Report on the Charities of the Drapers' Company
Part III

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

160-177

Citation Show another format:

'Report on the Charities of the Drapers' Company: Part III', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 160-177. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69710 Date accessed: 23 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

PART III.

Sir John Milborne's Almshouses.

Sir John Milborne is stated by the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 395), and by the recitals of the will of William Dolphin, to have granted by deed poll of the 5th March, 26 Henry VIII., to William Dolphin, in fee, 13 tenements (which he had newly built) and gardens in the parish of St. Olave, near the Tower of London, by the description of an eighth part of an acre.

And William Dolphin, by his will of the 24th March 1534, devised the same 13 tenements and also 11 messuages, namely:—

Five messuages in Thames Street, in the parish of Saint Lawrence, Pountney.

Two messuages in the parish of Saint Nicholas, near Newgate.

Two messuages against the gate of Saint Martin the Great; and

Two messuages in the parish of Saint Mary, Aldermary, in the ward of Cordwainers, and bounded on the east by the King's highway, to the Draper's Company, on trust, to repair the said 13 tenements, and pay every month to and amongst 13 poor men, being householders, married or unmarried, 32s. 10d., especially such as should have most need and be brethren and sisters of the said Company, and if there should not be drapers found, then others to be taken, householders of the parish of Saint Edmund and Saint Bartholomew the Little. And the will declared that the master and wardens, and their successors, for their pains should have 20s. yearly, namely:—

s.d.
The master68
Wardens34
Clerk30
Beadle20
Renter50

with a devise over in default as therein mentioned to the mayor, commonalty, and citizens of the City of London.

The Commissioners of Inquiry (p. 397), state that, "if the Company are only liable to pay the specific sums mentioned in Dolphin's will, they are entitled to the credit of having advanced out of their own revenues upwards of 400l. a year to the support of these almshouses; but if, on the other hand, the premises described, and producing 589l. 13s. 10d. a year, are those which were devised to them under the directions of Sir John Milborne, the whole of such income, except what is expressly given to the Company's officers, is applicable to the support of the almshouses, it ought to be carried to a separate account," and the Commissioners conclude by stating that they thought it was a fit case to be certified to the Attorney-General.

The attention of the Charity Commissioners was directed to the subject by the letter of the clerk of the Drapers' Company of the 7th June 1856, stating the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry, and requesting to know exactly the position in which the Company were placed with respect to the almshouses and the property stated in such report to answer the description of that mentioned in William Dolphin's will, and whether it was intended that any steps should be taken with reference to the question raised in the Commissioners' Report.

By a letter from the solicitor to the Attorney-General, addressed to the Charity Commissioners, dated the 14th July 1858, he states that he had found among the papers of his predecessor, Mr. Parkes, an opinion of Mr. J. E. Blunt, of the 17th February 1841, that it was extremely doubtful upon the construction of the will of the founder whether the Company were not entitled to the whole premises, subject to the payments specifically directed, but that as the will was not fully set out in the case, it would be right to obtain a full copy. The statement of the will given in the case submitted to Mr. Blunt was that which is contained in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry. The case was in fact a copy of that report. Mr. Blunt further suggested that communication should take place with the Company, and that it should be proposed to them to concur in a scheme and in a reference to ascertain the property; but that nothing further was done in the matter.

The Board having requested to be informed whether there was any intention to take the matter up, Mr. Fearon, by his letter of the 19th July 1858, says that he had taken the Attorney-General's directions on the subject of the charity, and that it was not his intention to take any proceedings on the certificate of the late Commissioners.

An ancient book of the Company, containing a description of deeds, and which appears to be a list made at some former and remote time of deeds in their possession, describes shortly under the head of "Almshouses," to which a later hand has added the words "at Tower Hill," the following instruments:—

1. One indenture whereby Edmund the Prior of the Holy Cross and the convent of the same did bargain and sell the plot of ground in the parish of Saint Olave on Tower Hill of London, abutted and for the building of the 13 almshouses to Sir John Milburne, knight, his heirs and assigns.—24, 26 Henry 8.

2. An exemplification of the recovery of the land at Tower Hill against the prior and convent thereof by Sir John Milborne, knight.—1 February, 26 Henry 8.

3. A deed poll by which the said Sir John Milborne, knight, did confirm unto William Dolphyn, his heirs and assigns,

the said 13 tenements and voide plot of ground measured for the fulfilling of the said William Dolphyn's will, with the usual warranties and livery of seisin endorsed.

4. One deed poll whereby the said prior and convent did release unto Sir John Milborne, knight, his heirs and assigns, the former plot of ground, with the obligation of 200l. with the said prior and convent.

5. The last will of William Dolphin, draper, whereby he devised the premises for 13 poor and for further relief they have to have paid unto them 12 times a year, 32s. 10d. among them, and 20s. to the master, wardens, and officers as above stated.

The deed poll referred to by the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 395) has not been produced to me, nor does there appear to be any proof of its existence. In reply to my inquiries Mr. Sawyer, the clerk of the Company, informs me: That he has no knowledge of any deeds relating to Sir John Milborne's Almshouses, or the property referred to by the Commissioners of Inquiry as connected with them,—that there is a tradition that deeds were lost at the Great Fire when the Hall was destroyed, and also at a later fire, in 1772, when the whole of the east side of the Hall was burnt,—that many deeds had been deposited in a damp strong room, and were discovered about the year 1825 or 1826 dropping to pieces from damp, and in a great measure illegible, some perfectly so, that nothing was done to preserve them, and the fragments were thrown away to the best of his recollection.—That the Company have now a strong room in which there are ancient deeds, and that no specific search had been made prior to the time of this inquiry in that room for deeds relating to this property. Since the commencement of this inquiry a search has been made, and an ancient deed has been produced to me of the 4th January, 31 Henry 8., whereby John, archbishop of Thebes, and perpetual commendatory of the cathedral church of Carlisle is witnessed to have bargained and sold to William Dolphin and his heirs all those messuages and tenements, &c. which the said archbishop, or any other person or persons to his use, have or be seized of in the City of London, namely, five messuages or tenements in Thames Street in St. Laurence, Pountney, two other small messuages or tenements situated in Saint Nicholas in the Shambles in Newgate, and two other small messuages or tenements in St. Martin-le-Grand. There is evidently nothing in this instrument capable of identifying the property of the Company with any endowment fund, and nothing else has been discovered amongst the muniments of the Company; and even if it were, under all the circumstances of the case I apprehend that the Board would not be inclined to differ from the view of the Attorney-General, as communicated by Mr. Fearon's letter of 8th July 1858.

It is to be observed that it is very possible that much property, the acquisition of which cannot be explained by this and other Companies, might have been granted and confirmed to them by the letters patent of the 14th of July of the 4th of Edward VI., and further assured by the statute of the 5th James I., which I have mentioned in my report on the charities of the Fishmongers' Company. The Drapers, amongst other Companies, appear to be entitled to benefits under the grant and the statute, but the Fishmongers' Company alone, so far as I have yet discovered, have obtained and placed among their records a copy of so much of the letters patent as describes the particular property comprised therein in which they were interested.

The property belonging to the Company in the parish of St. Lawrence Pountney, is—

£s.d.
Warehouses, Upper Thames Street, let to Mr. Henry Clarke (assignee of Thomas Goldie) for 65 years, from Lady-day 18358000
Warehouses in Lawrence Pountney Lane, now let to Elizabeth Langton for 21 years, from Christmas 185616000
Two warehouses in Arthur Street West, held by Fredk. Tollemache on building lease for 80 years, from Michaelmas 18364000
The Consols which represent the property taken by the City of London are in no distinct investment. The Company hold Consols to a greater amount than 1,288l. 10s. 3d. Consols, the sum mentioned by the Commissioners of Inquiry3800
The Newgate Street estate, supposed by the Commissioners of Inquiry to represent the property devised in Saint Nicholas in Newgate and St. Michael Le Querne.
Carried forward£31800
£s.d.
Brought forward31800
Nos. 52 and 53, Newgate Street, let to Samuel R. and W. Block for 21 years, from Christmas 185423000
The Bow Lane estate is supposed by the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 397) to be in Saint Mary, Aldermanbury, but this is an inaccuracy, as the property is in the parish of Saint Mary, Aldermary; but as it is in the Cordwainers' Ward it may be still the property in question, it being equally possible that the former parish may have been mentioned in the will by mistake for the latter. No. 12 (and the house at the back now all thrown into one), let to Messrs. Carlisle Pitman & Co. for 21 years, from Midsummer 1854, at14000
£68800

The almshouses consist of 16 old buildings in Cooper's Row, at the back, or parallel with, Crutched Friars. A proposal for the removal of these almshouses and the rebuilding of them upon a site at Tottenham, in the county of Middlesex, was brought before the Board by the Drapers' Company on the 26th May 1859, and is the subject of a report of Mr. Simons (by whom some inquiries on the subject were made) of the 6th July 1859, to which I beg to refer.

I may observe that the large expenditure which the Company propose to incur in these alterations, amounting to about 8,000l., is such a dedication of property to charitable purposes as would not be far from equivalent to what could be required of them under the most adverse construction of the identity of the annual endowments.

The expenditure on the almshouses and for the maintenance of the almspeople are—

£s.d.
16 almspeople, of whom 13 receive 2l. 2s. per month, and 3, 2l. 12s. 6d. per month42220
Coals for the same number of almspeople, at 18 sacks each per annum32129
A medical attendant for the almspeople2100
For gas light440
For water440
Gifts of 2s. 6d. each on the annual visitation200
£48629

There are always repairs necessary, but as the Company are about to rebuild and dispose of the site as above stated, it is not necessary to calculate the average amount. The necessary substantial repairs were lately estimated at 800l.

The almspeople are appointed by the master and wardens from the poor of the Company at a court of wardens. (fn. 1)

Ogborn's Charity.

Richard Ogborn, by his will of the 31st October 1833, bequeathed to the Company 1,000l. 3l. per cent. Bank Annuities, the dividends to be applied annually for the liberation of poor prisoners confined in Newgate, or the Compters, by compounding for their debts.

The dividends on 900l. 3l. per cent. Consols (100l. having been required to pay the legacy duty) amount to 27l. per annum, which are applied in the manner described in the account of Frances Clark's Charity (p. 15).

Parker's Charity.

William Parker, the elder, by his will of the 6th April 1576, gave to the Company a house in Watling Street, on trust, to pay to the churchwardens of Saint Antholin 6l. a year for a learned preacher to read a lecture of divinity two days in a week for ever. The sum of 6l. a year is annually paid to the churchwardens of Saint Antholin's parish.

Pemel's Almshouses, in Stepney.

John Pemel, by his will of the 28th February 1681, bequeathed to the Company 1,200l. to lay out the same in land, and employ the first clear rents in buying a piece of land at Stepney and building an almshouse, and afterwards to pay—

£s.d.
To the eight almspeople yearly, 4l. each3200
For coal800
Clerk of the Company100
Clothing for the almspeople600

The legacy which was received in 1682 was not laid out until 1694, when 564l. 6s. had accrued as interest, of this 342l. 10s. was employed in the purchase of a site for the almshouses, and the residue of the accumulations was applied for the building.

By indentures of the 18th, 19th, and 20th of June of the same year, the Company, in consideration of the 1,200l. principal of the legacy, charged property in Saint Olave's, Southwark, and in Threadneedle Street of ample value with a rentcharge of 52l. 12s. a year, clear of all taxes, for the maintenance of the almspeople and the other purposes of the trust. The property in Threadneedle Street is represented by 10,687l. 17s. 6d. 3l. per cent. Consols, standing in the name of the Accountant-General of the Court of Chancery, and a field at Tottenham, purchased by the authority of the Court of Chancery by the sale of 2,597l. 0s. 1d. like stock. This is the field on which Milborne's and Lady Ascew's almshouses are proposed to be erected. The property of Saint Olave's, Southwark, remains in the possession of the Company.

The almshouses are in Whitechapel Road and are occupied by eight widows, four of whom are nominated by the Company and four by the hamlets of the parish of Stepney alternately, as vacancies arise. The nominations are made by the parish officers of each district, usually the incumbent and churchwardens.

£s.d.
Each almswoman receives 6s. 8d per month3200
Clerk of the Company100
Coals supplied to the almshouses (1860):—£s.d.
Charged against the trust fund581010178
Charged on the proper funds of the Company5810
Medical attendant on the almspeople: salary500
Gowns, every third year, 5l.1134
Repairs of the almshouses—£s.d.
186014141say1100
18596181
Water3120
Insurance0180
Gift 2s. 6d. each on the annual visitation100
£6710

The balance against the charity at the end of 1860 was 154l. 6s.

Pennoyer's Charit

£s.d.
Samuel Pennoyer, by his will of the 29th June 1652, devised to certain trustees, members of the Drapers' Company, certain lands and tenements in trust to apply the rents yearly for putting forth apprentices fatherless children, male or female, for each such child5000
For a weekly lecture at St. Stephen's, Bristol1200
Officers of the Company2000

The property of this charity consists of the following:—

£s.d.
A farm in the county of East Meath (described in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry, vol. 32, part 2, p. 426), John Rorke, by lease for 33 years, from May 184456000
The sum of 16,453l. 18s. 3l. per cent. Reduced Annuities standing in the corporate name of the Company, and having apparently accrued for fines received on letting the estate for long leases493124
£1,053124

The lease of the farm was granted on surrender of a former lease, which was granted on the terms specified in the following minute of the 9th June 1836.

"That in accordance with the authority given to the clerk by the Court, he entered into an agreement with Mr. Rorke for letting him the Meath estate for 41 years, from 12th May 1836, upon his payng a fine of 500l., and agreeing to pay a further sum of 1,500l. upon the granting upon the lease, and to pay a rent of 500l. per annum for the first five years of the term and 600l. for the remainder of the term, and to expend 2,500l. in the permanent improvement of the property, and to accept a lease of the said farms containing covenants in conformity with the agreement on such other covenants not inconsistent therewith as were included in the lease to Mr. Halpin,—whereupon it was resolved that the Court approve of what the clerk had done, and it was ordered that the Company's seal be affixed to a lease to the said Mr. Rorke pursuant to such agreement."

