1667.Humphrey Beane. Father-in-law of Sir John Parsons (Lord Mayor 1703–4), and grandfather of Humphrey Parsons (Lord Mayor 1730–1, 1740–1).
1667.William Dashwood. Nephew of Francis Dashwood (Alderman 1658).
1667.Sir Denis Gauden. Brother of John Gauden, Bishop of Winchester (the reputed author of Eikon Basilike). His official position in the Navy Office brought him much into contact with Pepys, in whose Diary his name is of frequent occurrence. The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 speaks of him as 'esteemed justly a man of great justnesse and uprightnesse in his place of government,' but adds that his official duties as Victualler of the Navy prevent his frequent attendance in the Court of Aldermen.
1667.William Sherrington. His daughter married Sir William Luckyn, Bart., and was mother of the 1st Viscount Grimston, and ancestress of the Earls of Verulam.
1667.George Clark. From his daughter's first husband, John Trevor (son of Sir John Trevor, Secretary of State), the Viscounts Hampden are descended. Her third husband was Lord Cutts, the 'salamander,' one of Marlborough's Generals at Blenheim.
1667.Sir Thomas Davies. 'The little fellow, my schoolfellow, the bookseller, who was one of Audley's executors and now become Sheriff; which is a strange turn, methinks' (Pepys' Diary, Oct. 23, 1667). His mother was niece of Hugh Audley, the wealthy usurer, from whom he and his brother inherited large fortunes. His niece, Mary Davies, by her marriage with Sir Thomas Grosvenor, 3rd Baronet of Eaton, brought into that family the great West-end Estate, from which the great wealth of her descendants, the Marquess and Dukes of Westminster, was derived. He was son-in-law of William Ridges (Alderman 1651). The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 says of him that 'hee knows as well how to keep as Audley knew how to get and keepe' his estate, and describes him as 'a meane spirited person . . . one that will venture as little as may be, either for the safety of the king, or service of the citie.'
1667.Francis Asty. Son-in-law of Ambrose Bronskill (Alderman 1657).
1668.John Forth. (fn. 7) Brother of Dannet Forth (Alderman, Sheriff 1670–1) and sonin-law of Sir Henry Vane, the Republican statesman. Tho MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 describes him as 'a hasty, passionate person; noe lover of the Church of England . . . he rarely sees the inside of a church . . . he hath a consecrated chappell in his owne house . . . a nonconformist and a brewer officiating there, when he is at leisure on a Sunday to heare. He is a man of noe reputation for keeping his word.'
1668.Sir Francis Chaplin. Father of John Chaplin (ancestor of the Chaplins of Blankney, now represented by the Right Hon. Henry Chaplin) and of Sir Robert Chaplin, Bart. Pepys (Diary, January 22, 1668) describes him as 'a pretty humoured little man, and the MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 speaks of him as 'a person truly loyall' and 'active in businesse, but too quick and open sometimes in declaring his opinion.'
1668.Sir Richard Howe. Father-in-law of Sir Michael Hicks and ancestor of Viscount St. Aldwyn.
1668.John Lane. Father of Sir Thomas Lane (Lord Mayor 1694–5). His daughter married Paul Foley (Speaker of the House of Commons), from which marriage descended the Lords Foley of the present creation.
1668.William Bainbrigg. His daughter married Sir William Maynard, Bart, and was ancestress of the Viscounts Maynard and the present Countess of Warwick, the aristocratic patroness of Socialism.
1668.Henry Ashhurst. A leading Nonconformist and friend of Richard Baxter, who preached his funeral sermon. Father of Sir William Ashhurst (Lord Mayor 1693–4) and of Sir Henry Ashhurst (Alderman 1688–9).
1668.Sir John Smith. Son of James Smith (Alderman 1650) and father of Sir John Smith, Bart., of Isleworth. The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 describes him as 'an honest good-natured person, desireing to serve his majestie to his utmost and ready to oblige any of the King's friends. He is willing to receive good advice . . . and able to distinguish betweene good and bad.'
1668.Benjamin Albin. Son-in-law of John Mayo (Alderman 1650–3).
1669.John Colvill. A goldsmith who lost over £85,000 by the shutting up of the Exchequer in 1672. Pepys did business with him and frequently mentions him in his Diary, in one place (May 24, 1665) characterizing him as 'an impertinent fool.'
