Report on the Charities of the Goldsmiths' Company

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

284-302

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'Report on the Charities of the Goldsmiths' Company', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 284-302. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69718 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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Contents

GOLDSMITHS' COMPANY. PART I.
Men, Hackney Almshouses. Men, Class D. Men, Class C. Men, Class B. Men, Acton Almshouses. Widows, Class D. Widows, Class C. Widows, Class B. Widows, Class A. Women at Acton. Goldsmiths' Company's Exhibitions.
Ash's Charity.
Thomas Atte Hay's Charity.
Parish of St. Martin, Ludgate. Parish of St. Dunstan, Fleet Street. Bannister's Charity.
Barrett's (otherwise Read's) Charity.
Robert Blanchard's Charity.
Blundell's Charity.
Sir Martin Bowes' Charities.
Mundie's Charity.
Southwood's Charity.
Brocklesby's Charity.
Cheney's Charity.
Croshawe's Charity.
Cureton's Charity.
Davy's Charity.
Sir J. Drax's Charity.
PART II. Farmer's Charity.
Fickett's Gift.
Fountain's Charity.
Sir Thomas Fowles' Charity.
Fox's Charity.
Gurden's Charity.
Hall's Charity.
Agas Hardinge's Charity.
T. Harding's Charity.
Hetherington's Charity.
Heydon's Charity.
Hille's Charity.
Henry Hoare's Charity.
Sir Richard Hoare's Charity.
Jameson's Charity.
Jenner's Charity.
Loveday's Charity.
Makepeace's Charity.
Morley's Charity.
Morrell's Charity.
Taddy's Charity.
Sir Hugh Myddelton's Charity.
Newman's Charity.
Paine's Charity.
Patteslie's Charity.
Sir James Pemberton's Charity.
Perchard's Charity.
Perryn's Charity.
Pierson's Charity.
Dame Mary Ramsay's Charity.
Sir B. Read's Charity.
Robinson's Charity.
Sir E. Shaa's Charity.
Smith's Charity.
Strelley's Charity.
Taylor's Charity.
Sir Thomas Vyner's Charity.
Walker's Charity.
Walter's Charity.
Walton's Charity.
Sir J. Wollaston's Charity.
Footnotes

GOLDSMITHS' COMPANY. PART I.

TO THE CHARITY COMMISSIONERS FOR ENGLAND AND WALES.

In pursuance of a Minute of the Board of the 7th day of November 1862, I have inquired into the condition and circumstances of the following Charities under the management of the Goldsmiths' Company of the City of London, and I have stated in the Report under the head of each specific endowment the result of my investigation.

The constitution of the Company is—

The prime warden, three wardens, and a Court of 21 assistants.

The assistants are chosen by the Court from the livery.

The liverymen are 150 in number, besides those who are liverymen by special grant, and the number of freemen is not known, but it is thought that their number does not diminish.

Freedom is acquired by apprenticeship according to the custom of the City; to a freeman of the Company by birth, after the admission of the father to the freedom: and by redemption. The number who acquire it in this form rather increase than the contrary. The fines and fees on such admissions are about 130l. There is another but a rare case of freedom admitted by special grant.

Besides the allowances to the regular pensioners, it is the habit of the Company to receive application for casual relief from freemen, freemen's widows, or daughters of freemen of the Company. These applications are made in writing, and evidence is collected by the visitation and report of the beadle in each case.

The amount distributed for charitable purposes to the casual poor, exclusive of the gifts in pensions, which I have before mentioned, forms in the aggregate a large sum varying according to the exigencies of each particular year.

I have been furnished with the following tables as to the pensions and exhibitions which exhibit in another form an abstract of the statements I have collected and mentioned under the heads of the several Charities.

GOLDSMITHS' COMPANY. Charity Estates that contribute towards the pensions of the several classes:

Men, Hackney Almshouses.

£s.d.
Cheney400
Davy614
Fox400
Hetherington400
Hill206128
Morrell3140
Newman6188
Pattesley1534
Perchard600
Taddy1200
Walker400
£30000

Men, Class D.

£s.d.
Brocklesby200
Crowsham2000
Ficketts400
Jenner1500
Paine500
Ramsay1000
Robinson200
Vyner700
Watton
£6500

Men, Class C.

£s.d.
Hoare, Henry800
Southwood
Watton

Men, Class B.

£s.d.
Atte Haye
Hille
Southwood
Watton
And G. Co. if required

Men, Acton Almshouses.

£s.d.
Ash661010
Harding, Thomas711210
Perryn55152
Wollaston2612
£22000

Widows, Class D.

£s.d.
Hille
Makepiece566
Mundie30142

Widows, Class C.

£s.d.
Atte Haye
Gurden900
Hille
Morrall
Mundie
Myddleton
Perchard8198
G. Co.

Widows, Class B.

£s.d.
G. Co.

Widows, Class A.

£s.d.
G. Co.

Women at Acton.

£s.d.
Ash3524
Blanshard800
Fowle800
Harding, A.394
Harding, T.711210
Loveday500
Pemberton1000
Perryn66156
Pierson200
Smith1000
£22000

Daughters, Classes D., C., B., and A. all paid by the G. Co.

Goldsmiths' Company's Exhibitions.

£s.d.
17 at Cambridge, at 30l. per annum51000
17 at Oxford do.51000
1,02000
5 of the above are charged to Perryn's estate15000
Paid by the G. C.87000
1 to St. Mary Hall, Oxford, also paid by the Company5000
1 to a scholar of the City of London School, paid by the Company5000
Total paid by the Company£97000

There are also two of 5l. each chargeable to Strelley's estate—seldom applied for.

The charity expenditure of the Company in the year 1861–2, preceding that of my inquiry, was:

£s.d.
Pursuant to wills of donors and benefactions of founders6,52564
Additional sums disbursed by the Goldsmiths' Company from their proper funds for charitable objects9,326139
£15,85201

I am informed that there is nothing extraordinary in this year in point of amount, the gifts of the Company exceed rather than fall short of this amount. The voluntary portion is supposed to average 10,500l. a year.

Ash's Charity.

Francis Ash, by indentures of the 5th and 6th September 1652, granted to the Company an old messuage and five other messuages between Shoe Lane and Fetter Lane, upon trust to pay out of the rents as follows:

£s.d.
To the wardens and commonalty400
To the nominee of the mayor and aldermen of Derby2000
To eight poor working goldsmiths1600
For apprenticing two sons of poor freemen1000
To the four wardens, 10s. each; clerk, 13s. 4d.; and beadle, 6s. 8d.300

And the residue as the Court of Assistants should direct.

The estate derived from the Gift is—

No. 13, Little New Street, let to John Weller, on lease for 21 years, from Michaelmas 18503960
No. 14, Little New Street, let to William Scattergood, on lease for 21 years, from Lady-day 18484460
No. 15, Little New Street, let to James Pettard, on lease for 21 years from Ladyday 18484460
No. 16, Little New Street, let to Edmund Roberts on lease for 21 years from Midsummer 18444460
£17240

I do not find that any judicial interpretation has ever been obtained of the effect in this case of the gift of the residue to the appointment of the Company. Such an interpretation is rendered immaterial by the ancient and constant habit of the Company to apply the whole income of the estate for charitable purposes.

The 20l. per annum is annually paid upon the receipt of the town clerk of Derby.

A portion of the residue is carried to the account of pensions paid to the almspeople in the almshouses at Acton, belonging to Perryn's Charity.

£s.d.
The sum thus appointed to the women pensioners at Acton is3524
And the men661010
£101132
The sum of 1l. a year is given to 16 poor freemen of the Company, whose names are on a list but who are generally unsettled, that is to say, those who are not in receipt of regular annual pensions, under classes A. B. C. and D., and the Acton almspeople. The gift in the will is 2l. each to eight men, but the same men in most cases receive 2l. a year from this and other sources£1600

The sum of 5l. is applied in apprenticing a boy the son of a freeman whenever application is made for it. In such cases care is taken that the apprenticeship actually takes place. The payments are made to the wardens, clerk, and beadle, and the balance is usually the amount given to the casual poor. The account is closed every year, leaving no balance on either side.

Thomas Atte Hay's Charity.

Thomas Atte Hay, by will of the 6th of April 1405, gave to the Company his tenements in St. Martin, Ludgate, and St. Dunstan, Fleet Street, for the relief, augmentation, and better support of the blind, aged, and infirm members of the Company.

In 1832, subsequent to the Report of the Commissioners' inquiry an information was filed at the relation of Peter Upjohn and John Hitchin, against the Goldsmiths' Company, and by a decree of the 26th June 1833 it was ordered that the messuages or dwelling-houses and hereditaments stated in the defendant's answer were to be considered as the hereditaments given and devised by the will of Thomas Atte Haye, and were held upon and subject to the charitable trusts and purposes of his said will, and it was thereby referred to one of the Masters of the Court to take an account of the rents and profits of the said messuages or dwelling-houses and hereditaments, since the time of the filing of the information, received by the defendants or by any person by their order or for their use. And it was thereby ordered that the Master should inquire and state to the Court whether the rents and profits had been substantively applied for purposes justified by the will of the said testator, and in taking the said account and making the said inquiry, the Master was to be at liberty to state special circumstances; and it was thereby ordered that it be referred to the Master to settle and approve of a scheme for the application of the said rents and profits and the future rents and profits, having regard to the said testator's will, and to the other trusts of other charitable estates and property vested in the defendants for the use of the poor of the Goldsmiths' Company.

The cause was referred to Master Wingfield, and on 23rd February 1835, he made his general report as follows:—

That Thomas Atte Hay by his will gave and devised to the Wardens and Commonalty of the Mystery of Goldsmiths certain messuages or dwelling-houses with the appurtenances therein particularly mentioned, to hold the same for ever in aid of the subsidy, increase and better support of the sustentation of the poor blind, aged, and infirm of the Commonalty of the said Mystery, and he found by the answer of the said Defendants, and by the examination of the said defendants to certain interrogatories exhibited on behalf of the relators, that the rents and profits of the said messuages or dwelling-houses and hereditaments held by the said defendants yield a clear yearly income of 675l. or thereabouts, applicable to the said charitable trusts and purposes of the said testator's will according to the scheme to be settled and approved in pursuance of the said decree. But that inasmuch as it appeared from the answers of the said defendants to the said information, and from their examination to the interrogatories first exhibited on behalf of the relators, that the said defendants had made no other specific application of the said rents and profits than the payment of a small annual sum, but had been in the habit of putting together the funds of the several charity estates (the income of which was vested in them to or for the use of the poor of their Company), and paying and administering from such common funds all such charities, he was of opinion that he could not report that the rents and profits of this charity estate had been applied to or for purposes justified by the said testator's will, without taking an account not only of the rents and profits of this particular charity estate, but also of all other charity estates, funds, and property vested in the said defendants to or for the use of the poor of their Company. He therefore allowed certain interrogatories to be exhibited for the examination of the said defendants, with a view to ascertain what was the annual income of the several charity estates, funds, and properties so vested in them for such uses and purposes. And it appeared to him by the examination of the defendants to such last-mentioned interrogatories, and by the schedule to such examination, that the annual income of the several charity estates, funds, and property so vested in the said defendants as aforesaid was about 3,791l. 9s. 7d., and he certified that from the answer of the said defendants and the accounts therein set forth it appeared that the annual expenditure of the said defendants in charities to the poor of their Company amounted to about 5,000l.; and he further found from the said last-mentioned examination that the said defendants since the said decree had changed the mode of keeping their accounts, and to the accounts now kept by the said defendants the funds and income of each and every of the said estates and properties which were vested in the above-named defendants either wholly or in part for charitable purposes were separately credited in an account opened to each and every of their benefactors, each and every of which said accounts was debited with the payments which defendants were bound to make in pursuance of the trusts reposed in them for or in respect of the same, and which accounts commence from Lady-day 1833. And it appeared that the account opened to the said testator Thomas Atte Hay contained on the credit side the annual rents of the messuages and hereditaments declared by the said decree to be the hereditaments devised by his will, amounting to the annual sum of 675l., and on the debit side the following items:—

To fifty-six of the third class of almsmen at twelve pounds each, 672l.