On the 9th May 1844 the matter was again brought before the court and the following minute made:—

"Read a letter from Mr. Edmund Rorke, the tenant of the Meath estate, calling the court's attention to the details of his agreement, and to the lease founded thereon, pointing out several difficulties arising out of the present lease, and submitting for the consideration of the court, that the Company should either purchase back his interest in the estate at a fair value, or that the Company should accept a surrender of his lease and grant him a new lease for the remainder of the term, with certain modifications in the covenants, and particularly omitting those which were prospective and have been fully performed, and also suggesting that questions may arise as to the tenant's liability to pay the tithe of the lands therein comprised in consequence of the Acts passed for the commutation of tithes, and the said Mr. Rorke being in attendance and called and heard thereon, and the court being satisfied that the property is not of the annual worth which it was calculated it would be after the large outlay made for its improvement, and being well satisfied with Mr. Rorke's performance of the covenants, and considering the great expediency of settling all doubtful questions relative to the party liable to pay the tithe, and it appearing that such tithe had been converted into a rentcharge, amounting to nearly 60l. per annum, and that under the circumstances 500l. per annum, in addition to such rentcharge, would be a fair rent to be hereafter paid by Mr. Rorke,—It is resolved that upon Mr. Rorke's surrender of his lease he be granted a new lease for the remainder of his term at 560l. per annum over and above all outgoings, excepting tithe, omitting therein all the prospective covenants contained in the old lease, and which have already been fulfiled, and that such lease should be a the said Mr. Rorke's expense, and shall be granted to him under the direction of the master and wardens, and it was ordered that the Company's seal be affixed thereto."

The charges and distribution of the fund are as follows—

£s.d.
To the lecturer of St. Stephen's, Bristol, who is the rector of the parish, but holds his appointment as lecturer under the Company2000
The tithe upon the Irish estate6000
The landlord's moiety of the poor rate under the poor law in Ireland—
£s.d.
185923192say1500
186012100
18581192
The allowances to the officers of the Company—
£
Clerk14
Beadle2
Upper porter2
Under porter2
2000
In the year 1860 the sum of 900l. was disbursed in the apprenticeship of 18 persons90000
£1,01500

The nomination is by the court of assistants, who nominate in rotation. Applicants for apprenticeship apply to the members of the court individually who present them to the court. They must be according to the will fatherless children of known godly English parents, of the age of 14 or upwards. Since the union the children of Irish parents have been considered to come within the description.

They may be of either sex, boys are bound for seven years and girls for five. They are in nearly all cases bound to live with the master or mistress.

The balance due to the charity at the end of 1860 (31st December) was 658l. 12s. 2½d. (fn. 2)

Quarles' Charity.

John Quarles, by his will dated in 1587, gave to the Drapers' Company 200l., to be lent to four young freemen. It appears that the trust of the interest is to pay yearly to the—

£s.d.
Parish of St. Peter-le-Poor540
The churchwardens040
Four wardens080
Clerk (Renter meant rent gatherer.)040

The sum of 5l. 8s. annually is paid to the churchwardens of St. Peter-le-Poor on their receipt.

The sum of 8s. is carried to the account of the wardens of the Company, and 4s. to the clerk, who is the rent collector meant by the term renter in the bequest.

The 200l. is calculated in the 3,811l. 10s. 6d. mentioned in the report on Clonne's Charity.

Rainey's Charity.

John Rainey, by his will of the 21st February 1631, directed the Drapers' Company, out of the rent of 100l. to be had of three messuages in Gracechurch Street, to pay annually to the—

£s.d.
Chapelry of Worsborough, Yorkshire5000
For a morning lecture at St. Michael, Cornhill4000
To the churchwardens0150
To the clerk and sexton, each 20s.200
For candles150
To the wardens of the Company200
To the Company for defraying any expenses, or for their poor400

The testator in his will recites that the property is let at 100l. per annum, subject to great fines, which he directs shall continue to be taken, and the amount so received and employed for the use, relief, and comfort of the poor distressed members of the Company, or for the repair or rebuilding of the houses in case of necessity.

The property is not, however, let upon fines, that being an inconvenient and improvident system.

The present rental of the estate is—

£s.d.
No. 56, Gracechurch Street, let to Cornelius Smith for 21 years, from Christmas 185515000
£s.d.
No. 55, Gracechurch Street, let to Thomas Hatchard Palmer for 21 years, from Christmas 185513550
Of which there belongs to Bancroft's Charity, see Table of that estate (No. 18) in my report on Bancroft's Charity33150
10150
No. 2, Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, let to Thomas Kelby for 21 years, from Midsummer 18454200
No. 3, Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, let to John Debendam for 21 years, from Midsummer 18454500
No. 6, Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, let to John Debendam for 21 years, from Midsummer 18453800
No. 4, Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, let to Stephen Jones for 21 years, from Midsummer 18454500
No. 5, Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, let to David Haswell for 21 years, from Midsummer 18454000
No. 7, Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, let to Mary Menniss for 21 years, from Midsummer 18455000
Carried forward£51150
Brought forward51150
Nos. 8, 9, 10, Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, let to Henry C. Calder for 21 years, from Michaelmas 18428000
Piece of ground in the court let to Thomas Jennings for 21 years, from March 185610100
£601150

The disbursurements under the endowment are as follows:—

£s.d.
To the lecturer and schoolmaster and poor of Worsborough, Yorkshire5000

This sum is paid quarterly on the receipt of the Reverend John Andrew, perpetual curate of Worsboro', and the churchwardens of the parish.

The Company not having any knowledge of the appropriation of the money after its payment by them, at my request, Mr. Sawyer, the clerk of the Company, addressed a letter to the churchwardens of Worsborough, making inquiries as to the school and the other objects of the Charity so far as they related to Worsboro'. A copy of which letter and of the reply thereto are as follows:—

"Drapers' Hall,
30th July 1861.

"Gentlemen,
"The court of assistants of the Drapers' Company will at their meeting, which is fixed for Monday next the 5th August, have under their consideration so much of the will of Mr. John Rainey as relates to his bequest to the master of the Worsboro' Grammar School and the lectureship at the church or chapel of that place, and I shall be obliged by your furnishing me with information on the subject, together with the names of the visitors of the school appointed under the directions of Mr. Rainey's will.

"The court will like to have some account of the school, with the sort of education imparted to the scholars; the number attending, with the age of their admission; and if the school is entirely for boys or for children of both sexes. You will be so good as to state if it is a free school, or whether anything is paid for the children's education, and if so, how much? You should also let me know if the master receives private scholars, and the amount paid with each. Will you also let me know if the admission is ordered by the visitors.

"By the will of the founder the lecturer is to preach twice every Sabbath day in the church or chapel of Worsboro', will you, when you write, let me know if this duty is regularly performed; I shall also be obliged by your informing me how Mr. Rainey's gift for the poor of Worsboro' is disposed of.

"I am, Gentlemen, "Your obedient servant,
"(Signed) W. H. Sawyer.

"To the churchwardens of Worsboro'."

Reply.

"Worsboro', August 1st, 1861.

"Dear Sir,
"Relative to your inquiries respecting the Worsborough Grammar School, together with the distribution of the Rayner's Bequest Charity, I beg to make the following reply: firstly, I am not aware that any person, except Her Majesty's Inspectors of Schools, makes any visits to the school. The deputy master informs me the number of names on his register amounts to 46, all of which are boys, but the average attendance of the scholars is 32–3. The children have a sound English education,—the catechism and liturgy of the Church of England, grammar, and geography are taught to such as remain at school until their reason is sufficiently developed to attain those subjects. The children are admitted at the age of seven years and upwards, and pay the various sums of 2d., 3d., 4d., and 6d. per week, according to the means of the parents. No private scholars are taught by the master; any person in the parish may have their children admitted by applying to the deputy master. The lecturer, the Rev. John Andrew, delivers a lecture at our parish church twice daily on Sunday, morning and afternoon. That part of the Rayner's equest to be given to the poor of this and neighbouring ownships is regularly distributed at Christmas yearly.

"I am, Gentlemen,
"Your obedient servants,
"(Signed) John Hall,
"Churchwarden,
"Worsboro', near Barnsley Yorkshire.

"To W. H. Sawyer, Esq."

(Disbursements—continued.)

£s.d.
The lecturer of St. Michael's, Cornhill4000
The present lecturer is the Rev. Mr. Hunt, who is the master of Bancroft's Hospital. He reads a lecture and performs a full service on Sunday evening of every week. The Company add a donation of 30l. to the lecturer out of their own funds.
The churchwardens of the same parish, for themselves, the clerk, and sexton, and for candles800
The wardens of the Company200

The balance, which amounts to about 500l. per annum, is specially applied to the payment of what are called the "casual poor" on the account of the charities general.

The gifts to the casual poor are made quarterly, and vary from about 10s. per quarter to about 3l. a year. They are regarded as pensioners, although the greater part of the recipients receive about the same sums quarterly as long as they apply, and are supposed to stand in need of it. They are necessarily free of the Company. The numbers of the casual poor are from 74 to 100 persons.

The amount of the fund falling under the head of charities general in 1860 was 3,000l. 1s. 11d., and of that the balance out of the proper funds of the Company was 1,235l. 2s. 4d. (fn. 3)

Charities of Rainey and Hibbens.

John Rainie or Rainey, by his will of the 21st February 1631, bequeathed to the Company 200l. to purchase lands and distribute the rents to the most needy, aged, and distressed poor members of the Company.

Anthony Hibbens, by his will of the 18th May 1639, bequeathed to the Company 200l. for purchasing a house, and the rent to be given amongst the poor of the Company. And by indentures of the 18th and 19th June 1694 the Company agreed to pay 20l. a year amongst the poor of the Company according to the wills above mentioned, and charged the same on certain leases in St. Michael Barrishaw and St. Stephen, Coleman Street. This property is situated in Basinghall Street, and is the 'property of the Company, let to John Tregon at a much greater rent.

The 20l. a year is carried to the account of the charities general, and forms part of that distribution. (See John Rainey's Charity.)

Lady Ramsay's Charity.

Lady Mary Ramsay, by her will of the 8th July 1601, gave to the Drapers' Company 200l., to be lent out at 5l. per cent., and the profits distributed towards the relief of the poor of the Company. This forms part of the 3,811l. 10s. 6d. mentioned in Clonne's Charity.

The 10l. a year applicable for the poor of the Company forms part of the pensions to the poor on the roll. (See Kendrick's Charity.)

Royley's Charity.

Theophilus Royley, by his will of the 12th February 1655, devised to the Company lands in the parish of St. Giles, Cripplegate, in trust, after the expiration of 32 years from his decease, out of one moiety of the rents and profits to dispose as follows:—
and the residue in placing out children of the poor of the Company, 5l. a boy and 3l. a girl. And he directed the other moiety of the rents should be disposed of amongst his grandchildren, but not to go beyond two degrees from his daughter Mary.

£s.d.
To 80 poor men of the Company2000
To the minister of St. Mary-le Bow100
To the clerk and sexton0100
To the youngest wardens0100
To two persons for collecting the rents800

The estate was administered by the Company without, so far as I can discover, any suit or directions of the Court of Chancery and according to the directions of the will. The property having increased in value, the specific payments directed to be made did not exhaust the moiety of the income, and the payments to the grandchildren ceased in 1751, when the last of the persons entitled under that bequest died. The trust was then indebted to the Company and continued so for about eight years. No separation of the moieties of the accounts took place until long afterwards. The account was continued under the head of Royley's Trust as one fund, and as the payments to members of his family had ceased altogether, and the objects of the charity were so limited as to exhaust only a portion of the income, the gross fund had considerably increased. Up to the 1st January 1836 the Commissioners of Inquiry (Reports, vol. 32, part 2, p. 428) found that the aggregate accumulation was 5,912l. 15s. 8d., of which the balance of the charity moiety was 1,714l. 4s., and of the other or family moiety, 4,198l. 11s. 8d. The Company subsequently presented their petition to the Court of Chancery under Sir Samuel Romilly's Act, stating the will, and stating that the property, one moiety of the rents and profits whereof was by the will devised to charitable purposes aforesaid, consisted of certain tenements and premises in Old Street, St. Luke's, Middlesex, and had very considerably increased in value, and then produced a yearly rental of about 275l., and one moiety of the said yearly rental was, and for some years past had been, more than sufficient for fulfilling the charitable bequests to which the same was devoted by the said testator, and there was then a considerable balance in the hands of the Company, which had arisen from the overplus of the moiety of the said rents after answering the charitable purposes and bequests aforesaid, and stating also that the Company were desirous of the direction of the Court of Chancery for the application of the balance and the future regulation of the said charity; and praying that it might be referred to the Master to inquire into the trusts of the charity declared by the testator's will, and to settle a scheme for the future management thereof, and for the application of the said charity funds towards the charitable objects mentioned in the said testator's will, or as near thereto as might be, having regard to the increase of the said funds.

The Court, by its order of the 31st January 1840, referred it to the master to settle a scheme for the future regulation of the charity and for the application of the income of the said charity funds towards the said charitable objcts mentioned in the said testator's will, or as near thereto as might be, having regard to the will and the income of the funds, and it was ordered that the AttorneyGeneral should have notice of the order, and be at liberty to attend the Master. The Master, by his report of the 24th May 1841, found that, besides the moiety of the annual rents (then 137l. 10s.), the balance of the surplus of the said moiety which had been accumulated had been invested by the Company in 1,898l. 18s. 7d. 3l. per cent. Consols, the annual dividends of which were 56l. 19s. 2d., and he thereupon approved of the following scheme for the administration of the increased income.

1st. That the sum of 40l. shall be annually paid to 80 poor men of the said Company of Drapers by equal portions on the 5th of November in each year.

2nd. That the sum of 2l. shall be paid annually to the minister of St. Mary-le-Bow for preaching a sermon on the 5th November in every year; the sum of 1l. to the clerk or sexton for his pains and for candles; the sum of 1l. to the youngest warden of the said Company for the time being to take the oversight of the distribution of 40l. to such poor as aforesaid; and the sum of 16l. to the person the court of assistants shall appoint to gather the rents of the said charity messuages and tenements and receive the dividends of the charity fund.