1669.Sir James Edwards. He is described in the MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 as 'a bold stoute man, furnished with honest loyall principles, a man of good understanding and as good a resolution: he is like to prove a very usefull person in the cittie, especially if he would but come and live there.'
1669.Dannet Forth. Brother of John Forth (Alderman, Sheriff 1668–9). He was originally a member of the Drapers' Company, and was translated to the Brewers January 15, 1661 [Rep. 67, fo. 183b], thus exchanging one of the 12 greater Companies for one of the minor ones, of which there are few instances recorded. His daughter married Francis St. John, son of Oliver St. John, the Chief Justice of the Commonwealth period, and was mother of Sir Francis St. John, Bart., and ancestress of the later Dukes of Manchester. In the MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 he is described as 'a person that hath much more command of his passion than his brother, and a man of greater abilities in busynesse, but as to church affaires, of the same principles with his brother.'
1669.William Fluellin. His daughter was mother of Sir Thomas Colby, Bart.
1669.Sir Jonathan Dawes. His daughter married Sir Martin Lumley, 3rd Bart., great grandson of Sir Martin Lumley (Lord Mayor 1623-4). The writer of the MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672, after noticing his friendship with his brother-Sheriff, Sir Robert Clayton, says that they 'industriously endeavour to serve his majestie and the cittie. They want no courage, nor conduct in any businesse they undertake; they have a greate share of love and estieme from people of all sorts.'
1670.Sir Robert Clayton. He was partner in business as a scrivener with John Morris (Alderman 1669), whose property he inherited. His nephew and heir, William Clayton, was created a Baronet, and was ancestor of the Clayton Baronets of Morden and the Clayton-East Baronets of Hall Place. The writer of the laudatory remarks on him and Sir J. Dawes, quoted above, did not foresee that he would later be one of the Whig leaders both in the City and in Parliament. In the portion of Absalom and Achitophel written by Tate, he is described as 'Extorting Ishban,' in reference to his having amassed a fortune by usury, and
'Ishban of conscience suited to his trade, As good a saint as usurer ever made,'
and some succeeding lines accuse him of having offered 'talents of extorted gold' and to 'turn loyal' in return for a peerage, which was refused him.
1670.Sir Patience Ward. It is said that he was so christened because his father was disappointed in the sex of his child, having desired a daughter. He was one of the leaders of the Whig party in the City, and it was during his Mayoralty that the inscription was placed on the Monument ascribing the Great Fire to the Roman Catholics. The MS. account of the Aldermen of 1672 says that 'he hath had a wife many years, but whether they were ever married is a question, unless it were according to the directory of the quakers.' His wife was daughter of William Hobson (Aldorman 1657). He was uncle of Sir John Ward (Lord Mayor 1718-9). He was convicted of perjury in his evidence at the trial of the action of the Duke of York against Sir Thomas Pilkington, and fled to Holland 1683, where he remained till the Revolution.
1672.Sir William Prichard. One of the leaders of the civic Tories. He obtained a verdict for £10,000 damages in 1684 against Thomas Papillon (Alderman 1689) for illegal arrest in connexion with the disputes arising out of the election for Sheriff in 1682.
1673.Sir Henry Tulse. His daughter, who married the first Lord Onslow, drowned herself in a pond in the Archbishop of Canterbury's palace at Croydon.
1674.Sir James Smyth. Second son of Sir Robert Smyth (Alderman 1650), sonin-law of Sir William Peake (Lord Mayor 1667-8), and father of James Smyth, created Baronet 1714.
1676.Sir Nathaniel Herne. Grandson of Richard Herne (Alderman, Sheriff 1618-9), half-brother of Nicholas Herne (Alderman 1657), and son-in-law of Sir John Frederick (Lord Mayor 1661-2). His grand-daughter married the second Earl of Jersey, and was mother of the first Earl of Clarendon of the present creation.
1676.Sir John Lethuillier. Son-in-law of Sir William Hooker (Lord Mayor 1673-4) and brother of Sir Christopher Lethuillier (Alderman, Sheriff 1689-90). Pepys (Diary, December 13, 1665) describes him as 'a pretty, civil, understanding merchant,' and his wife as 'our noble, fat, brave lady in our parish that I and my wife admire so,' and (December 3) as 'my fat brown beauty, a very noble woman.'