Leaving a balance of 3l. to be appropriated to the Christmas donations.

And it was stated to him that the said third class of almsmen was composed of 63 poor freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company, of the age of 55 years and upwards, who were elected pensioners of the said Company for life, their pensions being whilst they were in the said third class of almsmen a fixed payment of 12l. per annum each, and further that they receive no other fixed pension, but are eligible with all the other poor freemen of the said Company to receive casual relief. And he certified that it had been submitted to him on behalf of the said defendants that the present application of the rents and profits of the said charity estate of the said testator would be a proper scheme for the future application of the said charity funds. And he certified that upon consideration of the several matters aforesaid he found that the rents and profits of the said testator's estate since the filing of the information had been substantively applied in and for the purposes justified by the will of the said testator; and he further certified that he approved of the application of the funds of the said charity estate, as stated in the account, as a proper scheme for the application of the future rents and profits thereof, having regard to the said testator's will and to the other trusts of other charitable estates and property vested in the defendants for the use of the poor of the said Goldsmiths' Company; and that he was of opinion that the separate account so opened to the said testator Thomas Atte Hay should be continued; and that when and as any vacancy should occur among the objects of the said charities, public notice of such vacancy should be affixed at the hall of the said Company, and that a subsequent notice should also be given of the person selected to fill up such vacancy immediately after such selection. And as to that part of the said decree whereby it was referred to him to tax the costs of the relators to the date of the said decree as between solicitor and client, he certified that he had considered and taxed the said costs, as appeared by his report dated the 2nd August 1883.

The Master's report was confirmed by order of the Court dated the

The present income of the estate derived under this endowment is:—

Parish of St. Martin, Ludgate.

£s.d.
No. 7, Stationers Court, let to Joseph Greenhill on lease for 21 years from March 18517500
No. 8, Stationers Court, let to J. W. Warren on lease for 21 years from March 18516000
No. 36, Ludgate Street, let to Mrs. Ann Horwood on lease for 21 years from Lady-day 185315000
No. 37, Ludgate Street, let to R. W. Beckley on lease for 21 years from March 185115000

Parish of St. Dunstan, Fleet Street.

No. 164 and 165, Fleet Street, let to Frank Clemow on lease for 21 years from Lady-day 185725000
£68500

This fund as well as the other charity funds of this Company are administered by the Company without any charges of management. The balance of the fund after the necessary expenditure on the buildings, if any, is carried by the Company to the account of the disbursements in respect of the two classes of pensioners B. and C., the males of Class B. and the females of Class C.; thus, in the year ending Lady-day 1861 the account of disbursements stood thus,—

£s.d.
1.Paid the male pensioners, class B. towards their pensions of 18l. each, 70l. 1s. 6d.7016
2.Ditto, the widow pensioners, class C. towards their pensions of 21l. each614186
£68500

If the fund derived from this charity should in any year exceed what is required for these classes, it would be carried over to some other class or classes. But this it will be seen is not likely to occur.

The Company, it should be explained, have established several classes of pensioners, which they distinguish by the respective denomination of Classes A., B., C., and D.

The Class A. consists entirely of women pensioners, who are widows of freemen.

The qualification for this class is the age of 55 and under 60, and the allowance is 15l. a year each. Of this class there are about 20.

The Class B. comprises:—Males,

Pensioners, poor freemen of the Company, each of whom receives 18l. a year. The number of these pensioners is variable. The habit of the Company is to admit no male as a settled pensioner under 60 years of age. The pensioners from 60 to 70 years old form the Class B. The average number of males of this class is about 50.

The female pensioners of the Class B. are widows of freemen of the age of 60 and under 70, and the allowance 18l. a year each. The number of this class is about 50.

The Class C. consists of male pensioners from 70 to 80 years old, who receive 21l. a year. The average number of this class is about 50.

The female pensioners of Class C. are widows of the ages of 70 and under 80. They receive 21l. a year each. The number on this list is about 60.

The Class D. consists of male pensioners of 80 years and upwards, whose allowance is 24l. per annum each. The number in this class does not amount to 10. Lately they have not exceeded six.

The female pensioners of Class D. are widows of the like age of 80 and upwards, who receive 24l. a year each. The number on this list is 17, which is said to be about the average.

The amount thus distributed in pensions would therefore be as follows:—

£
Class A., women, 20 at 15l. each300
" B., men, 50 at 18l. each900
" " women, 50 at 18l. each900
" C., men, 50 at 21l. each1,050
" " women, 60 at 21l. each1,260
" D., men, 6 at 24l. each144
" " women, 17 at 24l. each408
£4,962

The amount distributed by the Company in pensions in the year ending 31st March 1862 was 7,637l. 14s. This includes the above classes—the Acton almspeople, the Hugh Middelton pensioners, the fixed pensioners under gifts such as Ash's of 20s. a year each together with four classes of daughters of freemen, who are entirely relieved out of the proper funds of the Company, and of whose allowances therefore I have not thought it necessary to inquire. (fn. 1)

Bannister's Charity.

Henry Bannister, by will of the 16th July 1622, gave to the Company 160l. to pay 8l. to the parish of Hackney towards setting out of four poor men's children to be apprentices.

The Company pay annually, on the receipt of the rector of Hackney, the sum of 8l. The Company charge themselves with this sum as interest of 160l. at 5l. per cent.

Barrett's (otherwise Read's) Charity.

John Barrett, by his will of the 16th October 1511, gave to the Company three messuages, &c., in Westcheap to pay out of the rents 10l. a year, as follows, viz.: 5l. a year for coals amongst the poor of the following parishes:—

St. John Zachary20 quarters.
St. Mary Steyning15 "
St. Ann's15 "
St. Michael10 "
St. Peter, Westcheap15 "
St. Foster20 "
St. Leonard5 "

And he also directed the following payments:

£s.d.
To poor widows of Goldsmiths308
To the Churchwardens of St. John Zachary for superstitious purposes364
To 12 almsmen0120
To officers of the Company0110

I am informed that the property derived under this will, of whatever it might have consisted, had become forfeited to the Crown, under the statute (of Henry 8th or Edward 6th) of superstitious uses, and that the Company took the estate by re-grant from the Crown, in consideration of a money payment, and that the property has since been held by the Company, as of their own estate. The words of the gift for the distribution of the coals are to the intent they (the poor recipients) " shall pray for the good estate of Dame Eliz Read while she liveth and of the soul of the said Sir B. Read, her late husband, and for both their souls when she is departed out of this world." Under this form of gift the donation would be probably held as incidental to the superstitious use and therefore void. The Company have, however, continued the payment to the several parishes, as under:

£s.d.
St. Vedast Foster0100
St. John Zachary150
St. Leonard Foster026
St. Michael050
St. Mary Steyning076
St. Peter, Westcheap076
St. John and Agnes076
350

Robert Blanchard's Charity.

Robert Blanchard, by a codicil to his will of the 17th August 1680, gave to the Company 200l. to pay 4l. a year a piece to two widows.

The Company charge themselves with 8l. a year, as the produce of this fund, and apply it towards payment of the pensioners to the Acton almswomen.

Blundell's Charity.

Peter Blundell, by his will of the 9th June 1599, from 150l. to the Company to purchase lands out of which 40s. a year should be paid to the poor prisoners in the Compter, Wood Street. It does not appear that any land was purchased, and none has certainly ever been appropriated by the Company to this endowment, nor is it material, as the residue of the income beyond the 40s. a year is given to the wardens absolutely. The 2l. a year is paid annually upon the receipt of Mr. Temple, the officer appointed by the Court of Aldermen, to receive the fund payable for the benefit of the city prisoners." (fn. 2)

Sir Martin Bowes' Charities.

Sir Martin Bowes, by deed of the 28th September 1560, gave to trustees his five messuages and gardens in Woolwich, to permit five poor persons to have the use thereof, such persons to be poor inhabitants of Woolwich, and, in default, the poor of the Company.

By his will of the 20th September 1562 he gave to the Company two messuages in Lombard Street of 15l. a year, and a messuage in St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, of 20s. a year, viz.:—

£s.d.
To the five poor folk of Woolwich, 1l. 10s. 5d. a year each7121
To a preacher at Woolwich068
To the poor of Woolwich0711
To the wardens0134
To the poor of the parish of Woolnoth, London, in coals300
To the almsmen of the Company100

And the surplus of the 16l. a year he gave to the Company for the maintenance of the hall and the relief of the poor.

This endowment, and those of Southwood and Mundie, were the subject of an information filed in 1832 against the Company, since the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry. In this suit a decree of the 1st July 1833 was made by Sir John Leach, Master of the Rolls, by which it was declared that the lands, tenements, and hereditaments stated in the defendants' answer, excepting those relating to the inquiry therein-after directed, were to be considered as the hereditaments given and devised by the deed of feoffment and will of Sir Martin Bowes, Knight, and William Southwood respectively, and were held upon and subject to the charitable trusts and purposes of the said deed and wills. And his honour did order and decree the same acccordingly. And it referred to the Master to whom the decree in the cause "Attorney General v. Goldmiths' Charity" made on the 26th day of June 1833 in the Charity of Thomas Atte Hay was referred, to inquire what lands and hereditaments had been possessed by and were then held by the defendants under the will and codicil of Roger Mundie, and his honour did declare that the stocks or funds purchased with the premiums received by the Company on leases of the said premises, as stated by the defendants' answer, belonged to the charity entitled to the hereditaments for which the premises were given. And it was ordered that the said Master should inquire of what such stocks or funds consisted, and that it be referred to the said Master to take an account of the rents and profits of such lands, tenements, and hereditaments since the time of the filing the information received by the defendants, or by any person by their order or for their use. And it was ordered that the said Master should inquire whether such rents and profits had been substantively applied by the defendants in and for the purposes justified by the said deed and wills and codicil respectively. And the said Master was to be at liberty to state circumstances specially with regard to the last-mentioned inquiry. And it was ordered that it be referred to the said Master to settle and approve of a scheme for the application of the said rents and profits and the future rents and profits, having regard to the said deed and wills and codicil respectively, and to the other trusts of other charitable estates and property vested in the defendants for the use of the poor of the Goldsmiths' Company.