3rd. That the said court of assistants shall in future expend any sum of money not exceeding 30l. for placing forth a boy, and any sum not exceeding 20l. for placing out a girl, and that such court of assistants shall in selecting such boys and girls give a preference to the children of widows of members of the said Company, and shall in placing forth such boys and girls expend any sum not exceeding 30l. in placing forth a boy, and not exceeding 20l. in placing forth a girl, and that when and as often as the Company shall have in their hands any of the moneys aforesaid ready to be advanced in the manner herein-before stated, that the said court shall cause to be posted up in some conspicuous place in the porter's lodge at the entrance of the said Hall, in manner heretofore accustomed as to the said gifts 5l. and 3l., a notice that such moneys are ready to be advanced, and shall in default of applications cause to be advertised in two or more of the London daily newspapers a notice to the like effect.

4th. And that the court of assistants shall apply the residue of the income of the said charity estate and funds, if any, in placing forth poor boys and girls of the court, having regard to the preference directed by the said testator's will as to the children of widows of members of the said Company.

The court by its order of the 5th August 1841 confirmed the Master's report, and directed the costs to be taxed and paid out of the said accumulated stock.

The present estate of the charity is one moiety of the rents of the following property:—

£s.d.
Nos. 28 and 30, Old Street, St. Luke's.Building lease to James Gardner for 61 years, from Midsummer, 1844.2000
No. 29, Old Street and Builders Yard.Building lease for the same term to Samuel James.1000
Nos. 1 to 5, Royley Street, St. Luke's.Building lease for the same term to Thomas Moore.1000
Nos. 6 to 10, Royley Street, St. Luke's.Building lease to John Brain's representatives, same term.3000
Nos. 11 and 12, Royley Street, St. Luke's.Building lease to R. H. Shrewsbury, same term.2100
Nos. 13 to 16, Royley Street, St. Luke's.Building lease to John Brain's representatives, same term.2400
11500
Of which the moiety of the charity is57100
2,000l. Consols 3l. per cent. standing in the name of the Company, consisting of the residue of the 1,898l. 18s. 7d. mentioned in the Master's report, after paying costs and a small subsequent accumulation6000
£117100
This is applied as follows under the scheme—
£s.d.
A sum of 10s. a-piece is given to so many poor freemen of the Company as apply for it at the warden's court held in the month of November (not exceeding 80). For three years past the full number have not applied. In 1858 there were 77 applicants. In 1859 and 1860 only 75 in each year37100
The minister 2l., clerk and sexton of Bow Church 1l.300
In 1860 one apprentice fee (a girl)500
In 1859 40l. was assigned; and In 1858 100l. (three 30l. and one 10l.).
The clerk 16l. and the wardens 1l.1700

At the close of the year 1860 there was a balance to the credit of the charity of 294l. 17s. 5d.

The remaining moiety of the estate was, as it has been seen, devised by the testator to be disposed of by his trustees and their successors "amongst such of his grandchildren by such sums and proportions as the court of assistants should for the time being think fit, having respect to the necessities of his grandchildren not going beyond two degrees from his daughter." The accumulation on this account in 1836 has been stated as 4,198l. 11s. 8d., and the subsequent accumulations, in the absence of any appropriation, might be readily calculated. It will be seen that this fund was not, nor was the moiety of the estate from which it proceded, the subject of any question in the proceedings in the Court of Chancery. The gift of the rents to the grandchildren would, I apprehend, have been a gift of the corpus (unless it be read as a reservation for the benefit of two degrees of the kinsfolk only), but that right does not appear to have been insisted upon, and the claimants on the income of the fund expired a century ago. The Drapers' Company under these circumstances claim to hold the property as lapsed to them and subject to no further claim, charitable or otherwise.

I should, however, observe that the Company have determined to apply the accumulated fund as of their own bounty towards the erection of an educational institution and almshouses at Tottenham (mentioned elsewhere), and to dedicate the growing income of the same moiety until further order for the maintenance of the same institution.

Thomas Russell's Charity (Will).

Thomas Russell, by his will of the 7th July 1593, devised to the Drapers' Company certain messuages in the city of London, to pay 19l. 13s. 4d. yearly, viz.:—

£s.d.
To 13 poor members of the Company, 2s. 6d. a month19100
To the renter and beadle034

The Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 436) state the income of the premises described under this devise at the time of the inquiry, and the fact that the specific payments only were applied to charitable trusts, and they add that in order that it might be determined whether the Company were entitled to the surplus rents, the case had been certified to the Attorney-General.

On the 10th January 1839 an information ex-officio was filed by the Attorney-General against the Drapers' Company, praying that it might be declared that the whole of the rents and profits of the said premises ought to be applied to the purposes in the said will pointed out or to some other like charitable purposes. And that the said Company were not entitled to appropriate any part thereof to themselves. And that the said Company might be decreed to make good and pay, to be applied as aforesaid as the Court might direct, the whole surplus of such income which had been so retained by them as aforesaid during such time as to the Court might seem just. And that it might be declared how such increased rents, together with whatever might be coming from the said Company, ought to be applied, and that, if necessary. it might be referred to the Master to approve of some proper scheme.

The Court, by its decree of the 17th July 1840, declarea that the whole of the rents referred to were applicable for the charitable purposes of the will of Thomas Russell, or to some other like charitable purposes, and directed the account of the receipts of the defendants since the filing of the information to be taken, and a scheme to be settled for the future administration of the charity. The decree appears to this point to have been taken by consent. By a decree, on further directions, of the 16th December 1845, it was declared that the scheme in the Master's report of the 10th December 1845 was a proper scheme for the future administration of the charity, and the costs of the AttorneyGeneral were ordered to be paid out of the 1,888l. 8s., the balance found due from them in respect of the charity estates, and the residue of the said sum was ordered to be invested in Consols in their names, and the interest was directed to be applied as part of the income of the charity. A printed copy of the scheme, which was settled by the Master, is appended to this report.

The present property of the charity is—

£s.d.
No. 19, Birchin Lane, Cornhill, let to the Guarantee Society for 21 years, from Michaelmas 185337000
No. 58, Tower Street, let to D. Fowkes for 21 years, from Christmas 18434500
Rentcharge on a churchyard in the parish of St. Edmund the King0134
Carried forward£415134
Brought forward415134
851l. 1s. 3d. 3l. per cent. Reduced Annuities, representing the 750l. Old South Sea Annuities, mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 436)25106
1,672l. 6s. 3l. per cent. Consols, residue of the sum found due from the Company in the above suit after paying costs5036
£49174

The sum (except the allowance of 20l. to the clerk) is disposed of in pensions of 25l. each to 19 poor of the Company, according to the scheme. They are necessarily free of Company, and are selected by the master and wardens at their court, at their discretion, without other qualification.

The scheme allows 20l. a year to the clerk of the Company.

On the 31st December 1860 there was a balance of 10s. 8d. against the trust.

Russell's Charity (Deed).

Thomas Russell, by deeds poll of the 6th July 1593, gave to trustees (the same being afterwards conveyed to the Company) a yearly rent of 50l. 10s., charged on messuages and hereditaments, called the Crown rents, in St. Leonard, Shoreditch, on trust, to pay—

£s.d.
To 20 unbeneficed preachers at St. Paul's Cross, each 10s.1000
Churchwardens of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, for bread to the poor on Sunday2120
Two poor scholars of Oxford and Cambridge, each 6l. 13s. 4d. for six years each1368
To the poor of Barton, Staffordshire2120
To the school there21100
£5000

The Company receive 40l. 8s. (the land tax being deducted) from the representatives of Mr. Smart, the owners of property in Shoreditch.

The Company receive annually a certificate from the Lord Mayor of the preceding year of the names of the ministers who have preached at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul before the Lord Mayor during his mayoralty, and the Company then pay the sum of 8l. to the Chamberlain of the City, leaving the distribution to the City functionaries. I do not see exactly the purpose of the certificate, nor does it appear whether any of the preachers are unbeneficed.

The sums of 6l. 13s. 4d., without deduction, are paid to two scholars of Oxford and Cambridge, selected by the court of assistants of the Company.

The sum of 2l. 12s. is paid to the churchwardens of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, and the same to the churchwardens of Barton, Staffordshire.

The Company also pay 30l. 10s. to the master of the Barton Free School, Staffordshire.

The present master is Mr. George Heap. He was appointed by the Company on the recommendation of the visitors of the school. I have addressed certain questions to him as to the state of the school, to which, by a letter of the 9th May 1864, he replied as follows:—

"Free School, Barton-under-Needwood, May 9th, 1861.

"Sir,
1. "The premises generally are in a very dilapidated condition. The roof is bad, and lets in the wet in many places, and in one place it is falling in. One of the gables is falling off. The floors are worn through in several places. The doors are out of repair and fit very badly. The fireplaces are worn out. The windows are most of them falling out. The watercloset wants moving, it being near the front door, and smells badly, A new pump is wanted. The brickwork wants pointing, as the mortar is falling out of the joints, and some of the bricks are loose near the foundation. The fences are very bad round the premises. There are no suitable outbuildings.

"The house is occupied by the master, who also holds the land adjoining the school, this and two small allotments are worth about 9l. 10s. per annum.

2. "There are 80 names on the books. Boys only are admitted. The number is not limited.

3. "The age of admission is six and upwards. A charge of 1s. per annum is made for firing. All reading books and slates used in the school are provided by the school fund committee at Barton, but copy-books, pens and ink, and books for home lessons the parents provide.

4. "Admission to the school is obtained by the parents or guardians making application to the master. Children living in Barton, Tatenhill, Dunstall, and Wichnor are admitted free.

5. "There are two private day scholars who pay each 6d. per week.

6. "The presont course of instruction is of an elementary character, comprising reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, grammar, English history, and geography. Greek and Latin are not taught.

7. "The present master is not a graduate of a University or Certificate.

£s.d.
8. "Over and above that which the Drapers Company pay as the original endowment they make a yearly gratuity to the master of11100
"The school fund committee at Barton give1500
The land produces9100
£3600

9. "Formerly there were 12 visitors appointed by the Drapers' Company. Three of these are dead, three have left the neighbourhood, and the remaining six are living in or near Barton.

"In reference to question 6, I understand that application was made some years ago to the Draper's Company for an alteration in the course of instruction, which was granted."

(Signed) Geo. Heap.

It should be observed that the Company pay annually 57l., being much more than they receive. The increased allowance had been made to the school whilst the charity of the same founder under the will was administered as it was before the information. Since the information the Company have not withdrawn the extra payment.

The Drapers' Company in the year 1841 were led to institute proceedings in the Court of Chancery for liberty "either at once by a writing under their seal, or after such inquiries and by such mode of proceedings as the Lord Chancellor might direct, to remove or to declare the removal as from the 9th December 1840 (or such other terms as the Court should direct) of William Thompson from the office of Master of the Grammar School." It appears that the Court on the 16th July 1841 ordered "that the Company should exercise visitorial jurisdiction in the matter of the petition and upon the charge made thereby against William Thompson. And that the several persons who had made affidavits in support of the petition should attend and be examined by such members upon such charge, with liberty for the said William Thompson to attend such inquiry by himself, his counsel and solicitor, and to cross-examine such witnesses, and also in contradiction and defence of and against such charge to call and examine such witnesses and to make such statement before the said Company and their said assessor as he should think fit. And that all witnesses before giving their testimony be sworn either before one of the Masters of the Court or before a Master extra in the country, and after such inquiry should have been made,—it was ordered that the said Company be at liberty if they should think fit and adjudge by writing under their corporate seal to remove the said William Thompson from being schoolmaster."

The visitation was held, an assessor having been duly appointed; the master and wardens of the Draper's Company, by their order of the 18th February 1842, adjudged by writing under the corporate seal "that the said William Thompson be and he was thereby removed from being the schoolmaster of the Free Grammar School of Barton-under-Needwood, in the county of Stafford, upon the ground of the allegations of immoral conduct charged against the said William Thompson, or such schoolmaster as aforesaid having been in our judgment and opinion established before us."

The Company in respect of this inquiry incurred a charge of 259l. 19s. 11d. for costs. In 1844 they expended 82l. 19s. 8d. in the repair of the school. On the 31st December 1861 there was on the books of the Company a balance of 757l. 16s. 1d. against this charity. The Company would probably have been entitled to the costs of removing the master out of the charity funds, if they had asked to retain them. How far the other excess of payments would be allowed may be a question. (fn. 4)

Agnes Smith's Charity.

Agnes Smith, sometime before 1620, gave the Company 50l. for 50s. a year to be paid to the churchwardens of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, annually. This is paid accordingly on their annual receipt.

John Smith's Charity.

John Smith, by a direction given inter vivos on condition that the Company would make the payments after directed, gave them 1,250l. to distribute amongst 20 poor, honest, decayed men of the Company 25l. annually, and—

s.d.
To the wardens230
" clerk50
" rent gatherer34
" beadle30
" under beadle20

The founder appears to have desired to make a different appropriation of this fund by his will, which has not, however, been attended to.

The 25l. is paid yearly to the account of the charities general, and forms part of the distribution under that head (see Sir R. Champion's Charity). The clerk and rent gatherer receive 8s. 4d. a year and the beadle 3s., and the upper porter 2s. a year.

Sir Samuel Starling's Charity.

Sir Samuel Starling, by his will of 7th August 1673, directed his trustees to convey to the Company a messuage in the parish of Saint Sepulchre to distribute one moiety of the rents for the relief of the poor of the Company and the other moiety for the use of the stock of the said Company.

The sum of 4l. a year is still paid by the Company to the account of the charities general, as representing the benefaction of the donor, nothing in Giltspur Street (parish of St. Sepulchre) being now belonging to the Company. It remains as at the last inquiry.

Stock's Charity.

John Stock, by his will of the 26th February 1780, gave the Company 100l., and the interest applied annually for the benefit of the poor of the Company. The sum appears to have purchased 200l. 3l. per cent. Consols. The sum of 6l. a year is carried to the account of the charities general for the benefit of the poor of the Company.

Stock's Gift to Christ's Hospital.

John Stock, by his will of the 26th February 1780, empowers the Drapers' Company to present one boy to be maintained and clothed in Christ's Hospital. The presentation, when a vacancy occurs, is made by the court of assistants.

Stocker's Charity.

John Stocker is said to have directed by his will (date unknown) that the Drapers' Company should between the feasts of All Saints and Christmas yearly distribute to the poor people of the parish of Saint Mary, Abchurch, one load of coals.

s.d.
To the poor prisoners of the King's Bench, Marshalsea, White Lion, Newgate, and Bethlehem, each 5s. in bread250
Master and wardens50

The Company pay 2l. a year on the receipt of the churchwardens of the parish of St. Mary, Abchurch, and send yearly at Christmas 50 2-lb. loaves to each of the prisoners of the Queen's Bench, Marshalsea, Newgate, Bethlehem, and Horsemonger Lane.