1676.Sir Robert Geffery. Founder of the almshouses which are known by his name, for the establishment of which he bequeathed money in trust to his Company, the Ironmongers.
1676.Sir John Shorter. A Nonconformist, described by Evelyn (Diary I., 643) as 'an Anabaptist, a very odd ignorant person, a mechanic, I think.' He was one of the Aldermen superseded when the Charter was suspended in 1683, but was restored by James II. when that monarch was courting the Dissenters in 1687, and made Lord Mayor, with permission to have whom he pleased as his chaplain. For the accident which caused his death see Sir J. Baddeley's Aldermen of Cripplegate Ward, p. 80. His grand-daughter married Sir Robert Walpole, and was mother of Horace Walpole.
1676.Sir Thomas Gold. His grand-daughter married the 2nd Lord Barnard and was mother of the 1st Earl of Darlington and ancestress of the Dukes of Cleveland. He was a strong Whig and one of the candidates of that party for the Mayoralty at the crucial election of 1682. He was superseded when the Charter was suspended in 1683, and died before its restoration.
1679.Sir John Peake. Son of Sir William Peake (Lord Mayor 1667-8) and brother-in law of Sir James Smyth (Lord Mayor 1684-5). His daughter married Sir John Shaw, 2nd Baronet, and was ancestress of the succeeding Baronets.
1679.Sir Thomas Beckford. His wife (sister of Sir William Thomas, Bart.) married four times, Sir Thomas being her second husband. Her fourth was Sir Henry Fermor, Bart.
1680.Sir John Chapman. See Wilford's Memorials, pp. 507, 508. He was father of Sir William Chapman, Bart.
1680.Henry Cornish. This barbarous person, whose execution for treason on insufficient evidence in James II.'s reign has given occasion to Whig historians to glorify him with the halo of martyrdom, was one of the two Sheriffs who protested against the remission of the vivisection portion of the sentence on the aged Viscount Stafford, the victim of Oates' perjury, whose only offence was his adhesion to the Romanist faith, in which protest he was supported by the immaculate William, Lord Russell!
1680.Sir Thomas Pilkington. One of the most prominent leaders of the Whigs in the City during the troubles of the later years of Charles II. The Duke of York obtained a verdict for £50,000 damages against him in 1682 for scandalum magnatum, and in default of payment he was imprisoned till 1686. Burnet writes of him as 'an honest but indiscreet man that gave himself great liberties in discourse.'
1681.Sir Jonathan Raymond. Son-in-law of Philip Jemmett (Alderman 1667). Le Neve (Pedigrees of Knights, p. 333) says that he was 'a very weak silly man but gott a great estate' (by his marriage). He was one of the few Tories in the Court of Aldermen in William III.'s reign, and his resignation of the Aldermanry was said to be due to vexation at having been passed over for the Mayoralty: he had been defeated at the poll in 1689, 1691, 1692, and 1693, and though one of the two returned in 1690 was not elected.
1682.Dudley North. 4th son of the 4th Lord North, and brother of the 1st Earl of Guilford (Lord Chancellor) and of Roger North (author of the Examen and of Lives of the Norths). He was an early advocate of Free Trade, and is described by Macaulay as 'one of the ablest men of the time.'
1682.Sir Peter Daniel. Son of William Daniel (Alderman 1670 His Tory politics caused him to be passed over for the Mayoralty.
1683.Sir Peter Rich. Son-in-law of Richard Evans (Alderman 1663).
1683.Sir Samuel Dashwood. Son of Francis Dashwood (Alderman 1658), grandson of Edmund Sleigh (Alderman, Sheriff 1654-5) and elder brother of Sir Francis Dashwood, Bart. He married the sister of John Smith, Speaker of the House of Commons. His eldest daughter was mother of the first Lord Archer, and a younger daughter married Sir Thomas Saunders Sebright, Bart., from whom the later Baronets are descended.
1683.Sir Benjamin Newland. Son-in-law of Robert Richbell (Alderman 1661) and father of Sir George Newland, M.P. for the City 1710-4.