The cause was referred to Master Wingfield, who on the 23rd February 1835 made his general report as follows:—

After reciting the deed of feoffment of 1560, and the will of 1562, he found that the said Sir Martin Bowes, being seized of other freehold estates which he was minded and desirous to bestow upon the charitable purposes in the pleadings and decree of this cause mentioned, made assurance thereof unto the several persons whose wills were therein-after set forth to the intent that they might devise the same in manner therein-after mentioned, and accordingly William Southwood, by his will bearing date the 23rd of October 1557 (he being a grantee of the messuages and tenements conveyed to him by the said Sir Martin Bowes) after reciting a deed of conveyance from the said Sir Martin Bowes to him to the effect therein mentioned, gave to the wardens and commonalty of the Mystery of Goldsmiths all those messuages, lands, and tenements which had been conveyed to him by said Sir Martin Bowes, situate in Scalding Alley, in the parish of St. Mildred, in the Poultry, London, of the yearly rent of 16l. 13s. 6d., and also several rents and quit rents growing out of certain tenements with their appurtenances in Matthew's Alley, in West Street, in the parish of St. Matthew, in Friday Street, London, amounting to the yearly rent of 1l. 13s. 2d. To the intent that the said wardens and commonalty should make certain payments amounting to the annual sum of 15l. or thereabouts; and he declared that the surplus of the rents and profits of the said premises should remain and go yearly to the said wardens and commonalty towards the reparation of the said almshouses at Woolwich, and the relief and maintenance of the almsmen and poor of the said Company perpetually; and he found that Roger Mundie, another grantee, in trust for the said Sir Martin Bowes, by his will dated 12th August 1562, after reciting that the said Sir Martin Bowes by his will granted and confirmed to him, the said Roger Mundie and his heirs for ever, all that great messuage or tenement, with all stables, courts, gardens, and hereditaments thereto belonging situate in the parish of St. Botolph Without Bishopsgate, in London, and also 22 gardens and a small tenement or garden which are therein particularly described, all situate in the same parish, and reciting that the said messuage, gardens, and premises were at the time of the said grant and will of the yearly value of 13l. 16s. 8d.; and further reciting that the intent and meaning of the said Sir Matthew Bowes was that he, the said Roger Mundie, should by his will give the said hereditaments with the appurtenances therein mentioned to the Wardens and Commonalty of the Art or Mystery of Goldsmiths and to their successors for ever, for the purpose and to the intent in the said will mentioned, he the said Roger Mundie minding only to perform the mind, will, and intent of the said Sir Martin Bowes, Knight, Did give, will, and bequeath unto the wardens and commonalty of Goldsmiths and their successors for ever all the said great messuage and hereditaments thereinbefore described; and after reciting that the ward of Langbourne, London, in which Sir Martin Bowes then inhabited, was charged for every fifteenth granted by Act of Parliament to the King the sum of 20l. 10s., which was a great burden to the poor within the said ward, for the relief and ease of the said ward, and the inhabitants thereof from the payment of the said fifteenth the will mind, and intent of the said Sir Martin Bowes, and of the said Roger Mundie was that whensoever every fifteenth, after the decease of the said Sir Martin Bowes, should be granted by Act of Parliament to the King, the said wardens and commonalty should discharge the inhabitants of the said ward of Langbourne from the payment of the said sum of 20l. 10s. for every fifteenth. And further, that one moiety of all the rents, revenues, issues, and profits of the said premises, with the appurtenances, that should remain over and above that should fully discharge the said fifteenth to be paid to the said ward in form thereinabove expressed, should be distributed among the poor people of the said Company of Goldsmiths, and the other moiety should remain to said wardens and commonalty towards the maintenance of the house of Goldsmiths' Hall and the charge of the same. And the Master found that by a codicil to his will, dated 10th October 1562, the said Roger Mundie after reciting a deed of feoffment from Sir Martin Bowes to him, dated 10th October in the same year, gave and devised to said Company all those two messuages or tenements therein divided into three with all and singular their appurtenances situate in the said parish of Saint Botolph, therein particularly described, for the several uses and intents in his said will declared of or concerning the other lands and tenements therein contained. And he found that by the answer of the defendants to the information filed in this cause, and also by their examination to the interrogatories first exhibited before him on behalf of the relators, it appeared that the lands, messuages, tenements, and hereditaments constituting the charity estate of the said Roger Mundie, the testator in the pleadings and decree mentioned, and held by the defendants under the said testator's will and codicil, consist of two houses with their appurtenances situate in Primrose Court, and 34 houses with their appurtenances in Primrose Street, in the parish of St. Botolph Without Bishopsgate, and that other than and besides the said premises last mentioned, the said defendants were not nor had been seized or possessed of any lands, messuages, tenements, or hereditaments under, upon, and subject to the trusts of the said will and codicil of the said Roger Mundie. And he found by the answer of the said defendants to the said information, and also by their examination to certain other interrogatories exhibited before him on behalf of the said relators, and the schedule annexed thereto, it appeared that the lands, messuages, or tenements and hereditaments so declared by the said decree as aforesaid to be held by the said defendants under and subject to the said trusts of the said will of the said testator, Sir Martin Bowes, yield a clear yearly income of 258l. 15s. 6d. applicable to the said charitable trusts and purposes of the said Sir Martin Bowes' will, according to the scheme to be settled and approved in pursuance of the said decree in that behalf, and that the lands, messuages, or tenements and hereditaments so declared by the said decree as aforesaid to be held by the said defendants under and subject to the trusts of the said will of the said testator, William Southwood, yield a clear yearly income of 475l. 7s. or thereabouts applicable to the charitable trusts of the said will of the said testator, William Southwood, according to the scheme to be settled and approved in pursuance of the decree in that behalf, and that the lands, messuages, or tenements and hereditaments so appearing by the answer and by the examination of the defendants to constitute the charity estate of the said testator, Roger Mundie, as aforesaid, yield a clear yearly income of 752l. 4s. 6d. or thereabouts applicable to the said charitable trusts of the said will and codicil of the said testator, Roger Mundie, according to the scheme to be settled and approved in pursuance of the decree in that behalf. But he certified that inasmuch as it appeared from the answer of the defendants to the said information, that the said defendants had made no other specific application of the residue of the said rents and profits, after making the specific payments directed by the said deed, wills, and codicil respectively as aforesaid, than the payment of a small annual sum to the poor of their Company in respect of the said charity estates of each of the aforesaid donors, but had been in the habit of putting together the funds of the several charity estates (the income of which was vested in them), to or for the use of the poor of their Company, and paying and administering from such common fund all such charities, he was of opinion that he could not report that the rents and profits of the several charity estates of the said testators, Sir Martin Bowes, William Southwood, and Roger Mundie respectively had been applied to or for purposes justified by the said deed, wills, and codicil of the said testators respectively, without taking an account, not only of the rents and profits of these particular charity estates, but also of all other estates, funds, and property vested in the said defendants to or for the use of the poor of their Company, and therefore he allowed certain interrogatories to be exhibited before him for the examination of the said defendants with a view to ascertain what was the annual income of the several charity estates, funds, and properties so vested in them for such uses and purposes. And he found by the examination of the defendants to such last-mentioned interrogatories, and by the schedule to such examination, which was brought in on the 22nd day of May 1834, that the annual income of the several estates, funds, and property so vested in the said defendants for the use of the poor of their Company was about 3,791l. 9s. 7d. And he found by the answer of the said defendants and the account therein set forth that the expenditure of the said defendants in charities to the poor of their Company amounted to about 5,000l. per annum. And he further found from the answer of the said defendants to the said information and from their examination to the interrogatories so exhibited before him as aforesaid, that two several sums of 420l. and 300l. had been received by them or their predecessors in the years 1817 and 1818 respectively as considerations on the granting of two leases of two houses in St. Mildred's Court, part of the charity estate of the said testator William Southwood and another, of a house in Primrose Street, part of the charity estate of the said Roger Mundie, and that the sums of 553l. 12s. 3d. Bank three per cent. annuities, and 376l. 5s. 3d. Bank three per cent. annuities had been purchased with the said sums of money respectively so received as aforesaid, and that the said purchases were made in the names of the said defendants, and that such sums then stood invested in their names. And he found from the examination of the said defendants to the interrogatories so last exhibited as aforesaid, that the said defendants had, since the said decree, changed their mode of keeping their account, and that in the accounts now kept by the said defendants, the funds and incomes of each and every of the estates and properties vested in the said defendants either wholly or in part for charitable purposes, were separately credited in an account opened to each and every of their benefactors, each and every of which said accounts was debited with the payments which the said defendants are bound to make in pursuance of the trusts reposed in them for or in respect of the same, and which accounts commenced from Lady-day 1833. And it appeared to him that the accounts opened to the above-named testator Sir Martin Bowes contained on the credit side the annual rents arising out of the messuages and hereditaments so declared by the said decree as aforesaid, to be the messuages and hereditaments so declared by the said decree as aforesaid to be the messuages and tenements devised by his will amounting at that period to the sum of 258l. 13s. 6d. as aforesaid, and on the debit side the following items: "To five Woolwich almswomen at 13l. each per annum, 65l." "Coals and candles, 16l." Donation on visitation, 2l. 12s. 6d." "Taxes, &c, 5l." Sundries on visitation to the clergyman, &c., 3l. 1s. 4d." "Repairs of houses, 29l. 8s. 6d." "St. Mary Wolnoth's parish, 3l." "Clerk, beadle, and almsmen, 1l." "Goldsmiths' Hall for repairs, 66l. 15s. 7d." "To the 10 widows at Acton, in aid of the pension of 15l. each, allowed them as almspeople, 66l. 15s. 7d.=258l. 13s. 6d." And it further appeared to him that the account opened to the above-named testator William Southwood contained on the credit side the annual rents of the messuages and tenements so declared by the said decree as aforesaid to be the messuages and tenements devised by the will of the said testator William Southwood and the interest of the said sum of 553l. 12s. 3d. Bank 3l. per cent. annuities, amounting in the whole to the annual sum of 491l. 19s. 0d., and on the debit side the following items: "To the Minister of St. Mary's Wolnoth on sermon, 4l. 3s. 0d. Poor of the parish 12l. 19s. 8d. Parish of North Cray in Kent 12l. 10s. 0d. Twenty-one almsmen of the first class at 11l. 2s. 0d. each for one year, to 227l. 6s. 6d. Eighteen of the senior widows of the second class at 10l. each, 180l. Four senior widows of the first class at 12l. each, 48l. Balance to Christmas donations 6l. 19s. 10d." And it further appeared to him that the account opened to the above-named testator Roger Mundie, contained on the credit side the annual rents of the messuages and hereditaments so appearing by the said answer and by the said examination as aforesaid, to be the hereditaments devised by his will and codicil, together with the interest of the said sum of 376l. 5s. 3d. Bank 3l. per cent. annnities, amounting in the whole to the annual sum of 763l. 10s. 3d., and on the debit side the following items. "Moiety to the maintenance of the Hall and charges of the same, 381l. 15s. 1d. To thirty-one widows of the first class at 12l. each for one year to 372l. Balance 9l. 15s. 2d. to be appropriated to the Christmas donations." And he certified that the payments mentioned in the account opened to the said testator Sir Martin Bowes, to the Woolwich almswomen was an application of that part of the income of his charity estate, which was justified by his will. That the Acton almswomen amongst whom one half of the residue of the income of the said charity estate had been appropriated as in the said account mentioned, are ten poor widows of Freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company of the age of 60 years and upwards, residing in the Company's almshouses at Acton, who receive as a settled pension the sum of 22l. 3s. 3d. per annum, and that half of the residue so appropriated as in the said account mentioned to the repairs or Goldsmiths' Hall, was so given by the said will of the said Sir Martin Bowes, and he certified that the payments mentioned in the account so opened to the said William Southwood to the minister and poor of Saint Mary Woolnoth and to the parish of North Cray in Kent, were an application of that part of the income of his charity estate which was so applied justified by his said will, and that the senior widows of the first-class amongst whom part of the residue had been appropriated, were poor widows of Freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company of the age of 65 years and upwards, who received the sum of 14l. per annum each, as a settled pension, and the senior widows of the second-class amongst whom the remainder of the residue had been appropriated were poor widows of freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company of the age of 60 and upwards, who received the sum of 11l. per annum each, as a settled pension. And he certified that 30 were widows of the first-class to whom half the income of the charity estate of the said testator Roger Mundie had been appropriated as aforesaid were poor widows of freemen of the Goldsmith's Company of the age of 60 and upwards, who received 12l. per annum each, as a settled pension, and that the appropriation of the other half of the income of the said estate of the said Roger Mundie to the maintenance of Goldsmiths' Hall, and the charges of the same was a purpose directed by the said Roger Mundie's will, and he certified that upon consideration of the several matters aforesaid, he found that the rents and profits of the said charity estates of the said Sir Martin Bowes and of the said William Southwood, and of the said Roger Mundie, since the filing of the said information had been substantively applied to or for purposes justified by the said deed and wills and codicil of the said testators respectively. And he further certified that he approved of the application of the said rents and profits as stated in the said accounts respectively as a proper scheme for the application of the future rents and profits respectively, having regard to the said deed and wills and codicil respectivety, and to the other trusts of other charitable estates and property vested in the defendants for the use of the poor of the Goldsmiths' Company. And he was of opinion that the separate accounts so opened to the said testators respectively should be continued, and that when and as any vacancy should occur among the objects of the said charities public notice of such vacancy should forthwith be affixed at the Hall of the said Company, and that a subsequent notice should always be given of the person selected to fill up such vacancy immediately after such selection. And as to that part of the decree whereby it was referred to him to tax the costs of the relators to the date of the said decree, as between solicitor and client, he certified that he had considered and taxed the said costs as approved by his Report, dated the 31st day of July 1833.