The distribution is in kind, and delivered on the receipt of the governor or keepers. The bread in 1860 was 5l. 18s. 9d. The 5s. is carried to the account of the master and wardens, making 8l. 3s. 9d. in lieu of 3l. 10s., the founder's gift.

Tarn's Charity.

William Tarn and the Drapers' Company, by their indenture of the 18th July 1799, declared the trust of the sum of 400l. Consols transferred by W. Tarn to the Company to pay the dividends (after deducting 20s. for executing the trust) to the rector and churchwardens of the parish of Middleton-in-Teesdale for supplying coals or other fuel for the use of the school at Newbiggin in the said parish.

The Company remit annually, on application, the sum of 11l. to the minister and churchwardens of the parish of Middleton-in-Teesdale. The last receipt was on the 8th of July 1857, expressed to be for the gift due to the 5th of July 1857. No application has been since made, and three years' dividends are in hand.

Sir William Terry's Charity.

This charity does not appear to have taken effect. Nothing more is known of it than at the last inquiry.

Thompson's Charity.

Lawrence Thompson, by his will in 1601, gave to the Company 100l., to be lent out at 5l. per cent., and the interest paid to the poor of St. Peter, Cornhill.

The 100l. forms part of 3,811l. 10s. 6d. mentioned in Clonne's Charity, and the 5l. is paid annually to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Peter, Cornhill.

Thorowgood's Charity.

William Thorowgood, by his will of the 6th August 1602, gave an annuity of 4l. 6s. 8d. out of houses in Aldgate for poor decayed brothers and sisters of the Company. The Company receive 4l. 6s. 8d. from the owners of the property, and carry it to the account of the charities general (see John Rainey's Charity).

Torkington's Charity.

John Torkington is stated in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 434) to have devised to the Company, by his will of the 19th October 1563, a messuage in the parish of St. Edmund, to pay 40s. to the use of the poor of that parish. The Company have no property in the parish, and I cannot find that any payment of this description has been ever made. There is no notice of this will in the books of the Company, and I am ignorant of the source of the former report.

John Walter's Almshouses in St. George's, Southwark, and St. Mary's, Newington.

John Walter, by his will of the 17th October 1656, gave to the Company certain messuages in trust to pay out of the rents—

£s.d.
To 16 poor people in the eight almshouses in St. George's, Southwark, 6s. 8d. monthly6400
The like, to the 16 poor in the Newington almshouses6400
To one of the almspeople in each parish for reading prayers200
For sea coal yearly to be divided equally amongst the poor1200
To the parson of Newington and the parson of St. George's, 10s. each100
To the two upper wardens100
To the two younger wardens200
To the clerk200
To the rent gatherer080
To the beadle and porter068
To the servant of the clerk060
To the clerks and sexton of the two parishes0130
To the wardens for visiting the almshouses100
To the poor of the city of Hereford2000

St. George, Southwark Almshouses.

The land for the erection of the almshouses in St. George's Fields appears to have been conveyed in the lifetime of Mr. John Walter, and that, in 1650, eight almshouses had been built upon it, and by a deed of the 20th February in that year it was declared that the four houses lying next together towards Newington should be from time to time inhabited by aged, godly, and distressed poor people of the said parish of good name and fame and of quiet life and honest conversation, and none to be chosen but such as, for the space of two years then before, should have received relief of the said parish, unless there should happen such an extraordinary object of charity as thereinafter mentioned who had not received parish relief, and yet should be thought more fit to be preferred than any other, and that the said parishioners should elect only those poor as should inhabit those four houses, namely, to inhabit the corner house thereof, two poor aged and godly single men, and to inhabit the other three houses, six poor aged and godly single women, two in each house: that the two houses lying next such four houses should be for the habitation of four single women or widows of the said parish, two in each house, to be appointed by the wardens of the Company, and the two houses lying next together northward for the habitation of such poor as the four wardens of the Drapers' Company should elect to be taken from any place whatsoever, and that of those two houses, the corner house should be for two men, and the other for two single women or widows; and it was agreed that the parishioners of St. George's (several being parties to the deed) should from time to time repair the almshouses or should forfeit the benefit of the election of their parish poor.

Saint Mary, Newington, Almshouses.

The same John Walter appears to have in his lifetime built eight almshouses and a chapel, for which, by a deed of the 2nd January 1650, ordinances were made in most respects similar to those for the St. George's almshouses above stated, with the exception that the almshouses were to be chosen from St. Mary's parish. This deed providee that six of those eight almshouses erected as aforesaid should be from time to time for the dwellings of the honest, quiet, aged, and godly poor of that parish: the corner house westward for two men, and the three houses next it and the two houses next the chapel on the east side of that chapel for ten women of that parish, two to dwell in every house together. And that all the poor only to dwell in the four houses on the west side of the chapel should be from time to time thereafter named and chosen by such of the parishioners of that parish as thereafter mentioned, they making their election of such poor people and in such manner as thereafter expressed, and that those poor people to dwell in the other two houses on the east side of the chapel, and in the two houses lying together next them towards the east should be for the several dwellings of such godly, aged, or fit poor as the four wardens of the Drapers' Company should from time to time name, elect, and place to dwell or inhabit therein, and the poor which were to dwell in the said two last-mentioned houses towards the east were to be taken away from any place, town, or parish whatsoever, and that of those two houses the corner or end house should be for the habitation of two men, and the other house for the habitations of two single women or widowers. And it was further agreed that if thereafter at any time the master, wardens, and court of assistants of the Drapers' Company or the said founder should find cause and think fit to have but one person to dwell in every of those eight almshouses, that, then, and from time to time thereafter there should be but one to dwell in every of the said houses accordingly.

The lord of the manor of St. Mary, Newington, appears to have been a party to the deed settling the site of the almshouses in that parish, being part of the waste of the manor, which I presume became enfranchised by this conveyance.

The will of the testator devising the estate for the endowment before referred to, in addition to the specific provisions above stated for the poor in the almshouses and the various officers, appointed that such honest and godly poor as should happen to be sick, extreme aged, blind, or bedrid and could not work, but by want should be like to perish, should, in the time of such their necessities, and to avoid extremities, be relieved (as their necessities might require) by the said governors or paymaster with some part of the moneys which should happen to be in stock for the said poor. And he appointed the two younger wardens to be governors of the almshouses. Various other directions for the government of the institutions are set forth in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 407), which it is unnecessary to repeat.

A further endowment arose from Ann Mills' Gift.

Ann Mills, by an indenture of the 10th December 1690, granted to the Company two messuages in Lime Street and land in Islington, upon trust, to apply the rents for the relief of the poor of the almshouses in St. George's and Newington. The property derived from this source is numbered in the tabular statement of the Charity estate, Nos. 12 and 13 (page 354).

The other endowment of the almshouses arose from Walter and Richard Mills' Gifts.

Dr. Walter Mills and Richard Mills in the year 1725 each gave to the Company 350l. South Sea Annuities (making together 700l. South Sea Annuities) in trust, to pay to the almspeople of St. George's and Newington and also to eight almspeople in the St. Leonard, Shoreditch, almshouses 10s. per annum each. This has now become 794l. 6s. 6d. (part of 1,489l. 8s. 9d.) Reduced 3l. per cent. Annuities. The South Sea Annuities have been paid off (see Table No. 10 below). Under the second clause in the scheme hereafter mentioned, the Company are directed, after the retention of 5 per cent. commission, to pay the dividends to the St. George's and Newington almshouses and to the Shoreditch almshouses in equal portions. The construction of this has been one third to each set of houses. I rather think equality of each recipient was meant, but it must be remembered that the number of the almspeople were formerly the same in each house.

The Commissioners of Inquiry by their Report, (vol. 32, part 2, pp. 408, 409), set forth the estate and the management of the institution up to the time of their inquiry.

On the 31st May 1852 an information was filed against the Drapers' Company by the Attorney-General at the relation of James Brooker and John Ireland, two inhabitants of the parish of Saint Mary, Newington, which was several times amended by adding parties, and praying that an account of the estate might be taken, and that it might be ascertained and declared in whom the legal estate of the said almshouses, chapel, and premises were then vested. And that it might also be ascertained who and what classes or class of persons were entitled to elect the said almspeople according to the true construction of the said indenture of the 2nd January 1650 and of the 10th September 1650, or either of them, and the said will of the said testator John Walter, and that it might be referred to the Master to settle a plan or scheme for the future application of all the rents and profits, interest, dividends, annual produce and revenues respectively belonging to the said endowment of almshouses in the said parish of Saint Mary, Newington, to the use of the said charity according to the trusts of the indenture of the 2nd January 1650 and the will of the said testator, and such other gifts and bequests as aforesaid respectively, or as near thereto as might be.

The information came on to be heard on the 11th June 1855, when an inquiry was directed of who or what classes or class of persons were entitled to elect the almspeople for the almshouses in the parish of St. Mary, Newington.

The chief clerk certified that the persons so entitled were the rector or parson, the churchwardens and overseers of the poor of the said parish, and so many of the parishioners as had borne the office or place of churchwarden or overseer of the said parish or the greater number of them assembled at a public meeting or vestry to be convened in manner by the said indenture of 2nd January 1650 prescribed, and the four wardens of the Drapers' Company.

The chief clerk's certificate (dated in December 1855) further stated other particulars of the deed of settlement, together with a local Act of the 54 Geo. 3., relating to powers for rebuilding the workhouse of St. Mary's parish, whereby the rector, churchwardens, and overseers, and also the justices of the peace for Surrey resident in the said parish, together with certain persons therein named, and their successors to be appointed in manner therein-after mentioned, were appointed governors and guardians of the poor of the said parish for the purposes of well-governing, providing for employing and managing the poor and for carrying the several other purposes of the said Act into execution. And that by the 57th section of the same Act the inhabitants of the said parish in vestry assembled were required to nominate eight householders, of whom the justices of the peace for the eastern half hundred of Brixton and borough of Southwark should appoint four to be overseers, and such persons so nominated should thenceforth, together with the churchwardens for the time being, be overseers of the poor of the said parish, and they were thereby required to take upon themselves the office of governor and guardians, and to perform all duties of the said office, as well as the matters and duties incident to the office of overseers of the poor.

The information came on to be heard for further consideration on the 6th March 1856, when the costs of the suit were directed to be taxed and paid out of the funds of the charity, and a proper scheme was ordered to be settled by the judge of the court. In accordance with this order the costs found due to the different solicitors and paid in the year 1856 amounted to 1,671l. 15s. 5d.

It was on the 12th November 1857 ordered that the application should be adjourned to be heard in Court upon the question whether the right or election conferred by the deed of the 20th February 1650 was not a duty, power, or privilege within the meaning of the 19 & 20 Vict. c. 112. s. 3., and therefore to be exercised by the vestry elected under the provisions of the 18 & 19 Vict. c. 120., as amended by the last-mentioned Act, or whether it was in the minister, churchwardens, and overseers, and such parishioners of the parish of St. George-the-Martyr, Southwark, as should pay taxations to the poor, and should not keep inmates or poor lodgers, or the greater number of them. And this question coming on the 25th February 1858, it was declared by the Court that the minister, churchwardens, and overseers, and such parishioners of St. George-the-Martyr, Southwark, as pay taxations to the poor, and do not keep inmates or poor lodgers, or the greater number of them, assembled at a public meeting or vestry to be convened for the purpose, pursuant to the provisions of the deed dated the 20th February 1650, were the parties to be represented in proceeding on the inquiries directed by the order of the 1st August 1857, or such of them as related to the last-named parties; and with that declaration it was ordered that the said application be remitted back to Chambers.

Several questions arose in the discussion in Chambers as to the right of the several portions of the charitable objects to a rateable increase of the income of the charity, and as to the right of a wider class of poor to participate in the gift in cases of great distress and emergency, under the clause in the will above referred to. The case was argued in Court as well as in Chambers, and judgment was delivered by the Vice-Chancellor (Kindersly) on the 5th March 1860, a transcript of the short-hand writer's notes of which judgment is annexed to this report.

The scheme ultimately settled by the Court and confirmed on the 27th April 1861 is as follows:—

1. The Drapers' Company shall have power to grant leases of the charity estates for any term not exceeding 21 years in possession, provided that such leases be at the best rent that can reasonably be obtained and without fine or foregift.

2. The Drapers' Company shall pay the dividends to accrue due on the sum of 794l. 6s. 6d. Reduced 3l. per cent. Annuities (which represents the gifts of Walter Mills and Richard Mills), after deducting the commission of 5 per cent. on the amount thereof, which is to be paid to their clerk in three equal portions among the poor inhabiting the three several almshouses at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, St. Mary, Newington, and St. George's, Southwark.

The Drapers' Company shall carry the income arising from the land which was the gift of Robert Render, after deducting the like commission of 5 per cent. to be paid to their clerk to the account of the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses, to be wholly applied as a part of the income of such almshouses.

The Drapers' Company shall carry the income arising from the land, which was given by Ann Mills, in equal moieties to the accounts of the almshouses of St. Mary, Newington, and St. George's, Southwark, to be applied as parts of the incomes of such almshouses respectively.

Out of the income of the remaining trust property and funds of the charity, there shall be paid by the Drapers' Company to the trustees of the municipal charities of the city of Hereford for the time being, or any two of them, 20l. per annum, to be applied for the benefit of the poor of that city.

To the clerk of the Drapers' Company for the time being, a commission or salary after the rate of 5l. per cent. per annum on the income of such remaining trust property and funds, which commission or salary is to cover all expenses for collecting the income and keeping the accounts of the charity, but this allowance and the previously allowed commission to the said clerk of the Drapers' Company is not to exceed in the whole the annual sum of 50l.

To the vestry clerk of the parish of St. George's, Southwark, and to the clerk of the governors and guardians of the poor of St. Mary, Newington, 10l. per annum each, and an additional sum of 2l. 2s. per annum to each of such clerks for books, printing, stationery, postages; and other incidental expenses.

To the beadle of the Drapers' Company 1l. per annum and to the two elder or upper wardens of the Drapers' Company 10l. per annum, to be equally divided between them, and to the poor of the Drapers' Company 6l. 13s. 4d. per annum.