1683.Sir Peter Paravicini. Le Neve (Pedigrees of Knights, p. 412), who writes the name Pallavicini, says that he was born in Italy, came over to England a poor lad and was butler to Charles Torreano, a London merchant, whose son married his daughter.
1683.Sir Benjamin Bathurst. Grandson of Lancelot Bathurst (Alderman 1593), father of the 1st Earl Bathurst, grandfather of the 2nd Earl (Lord Chancellor) and ancestor of the succeeding Earls.
1683.Sir John Buckworth. His funeral sermon (December 29th, 1687) is preserved in Wilford's Memorials, pp. 604, 5. He was father of Sir John Buckworth, Bart., Whig candidate for the City in 1707 and 1708.
1683.Sir Charles Duncombe. An eminent goldsmith, originally apprenticed to Edward Backwell (Alderman 1660-1), afterwards in business for himself at the sign of 'the Grasshopper' in Lombard Street. He was the 'City Knight' who bought 'Helmsley, once proud Buckingham's delight' (Pope: Imitations of Horace, Satire II., 176) and is supposed by some to be the 'Euclio' of Pope's Moral Essays, Epistle I., 256-262. From his sister who married Thomas Browne (afterwards Duncombe) the Earls of Feversham are descended: her daughter married the 2nd Duke of Argyll, the general and statesman.
1684.Sir William Gostlyn. His daughter married Sir Henry Bendish, 4th and last Baronet.
1684.Sir Peter Vandeput. Son-in-law of Sir John Buckworth (Alderman 1683-6). See his funeral sermon by Nicholas Brady, the psalm-writer, in Wilford's Memorials, pp. 405, 406, in which he is described as 'a sincere Christian, a true Churchman, a lover of his country, a true gentleman.'
1886.Sir Thomas Kinsey. 'He kept the Crown tavern in Bloomsbury after the building of that square and there got his estate.' (Le Neve, Pedigree of Knights, p. 399.)
1686.Sir Joseph Herne. Brother of Sir Nathaniel Herne (Alderman 1674-5) and son-in-law of Sir John Frederick (Lord Mayor 1661-2). His daughter married Sir Lambert Blackwell, Bart.
1686.Sir Thomas Rawlinson. Father of Richard Rawlinson, the antiquary and book collector (styled by Le Neve 'helluo librorum'), and of Thomas Rawlinson, the non-juring Bishop. His father kept the Mitre Tavern in Fenchurch Street, and his father-in-law the Devil Tavern by the Temple.
1686.Thomas Hartopp. Son-in-law of Sir John Buckworth, his predecessor in the Aldermanry of Coleman Street.
1687.Joas Bateman. Father of Sir James Bateman (Lord Mayor 1706-7) and grandfather of the first Viscount Bateman.
1687.John Jolliffe. Great-nephew of John Jolliffe (Alderman 1658) and son-in-law of the 2nd Lord Crewe.
1687.Sir Jeremy Sambroke. He married the sister of the wife of Sir William Hedges (Alderman, Sheriff 1693-4) and was father of Sir Samuel and Sir Jeremy Sambroke, Baronets.
1687.Daniel Mercer. His two wives were daughters respectively of Thomas Essington (Alderman 1651) and Charles Thorold (Alderman 1654).
1687.Sir Samuel Thomson. Son of Sir William Thomson (Alderman, Sheriff 1655-6).
1687.Thomas Frederick. Son of Sir John Frederick (Lord Mayor 1681-2), father of Sir John Frederick, 1st Baronet and ancestor of the succeeding Baronets.
1687.Sir John Parsons. Son-in-law of Humphrey Beane (Alderman 1667) and father of Humphrey Parsons (Lord Mayor 1730-1, 1740-1).
1687.John Mawson. A goldsmith at the sign of the Golden Hind, Fleet Street.
1687.Sir Basil Firebrace. Son of Sir Henry Firebrace, a well-known Cavalier officer. His daughter married the 4th Earl of Denbigh, from which marriage the later Earls are descended.