The almshouses at Woolwich consist of five houses, which were rebuilt about a century ago, and remain as stated, in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry. They have a court in front and a garden behind.

In the year ending Lady-day 1862, a sum of 104l. 1s. 4d. was spent on their repair out of the income of Bowes' Charity. They are occupied by the widows of parishioners who have been ratepayers of Woolwich selected by the Company.

The estate devised by Sir M. Bowes consists of a part of the house, No. 67, Lombard Street (the banking house of Glyn & Co.) extending from the outside of the adjoining house, No. 66, 39 feet 6 inches in front, and 41 feet on the back, with a depth of 66 feet, the remaining portion of the house being the property of Messrs. Glyn, and the whole of No. 67 having been built by them. The charity premises are let to Messrs. Glyn & Co. upon a building lease for 81 years from Lady-day 1828, at a rent of 192l. 18s. a year.

The income of Bowes' Charity is applied in the support of the Woolwich almshouses and pensions.

The five Woolwich almswomen now receive—

£s.d.
13l. a year each6500
The coals and candles (average)1756
The water rate600
The wardens give them 1l. each on the day of the visitations500
To the clergyman 1l. 1s., and officers of the church: organist 10s. 6d. clerk 5s., sexton 2s. 6d, beadle 1s., and poor of Woolwich 8s., wardens of the Company 13s. 4d.314
The surgeons attending the almshouses1000
Insurance of the almshouses200
Quit rent006
In the year 1861–62 the residue was exhausted by the repairs of the almshouses which would otherwise have been divided between the poor of the Company and their general funds for the repair of the Hall, &c.10414
21288

The gift of 3l. to the poor of the parish of St. Mary Woolnooth in coal is more than met by the additional gift of 10l. to the poor of that parish mentioned in the disbursement of Southwood's Charity.

Mundie's Charity.

Roger Mundie, by will of the 12th August 1562, gave to the wardens a great messuage, &c. in St. Botolph Bishopsgate, of the yearly rent of 13l. 16s. 8d. for discharging the inhabitants of Langbourn Ward from the payment of fifteenths. And of the residue, one moiety should be distributed amongst the poor of the Company, and the other moiety towards the maintenance of the Company's Hall.

This property was one of the subjects of the information mentioned in the report on Sir M. Bowes' Charity.

The property consists of Primrose Street and Primrose Court, as mentioned in the Master's report. It is now let as follows:—

Roger Mundie's Estate, Primrose Street, Bishopsgate.

No.Tenants.Terms of Leases.Annual Rent
£s.d.
2 and 5Briggs and Garford21 years from Christmas 1852.20000
4Gowar, Frederick21 years from Midsummer 1847.67166
5Peters, William21 years from Lady-day 1848.1400
6Gowar, Frederick21 years from Midsummer 1848.1476
7Murphy, Daniel21 years from Christmas 1852.2200
8Smith, Mrs.Ditto2000
9Phillips, VincentDitto2000
10Ball, Mrs.Ditto1500
11Sanders, Henry21 years from Midsummer 1859.2310
12 and 13Stewart, Mrs.21 years from Christmas 1852.4500
14Draysey, John21 years from Lady-day 1853.3000
15 and 16Murphy, Daniel21 years from Christmas 1852.4400
17McLean, Francis3 years from Midsummer 1862.2000
18 and 19Harding, Walter21 years from Michaelmas 1858.8000
20Davidson, Jacob21 years from Christmas 1852.2200
21Andrew, R. J,21 years from Michaelmas 1850.2010
22Miles, John21 years from Midsummer 1850.21146
23 and 24Carter, William21 years from Christmas 1852.4500
25Miles, John21 years from Midsummer 1849.2500
26Andrew, R. J.21 years from Christmas 1852.2310
27How, James21 years from Christmas 1853.2200
28French, Mrs.21 years from Christmas 1852.2200
29Binnington, J.21 years from Michaelmas 1858.3000
30Barter, James21 years from Lady-day 1858.2500
31Norman, John21 years from Christmas 1852.2000
32Tatum, Mrs.21 years from Michaelmas 1858.2500
33Saunders, Henry21 years from Christmas 1852,2200
34Wood, E. J.21 years from Christmas 1852.2200
35Davies, G. E.21 years from Michaelmas 1858.2500
A sum of 376l. 5s. 3d. Consols, the produce of a fine taken on the property in Primrose Street, as mentioned in the Master's Report.1158
£1,00172

The entire fund is applicable and is applied to two objects, the poor of the Company, and the maintenance of the Hall.

The moiety for the benefit of the poor of the Company was appropriated in the last year ending Lady-day 1862:

£s.d.
To the widows in class C.469196
Ditto class D.30142
£500138

And the same method of application is generally followed.

The other moiety is carried to the general funds of the Company, which is subject to the necessary repairs of the Hall and property. (fn. 3)

Southwood's Charity.

William Southwood (trustee of Sir Martin Bowes), by his will of the 23rd October 1557, gave to the Company messuages and lands in St. Mildred, Poultry, and also property in St. Matthew, Friday Street, to be employed as follows:

£s.d.
To a preacher of St. Mary Woolnoth on the 9th of November068
To each of the wardens014
To each of the assistants010
To each of the renters present020
To the clerk and beadle014
To every almsman present004
To the clerk of the church008
For a dinner300
To the churchwarden for a potation090
To one almsman kept at Goldsmiths' Hall3118
To the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth for bread to the poor200
To the poor of the parish of Woolwich for ditto200
To the parish of North Cray for ditto200

I refer in this case to the proceedings in the Court of Chancery since the last report, set forth in the report on Sir M. Bowes' Charity.

The estate comprised in the will of Southwood now consists of—

£s.d.
No. (5), formerly 2 to 4 St. Mildred's Court, in the parish of St. Mildred, Poultry, let to Haggard and Weston on a building lease for 61 years from Lady-day 18364500
No. 5, 6, 7, St. Mildred's Court, let to the trustees of the London Joint Stock Banking Company on a building lease for 61 years from Lady-day 183625000
No. 8 & 9 St. Mildred's Court, let to the same lessees for the same terms18000
No. 4, Princes Street, same lessees and same term10500
No. 5, Princes Street, same lessees, same term32500
No. 3, Princes Street, let to the Metropolitan Life Insurance Society on lease for 61 years from Lady-day 183620000
There is also a sum of 553l. 12s. 3d. 3l. per cent. Consols the produce of an investment of a sum of money received as mentioned in the foregoing Master's report16126
£1,121122
£s.d.
The same five persons as receive the 13l. a year each from Bowes' estate receive also 12l. a year from this fund6000
The greater part of the fund is then carried to the pension fund:— Class B.543161
Class C.494175
The residue is applied as follows:— Gifts at the visitation of St. Mary Woolnoth, the fund being paid to the parish officers and distributed by them (1861–1862)20188
Carried forward1,119122
Brought forward1,119122
This comprised in the year ending Ladyday 1862—
£s.d.
The minister in lieu of the 6s. 8d.110
Organist0106
Clerk050
Sexton026
Beadle010
Poor of the parish5198
" additional10100
(This 10l. 10s. additional gratuity is partly in satisfaction of the 3l. a year directed to be given to the poor of St. Mary Woolnoth in coals by Sir Martin Bowes, deceased.)
54 children attending the church at 6d.170
22 almsmen 1s. each120
(The Commissioners of Inquiry mention one almsman as receiving a shilling, and being styled Sir Martin Bowes' almsman. The whole of the almsmen attending now received 1s. each. There is no gift specifically representing "the almsmen kept at the Goldsmiths' Hall" mentioned in the will).
The amount varies according to the greater or less attendance of the almsmen.
£20188
The parish of North Cray on the receipt of the incumbent200
This is constantly increased by the voluntary gift of 10l. 10s. to the poor out of the funds of the Company. This gift is referred to in the Master's report.
£1,121122

Brocklesby's Charity.

Robert Brocklesby, by his will of the 3rd September 1615, gave to the Company 40s. a year for five poor men at Christmas and Good Friday at 4s. a piece at each distribution.

This gift, which is for poor persons generally, the Company carry to the account of the Pensioners, Class D. There is no record of any investment of the principal of this gift, which appears to have been a sum of 34l. the receipt of which the Company acknowledged by a deed poll of 1625.

Cheney's Charity.

Richard Cheney, by his will of 29th June 1625, gave to the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth, London, a parcel of marsh ground at West Ham, Essex, and charged the same with 4l. for four poor men of the Company at the discretion of the Company.

The churchwardens of St. Mary Woolnoth pay the Goldsmiths' Company 4l. a year. It is paid to the account of the poor of the Company in the Hackney Almshouses. (See Morrell's Charity.)

Croshawe's Charity.

Richard Croshawe, by his will of the 26th April 1631 gave to the Company 400l., to pay 20l. yearly to 20 poor working goldsmiths.

There has been no specific investment nor charge of this sum of 400l., but 20l. a year is carried to the account of the male pensioners, Class D.

Cureton's Charity.