To the clerk and sexton of each of the two parishes of St. Mary, Newington, and St. George's, Southwark, 13s. per annum, to be equally divided between them; and to the parsons or rectors of the two last-named parishes for visiting and spiritually comforting the almspeople, the sum of 3l. 3s. each per annum.

3. Out of the accumulated fund already made of the charity property, the sum of 40l. sterling shall be paid to the trustees of the municipal charities of the city of Hereford for the time being, or any two of them, to be applied for the poor of the said city, and the sum of 53l. 6s. 8d. sterling shall be applied for the poor of the Drapers' Company, and the sum of 205l. 17s. 8d. sterling shall be carried to the account of the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses, to make good deficiencies in annual payments heretofore made, and the residue of such accumulated fund (subject to the payment of the costs of this suit) shall be divided into two equal parts, one of which shall be carried to the account of the St. Mary, Newington almshouses, and the other to the account of the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses, and such parts thereof as shall consist of cash shall be respectively invested in 3l. per cent. Consolidated Bank Annuities.

4. The income of such part of the accumulated fund, as under the preceding direction shall be carried to the account of the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses, or as shall be invested to that account under the directions herein-after contained, and one moiety of the surplus income of the charity, after making the payments directed by the second clause, shall be applied according to the provisions herein-after contained with reference to the income of the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses, and the surplus (if any), less only such sum as it may be necessary to retain in hand for current purposes, shall be invested in 3l. per cent. Consolidated Bank Annuities to the account of the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses. The income of such part of the accumulated fund as under the preceding direction shall be carried to the account of the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses or as shall be invested to that account under the directions herein-after contained, and one moiety of the surplus income herein-before mentioned shall be applied according to the provisions hereinafter contained with reference to the income of the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses, and the surplus of such last-mentioned income (if any), less only such sum as it may be necessary to retain in hand for current purposes, shall be invested in 3l. per cent. Consolidated Bank Annuities to the account of the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses.

Mode of applying the separate Income of St. Mary, Newington, Almshouses.

5. The number of the poor in the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses shall be increased to sixteen.

6. The Drapers' Company shall, with the approbation of the judge of the Court of Chancery, to whose Court this cause and matters are attached, to be obtained by summons at Chambers, provide by addition to or alteration of the existing almshouses belonging to St. Mary, Newington, or by the erection of new almshouses on the same or any other site, or in such other mode as shall be deemed preferable, proper accommodation for the number of almspeople, and the costs of so doing shall be paid out of the capital of the fund standing to the account of the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses.

7. The St. Mary, Newington, almshouses shall be kept in good repair, and insured against fire out of the income belonging to the said almshouses.

8. Three-fourths of the inmates of the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses shall from time to time be elected out of such of the poor of that parish as shall be honest, godly, and fit persons inhabitants of that parish, and who shall be deemed fit objects of charity by the majority present at any meeting duly convened of the following persons, viz., the rector and churchwardens and overseers of St. Mary, Newington, for the time being, the governors and guardians of the poor of that parish for the time being, and such of the ratepayers in that parish as shall have held any of the above-mentioned offices who shall be resident in that parish, or who being non-resident shall have given to the said clerk to the said governors and guardians notice in writing of their places of residence, which persons are herein-after described in the aggregate as the electors of St. Mary, Newington. The rest shall be chosen by the Drapers' Company as they shall see fit.

9. The electors of St. Mary, Newington, shall hold their meetings at such time and place as they shall determine. At every such meeting seven shall be a quorum; every election made shall be immediately certified to the Drapers' Company by the clerk to the governors and guardians of the poor of St. Mary, Newington, whose duty it shall also be to convene and attend the meetings of the electors, and keep proper minutes of the proceedings at such meetings. And that the mode of convening such meetings shall be by the said clerk giving five clear days' notice in writing to such electors, to be left at their usual place of abode (if residing in such parish), and in case of any such electors residing out of the said parish, then such notice shall be sent by post to the places of residence of such last-mentioned electors, as they shall from time to time have specified in writing to such clerk.

10. The Drapers' Company shall be at liberty to expend a sum not exceeding 20l. a year in providing medical attendance on and medicine and medical comforts for the inmates of the St. Mary, Newington, almshouses.

11. Each of the almspeople in St. Mary, Newington, almshouses shall receive 1l. 11s. 6d. per calendar month, and 2s. 6d. on the annual visitation by the Drapers' Company, and further, two tons of coals a year. But these allowances shall be rateably reduced if the income proves deficient.

Mode of applying the separate Income of the St. George's, Southwark, Almshouses.

12. The number of the poor in the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses shall be increased to 16.

13. The Drapers' Company shall, with the approbation of the judge in Chambers, to whose Court this cause and matters are attached, to be obtained by summons at Chambers, provide by addition to or alteration of the existing almshouses belonging to St. George's, Southwark, or by the erection of new almshouses on the same or any other site, or in such other mode as shall be deemed preferable, proper accommodation for the number of almspeople, and the cost of so doing shall be paid out of the capital of the fund standing to the credit of St. George's, Southwark, almshouses.

14. The St. George's, Southwark, almshouses shall be kept in good repair and insured against fire out of the separate income of the said almshouses.

15. Three-fourths of the inmates of the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses shall from time to time be elected out of such of the poor of the parish as shall be honest, godly, and fit persons, inhabitants of the parish, and who shall be deemed fit objects of charity by the majority at a meeting duly convened, of the following persons, viz., the rector of St. George's, Southwark, for the time being, and the churchwardens and overseers of the poor, and such parishioners of the parish of St. George-the-Martyr, Southwark, as pay taxations to the poor, and do not keep inmates or poor lodgers, or the greater number of them, assembled at a public meeting or vestry, to be convened for that purpose, pursuant to the provisions of the deed dated the 20th day of February 1650, which persons are herein-after described as the electors of St. George's, Southwark. The rest shall be chosen by the Drapers' Company as they shall see fit.

16. The Drapers' Company shall be at liberty to expend a sum not exceeding 20l. a year in providing medical attendance on and medicine and medical comforts for the inmates of the St. George's, Southwark, almshouses.

17. Each of the almspeople in the St. George's, South wark, almshouses shall receive 1l. 11s. 6d. per calendar month and 2s. 6d. on the annual visitation of the Drapers' Company, and further two tons of coals a year; but these allowances shall be reduced if the income prove deficient.

Rules applicable to both sets of Almshouses.

18. No inmate shall be absent for any time exceeding 48 hours without the consent in writing of one of the wardens of the Drapers' Company, and then only for such time as such consent shall authorise.

19. The wardens of the Drapers' Company shall have power to remove from the almshouses any inmate who, in their judgment (which shall be final), shall be guilty of insobriety, immorality, or unbecoming conduct, or shall become unfit to remain an inmate.

20. The wardens of the Drapers' Company, or any two of them, accompanied by their clerk, shall visit and inspect each set of almshouses twice in each year without further expense to the charity than that of coach hire.

General Provisions.

21. If the surplus income applicable to either set of almshouses shall at any time exceed 100l. a year, the Drapers' Company shall apply to the Charity Commissioners of England and Wales for directions as to how such surplus shall be applied.

22. This scheme shall be printed by the Drapers' Company at the expense of the charity, and a copy given to each member of the court of assistants of the Drapers' Company, and to each rector and vestry clerk of each of the parishes of St. Mary, Newington, and St. George's, Southwark.

The decree of the 27th April 1861 declares that the surplus income of the charity estates is applicable to the almshouse charities of Saint Mary's and Saint George's, and approves the foregoing scheme and directs the costs to be taxed and paid.

The property of the charity is as follows:—

£s.d.
1. Nos. 2 to 6 in Beech Lane, Barbican, let to William Heath for 21 years, from Midsummer 18516300
2. No. 2, Beech Street, Barbican, let to I. W. Machon for 99 years, from Lady-day 18483500
3. No. 3, Beech Street for 21 years, from Ladyday 1848, to James Bent4000
4. Nos. 4 and 5, Beech Street, by lease 21 years, from Lady-day 1848, to William Elliot7500
5. No. 6, Beech Street, let to William Raycote for 21 years, from Lady-day 18484500
6. No. 130, Wood Street, let to J. Holland for 61 years, from Midsummer 18021500
7. Harlington Grange farm, Bedfordshire, let to James Nash Godfrey for 21 years, from Michaelmas 1845. A farm-house and buildings and 73a. 1r. 27p.12000
This property, which is situated in the parish of Harlington, in Bedfordshire, together with—
8. 517l. 19s. 2d. 3l. per cent. Consols, in the name of the Accountant-General of the Court of Chancery ex parte Drapers' Company, John Walter's Charity15104
408104
represents the estate of the charity which was formerly situated in Lombard Street, and which is mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 408), where it is stated that two houses in Lombard Street belonging to this endowment were required by the Corporation for improving the approaches to London Bridge, and that the sum of 3,370l. was fixed as the price to be received by the Company for such houses. This money was paid into the Court of Exchequer, and the premises in Lombard Street were, by deed of the 23rd March 1837, conveyed to the London Bridge Trustees, and the purchase money was laid out in the purchase of 3,703l. 6s. Consols in the name of the Accountant-General, "The "account of John Walter's Charity." Under subsequent orders of the Court of Chancery the purchase of an estate, called Harlington Grange Farm, was directed to be made on behalf of the charity for the sum of 3,150l.
By an indenture of the 7th August 1845, between Robert Lindsell of the first part, the Rev. Edward Lindsell of the second part, and the Drapers' Company of the third part, the parties of the first and second parts, in consideration of 3,150l., conveyed to the Company a capital messuage, with the outbuildings, yards, orchard, and garden thereunto adjoining,
Carried forward408104
Brought forward408104
in the parish of Harlington, in the county of Bedford, and known as Harlington Grange, and containing by admeasurement 3r. 21p.; and several pieces of land containing in the whole 72a. 2r. 6p., that is to say, Dovehouse Close, 6a. 0r. 39p.; Cowmead, 5a. 2r. 31p.; Little Grove, 9a. 1r. 22p.; Great Grove, 17a. 2r. 3p.; Broad Oak, 16a. 1r. 33p.; Prim Close, 5a. 1r. 34p. (5 acres whereof are in Westoning parish); the Spinny adjoining Prim Close, 30 perches (also in Westoning parish); Great Fan Meadow, 6a. 0r. 22p. (whereof 2a. 3r. 20p are in Streatley parish); and Little Fan Meadow, 5a. 1r. 32p. (whereof 2a. 0r. 20p. are also in Streatley parish). All which messuage or dwelling-house and other hereditaments, containing together by admeasurement 73a. 1r. 27p., are (with the exceptions before mentioned) situate in the parish of Harlington aforesaid. To hold unto and to the use of the said Company, their successors and assigns, upon the trusts subsisting of the premises purchased by the trustees of London Bridge as aforesaid.
The sum of 3,185l. 16s. 10d. Consols, part of the sum of 3,703l. 6s. like stock, was sold out to produce the purchase money of 3,150l., leaving the sum of 517l. 9s. 2d. Consols remaining in the name of the AccountantGeneral of the Court of Chancery.
9. The sum of 624l. 2s. 3d. 3l. per cent. Reduced Annuities, formerly 500l. South Sea Annuities, the produce of a sum of 315l. cash, received from the City of London on the 27th June 1782, under an Act of Parliament, as the compensation for part of Walter's estate in Beech Lane, which was laid into the public stock18146
(This sum was a part of 1,250l. Old South Sea Annuities mentioned by the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 32, part 2, p. 408), of which the residue was the produce of Walter and Richard Mills Gifts. This is now 1,418l. 8s. 9d. 3l. per cent. Reduced Annuities.)
10. The residue of the sum of 1,418l. 8s. 9d. 3l. per cent. Reduced Annuities, the gifts of Walter and Richard Mills above referred to, being 794l. 6s. 6d. like annuities23166
11. 5,300l. Consols, arising from accumulations since the year 179115900
The Ann Mills Gift.
12. The house No. 30, Lime Street, leased to Mr. Townend for 31 years, from Lady-day 18446300
13. The Gossey Field, Islington, now let on building leases and forming Lonsdale Square, St. George's Terrace, and Upper Bloomsbury Street, Islington:—
Nos. 1 and 2, Lonsdale Square, Islington, let on building lease to Mary Hockley for 70 years, from Lady-day 1839400
Nos. 3, 4, and 6, Lonsdale Square, let on building lease to Henry Bird for 70 years, from Lady-day 1839600
No. 5, Lonsdale Square, to Mary Hockley for a similar term200
Nos. 7, 8, and 9, Lonsdale Square to James Johnstone, similar term600
Nos, 10, 11, and 12, Lonsdale Square, to William Jones, similar term600
Nos. 13 to 18, Lonsdale Square, to Stephen Phillips, similar terms1200
Nos. 19, 20, and 22, Lonsdale Square, to Henry W. Elder, similar terms600
No. 22a, Lonsdale Square, let to Thos. B. Vacher, on similar terms200
No., Lonsdale Square, to Buttress and Parker, on similar termsPeppercorn.
No. 23, Lonsdale Square, to Richard Carpenter's representatives, similar terms200
Nos. 24, 25, and 28a Lonsdale Square, to William Jones, similar terms400
Nos. 26 to 31, Lonsdale Square to William Richards, similar terms1200
Nos. 32 to 36, Lonsdale Square to William Richards, similar terms1000
No. 37, Lonsdale Square, let to Messrs. Thomas and W. O. Smith, on similar terms200
Carried forward74714
Brought forward74714
No. 38, Lonsdale Square, let to Thomas and W. O. Smith, similar terms200
Nos. 39 and 40, Lonsdale Square, let to James Carpenter, on similar terms400
No. 47, Lonsdale Square, let to John Dean's representatives, on similar terms200
No. 43, Lonsdale Square, let to Michael Hollings, similar term200
No. 45, Lonsdale Square, let to George T. Jerran, similar term200
No. 46, Lonsdale Square, let to William Cooper, similar term200
No. 48, Lonsdale Square, let to William Harvey, similar term200
No. 1, St. George's Terrace, let to James Johnstone, similar term800
No. 2, St. George's Terrace, let to John Neale's representatives, similar term800
No. 3, St. George's Terrace, let to Thomas Prout, similar term800
No. 4, St. George's Terrace, let to Henry Halford, similar term800
Nos. 5 and 6, St. George's Terrace, let to Thomas Rogers, similar term11110
Nos. 7 and 8, St. George's Terrace, let to John A. Cahusac, on similar term11110
Nos. 9, 10, and 13, St. George's Terrace, and Nos. 35 to 38, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to Eleanor White, similar term1400
Nos. 11 and 12, St. George's Terrace, let to J. C. Dyer's representatives, similar term10100
Nos. 14 to 18, St. George's Terrace, let to T. and W. O. Smith, on similar term200
No. 19, St. George's Terrace, let to Richard Carpenter's representatives, similar term080
Nos. 1 to 5, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to William Crump, for similar term1000
No. 6, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to Thomas Goodman, similar term800
No. 7, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to George Teasdell, similar term800
No. 8, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to William Wallace, similar term800
Nos. 9 to 18, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to Ann Clare, similar term2000
Nos. 19, and 20, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to Ann Clare, similar term400
Nos. 21 to 25, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to James Reeves, similar term1000
Nos. 26 to 28, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to William A. Hallows, similar term600
No. 29, Upper Barnsbury Street (Public-house), let to Henry Smart, similar term400
Nos. 30 to 34, Upper Barnsbury Street, let to Joseph Hoare, similar term1000
Piece of ground at the back of the west side of Lonsdale Square, let to George Thornhill, similar termPeppercorn
House standing on what was formerly garden ground to the almshouses in St. Mary's, Newington, let on building lease for 99 years, from March 1783, to Thomas Fish1500
This is appropriated specially for the benefit of the almshouses in the parish of St. Mary, Newington.
The almshouses in the parish of St. Mary, Newington, Cross Street, two distinct houses with six rooms in each, being of two storeys, and forecourtIn hand
Carried forward94814
Brought forward94814
The almshouses in Saint George the Martyr, Southwark, Wellington Street:—Three houses, with four rooms in each, and a garden at the back and frontIn hand
£94814