1687.Sir Humphrey Edwin. Son-in-law of Samuel Sambroke, brother of Sir Jeremy Sambroke (Alderman 1687). His eldest son, Samuel, married a daughter of the 3rd Earl of Manchester, and another son, John, is stated to have been ancestor of the present Earl of Crawford. He was a strong Nonconformist, and his attendance in State, while Lord Mayor, at a Dissenting Meeting House was the origin of the Occasional Conformity Bills of Anne's reign.
1687.William Kiffin. The well-known Baptist preacher.
1687.Sir William Ashhurst. Son of Henry Ashhurst (Alderman 1668).
1687.Sir John Eyles. Brother of Sir Francis Eyles (Alderman, Sheriff 1710-1) and uncle of Sir John Eyles (Lord Mayer 1726-7) and Sir Joseph Eyles (Alderman, Sheriff 1724-5). His daughter married Sir John Smith, Bart., of Isleworth, son of Sir John Smith (Alderman, Sheriff 1669-70).
1687.James Paule. Son of William Paul, Bishop of Oxford, and son-in-law of Sir Thomas Duppa, Garter King-at-Arms. The James Paule, Consul for Zante, with whom Deputy White (History of Walbrook Ward, p. 259) erroneously identifies him, was his son.
1687.Gregory Page. Father of Sir Gregory Page, Bart., M.P., with whom I have erroneously identified him in vol. I., pp. 304, 305, 319, 320 (corrected on p. 421).
1687.Sir Christopher Lethuillier. Brother of Sir John Lethuillier (Alderman, Sheriff 1674-5) and son-in-law of Peter Ducane (Alderman 1666).
1687.Charles Chamberlain. Son-in-law of Sir John Lawrence (Lord Mayor 1664-5).
1687.William Jolliffe. Son of William Jolliffe, who was half-brother of John Jolliffe (Alderman 1658). His second wife was daughter of the 6th Earl of Huntingdon, and his third, sister of Sir John Trenchard, Secretary of State.
1688.Sir Henry Ashhurst. Son of Henry Ashhurst (Alderman 1668) and brother of Sir William Ashhurst (Lord Mayor 1693-4). He married a daughter of the 6th Lord Paget.
1688.Sir Thomas Stampe. Son-in-law of John Aleyn (Alderman 1658-9).
1688.Sir Thomas Lane. Son of John Lane (Alderman 1668), son-in-law of Henry Ashhurst (Alderman 1668) and brother-in-law of Sir William and Sir Henry.
1689.Sir John Houblon. First Governor of the Bank of England; brother of Sir James Houblon (Alderman 1692-1700). His grandmother was sister of John La Motte (Alderman 1648).
1689.Thomas Papillon, Father-in-law of Sir Edward Ward, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. A leader of the Whig party in the City, and one of the candidates for the Shrievalty at the great election of 1682 (See Dr. Sharpe's London and the Kingdom, ii., 479-489). He wrote or inspired a treatise on the East India trade printed at his house. In 1684 he fled to Holland to avoid payment of £10,000 damages recovered by Sir William Prichard (Lord Mayor 1682-3) in an action against him for false imprisonment, and he did not return till the Revolution. A memoir of him has been written by his descendant, A. F. W. Papillon.
1689.Sir Francis Child. He had a family of 12 sons and 3 daughters, two of the former being his immediate successors in the Aldermanry of Farringdon Without, Sir Robert and Sir Francis. He was the first of his family in business at the sign of the Marygold in Fleet Street, having married the daughter of William Wheeler, the former proprietor, whose widow married Child's partner Robert Blanchard. He was the first banker to give up the business of a goldsmith.
1690.Sir John Wildman. Son-in-law of the 4th Lord Teynham. The celebrated 'Major Wildman,' leveller and conspirator, who was connected with the Rye House plot and Monmouth's rebellion. Disraeli (Sibyl, Book I., ch. 3) says that 'he was the soul of English politics from 1640 to 1688.' Macaulay (History of England, People's ed. i., 256) refers to his 'long series of conspiracies, first against the Protector and then against the Stuarts,' and his 'wonderful skill in grazing the edge of treason' by which 'though always known to be plotting, he eluded every danger and died in his bed, after having seen two generations of his accomplicies die on the gallows.'
1690.Sir Richard Levett. Father of Richard Levett (Alderman, Sheriff 1728-9). His daughter married Sir Edward Hulse, Bart., and was ancestress of the succeeding Baronets.