Harry Osborn Cureton, by a deed dated the 9th February 1838, made between himself of the one part, and the Wardens and Commonalty of the Mystery of Goldsmiths of the other part, reciting that he was desirous of founding and perpetuating a charity for the relief of poor blind aged men, free of the said Company, who had served their apprenticeship to the craft of goldsmithery, and of such other poor blind persons as were therein-after mentioned, to be called "Cureton's Charity." And that he had transferred into the name of the said wardens and commonalty in the books of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England the sum of 3,000l. New 3l. 10s. per cent. annuities, it was witnessed that for the purpose of founding and perpetuating the said charity, and declaring the trusts of the said stock it was thereby declared and agreed, and they, the said wardens and commonalty, thereby for themselves and their successors covenanted with the said Harry Osborn Cureton, his executors and administrators, that they the said Wardens and Commonalty should stand possessed of the said sum of 3,000l. New 3½l. per cent. annuities upon and for the trusts and purposes following, that is to say, upon trust during the natural life of him the said Harry Osborn Cureton, to pay to him and his assigns or otherwise to permit him and them to receive the dividends which should from time to time accrue, and become payable for and in respect thereof for his and their own use and benefit, and for that purpose to execute and give such power or powers of attorney, and do such other acts as might be necessary or proper for enabling him the said Harry Osborn Cureton and his assigns to take and receive the said dividends as he the said Harry Osborn Cureton should reasonably require in that behalf. And it was declared and agreed that in case the said Harry Osborn Cureton should happen to die on any day not being one of the half-yearly days on which the said dividends accrue and become due and payable on or in respect of the said trust stock, then and in such case the executors, administrators, or assigns of the said Harry Osborn Cureton should not be entitled to any rateable share or proportion whatsoever of the dividends to accrue due at the expiration of the then current half year, and from and after the death of the said Harry Osborn Cureton, they the said Wardens and Commonalty should stand possessed of the said sum of 3,000l. New 3½l. per cent. annuities, and the dividends then accruing or thereafter to accrue due upon or in respect thereof upon trust by and out of the said dividends, to pay to each of five poor persons to be elected as therein-after provided for, and to be called and designated as "Cureton's Pensioners," the clear yearly sum of 20l. during his or her natural life (except and determinable as therein-after mentioned), and to be paid half-yearly on the 28th May and the 21st December in each and every year or thereabouts, and in case any person should be elected to be any such pensioner on any day not being one of such half-yearly days as aforesaid, then such person should on the next of such half-yearly days receive such part only of the half-yearly sum of 10l., as should be proportional to the time which should have elapsed from the day of such election, and in case any of such pensioners should die on any day not being one of such half-yearly days as aforesaid, then the said Wardens and Commonalty should pay to the widow, widower, or such one or more relative or relatives, friend or friends of the deceased pensioner, as the Wardens and Court of Assistants of the said Company should in their discretion think fit, such part of the said half-yearly sum of 10l. as should have elapsed between such last preceding halfyearly day of payment, and the day of his or her death. And it was thereby declared and agreed that the election of the said "Cureton Pensioners" should be in the Wardens and Court of Assistants or other the Governing Body for the time being of the said Company, who should proceed to elect them in such manner as they usuall adopt in the elections of their pensioners. And thereby declared and agreed that every such should be at the least 50 years of age, and should have been totally blind for 12 months before his or her election, and should not be in the receipt or enjoyment of any other Blind Charity, or any endowment or public gift whatsoever for the blind, and should not be in the possession or receipt of any other income exceeding 25l. per annum, and such persons (if any) as should be freemen of th said Company of Goldsmiths and should have actually and bonâ fide served an apprenticeship to the craft or act of goldsmithery, being otherwise duly qualified as aforesaid, should be preferred and elected before any other person whomsoever, and in case there should not be at any such election any candidate or applicant or sufficient number of candidates or applicants so qualified as aforesaid, who should have served such apprenticeship, then such candidates or applicants as should be freemen of the said Company, or the widow of such freemen being in other respects qualified as herein-before provided should have the next preference, and be elected before any other person whomsoever, and in case only there should not be at any such election any candidate or applicant or sufficient number of candidates or applicants so qualified as aforesaid, being freemen or widows of freemen of the said Company, then and in such case the vacancies or vacancy should be supplied by the election of persons or a person so qualified in all other respects as aforesaid, who should be freemen or widows of freemen or freeman or the widow of a freeman of the city of London, and for the better making such election. it was thereby declared that the Wardens and Court of Assistants of the said Company as soon as conveniently might be after the decease of the said Harry Osborne Cureton, and afterwards from time to time, when any of the said pensioners' places should become vacant, as soon as conveniently might be after the happening of every such vacancy, and before they should proceed to any such election should cause to be advertised, at least twice a week for four successive weeks, in two of the most public daily London newspapers, that they intend to proceed on a day to be therein mentioned, not less than six weeks and not more than eight weeks from the first advertisement, to elect the said five Cureton pensioners or to supply such vacancy as the case might be, therein stating the qualifications required for such pensioners, and the order or priority of preference or eligibility as thereinafter declared, and the time and place and manner in which the applications and testimonials of the candidates or applicants were to be made produced and left. And it was thereby declared and agreed that when and so often any such election should be made the said Wardens and Court of Assistants should cause the names or name of the successful candidates or candidate, with their, his, or her addresses or address, to be twice advertised in the same two newspapers, within one fortnight after such election. And it was agreed and declared that if any candidate or applicant should neglect to comply with any of the forms to be prescribed by the said Wardens and Court of Assistants as to the making, producing, and leaving his or her application and testimonials as aforesaid, or if any candidate or applicant should fail to make out to the satisfaction of the said Wardens and Court of Assistants that he or she was qualified as therein-before provided for, such candidate or applicant should not be eligible to be elected, notwithstanding that by reason of the want of candidates or applicants of the class of which such person should be or claim to be, the Wardens and Courts of Assistants should be obliged to elect out of any other class of persons or altogether to postpone such election. And provided further, that if at any such election there should not be a candidate or a sufficient number of candidates of any of the classes aforesaid, who should be duly qualified and eligible as aforesaid to be elected to the place or places then to be filled, the said Wardens and Court of Assistants should adjourn the election to fill up such vacancy or vacancies as should not then be filled up to any other time not more than three months from that period, and previous to such election cause the like notice to be given by such advertisements as aforesaid, and so from time to time as occasion might require. Provided always, and it was declared and agreed that if the said Wardens and Court of Assistants should be satisfied that any candidate or applicant, although in all other respects qualified and eligible as aforesaid, was a person who had been convicted of any shameful offence, or was of dishonest character, or of drunken or dissolute habits, and should make a minute that such had been shown to their satisfaction, then and in such case it should be lawful for the said Wardens and Court of Assistants, if they should think fit, to pass over such person altogether, although by reason of the want of candidates or applicants of the class of which such person should be or claim to be, the said Wardens and Court of Assistants be obliged to elect out of any other class or to postpone such election altogether. Provided also, that if after any person should be elected a pensioner as aforesaid he or she should be ascertained to be in the receipt or enjoyment of any other blind charity or any endowment or public gift for the blind or in the receipt or enjoyment of any income from any source exceeding 25l. per annum, or be convicted of any shameful offence, or be of dishonest character or of drunken or dissolute habits, and the said Wardens and Court of Assistants, after having investigated such matter, and heard such explanation or answer as he or she might give therein, should be satisfied that he or she was in such receipt or enjoyment, or had been so convicted, or was of such character or habits as aforesaid, then and in any of such cases it should be lawful them to declare the place of such pensioner vacant, and By proceed to an election to supply such vacancy, as if trustee pensioner had been dead or had resigned such pension, and as to the annual sum of 5l., being the balance or residue of the said dividends after paying and providing for the said five annual sums or pensions of 20l. each; and as to the proportions or parts of any of the said several pensions which should at any time or times remain to be disposed of or applied by reason of any vacancy in the place of any such pensioner for or in respect of the time which should elapse before the same should be filled up, it was agreed that the said Wardens and Commonalty of the said Company should stand possessed of the same upon trust for or towards defraying the costs charges and expenses of or attending the execution of the several trusts aforesaid, and after full payment and satisfaction of all such costs, charges, and expenses, then upon trust to pay over the surplus or residue thereof, if any, to any charitable fund of the said Company, or to pay, apply, and distribute the same to or for such charitable purposes and in such manner for the benefit of the poor of the said Company as they the said Wardens and Court of Assistants should in their discretion at any time or from time to time think proper, it being the intent and meaning of the said Harry Osborn Cureton, and hereby expressly declared, that the application of the said surplus should be in the absolute and uncontrolled discretion of them the said Wardens and Court of Assistants. And it was agreed and declared that if at any time the Parliament of this Kingdom should convert the said sum of 3,000l. New 3½l. per cent. annuities into any other stock so as to produce a less income than the present amount of the dividends thereon, or if from any other cause the income of the said trust fund should be diminished, then and in such case the said several pensions or annuities of 20l. each should respectively abate and be diminished in proportion to such reduction. And it was agreed that the said Wardens and Commonalty of the said Company of Goldsmiths, or their successors, should not be answerable or accountable for any loss of the said trust funds, or of any dividends or interest thereof, unless the same shall happen or be occasioned by the wilful act or default of the said Wardens or Commonalty or of the said Wardens and Court of Assistants, and that no election or other act or proceeding whatsoever, made or done in or about the execution of the trusts aforesaid, should be void or liable to be set aside, or in any manner whatsoever to be questioned, nor should the said Wardens and Commonalty, or the said Wardens and Court of Assistants, or any person or persons whomsoever, be answerable or liable for or in respect of the same for or by reason of any accidental violation, omission, or neglect of any of the forms, rules, and directions herein-before prescribed, expressed, or declared, or for or upon any other reason or ground what soever, unless the same should have been made in wilful and fraudulent breach of the trusts of the deed. And in case from any neglect, omission, or other cause whatsoever, any time therein-before appointed for the giving of any notice or the proceeding to any election, or the doing of any other act therein-before mentioned, should have elapsed without the giving, holding, or doing of such notice, election, or act, the said Wardens and Court of Assistants should nevertheless proceed to give such notice, make such election, or do such act, notwithstanding such default conforming as near as might be, or the circumstances would admit, to the forms, rules, and directions therein-before prescribed, expressed, and declared so far as the same should be applicable thereto. Provided lastly, and it was thereby lastly declared and agreed that the now abstracting deed should be recorded in the book or books of the said Wardens and Commonalty of the said Company of Goldsmiths, in which their charities were usually recorded, and should be therein entitled "The Gift of Mr. Harry Osborn Cureton" so that the memory thereof should be preserved and perpetuated.

Subsequently to the deed Mr. Cureton by his will of the 19th July 1848, bequeathed to the Company 2,000l. consols in addition to the 3,000l., because the interest of the 3½ per cents. having been reduced to 3¼, and it being probable that it would be further reduced to 3l. per cent., the testator found that the former gift of 3,000l. would not produce enough to pay his five pensioners their 20l. per annum as set forth in his said trust deed. The Company would therefore by the bequest have the sum of 5,000l. 3l. per cent. consols, being 50l. over and above the sum required for the payment of 20l. to each of his five pensioners. And he declared his will that the five pensioners should have out of the annual produce of the whole amount of the fund given to the Goldsmiths' Company and settled by the deed aforesaid, and bequeathed by his will a pension or annual sum of 20l. each; and he directed that at every election for one or more pensions the Prime Warden should have 40s., and each of the other three Wardens 20s. if they attend the election. That the clerk should have the sum of 40s. for his trouble, and the beadle the sum of 15s. for his trouble, and that advertisements be put into two or three of the principal London newspapers two or three times six weeks before the election, and that the names and addresses of successful pensioners be advertised in the same newspapers, (the testator wished this to be particularly attended to as he thought it would prevent frauds) and after payment of the above-named sums to his pensioners, and to the wardens, clerk, and beadle, and the expenses of printing papers for the use of the candidates and the advertisements, such sum as might remain over of the interest, dividends, or annual produce of the said trust fund, it was his will should go to the general funds of the said Company of Goldsmiths, to be applied for their general corporate purposes in such manner as they should think fit. And he gave to Mr. John Lane, then the Clerk to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths of the City of London, the sum of 100l. 3l. per cent. consols; but in case of his death before testator's, he gave the same legacy to whoever might be clerk of the said Company at his decease as some little remuneration for his trouble in preparing for the election of pensioners, but the sum was not to be paid until his executors were fully satisfied that the best had been done to comply with the above instructions.

The first sum of 3,000l. New 3½ per cent. stock has been reduced to the same sum, New 3l. per cent. annuities, and in respect of the second sum the Company received only 1,800l. 3l. per cent. consols—200l. stock having been deducted for legacy duty. Both sums stand in the corporate name of the Company, omitting in the description the words "of the City of" London, and describing the Company as "of London," in order to separate the account.

The dividends, amounting to 144l. a year, are carried to the account of the Charity without deduction.