The houses in each parish are occupied by 12 poor persons. In the St. Mary's almshouses there are two men, one of whom is married, and 10 women. In St. George's almshouses there is one man and 11 women, nine have been appointed in each place by the respective parishes, and the remainder by the Drapers' Company.

The expenditure for 1860 was as follows:—

£s.d.
Newington almspeople, 1l. 7s. 1½d. per month each (the excess over the 24s. to the other Institution has arisen from a division of the 15l. a year (No. 14) which has been continued to the married members)19560
Coals for do.2498
Gift on annual visitation at 2s. 6d. each1100
St. George's almspeople, 1l. 4s. 0d. per month each172160
Coals for do.2498
Gift on annual visitation1100
Gardener at St. George's almshouses400
Pension to the Shoreditch almspeople in respect of Walter and Richard Mills' gifts400
Coals for the Shoreditch almspeople (this will be discontinued under the scheme)589
Gift on annual visitation100
Quitrent to the "Clothworker's" Company0124
Poor of the city of Hereford2000
Poor of the "Drapers' Company. (This is appropriated to the account of charities general (see Champion's gift)6134
To the wardens and clerk of the company4168
(1860) Surveyor's charge330
£469155

There was at the end of the year, 1860-1, a balance of 3,161l. 15s. 1¼d. to the credit of the charity. This will be applicable to the costs, and to the extension of the charity under the scheme.

In my report on the administration of the charities of the city of Hereford, I called the attention of the Board to the distribution of this charity in that city in small sums to a vast number of persons as one of no utility or advantage. The same distribution is still continued; the payment is made by the Drapers' Company to the mayor of Hereford, and they receive a certificate from some gentlemen of the city, I presume deputed by him, of the manner of application. The last certificate was as follows:—

"To all to whom this present writing shall come, but especially to the worshipful wardens of the Linen Drapers' Company, London, greeting," "We, the undersigned, Edward Howells, of Hereford, clerk, Frederick Whitfield, of the same city, wine merchant, and Richard Johnson, town clerk for the city, do hereby certify that we did, on the 17th and 21st January, distribute 20l. bequeathed by J. Walter, late citizen and draper of London, to the poor distressed inhabitant householders, residing in the city of Hereford, and the suburbs thereof, in the sum of fourpence each, and that we did for that purpose attend the several dwellings of the said poor distressed persons, as witness, &c."

(And then follow the names of all the recipients of the charity). (fn. 5)

Alice Walter's Almhouses, in St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

Alice Walter, the widow of John Walter, by deed poll of the 13th April 1658, gave to the Drapers' Company 400l., they engaging to pay 20l. per annum, as follows:—

£s.d.
To the eight poor almspeople1940
To the four wardens0100
Clerk of the Company060

and she gave a further sum of 100l. to the said Company, they paying 5l. a year for coals for the almshouses.

The parish, it appears, purchased the ground on which the almshouses in Saint Leonard, Shoreditch, stand, and the houses were erected by contributions by John Walter in his lifetime, and by his friends.

These almshouses have no other endowment. The only estate of the charity consists of the eight almshouses which are situated in Old Street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, together with eight other almshouses which have been subsequently built on the same ground and other contributions. The whole constitute a block of buildings of one storey, with four outer doors.

Each occupant has one room. Fourteen are chosen by the parish and two by the Company. They are all women at present. Eight of the 16 almswomen receive 5s. 10d. per month each, making 28l. a year, which includes the 10s. each, under the gift of Walter and Richard Mills, and 24l. (not 24l. 4s.), nder the deed poll of April 1658, above referred to. In this case, and also in those of St. George's, Southwark, and St. Mary's, Newington, the pensions of the poor of the Company who are in the almshouses are made up to 2l. 2s. 0d. per month each, from the funds of the Company, as charged on the account of the charities general.

Wheeler's Charity.

Nicholas Wheeler, by his will of the 28th January 1618, bequeathed to the Company 60l., to be lent to two young men of the Company, paying 15s. each to the relief of the poor of St. Giles', Cripplegate.

The 60l. forms part of the 3,811l. 10s. 6d. mentioned in Clonne's Charity. The 30s. a year is paid to the churchwardens of St. Giles', Cripplegate.

Wilson's Charity.

Robert Wilson, by his will dated in 1639, gave to the Drapers' Company 100l., to be lent to a young freeman of he Company at 1l. 6s. 8d. per cent. interest, to be disributed at Christmas between poor men of the Company.

The 100l. is part of the 3,811l. 10s. 6d. mentioned in the report on Clonne's Charity, and the 1l. 6s. 8d. is appropriated to the pensions on the roll (see Kendrick's Charity).

Winch's Charity.

Robert Winch, by his will of the 15th August 1671, gave to the Drapers' Company 200l., to be lent to two young members of the Company, at 40s. per cent. It does not appear that more than 100l. was received by the Company, and they were in fact only charged with that sum in the report of the master on the loan charities, dated the 14th December 1843. The fund is administered under the decree of the Court, for which see Clonne's Charity.

The sum of 4l. a year is carried to the account of the Company's general charities, and applied to the pensions of the poor on the roll (see Kendrick's Charity).

The sum which, under the deed poll of the 22nd June 1843, is stated as the interest of this charity, to be paid by the Company, is only 2l. a year, being the 40s. per cent. on the 100l.; however, 4l. appears to be the annual appropriation.

Charities for Loans without Interest.

£s.d.
Dame Helen Branch5000
Sir Richard Champion20000
Lady Champion10000
Humphrey Chaffin10000
Andrew Chamberlayne3000
Sir Richard Champion5000
Sir James Deane30000
Sir Richard Goddard10000
William Lambard20000
William Parker10000
Catherine Pratt5000
Mr. Osborn10000
Thos. Russell20000
John Keete20000
Henry Smith5000
John Sambrook5000
Cleophas Smith2000
John Sandason15000
John Tatton20000
William Thorowgood2000
£2,27000

The Commissioners of Inquiry in their Report (vol. 32, part 2, p. 447) set forth the foregoing list of gifts and legacies, which, they state, are recorded in the books of the Company, to be lent out in sums varying from 20l. to 50l. each, for different periods, without interest, comprising together 20 donors, "Dame Helen Branch and others," and amounting altogether to a capital sum of 2,270l. The Commissioners add that no money has been lent out by the Company for a great number of years, nor any steps taken to comply with the object of the donors, and that they had therefore certified these cases to the AttorneyGeneral.

I have stated in my report on Clonne's Charity the information filed by the Attorney-General ex-officio in respect of the other loan charities, but I do not find that any proceedings have been taken with reference to any of the cases comprised in these 20 gifts. They have never formed the subject of any account in the books of the Company, and the only record of them is, therefore, the wills or entries of the donations. It is possible that they have been lost. A committee of the Company, on the 8th December 1791, observe that as to money left by different donors to be lent to young tradesmen, it was supposed that such moneys had been long since lost. It is unfortunate, perhaps, that the above-mentioned sums were not included in the suit mentioned in Clonne's case. As the matter at present stands, I can only submit it to the Board whether it should or should not be brought under the notice of the AttorneyGeneral.

The gifts of Sir Richard and Lady Champion of 200l. and 100l., included in the above donations, were also the subject of certificate to the Attorney-General, but neither in this case do any proceedings appear to have been taken.

All which I submit to the Board.

Thos. Hare, Inspector of Charities.

17th December 1861.

APPENDIX.

Francis Bancroft's Charity.

OBM

By an order made by the Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales in the matter of Francis Bancroft's Charity, dated the 4th day of March 1859, upon the application of the Drapers' Company as the trustees of the said charity, the said Company as such trustees were authorised to apply by petition to the Court of Chancery for an order empowering them to carry into effect a certain contract or agreement, dated the 17th day of January 1859, for the purchase on behalf of the said charity at the price of 3,000l. certain freehold property situate in the city of London, and to provide the purchase money partly by the realisation of the sum of 930l. 6s. 8d. Bank 3l. per cent. Annuities standing in the name of the Accountant-General of the said court in trust for the Eastern Union and Hadleigh Junction Railway Act, 1846, the account of the Drapers' Company, trustees of Francis Bancroft's Charity, and partly out of the general funds of the charity.

File 12,816. Order of Board, 31st January 1865.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the above-mentioned charity, dated the 31st day of January 1863, upon the application of the trustees of the said charity, the said trustees were authorised to apply by petition to the said Court of Chancery for an order, in pursuance whereof certain copyhold hereditaments belonging to the said charity situate in the parish of Chiswick, in the county of Middlesex, might become vested in certain individual trustees to be approved by the said Court.

File 15,760. Order of Board, 14th June 1867.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 14th day of June 1867, the said trustees were authorised to sell part of the trust estate belonging to the said charity situate on the north side of the Mile End Road, in the parish of Stepney in the county of Middlesex, for not less than the sum of 1,050l.; and it was by the said order directed that the purchase money should be paid by the said trustees to the banking account of the Official Trustees for investment in their name in trust for the said charity.

File 16,429. Order of Board, 10th December 1867.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 10th day of December 1867, it was ordered that the sum of 369l. 19s. 7d. sterling, which had been paid by Mr. Joseph Blood in respect of the enfranchisement of certain copyhold property, should be paid to the banking account of the said Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in trust for the said charity.

File 15,670. Order of Board, 7th July 1868.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 7th day of July 1868, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to grant a building lease of a piece of land fronting to the Mile End Road in the county of Middlesex, for the term of 80 years, at the yearly rent of 40l.

File 19,045. Order of Board, 18th January 1870.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 11th day of January 1870, it was ordered that the sum of 140l. 2s. 6d. sterling, which had been paid by Mr. William Matthews in respect of the enfranchisement of certain copyhold property, should be paid to the banking account of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in trust for the said charity.

File 21,546. Order of Board, dated 31st May 1872.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 31st day of May 1872. The trustees of the said charity were authorised to effect the purchase of certain property mentioned in the schedule to the order, comprising three pieces of land, formerly part of Clapton Hall Farm, near Dunmore, in the county of Essex, known as part of the River Mead, and containing 2a. 3r. or thereabouts, for 165l., and to provide the requisite funds by the sale of a sufficient part of the sum of 1,115l. 10s. 9d. Consols held by the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.

File 22,207. Order of Board, 29th October 1872.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity and of the charity founded in or about the year 1693 by Henry Dixon, dated the 29th day of October 1872, the Drapers' Company, as the trustees of the said charities respectively, were authorised to grant a building lease of certain pieces of land belonging to the said charities situate in the Poultry and Queen Victoria Street in the city of London, containing 4,000 square feet or thereabouts, for the term of 80 years from the 24th day of September 1871, at the annual rent of a peppercorn for the first year of the said term, 1,000l. for the second year of the same term, and 2,000l. for the residue thereof.

File 22,207. Order of Board, 12th May 1874.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity dated the 12th day of May 1874, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to take such proceedings at law as they should be advised were necessary against Mr. William Randall Lacey for recovering possession on behalf of the said charity of certain hereditaments known as Nos. 9, 10, and 11 in the Poultry, and No. 34 in Bucklersbury, in the city of London.

File 21,546. Order of Board, dated 13th August 1874.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 13th day of August 1874, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to enfranchise and sell certain property mentioned in the schedule to the order, comprising a close of land, called One Acre Pasture, adjacent to Clapton Hall Farm in the parish of Great Dunmow, in the county of Essex, for not less than 18l. 10s.

File 21,546. Order, 20th November 1874.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 20th day of November 1874, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to sell certain property mentioned in the schedule to the order, comprising 4 closes of land, known as Eight acres, Three acres, Five acres, and Five acres, and containing respectively 8a. 2r. 19p., 3a. 3r. 26p., 5a. 3r. 5p., and 5a. 3r. 25p., being part of the aforesaid Clapton Hall Farm, for not less than 847l.

File 21,546. Order, 10th January 1875.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 10th day of January 1875, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to erect two new cottages and to repair certain other property belonging to the said charity, called the Clapton Hall Farm, at a cost of 1,000l., and to apply the above-named sum of 847l. for that purpose, and to provide the remainder of the cost by the sale of certain timber belonging to the said charity standing upon the said farm.

File 21,546. Order, 9th February 1875.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 9th day of February 1875, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to exchange with Sir George Howland Beaumont the property mentioned in the first schedule to the said order, comprising a piece of land containing 2a. 3r., forming part of the aforesaid Clapton Hall Farm, for the property mentioned in the second schedule to the order, comprising two pieces of land containing respectively 1a. 1r. 2p. and 2r. 16p. or thereabouts.