1690.Sir William Gore. His son married a daughter of the 4th Earl of Northampton.
1692.Sir Thomas Abney. The patron of Dr. Isaac Watts who lived with him, and after his death with his widow, for 36 years until his own death. Sir Thomas was uncle of Sir Thomas Abney, judge of the Common Pleas.
1693.Thomas Darwin. One of the leading civic Tories. A Whig broadside (Guildhall Tracts, 203, 6) headed 'A New Years Gift for the Tories alias Rapperrees, alias Petitioners of London,' arranges the names of 38 persons acrostically so that the first letters form the words 'The British Rapperee R. Lestrange his gang.' These names include John Moore (presumably Sir John Moore, Lord Mayor 1681-2), Thomas Darwin, John Johnson (Alderman 1696-8), Robert Bedingfield (Lord Mayor 1706-7), Samuel Gerrard [i.e. Garrard, Lord Mayor 1709-10] and George Newland (M.P. 1710-4).
1693.Sir William Hedges. Brother of Sir Charles Hedges, Secretary of State to William III. and Anne.
1696.Sir Owen Buckingham. He was a manufacturer of sailcloth at Reading.
1697.Sir Robert Bedingfeld. Brother of Sir Henry Bedingfield, Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, temp. James II.

Footnotes

1 The Dictionary of National Biography in its article on Tyndale, erroneously states that Monmouth was knighted.
2 . He is the subject of an article in the Dictionary of National Biography, but I omitted to put the distinguishing mark to his name at p. 31 of this volume. In the article neither the name of his Ward nor the date of his election as Alderman is given, and the date of his knighthood is incorrectly recorded.
3 It is erroneously stated in Loftie's History of London, ii., 325, in G. E. C[okayne]'s Complete Baronetage, ii., 72 and ('quandoque bonus dormitat Homerus') in Dr. Sharpe's London and the Kingdom, ii., 130, that Acton was elected Lord Mayor in September, 1640, and afterwards discharged by Parliament. (G. E. C. fixes the exact date, October 6, 1640, of such discharge.) As a matter of fact his name was not one of the two returned to the Court by the Common Hall, though he was the Senior Alderman below the Chair, and, as Macaulay would say, 'every schoolboy knows' that no parliament was in existence at that date. The Long Parliament did not meet till November 3, on which day Wright, who had been elected Lord Mayor, was presiding in the Court of Aldermen in virtue of his office (Rep. 55, fo. 1).
4 For the proposal, which was not carried into effect, that he, with Aldermen Atkyn and Andrewes, should be knighted by the Speaker, see vol. I, p. 229, also Somers Tracts, vii., 57 (a tract entitled 'Hosanna or a Song of Thanksgiving set forth in three notable speeches at Grocers' Hall on the last solemn day of thanksgiving, June 7th, 1649'), where Hugh Peters is represented as saying, 'It was God's mercy you had not all been knighted: for it was put to the vote whether my Lord Mayor should be knighted and whether you, Alderman Pennington and Alderman Atkins should be dubb'd Sir Isaac and Sir Thomas of the State's own creation. But since it was resolved otherwise, I will make you all lords like myself.'
5 Miss Foot was his first wife and died in 1650; Sir John's second marriage to the daughter of Sir Thomas Tipping took place in 1669, when he is described in the licence as widower. The Dictionary of National Biography transposes the order of his wives.
6 G. E. C[okayne] in his Complete Baronetage, ii., 160, makes him son of the Sheriff, whose date of death he gives as June, 1609, whereas the true date was August, 1584 (see note p. 36). Burke's Peerage makes him the second son of the Sheriff with three younger brothers, no twins being recorded, and his own birth date being March 7, 1582. It is clear that Burke and Cokayne have missed a generation.
7 His name stands first in the list of those commissioned to farm the Irish Revenues from 1669 to 1675; he had ten colleagues, of whom six were at some time or other elected Aldermen of London, viz. : William Bucknall (1667), William Dashwood (1667), Philip Jemmett (1667), John Breedon (1667), James Hayes (1664), and his brother Dannet Forth (1669). The MS. quoted in the text says 'it is concluded by very many that his loyaltie consists much in his excise farmes, and the profit he makes by them.'