There are now four pensioners on this fund. It is contemplated, in the event of objects within the description of the gift being permanently deficient, to apply for some enlargement of the scope of the donation. The charges for printing and advertising according to the directions in the years 1859–60, and 1860–61, were upwards of 12l. in each year. The balance of cash in favour of this Charity at Lady day 1862 was 213l. 13s. (fn. 4)

Davy's Charity.

Oliver Davy, by his will of the 27th May 1474, gave to the Company all his lands and tenements in London. To the use of his wife for life, remainder to his daughter and her heirs, and if she died without heirs, then to the Company to pay weekly to two poor men of the fellowship 2s. 4d., and the remainder for the use of the said Company. The sum 6l. 1s. 4d. is carried to the account of the Hackney almsmen. The system of carrying 36l. 8s. in respect of this and Newman's Charity to the settled pension fund, which existed at the time of the last inquiry, has been since put an end to.

Sir J. Drax's Charity.

Sir James Drax, by his will in 1663, gave 100l., which was paid into the hands of the Company, and the interest thereof to be paid to the poor of St. John Zachary parish. The Company pay annually to the Churchwardens of the parish of St. John Zachary, the sum of 5l. as the interest of the money received under this endowment.

PART II. Farmer's Charity.

Rachael Farmer, by will of the 18th September 1813, gave to the Company 1,000l. 4l. per cent. annuities, the interest to be paid to 10 poor blind men or women. The stock was transferred to the Company, less the 100l. legacy duty, but the Company have charged themselves, in addition to the dividends, with a further sum of 10l. annually, making up 40l. The Company credit the Charity with the capital sum of 1,000l. New 3l. per cent. stock; the 100l. lost by legacy duty having been made up by accumulations. There are 10 poor blind persons on this list who receive 4l. a year each.

Fickett's Gift.

Anthony Fickett, by will of the 10th February 1685, gave to the Company 100l. to pay 4l. a year to two poor working goldsmiths. The Company pay the 4l. a year to the account of the Male Pensioners, Class D.

Fountain's Charity.

Jane Fountain, by her will of the 3rd December 1842, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, gave to John Lane, clerk of the Goldsmiths' Company, the sum of 700l. for the benefit of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, and to be applied in such manner as he the said John Lane should think fit. An entry in the book of the Company entitled, "The Book of Copies of Wills and Foundation Deeds of Charity Foundation," is as follows:—

"Memorandum.—The said John Lane decided that the charity fund bequeathed by Jane Fountain should be held by the Goldsmiths' Company in trust for the men and women pensioners, inhabitants of the Acton almshouses. The legacy duty, amounting to 70l., having been paid, reduced the principal sum bequeathed by the will to 630l., which was laid out in the purchase of 656l. 6s. 5d. 3l. per cent. consols."

This fund forms part of the charity funds invested by the Company and standing in their corporate name, the dividends amounting to 19l. 13s. 8d. The Company give annually 1l. each, or 20l. to the 20 almspeople in the Acton almshouses in respect of this Charity. This gift is in addition to the other allowances they receive.

Sir Thomas Fowles' Charity.

Sir Thomas Fowles, by his will of the 30th July 1691, gave to the Company a rentcharge of 10l., payable by the Bishop of Bath and Wells, for five poor widows, 40s. a piece on St. Thomas' Day. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners pay the 8l. per annum, deducting 2l. for land tax, to the Goldsmiths' Company. The 8l. a year is carried to the account of the almswomen in the Acton almshouses, and forms part of their allowance.

Fox's Charity.

John Fox, by will of the 14th March 1597, gave to the Company his shop in New Fish Street of the yearly value of 6l., and also 150l. to purchase lands of 8l. or 9l. a year to pay for a schoolmaster to teach poor men's children in the Free Grammar School of Deane, Cumberland, 10l. a year, and give to an honest poor man of the Company 1s. 4d. weekly.

The premises are supposed to be those described as 22 Fish Street Hill. The Company receive, in the name of George Pochin, a sum of 8l. a year as representing their interest in the property. This rent with the interest of 150l. with which the Company charge themselves at 4l. per cent. make together 14l. a year. The sum of 10l. a year is paid to the master of Dean School.

The sum of 4l. a year is paid to the account of the Hackney almsmen.

Gurden's Charity.

Benjamin Gurden, in January 1804, gave to the Company 300l. Consols, the dividends to be paid to nine junior widows in the 2nd class.

The sum forms part of the general charity investment of the Company. The dividends, amounting to 9l. a year, are paid to the account of the Female Pensioners, Class C.

Hall's Charity.

George Hall, who died in 1803, by his will dated the 5th August 1795, gave to the Company 1,000l. Reduced annuities, the dividends thereof to be divided amongst six of the senior pensioners.

This sum forms part of the sum 5,385l. 5s. Reduced annuities, the charity investments of the Company in that stock. The dividends, amounting to 30l. a year, are given to 30 poor men in sums of 20s. each. The directions that the gift should be distributed amongst six of the senior pensioners in addition to their other pensions is not observed: it is not in fact given to regular pensioners.

Agas Hardinge's Charity.

Agas Hardinge, by her will of the 22nd January 1513, gave all her lands and tenements in London to the Company to pay weekly to two poor widows of goldsmiths 8d. each.

The property, as stated by the Commissioners of Inquiry, is in Shoe Lane and Fetter Lane. It comprises East Harding Street and New Street, and forms a very considerable estate. The annual sum of 3l. 9s. 4d. is carried to the account of the Acton almswomen.

T. Harding's Charity.

Thomas Harding, by his will dated the 16th January 1824, proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, gave to the Company, on the contingency therein mentioned, all the 3l. per cent. Consolidated annuities and 3l. per cent. Reduced annuities standing in his name at the time of his decease in trust that the Prime Warden and Wardens for the time being do divide the dividends every six months equally between the pensioners living in the almshouses near Acton.

The stock referred to at the decease of the testator or found to be standing in the names of the executors on the death of the testator upon the 14th October 1829 was—

£
3,0003l. per cent. Reduced annuities, and
2,3963l. per cent. consols.

And the contingency, which was the death of a legatee under age and without issue having happened, there were transferred to the Company, after payment of the legacy duty—

£s.d.
2,3791223l. per cent. Reduced annuities, and
2,3961763l. per cent. Consols.

These sums now form part of the respective stocks standing in the name of the Company. I have stated the aggregate amount of the Reduced annuities in my report on George Hall's Charity. The total amount of consols held by the Company on these trusts is 6,219l. 12s. 1d., and Cureton's Charity 1,800l. 3l. per cent. consols, together with other like funds in the Court of Chancery.

The clear dividends of the two funds amounting to 143l. 5s. 8d. a year are equally divided between the almsmen and the almswomen at the Acton almshouses.

Hetherington's Charity.

Humphry Hetherington, by his will of the 17th April 1728, gave to the Company 100l., the interest to be distributed to the poor of the Company.

The charge of 8l. a year which the Company, before the last inquiry, would seem to have imposed upon themselves in respect of this Charity, has long since been reduced. The Company now pay 4l. to the account of the Hackney almsmen.

Heydon's Charity.

John Heydon, by his will of the 6th March 1579, gave 100l. to the Company to be lent out, and the interest 3l. 6s. 8d. paid to the Mercers' Company.

The Company have no sum representing this gift, but the interest which was to have been gathered from the fund at 3l. 6s. 8d. a year is paid to the Mercers' Company.

Hille's Charity.

John Hille, by will of the 6th September 1430, gave to the Goldsmiths' Company 19 messuages in St. Vedast Foster to give to 13 poor goldsmiths 13 black gowns in those years that the livery customarily have new clothing, and to distribute 52s. annually, that is to say, amongst the most indigent persons of the parishes of St. John Zachary, St. Mary Steyning, St. Ann, St. Vedast, and St. Michael, Huggin Lane, 20 quarters of coal, and the residue of said 52s. (except 6s. 8d. for the Wardens) amongst poor goldsmiths.

And he further gave to the Company three shops in Wood Street, and one in Fleet Street for the poor brethren of the Company who receive alms.

The Company possess certain houses, Nos. 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, and 43, Gutter Lane, in the parish of St. Vedast, occupying about 124 feet frontage, on which the rentcharge of 52s. and the cost of the gowns are imposed. The Company pay to the churchwardens of the five parishes 8s. each, and carry 12s. annually to the account of the casual poor of the Company.

Under the devise of the buildings and gardens in Wood Street, and the shop in Fleet Street, for the poor brethren, the Company held the following property:—

£s.d.
No. 118, Wood Street, the entire house is let to John Ray, on a building lease which expires in 1888 at a rent of 75l., of which 20l. belongs to the Charity of Sir Edward Shaa, and to this estate5500
No. 119, Wood Street, let to George Brettel, on a building lease expiring March 1885, at 183l. 10s., of which the portion of this estate is12000
No. 124, Wood Street, let to Messrs. Foster and Porter, for 21 years from Michaelmas 1848117146
No. 162, Fleet Street, let to Frank Clemow, for 21 years from Michaelmas 184711000
No. 163, Fleet Street, let to Messrs. Leveridge, for 21 years from Michaelmas 184712000
£522146

On this estate there is a quit rent of 4l. 1s. 10d. payable to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster.

The income, deducting the quit rent, is apportioned amongst the Hackney almspeople and the different classes of pensioners as follows:—

£s.d.
The Hackney almsmen206128
The Men Pensioners, Class B.46145
The Widows " " D.25748
The Widows " " C.8011
£518128

These three latter sums may occasionally vary according to the amount required to make up the aggregate payment to each class. (fn. 5)

Henry Hoare's Charity.

Henry Hoare, by a codicil to his will of the 5th March 1722, gave 200l. to the Company to pay 8l. yearly to poor freemen or their widows. The 8l. a year, which is supposed to represent this Charity, is annually carried to the Pensioners, Class C.

Sir Richard Hoare's Charity.

Sir Richard Hoare, by will of the 2nd October 1718, gave 200l. to the Company to pay 8l. a year to 8 poor widows who should most frequently receive the Sacrament. The sum of 8l. a year, as the produce of this gift, is annually paid to the almswomen in the almshouses at Acton, in addition to their pensions. They are at present all communicants, and receive 8s. a year each.

Jameson's Charity.

Thomas Jameson, on the 13th June 1679, paid to the Company 100l., they covenanting to pay 5l. annually to Hackney parish—

£s.d.
For two sermons on Good Friday and Holy Thursday200
To the poor of the parish300

The Company pay 5l. per annum to the churchwardens of the parish of Hackney.

Jenner's Charity.

Robert Jenner, by indentures of lease and release of the 1st and 9th December 1648, granted to the Company a messuage in Foster Lane, upon trust out of the rents to pay yearly 43l. 10s., as follows:—

£s.d.
To 15 poor goldsmiths, 20s. each1500
To Bartholomew's Hospital1500
To the parish of St. John Zachary, London500
To the poor of St. Leonard Foster500
To the four wardens 13s. 4d. each, the clerk 10s., and the beadle 6s. 8d.3100

And the residue of the rent to be disposed of by the said Company to such uses as they should think fit.

And by will of the 5th December 1651 he directed that the money to the two parishes should be laid out in bread, and that the 15 poor men of the Company should be incapable to receive the 20s. each again for three years.

The property charged is part of Nos. 1 and 2, Foster Lane, the other part of which belongs to the Company absolutely. The sum of 15l. a year is paid to St. Bartholomew's hospital, 15l. a year is carried to the account of the Pensioners, Class D., 5l. a year is paid to the churchwardens of the parish of St. John Zachary, and the like sum to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Leonard. The remaining 3l. 10s. is paid to the wardens, clerk, and beadle.