File 21,546. Order, 3rd March 1876.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 3rd of March 1876, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to grant a lease of certain property mentioned in the engrossment of the said lease upon which the said order was endorsed.

File 28,358. Order, 31st October 1876.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 31st day of October 1876, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to sell certain property mentioned in the schedule to the order, comprising a piece of land, containing 10,300 square feet or thereabouts, situate adjoining St. Benet's church, in the parish of Stepney, in the county of Middlesex, for not less than 500l.

Order of Board, 3rd November 1876.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 3rd day of November 1876, upon the application of the trustees of the said charity, the said Board approved of the enfranchisement which had been effected by the said trustees of certain copyhold property, comprising two messuages situate on Chiswick Mall, in the said county of Middlesex, with the garden and appurtenance, in consideration of the sum of 91l. 11s. 2d., and the said trustees to effect the enfranchisement of certain copyhold, comprising a cottage and garden, called Potters; a messuage, with the orchard and garden, called Courtmans; and a tenement and one acre of land, called Cock Watts; a messuage erected in lace of a tenement, called Printers, with the appurtenances; and a tan yard, called Bird's Garden, all situate in the parish of Prittlewell, in the county of Essex, these in the occupation of Mr. Benjamin Spurdelow, at a cost of 535l., and to provide the amount of the aforesaid cost and proper incidental expenses by the sale of a competent part of the sum of 3,245l. 11s. 2d. Reduced 3l. per cent. Annuities then held by the said trustees.

File 22,207. Order of Board, dated 10th November 1876.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said Francis Bancroft's charity, dated the 10th day of November 1876, the trustees of the said charity were authoed to execute a certain deed poll, upon the engrossment whereof the said order was written for the effectuation of a certain arrangement referred in the said deed poll.

File 29,902. Order, 8th January 1878.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 8th day of January 1878, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to sell certain property mentioned in the schedule to the order, comprising two pieces of land containing respectively 1a. 6r. 0p. and 2a. 5r. 0p. or thereabouts, situate in North Street, Prittlewell, in the county of Essex.

File 23,303. Order of Board, 12th April 1878.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 12th day of April 1878, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to effect the enfranchisement of certain copyhold property mentioned in the first schedule to the said order, comprising certain lands, messuages, and tenements held of the Crown manor of Enfield and of the manor of Worcester, both in the county of Middlesex, at a cost of 439l. 9s. 2d., and to provide the amount of the aforesaid cost and proper incidental expenses by the sale of a competent part of the sum of 2,278l. 10s. 11d. Consolidated 3l. per cent. Annuities there held by the said trustees.

File 23,303 Order of Board, 6th May 1879.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the said charity, dated the 6th day of May 1879, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to accept from the Local Board of Health at Enfield, in the said county of Middlesex, the sum of 60l. for compensation in respect of damage alleged to have been occasioned by the said Local Board to property belonging to the said charity situate at Enfield Lock, in the said county of Middlesex, and it was by the said order directed that the said sum of 60l. should be paid by the said trustees to the banking account of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds, to be held by them in trust for the said charity.

File 30,947. Order, 15th February 1881.

By an order made by the said Board in the matter of the the said charity, dated the 15th of February 1881, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to sell certain property mentioned in the schedule to the order, comprising two messuages with the gardens and appurtenances, situate on The Mall, in the parish of Chiswick, in the county of Middlesex, for not less than 3,000l.

This list revised 22nd March 1883, and corresponds with the files in the matter.

A. W.

Henry Dixon's Charity.

By an order made by the Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, in the matter of Henry Dixon's Charity, upon the application of the trustees of the said charity, dated the 3rd of April 1883, the trustees of the said charity were authorised to sell, for not less than 2,000l., the property described in the schedule to the said order, comprising a piece of land containing 3 acres or thereabouts, situate at Forty Hill, Enfield, in the county of Middlesex, abutting upon a road leading from Enfield Chase to Enfield.

19th June 1863.—By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date, made in the matter of John Pemel's Almshouse Charity, the Company were authorised to sell the almshouses belonging thereto, situate near the turnpike-gate, Mile End Road, in consideration of the sum of 1,800l. sterling, and of the further sum of 3,333l. 6s. 8d. Consols.

19th June 1863.—By a further order of the said Board of this date made in the matter of John Pemel's, Sir John Jolles', and John Edmanson's Charities, the Company were authorised to sell or permanently appropriate a piece of land at Bow, possessed by them in trust for Sir John Jolles' and John Edmanson's Charities aforesaid, as a site for new almshouses for the purposes of Pemel's Charity aforesaid, upon the following terms:—

1. That the Company should, out of the said sum of 3,333l. 6s. 8d. Consols, appropriate 400l. in trust for Sir John Jolles' Charity, and 133l. 6s. 8d. in trust for John Edmanson's Charity.

20th April 1869.—By an order of the said Board of this date made in the matters of Sir John Jolles', John Pemel's, and John Edmanson's Almshouse Charities, and of Thomas Corney's Charity, the Company were authorised to sell a dwelling-house, called "Elmslea," in the parish of Tottenham, in the county of Middlesex, and a piece of land, containing 1a. 1r., together with a right of way to a place called Bruce Grove, in trust for the sole use and benefit of Thos. Corney's Charity, in consideration of the sum of 3,000l., to be provided out of the funds of that charity, and to apply the said sum towards payment of the sum of 14,920l., authorised by the Court of Chancery to be expended in the erection of new almshouses for the aforesaid almshouse charities.

21st November 1876.—By an order of the said Board of this date made in the matter of Thomas Corney's Charity aforesaid, otherwise "The Drapers' Company's "Female Orphan School," at Tottenham, it was directed by way of scheme—in partial variation of the provisions of the founder's will.—that the limit of age for the continuance of girls at the school, fixed by such will at 15 years, be in special cases, with the approval of the trustees and upon the recommendation of the head mistress, exceeded for such period as the trustees may determine from time to time.

11th February 1879.—By an order of the said Board of this date, made in the matter of—1, Thomas Corney's Charity, and 2. Sir John Jolles', John Pemel's, and John Edmanson's Almshouse Charities, the Company were authorised to carry into effect the several transactions contemplated by the agreement, dated the 29th May 1878, annexed to such order. And it was by such order directed as follows:—

1. That the sum of 550l., to be paid by the Company as trustees of Thos. Corney's Charity in respect of property to be acquired in trust of that charity under the terms of the agreement, should be provided by sale of stock held by the Company in trust for that charity.

2. That the sum of 50l., to be paid to the Company as trusteees of the said almshouse charities under the terms of the said agreement, should be held by them in trust for those charities in the shares and proportions following, viz., as to four sixths from John Edmanson's Charity, one sixth from John Jolles' Charity, and one sixth from John Pemel's Charity.

3. That the sum of 470l., to be paid by the Company as trustees of the said almshouse charities in respect of property to be acquired in trust for those charities under the penultimate clause of the said agreement, should be provided by the appropriation to that object of the aforesaid sum of 50l., and to the extent that such sum was insufficient for the purpose, by the sale of stock held by the Company in trust for three charities, with a proviso that the said full amount of 470l. should, as between those charities, be provided in the shares and proportions above mentioned.

To the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales.

On the proposed removal of the inmates of almshouses situated in Cooper's Row, Tower Hill, and Beech Lane, Barbican, both in the City of London, to almshouses to be erected by the Drapers' Company on a site called "The Elms" at Tottenham, Middlesex.

The Drapers' Company are the trustees of almshouses built by Sir John Milbourne, Knight, in Cooper's Row, Tower Hill; it is stated that there were originally 13, now there are 16, inhabited by 16 widows of freemen of the Drapers' Company.

An external tablet records—This edifice was erected by Sir John Milbourne, Knight, Alderman of this city, A.D. 1535; when the addition of the last three was made is not known. I saw nothing to lead me to suppose it was not about the same period. The houses are very small, low, and require thorough repair; the ventilation is bad, the small windows being all in front, and as the back wall is a party wall to other buildings no through draught can be obtained.

Many of the sitting rooms are lower than the road, under these, in a very low dark underground cellar-each house has a water-closet, &c. I was astonished that this portion of the building has not been noticed by the sanitary officers. The staircases are exceedingly narrow and difficult. I saw several of the occupants who are unable to make use of them either to descend to this place or ascend to the small bedroom above, over which there is a loft in the gable, which does not appear in many cases to be used.

Beech Lane Almshouses, Barbican, the gift of Lady Askew, are supposed to have been built either in 1540 or 1544, and thoroughly repaired in 1691, there are now eight houses inhabited by a like number of the widows of freemen of the Drapers' Company, who are the trustees of the charity, these almshouses contain only the sitting room and bed room over, and are all lower than the road; they are better ventilated and generally less objectionable than Cooper's Row.

In the yard at the back is a privy, which is the only convenience for the whole of the occupants.

These houses are in a very bad state of repair, although the external appearance does not convey that idea.

It is superfluous to add both these almshouses are situated in noisy and densely populated districts ill-suited for the residence of old age and infirmity.

The application of the Drapers' Company to the Charity Commissioners is to sanction an exchange of the 16 almshouses in Cooper's Row, and eight ditto in Beech Lane, Barbican, for a like number to be erected on their newly purchased land at Tottenham High Cross. See letter from the clerk of the Company appended.

The site known by the name of "The Elms" is stated to be singularly salubrious. I had this information confirmed by a lady who had conducted a large school on the premises for the last 25 years.

The plan of the ground and the proposed buildings will be seen in the plans also appended.

I may remark I have seen almshouses built by the Drapers' Company at Queen Elizabeth's College at Greenwich on the same plan and dimensions, and I consider them well adapted for the purpose.

Mr. Herbert Williams, of 52, Broad Street, E.C., the Company's surveyor, reports the houses now proposed to be removed are quite worn out and incapable of efficient repair, and particularly calls attention to the wretched construction of the staircases, from which accidents have occurred, and the impossibility of obtaining ventilation by back windows, or placing the water-closets in any other position than the dark underground cellars where they are at present.

The report contains the following estimate for putting in repair, to last 21 years:—

£
The 16 houses in Cooper's Row800
The 8 houses in Beech Lane400
Also valuation of the site of the houses in Cooper's Row1,200
Value of old materials150
Valuation of site in Beech Lane400
Old materials100

I have not attempted to test the accuracy of these figures by application to an unbiassed professional man, but suggested that the Commissioners would most probably require such confirmation.

The result of my endeavour to ascertain the feeling of the almspeople on their proposed removal is favourable to the plan; in fact, the only objections named were two, a few who feared the removal from connexions in the locality, and a much larger number who are apprehensive that their money cannot be expended so advantageously, and consequently will not go so far as now.

In order to gain some information on this point I visited several of the inhabitants of a considerable range of almshouses within 50 yards of "The Elms," from whom I learned that no difficulty is experienced by them in this respect, as they can obtain all necessaries at London prices.

The 16 inmates of the almshouses in Cooper's Row receive from the Drapers' Company,—four, two guineas a month; twelve, a guinea and a half a month; also 18 sacks of coals each per annum, with gratuitous medical attendance and medicines, and 2s. 6d. each at the committee's annual visit.

The eight inhabitants of Beech Lane almshouses receive each a guinea and a half a month, 18 sacks of coal each and 2s. 6d. at the visitation. No medical aid is provided for the occupants of these houses, and they receive, equally divided, the dividends on stock, amounting to 25l. per annum, bequeathed by Samuel Whitbread to the poor widows resident in the Drapers' Almshouses in Beech Lane, or wherever else the said poor women should be removed to, be equal half-yearly payments; still the addition of medical attendance is an important advantage.

I am of opinion that the proposal of the Drapers' Company, if carried out, will conduce greatly to the comfort of the recipients of each of the charities affected by it; that far better houses, much more suitably located, will be obtained; therefore, the sanction of the Commissioners may with propriety be accorded to the arrangement.

All which I submit to the Board.

John Simons,
Inspector of Charities.

6th July 1859.

Drapers' Hall, June 22, 1859.

Dear Sir,
I am very sorry that the absence from town of the Company's surveyor has prevented my forwarding you the plan of the proposed almshouses at Tottenham until now, and I hope the delay will not have caused you inconvenience.

With reference to our conversation when you were here, I may venture to state that the Company will be willing to exchange the site on which it is proposed to erect the almshouses at Tottenham for the sites of the present houses in Cooper's Row and Beech Lane, and I will therefore request that my application to the Commissioners may be considered to contain a proposition to that effect, which will probably be placing the subject in a more convenient shape for you to report upon.

I am, &c. (Signed) W. H. Sawyer.

John Simons, Esq.

To the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales.

In pursuance of an order of the Board, dated 25th July 1862, I have inspected Sir John Pemel's almshouses, situate at Stepney, Middlesex, under the administration of the Drapers' Company, also the site to which it is proposed to remove the said almshouses at Bow, and have to report as follows:—

Sir John Pemel's Almshouses.

Sir John Pemel, by will dated 28th February 1681, bequeathed to the Drapers' Company 1,200l., in trust, to lay out the same in land, and employ the first clear rents in the purchase of land at Stepney, and building thereon an almshouse consisting of eight rooms, and afterwards to pay—

£s.d.
To the eight almswomen yearly 4l. each3200
For coal800
To the clerk of the Company100
For clothing for the almswomen600
£4700

The testator directed that four of the almswomen should be poor widows of deceased freemen of the Drapers' Company, and four widows of mariners or seamen, at the time of their election inhabiting Stepney.

The said eight widows to be admitted at the court of assistants of the Drapers' Company, and subject to such orders as that court should make for their government.

The legacy received in 1682 was not laid out until 1694, when 564l. 6s. had accumulated as interest; of this 342l. 10s. was employed in the purchase of the site of the present almshouses, and the residue in building them.

In the same year the Drapers' Company, in consideration of the 1,200l. principal, charged property of ample value in Southwark and Threadneedle Street with a rentcharge of 52l. 12s. per annum, clear of all taxes, for the maintenance of the almswomen and the other purposes of the trust. This is the whole income of the charity, while the annual expenditure, which varies but little from the following statement, leaves the charity always in debt to the Company:—

£s.d.
The eight almswomen receive 6s. 8d. each per month3200
Clerk of the Company100
Coals1000
Medical attendant on the almspeople500
Clothing, 5l. every third year1134
Repairs say1000
Water3120
Insurance0180
Gift of 2s. 6d. each at the annual visitation100
£6534

Pemel's eight almshouses are situate near to the turnpike in the Mile End Road, they are leasehold for 500 years, from Lady-day 1673, at an annual rent of 1s.