Loveday's Charity.

John Loveday, by his will of the 15th June 1693, gave to the Company 100l. to pay 5l. to five poor widows.

The Company charge themselves with 5l. a year, which they carry to the account of the Acton almshouses.

Makepeace's Charity.

Robert Makepeace, by his will of the 8th August 1798, proved in January 1801, which was invested in 177l. 11s. 3l. per cent. Consols to the Company, should pay the dividends to four poor widows.

This forms part of the consols standing in the name of the Company. The dividends, amounting to 5l. 6s. 6d., are received and carried to the account of Widow Pensioners, Class D.

Morley's Charity.

Elizabeth, the widow of John Morley, prior to 1588, gave 100l. to the Company, in consideration of which the Company covenanted to pay 5l. yearly to the poor of St. Botolph, Aldersgate.

The Company appears to have discharged the property on its sale by a covenant against incumbrances, and they now charge themselves with the annual payment of 5l. a year to the churchwardens of St. Botolph, Aldersgate.

Morrell's Charity.

Richard Morrell, by his will of the 7th October 1703, gave a competent sum of money for the purchase of an annuity of 52s. for bread for the poor of St. Olave, Silver Street, London.

And he also appointed a competent sum of money for erecting six almshouses for six poor decayed liverymen, or, in want of liverymen, of freemen of the Company.

And he also appointed a competent sum for the purchase of an annuity of 31l. 4s. per annum for the use of the said six almsmen.

And he also gave them three chaldrons of coal and a hundred and a half of faggots, and for each a new gown every year.

And he gave all the residue of his messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments to the use of the said Company and the poor thereof.

The almshouses, which appear to have been built in the year 1705, are in Goldsmith's Row, Hackney, and are the same buildings as are described in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 8, page 343). The fee simple of the almshouse is vested in trustees by a deed of the 9th April 1839, whereby the premises were conveyed to 15 trustees, of whom William Cox, James Boyle Smith, and William Taylor Copeland are the survivors. The clerk of the Company concurs with me in thinking that the keeping up of the trust is now an unnecessary expense and may be discontinued.

The Commissioners of Inquiry state that the residuary gift consisted of leasehold property of which the term had expired, but this appears to be inaccurate, in so far as it describes the estate as consisting only of leaseholds which had expired. There appears to have been a freehold house in Mark Lane, and a piece of land at Barking, which is supposed to have formed the residuary estate of the testator after payment of his debts, legacies, and funeral expenses, exclusive of the two sums directed to be laid out in annuities, and which the Company was probably satisfied to derive from the unconverted residue of the real estate. The house in Mark Lane was sold in 1816, is now represented by a sum of 1,025l. with which the Company have charged themselves, and for which they allow interest to the Charity at the rate of 4l. per cent.

The land at Barking, Essex, consists of 31a. 2r. 11 p., including watercourses, lying in the middle of the Marsh. The surface capable of being let, exclusive of the watercourses, is 24a. 2r. 1p. It is let at 3l. 8s. an acre to William John Corfe on lease for 14 years from Christmas 1860, producing 83l. 4s. a year.

The total income of the Charity therefore is—

£s.d.
The interest on the 1,025l.4100
The rent of the land at Barking8340
£12440
Out of this there is an annual quit rent payable to the Manor of Barking of 5l. 5s. with 8d. for an acquittance, such 5l. 5s. 8d. which, with a deduction for the land tax of 1l. 1s. leaves 4l. 4s. 8d. and 1s. 6d. and 4d. acquittance for a right of way makes the annual payment. (The rent is paid by Christopher Sage)466
£119176
£s.d.
Of this income there is carried to the account of the stipends of the Hackney almsmen the annuity of 31l. 4s. appointed by the founder and a further sum of 6l., or 1l. each, as a visitation gift3740
For their gowns1200
" Coal, gas, &c., 1861–286110
" water550
" Insurance on the almshouses200
" Pew rents in the church of St. John, Hackney1000
10300
The sum paid annually to the churchwardens of St. Ann, Silver Street2120
£105120

The buildings are old and require considerable repair. In the year 1861–2 the sum of 134l. 4s. 5d. was applied on such repairs, leaving the Charity in debt to the Company at the end of that year in a balance of 179l. 1s. 4d.

The Company do not, however, in their disbursements on account of the almsmen in the Hackney Almshouses limit themselves to the sum they receive from this or any other Charity. The allowances or stipends are made up from several charities, but supply the fund necessary for repairs or other extra charges from the income of the Company. The Hackney Almshouses receive annually a sum of 300l. per annum or 50l. each, in addition to the 6l. a year given on the visitation. They are paid quarterly 75l. in money besides the allowance of coals, gas, water, gowns, pew rents, &c., above mentioned. The 300l. a year is made up of the following gifts:—

£s.d.
Morrell's endowment3140
Taddy's "1200
Cheney's "400
Davy's "614
Fox's "400
Hetherington's "400
Hille's "206128
Newman's "6188
Pattersley's "1534
Perchard's "600
Walker's "400
£30000

The senior almsman has also an additional allowance for looking after the gardens.

The almsmen are chosen from the persons already on the pension list, and, therefore, must be of the age required to be placed on those lists. An exception would be admitted in case a poor liveryman were chosen. They are not necessarily single men; some of those now in the almshouses are married men.

Taddy's Charity.

James Taddy in 1818 transferred 400l. 3l. per cent. consols into the name of the Company. This gift was stated to the Commissioners of Inquiry to be a donation of an unknown benefactor, but it was known after the death of Mr. Taddy in 1828, (fn. 6) that he had communicated his name and the object of the gift to some officers or persons connected with the Company. The object was that the income should be paid to the six Hackney almsmen in equal portions half-yearly, and that the name of the benefactor should not be disclosed during his life. The dividends form part of the income paid to the Hackney almspeople.

Sir Hugh Myddelton's Charity.

Sir Hugh Myddelton, by his will of the 21st November 1631, gave to the Company one share in the New River Company, and the profits to be distributed half-yearly to the poor of the Company, and especially to those of his name, kindred, or countrymen free of the Company.

At the time of the last inquiry the produce of this share, which then amounted to about 190l. a year, was given away in small sums.

On the 22nd June 1852 a petition was presented by the Company to the Master of the Rolls stating, amongst other things, that the income of the Charity then amounted to upwards of 800l. a year, and praying for a scheme as to the future distribution of the said income. It was ordered that the following scheme should be established. "That the said Wardens, or the major part of them, shall, out of the poorer members of their said Company, or the widows of such members, elect 20 pensioners, to be called Sir Hugh Myddelton's Pensioners, and that in electing such pensioners the said Wardens and Assistants shall have regard to the preference given by the will of the said Sir Hugh Myddelton to such poor men of his name, kindred, or countrymen as should be free of the said Company. That each of such pensioners shall, so long as he or she shall remain in the number of such pensioners, receive out of the income of the said Charity an annuity of 20l. by equal half-yearly payments. And that the said Wardens and Assistants, or the major part of them, shall have power at their discretion to remove any pensioner, but every pensioner, unless so removed, shall continue in the number of pensioners for life. That the remainder of the income of the said Charity not required for payment of the said annuities of the said pensioners shall half-yearly be distributed to such of the poor members of the said Company, or of the widows of such members as the said Wardens and Assistants, or the major part of them, shall from time to time think most deserving objects of the said Charity, in such sums as they shall think fit; but in such distribution the said Wardens and Assistants shall have regard to the preference given by the said Sir Hugh Myddelton's will to such poor men of his name kindred or countrymen as aforesaid be carried into effect." And it was ordered that the Wardens and Assistants of the Company of Goldsmiths, or the major part of them, should carry such scheme into effect, and distribute and apply the future income of the charitable bequest accordingly.

The dividends of the share amounted last year to the sum of 856l.

The Company in pursuance of this order elect 10 men pensioners and nine women pensioners, who receive 20l. a year each. These pensioners form no part of any of the classes before referred to, but are especially denominated Sir Hugh Myddelton's Pensioners. The Company also distribute sums of 2l. 12s. a year to all the men pensioners, averaging about 110 in number. This distribution amounted in the year ending Lady-day 1862, to the aggregate sum of 288l. 12s.

The residue is carried to the fund applicable to the payment of the Women Pensioners of Class C. (fn. 7)

Newman's Charity.

Gaius Newman, about the year 1614, or his widow after his death, made an offer to the Company for maintaining two almsmen at 1s. 4d. a week each, and that she paid them 140l. for that purpose. The sum of 6l. 18s. 8d. in respect of this benefaction forms part of the 300l. a year, which constitutes the aggregate of the stipend of the Hackney almsmen.

Paine's Charity.

Robert Paine in his lifetime desired his wife to pay after his decease to the Company 300l., and pay—

£
To the poor of the Company5
To the poor of Marlborough5
To the poor of the Tower precinct5

There is no sum of 300l. invested to provide for this payment, but the sum of 5l. a year is carried to the men pensioners, Class D. The Company pay to the churchwardens of the parishes of St. Peter the Apostle, and St. Mary the Virgin, in the town of Marboro', an annual sum of 5l. The other 5l. is paid generally to the overseer of the precinct of the Tower without St. Peter's Vincula, in the liberty of the Tower of London.

Patteslie's Charity.

John Patteslie, by will of the 7th March 1450, gave to the Company all his lands and tenements in St. Mildred, Poultry, to pay five poor almsmen 1s. 2d. each weekly. The property on which this rent is charged is erroneously mentioned by the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 8, page 321) as not specifically existing, consists of a house at the corner of St. Mildred's Court (No. 1 from the Poultry), agreed to be let to the Union Bank with other property of the Goldsmiths' Company. The sum of 15l. 3s. 4d. a year is paid to the account of the stipends of the Barking almsmen.

Sir James Pemberton's Charity.

Sir James Pemberton, by will of the 8th September 1613, gave to the poor of the Company 200l. to be dis tributed amongst them at the discretion of his executrix. The Company charge themselves with the interest of 200l. at 5l. per cent. amounting to 10l. a year, which is carried to the account of the Acton almswomen.

Perchard's Charity.

Peter Perchard in his lifetime gave to the Company 250l. four per cent. stock, and by a codicil to his will of the 3rd January 1806 gave a further sum of 100l., which was invested in the purchase of 166l. 6s. 6d. Consols, and directed the Company to pay annually:—

£s.d.
To 4 poor widows400
To 5 other poor widows4198
To 6 Hackney almsmen600
£s.d.
The 250l. 4l. per cent. stock has been converted into New 3l. per cent. stock, and produces annually7100
The 166l. 6s. 6d. 3l. per cent. Consols4198
1298

The reduction of the 4l. per cent. stock having diminished the income to the amount of 2l. a year, the Company make up the payments from their own funds, adding 6l. a year to the Hackney almsmen's stipends, and to the widow pensioners (Class C.) 8l. 19s. 8d.

Perryn's Charity.

John Perryn, by his will of the 18th December 1656, gave all his freehold messuages, lands, and hereditaments in Acton to the Company upon trust to dispose of the rents thereof as follows:

£
To the parish of Bromyard, Herefordshire, for a weekly lecture26
To the parish clerk1
To the Free Grammar School at Bromyard20
To the poor of that parish5
To the poor of the Company20
To Christ's Hospital 5l., and for an exhibition to Oxford or Cambridge 5l.10
To the poor of St. Vedast Foster5
To the poor of East Acton10
To the poor of St. Sepulchre, London5
And for a septennial sermon and dinner3

And the remainder of the rents for the poor of the Company, and for exhibitions for scholars in the universities.