The Drapers' Company solicit the sanction of the Board to the sale of the above almshouses and site to Messrs. Mann, Crossman, and Company, of the Albion Brewery, for the sum of 1,800l., and such sum of money as will produce 100l. a year in Consols.

The approbation of the Board is also desired to the transfer of the eight widows, occupants of the above, to almshouses to be erected at Bow adjoining almshouses, and on ground belonging to Edmanson's and Jolles' Trust Estates, also under the management of the Drapers' Company.

The present almshouses consist of eight single-roomed tenements, built nearly 170 years ago, which are stated to want important repairs this, however, did not strike me; on the contrary, considering their age, they appeared to me to have been well kept up, and in fair condition; the arrangement of them is very defective, viz., one watercloset in the centre for the use of all the occupants, one receptacle for the dust, and one cistern for the supply of water, several of the inmates being too infirm to fetch the latter are much inconvenienced; they informed me the constant noise of the thronged road and the costermongers who are established immediately in front of the almshouses are great disadvantages. I visited each house, and in no instance was the slightest objection expressed to the proposed removal.

The site to which it is intended to transfer Pemel's almshouses is situate at Bow, rather over a mile from the present building; it is in my opinion every way more desirable for the purpose, the neighbourhood far better, the premises open and extensive, transit by railway and road to the metropolis every few minutes. It will be seen from the plan accompanying the application for the sanction of the Board what portion of the ground is occupied with almshouses; there is a chapel, and a reader is appointed to officiate.

With reference to the price of the old site, I may notice Mr. Herbert Williams, a competent land surveyor and valuer, and Mr. Sawyer, the clerk to the Company, inform me it is worth the sum offered only to the owners of the brewery, that if it were let on a building lease at the highest estimated rental, it would not command anything like the value of the present offer.

The advantages to the almswomen are obvious. Mr. Sawyer informs me it is intended to give them each 27s. a month instead of their present 6s. 8d., and in exchange for their old single room, a modern house, containing a sitting room, bedroom, washhouse, watercloset, &c. to each (similar to the almshouses last built on the same plot by the Drapers' Company, which are very comfortable).

On the subject of the parties who have the right of nominating four widows from Stepney to these almshouses concurring in the proposal, I find the nomination is exer cised by all the hamlets of Stepney in rotation in the following order:—

Mile End Old Town.

Poplar.

Limehouse.

Ratcliffe.

Lower Wapping.

Spitalfields.

Bethnal Green.

Mile End New Town.

The election is made by the churchwardens of each hamlet, and it is suggested that as the alteration is so manifestly advantageous to the parish widows there can be no doubt of their desire to promote it, for when some months ago it was in contemplation to remove these almswomen to Tottenham the churchwardens of each of the above districts were written to, and assented gladly, although the benefit then offered was only the improved dwelling, and that some miles from town.

There being but four elections among eight districts, there are of course many churchwardens to each hamlet who are never called upon to exercise the right of appointment.

On review of all the information I have received, coupled with a careful inspection of the premises, I am clearly of opinion that the sanction of the Board may with propriety be given both to the sale of Sir John Pemel's almshouses and site and the removal of the occupants to Bow.

All which I submit to the Board.

John Simons,
Inspector of Charities.

5th August 1862.

Footnotes

1 Sir John Milbourne's Almshouses and Lady Askew's Almshouses.
30th September 1861.—By an opinion of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date, the Company were advised that they might proceed to remove the inmates of the above almshouses, situate in Cooper's Row, Tower Hill, and Beech Lane, Barbican, London, to new almshouses recently erected at the expense of the Company upon a piece of land belonging to them at High Cross, Tottenham, the said Company having executed a declaration of trust to the effect that they would stand possessed of the lastmentioned premises upon the same trusts as those affecting the almshouses to be vacated.
7th March 1862.—By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to grant a lease of the site of above almshouses in Cooper's Row for 84 years, at the annual rent of 200l., the lessee undertaking to expend 4,000l. in the erection of substantial buildings.
4th August 1866.—By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to grant a lease of the site of the above almshouses in Beech Lane for 80 years, at the annual rent of 45l., the lessees undertaking to expend the sum of at least 800l. in the erection of substantial buildings.
2 Samuel Pennoyer's Charity.
9th August 1864.—By an opinion of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date the Company were advised that they might pay to the lecturer of St. Stephen's, Bristol, the annual stipend of 50l. in lieu of the annual stipend of 12l. provided for by the will of the founder of the charity.
29th May 1877.—By an order of the said Board of this date the Company were authorised to sell, in consideration of the sum of 32,280l. 17s. 9d., certain estates containing 952a. lr. 33p. situate in the county of East Meath in Ireland, and also an estate known as "Betagh's Town," containing 272a. Or. 21p. situate in the same county.
The sale was subsequently completed, and the purchase money was invested in Consols in the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in accordance with the directions contained in the order.
3 John Rainey's Charity.
27th April 1866.—By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date the Company were authorised to grant a lease for the term of 80 years, from Midsummer 1866, at the ultimate annual rent of 1,408l., of property situate in Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, London, comprised in an agreement to which such order was annexed.
21st January 1868.—By an order of the said Board of this date the Company were authorised to grant a lease of No. 2, Talbot Court, aforesaid upon the terms of the said agreement.
27th August 1869.—By an order of the said Board of this date the Company were authorised to grant a renewal of a lease of No. 56, Gracechurch Street, for the term of 80 years, from Midsummer 1866, at the annual rent of 220l., the lessee undertaking to lay out on the property not less than 2,700l.
20th February 1877.—By an order of the said Board of this date the Company were authorised, within the period of six calendar months (which period was subsequently extended for a further period of three months) to complete an arrangement for the sale of property in Talbot Court, Gracechurch Street, for the sum of 470l., upon the terms of an agreement whereon such order was endorsed.
The sum of 470l. was subsequently remitted to the banking account of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds and invested in their name in Consols.
14th June 1878.—By an order of the said Board of this date the Company were authorised to grant a lease for the term of 60 years at the annual rent of 420l., of No. 56, Gracechurch Street, London.
4 Thomas Russell's Charity.
30th November 1882.—Her Majesty, by Order in Council of this date, declared Her approbation of the following scheme for the administration of the charity.
Scheme for the Administration of the above-mentioned Foundation, except as is in this Scheme mentioned.
Future administration of foundation.
1. This foundation and its endowment, except as in this clause provided, shall henceforth be administered under this scheme under the name of Thomas Russell's Charity, herein-after called the foundation, by the Worshipful Company of Drapers of the City of London, hereinafter called the Company. Nothing in this scheme shall affect such interest in the schoolhouse of the foundation as by a deed dated the 4th day of February 1873 was transferred to the school board of Barton-under-Needwood under section 23 of the Elementary Education Act, 1870.
Trusts for purposes not educational.
2. The part of the endowment to be henceforth applied for purposes not educational shall consist of the following yearly payments to be made by the Company, that is to say:—
To 20 preachers yearly, preaching at Paul's Cross, not being beneficed, 10s. each, if and so far as any such payment can be made;
To the churchwardens of the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, in the county of Middlesex, 2l. 12s., to be by them applied for the poor of that parish as heretofore;
To the churchwardens of Barton-under-Needwood, 2l. 12s., to be by them applied for the poor of that township as heretofore.
Subject as in this scheme provided, the endowment shall be applied wholly to the educational purposes of this scheme.
Religiousopimons of governing bodies.
3. Religious opinions, or attendance or non-attendance at any particular form of religious worship, shall not in any way affect the qualification of any person for being a member of a governing body under this scheme.
Vesting property.
4. From and after the date of this scheme all lands and hereditaments, not being copyhold, belonging to the foundation, and all terms, estates, and interests therein, shall vest in the Official Trustee of Charity Lands and his successors in trust for the foundation; and all stock in the public funds and other securities belonging to the foundation shall be transferred to the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in trust for the foundation.
Prizes and scholarships for boys and girls.
5. The Company shall pay to the school board of Bartonunder-Needwood the yearly sum of 19l., to be by them applied in providing prizes and scholarships to be awarded to boys and girls who are and have for not less than three years been in any public elementary school or schools in the school district of Barton-under-Needwood, and have from the principal teacher or principal teachers of such school or schools a certificate or certificates in writing of their good conduct, regularity in attendance, and proficiency during that period. The amount of each scholarship shall be applied or accumulated by the governors for the benefit of the holder in payments for education, deposit in a Post Office Savings Bank, or such other manner as they think fit.
Exhibition.
6. Subject to payment of any necessary or proper outgoings, the residue of the income of the foundation shall be applied in maintaining an exhibition, tenable for three years at either of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and to be awarded under such conditions not inconsistent with the provisions of this scheme as the Company may from time to time prescribe to deserving students who are and have, for at least two terms, been resident at either of those universities, and who are, in the judgment of the Company, in need of such aid.
Religious exemptions.
7. No boy or girl shall, by reason of any exemption from attending prayer or religious worship, or from any lesson or series of lessons on a religious subject, be deprived of any advantage or emolument under this foundation to which he or she would otherwise have been entitled.
Residue.
8. Any income of the foundation not applied under the foregoing provisions, and not needed as a balance to meet current expenses, shall, on passing the yearly accounts, be invested in the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in trust for the foundation in augmentation of its endowment.
Further endowments.
9. The Company may receive any additional donations or endowments for the general purposes of the foundation. They may also receive donations or endowments for any special objects connected with the foundation which shall not be inconsistent with or calculated to impede the due working of the provisions of this scheme. Any question arising upon this last point shall be referred to the Charity Commissioners for decision.
Gereral power of Company to make regulations.
10. Within the limits prescribed by this scheme the Company shall have full power from time to time to make regulations for the conduct of their business and for the management of the foundation, and such regulations shall be binding on all persons affected thereby.
Question of proceedings under scheme.
11. Any question affecting the regularity or the validity of any proceeding under this scheme shall be determined conclusively by the Charity Commissioners upon such application made to them for the purpose as they think sufficient.
Construction of scheme.
12. If any doubt or question arises within the Company as to the proper construction or application of any of the provisions of this scheme, the Company shall apply to the Charity Commissioners for their opinion and advice thereon, which opinion and advice when given shall be binding on the Company and all persons claiming under the foundation who shall be affected by the question so decided.
Jurisdiction of ordinary abolished.
13. From the date of this scheme all jurisdiction of the ordinary relating to or arising from the licensing of any master under the foundation shall be abolished.
Jusisdiction of visitor.
14. From and after the date of this scheme all rights and powers reserved to, belonging to, claimed by, or capable of being exercised by any person or body other than Her Majesty as visitor of the foundation shall be transferred to Her Majesty, and all such rights and powers, and also any like rights or powers vested in Her on the 2nd day of August 1869 shall be exercised only through and by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales.
Alteration of scheme.
15. The Charity Commissioners may from time to time, in the exercise of their ordinary jurisdiction, frame schemes for the alteration of any portions of this scheme, provided that such schemes be not inconsistent with anything contained in the Endowed Schools Act, 1869, and amending Acts.
Foundation to be governed exclusively by this scheme.
16. From and after the date of this scheme the foundation shall for every purpose, except as herein-provided, be administered and governed wholly and exclusively in accordance with the provisions of this scheme, notwithstanding any former or other scheme, Act of Parliament, charter, or letters patent, statute, or instrument relating to the subject-matter of this scheme.
scheme to be printed and sold.
17. The Company shall cause this scheme to be printed, and copies may be sold at a reasonable price to all persons applying for the same.
Date of scheme.
18. The date of this scheme shall be the day on which Her Majesty by Order in Council declares Her approbation of it.
5 John Walter's Almshouses and other Charities.
30th October 1874.—By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date, Company were authorised to sell for the sum of 730l. to the Commissioners of Sewers a piece of land, containing 180 square feet, forming the frontage of No. 30, Lime Street, City. The period of six calendar months, limited by the foregoing order of the completion of the sale, was by a subsequent order dated 27th October 1876, extended for a period of six calendar months from that date.
The purchase money (730l.) was subsequently remitted to the banking account of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds, and invested in their name in Consols in trust for the charity.
25th May 1875.—By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to grant a lease of No. 30, Lime Street, City, for the term of 80 years, from 25th March 1874 at the annual rent of 100l.
27th February 1877.—The following order of this date, affects the provisions of the 21st clause of the scheme for the administration of the charities:—
In the matter of John Walter's Almshouses, in the respective parishes of St. George's, Southwark, and St. Mary's, Newington, in the county of Surrey, regulated by a scheme established by an order of the High Court of Chancery made in the matter of "John Walter's and other Charities," and dated the 29th April 1861; and In the matter of " The Charitable Trusts Acts, 1853 to 1869."
Whereas by the 21st clause of the above-mentioned scheme it is provided that if the surplus income applicable to either set of almshouses shall at any time exceed 100l. a year the Drapers' Company shall apply to the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales for directions as to how such surplus shall be applied:
And whereas the master, and wardens, and brethren, and Sisters of the Guild or Fraternity of the Blessed Mary the Virgin of the Mystery of Drapers of the City of London, commonly called the Drapers' Company, being the trustees of the said above-mentioned charities, have represented to the Board of Charity Commissioners that the amount of the surplus income of each of the said set of almshouses now exceeds 100l. a year, and have requested the sanction and authority of the said Board for applying a sufficient part of such surplus income in increasing the stipends of the inmates of the said almshouses respectively:
Now the said Board, having considered and inquired into the premises, do hereby order and direct, that, subject to, and until the further order or direction of the said Board, the said Company, as such trustees as aforesaid, shall be at liberty, if, and so long as the amount of the surplus incomes of the said respective almshouses after providing for the proper repair and maintenance of the buildings belonging thereto will admit, to appropriate and apply so much of the said surplus income of the said respective almshouses as may from time to time be necessary in increasing the pensions or stipends of the inmates of the said respective almshouses from 1l. 11s. 6d. per month to 2l. 2s. per month.
Sealed by order of the Board this 27th day of February 1877.
Henry M. Vane,
Secretary.
(L.S.)