The Company, as stated by the Commissioners of Inquiry, acquired a considerable estate at Acton in Middlesex under this devise, and in 1812 built 20 almshouses on part of that estate at an expense of about 12,000l. The Company charge the Charity interest at 4l. per cent. on 10,000l. part of this expenditure. The present condition and rental of the Acton estate is as follows:—

£s.s.
The Manor HouseWalker, Mrs.21 years from Ladyday 1852.20000
Manor Farm, 115 acres.Wright, Simeon14 years from Michaelmas 1853.25093
Dryburgh Farm, 11a. 3r. 10p.Winch and Weston.21 years from Michaelmas 1844.11000
HouseDuncan, W. H. E.56¾ years from Midsummer 1821.12120
A. R. P.
Land 46 0 17Young, Thomas14 years from Michaelmas 1853.13800
Ditto 9 2 11Hindley, CharlesYearly4500
Ditto 6 0 20Anderson, E. W.Ditto3000
Ditto 4 1 2North, Rev. J.Ditto21100
Ditto 0 3 22Acton, R. I.61 years from Michaelmas 1846.1200
Ditto 4 0 11Binney, Fred.Yearly2000
'Goldsmith's Arms."Thompson, Messrs.52 years from Midsummer 1829.550
The estates have been reduced in quantity of 10a. 2r. 14p. under the following circumstances:—£s.d.
A portion of this estate, in quantity 3a. 3r. 5p., was taken in 1836 by the Great Western Railway Company, for which 1,890l. 12s. 0d. was paid, and in 1837 a small additional plot of 0a. 2r. 10p. was also taken for which 100l. was paid; these sums, amounting to 1,990l. 12s. 0d., were laid out in the purchase of 2,005l. 12s. 10d. 3l. per cent. Reduced annuities6032
In 1838 a further portion, 1a. 0r. 21p. of land, was taken by the Great Western Railway at the price of 500l., which was invested in the purchase of 523l. 11s. 2d. 3l. per cent. Consols in the name of the AccountantGeneral of the Court of Chancery, to an account intituled In re Great Western Railway and The Goldsmiths' Company15142
In 1851 the North and South-West Junction Railway Company took 5a. 0r. 18p. of land at the sum of 1,000l., which was laid out in the purchase of 2,046l. 9s. 0d. 3l. per cent. Consols, in the name of the AccountantGeneral, a sum which has subsequently been reduced to 1,077l. 2s. 3d. 3l. per cent. Stock by an order of the Court dated the 23rd May 1856, under which 968l. 18s. 6d. Consols, producing 912l. cash, was invested in the enfranchisement of such of the lands at Acton as were of copyhold tenure3264
A fine received from Sir Moore Disney of 1,175l. in June 1851 as a portion of a consideration for a lease of the Manor House (which has since expired) was invested in 1,192l. 13s. 2d. 3l. per cent. Consols35156
988155
From this income there is deducted the interest of the 10,000l. part of the 12,000l. expended in the building of almshouses, which at 4l. per cent. is permanently charged on the estate40000
£588155

The Company pay to the account of the Acton almspeople:—

£s.s.
The 10 almsmen55152
The 10 almswomen66156
The vestry clerk of the parish of Acton, for the poor1000
The churchwardens of St. Vedast500
" " of St. Sepulchre500
The Vicar of Bromyard:£s.d.
For the lecturers2600
" " poor500
" " parish clerk100
3200
The master of the Grammar School at Bromyard2000
Five exhibitioners at 30l. a year15000
£344108

The Company support from their own funds a large number of exhibitioners, 17 of which are at Oxford and 17 at Cambridge. The only exhibitions charged to charity estates are the above five, and two under Strelley's Charity at 5l. a year each. The 34 are all of the same annual amount; they are distributed according to the rules specified in the printed circular which I append.

In the year 1861–2 there was a sum of 223l. 1s. 4d. applied in builder's work and repairs on the Acton estate. In 1860 the repairs amounted to 2l. 13s. 3d., and in 1859 to 5l. 17s. 7d.

The addition of the repairs on the estate of 223l. 1s. 4d. to the 344l. 10s. 8d. the other disbursements on the charity account in the same year (1861–2) left only a sum of 21l. 3s. 6d., which was carried to the account of the casual poor to which account this balance is always paid.

The almshouses are described by the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 8, page 340) which description is still applicable. The inmates are 10 men and 10 women (who may be married couples). They are appointed from the settled pension list, but are not (as the Commissioners state) always the oldest persons on that list.

The pensioners, both men and women, are all classed as ordinary pensioners, and receive the pension to that class on which they are placed. In addition to which they have 22l. each annually, and 1l. each from Jane Fountain's Gift, and another 1l. each in addition given by the Company at the annual visitation. The 24l. thus paid to them, especially as Acton almsmen or women, does not vary in amount. The pension payable is dependent, as above stated, on their class.

The establishment, other than the pensioners, consists of a chaplain, medical attendant, and gardener, who are paid by the Company out of their proper funds. The Company also pay in like manner for coals, candles, rates and taxes, repairs, &c. The whole of these disbursements not charged to the Charity, was in the year 1861–2, 761l. 19s. 10d. (fn. 8)

Goldsmiths' Hall,
186.

Sir,
In reply to your letter of the, I beg to inform you that vacancies in the exhibitions in the gift of the Goldsmiths' Company are only declared once in the year, viz. at the end of the month of January, and if application is made to me in the early part of February, stating at which University the applicant is resident, the necessary form of petition, and also a list of the members of the Court of Assistants, in whom the election is vested, will be furnished to you.

The petitions are required to be properly filled up, and returned by some fixed day, about the middle of the month of April; after which time, and until the next vacancies are declared, no application can be received.

A student who desires to become a candidate for one of these exhibitions must have been in actual residence at his college at least two terms before the time appointed for the return of the petition, and his income arising from preferment at college or elsewhere must not amount to more than 70l. a year, exclusive of the Goldsmiths' Exhibition

The exhibitions are at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and are of the value of 30l. per annum each, and can be enjoyed by the student until he takes his degree, or has kept the required number of terms for so doing.

I am, &c.

(Signed) Walter Prideaux,
Clerk.

To

Pierson's Charity.

William Pierson, on the 13th May 1689, paid to the Company 50l. to pay 2l. to four freemen's widows, and 10s. to the wardens and clerk. The Company charged themselves with interest at 5l. per cent., of which 2l. forms part of the payment to the Acton almspeople, and 10s. goes to the account of the wardens and clerk.

Dame Mary Ramsay's Charity.

Dame Mary Ramsay, by her will of the 8th July 1600, gave to the Goldsmiths' Company 200l. to be lent out at 5l. per cent., and distributed towards the relief of the poor. The fund is not lent, but the Company charge themselves with interest at 5l. per cent., carrying 10l. a year to the account of the men pensioners, Class D.

Sir B. Read's Charity.

Sir Bartholomew Read, by his will of the 19th October 1505, gave to the Company a messuage in St. John Zachary, and other tenements in London, to find and sustain a virtuous priest cunning in grammar to perform certain services in the parish church of Cromer, Norfolk, and to keep in the said town a Free Grammar School, teaching there gentlemen's sons and good men's children, and especially poor men's children, the said priest to receive 10l. a year. And the testator appointed an obit at the church of St. John Zachary, and that 1l. 13s. 4d. should be paid on that occasion. The Company hold a considerable estate in the situation indicated. Of this estate, the houses in Bread Street were taken for city improvements in the year 1852, and a sum of 3,324l. 16s. 2d. 3l. per cent. Consols paid into the Court of Chancery to the account, In re The Goldsmiths' Company ex parte The Mayor and Corporation of London; and they pay annually a sum of 10l. a year to the master of a school at Cromer, who is not in orders. In addition to this payment they contribute from their own funds to the support of the school and the school premises, which stand on the lands of this Company. I append a copy of the last report from the master of the state of the school.

The Company annually visit the church of St. John Zachary, and make a distribution to the minister, organist, clerk, &c., and charity school children, which varies in amount from about 7l. and upwards.

Sir, Cromer, July 2nd, 1862.

The following is the half-yearly report of the state of the Free School to Midsummer:—

Number of boys at Christmas 186178
Left the school12
66
Admitted9
Present number75

Of the 12 boys who have left six were from the first class and three from each of the other classes.

One of the boys left is dead, and one I expelled from truanting and encouraging others to do so; the other 10 boys are gone to work. The boy who has been expelled is brother to the one expelled last half-year. They have also been both turned out of the Sunday school for the second time as incorrigible.

In addition to the nine boys admitted I had taken in five or six more, all from the country; but after a few weeks they became so remiss in their attendance that I dismissed them all.

The attendance during the half-year has been tolerably good, but it now begins to be slack, as the usual summer work is coming on, and it is of no use refusing them leave.

I made no holidays at Christmas.

Admissions.

Boy's names.Age.Date of Admission.Class.Parents' Occupation.Residence.
1861
Matthew Abb12January 1st1InnkeeperRunton.
George Emery14"1"Sheringham. (fn. 9)
Sandford Simons9" 15th1FarmerGresham. (fn. 9)
Robert Goodman8February 13th2InnkeeperCromer.
William Stimpson7"3Labourer"
George Stimpson6May 26th3""
Hilery Nockels6"3Fisherman"
Robert Blyth6"3""
John Abbs7"3Rat-catcherRunton.
John Hall7"3Labourer"

Your obedient servant,
Simeon Simons.

Robinson's Charity.

Ralph Robinson, by his will of the 17th January 1648, gave 200l. to the Company to pay yearly—

£
To the poor of St. John Zachary parish2
To the Company's poor2

The Company charge themselves with 4l. a year, of which 2l. is paid to the churchwardens of St. John Zachary, and 2l. to the account of the men pensioners, Class D.

Sir E. Shaa's Charity.

Sir Edmund Shaa, by his will of the 20th March 1487, directed his executors to convey to the said Company sufficient property to pay 17l. a year to support the salary of a priest cunning in grammar and able to teach it in Stopfordcum-Chester (?) 10l., and the remaining 7l. he directed to be applied to certain superstitious uses.

The foundation continues nearly on the footing at which it stood at the time the Commissioners of Inquiry made their report until the year 1832, when the Company having acquired some adjoining land, at their own expense greatly improved the school-house and buildings, and added largely to the stipends of the masters, making the school free. Further alterations forming the school into two divisions were made about the year 1848. In 1859 the Company formed the desire of relinquishing the trust to the management of local authorities, offering at the same time to transfer it with an additional endowment of 290l. a year.

On the 29th July 1859 application was made to the Board by the clerk of the Goldsmiths' Company and the town clerk of Stockport for an order and certificate authorising an application to the county court for an order vesting the lands of the Charity and the rentcharge of 10l. in the Official Trustee of Charity Lands, and to establish a scheme for the future management of the school (File 6086); and the Board having authorised the application, an order was made in the county court of Chester, holden at Stockport on the 20th January 1860, in the matter of this Charity, settling a scheme whereby the Mayor of Stockport for the time being was appointed a trustee ex-officio, and 12 other persons to be elected by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Burgesses of Stockport were appointed trustees of the Charity, and a general scheme for its management, consisting of 33 articles or clauses (which are registered in the Department, and I forbear, therefore, to set forth), was settled and subsequently confirmed by the Board.

By a deed of the 28th March 1860, made between the Master, Wardens, and Commonalty of the Mystery of Goldsmiths of the one part, and George Chapman, the mayor of Stockport, and Edward Oldham, the town clerk, of the other part, reciting the said order of the county court of the 20th January 1860, and the scheme thereby sanctioned, and reciting that with a view to providing an endowment for the said schools, the Wardens and Commonalty for themselves and their successors covenanted with the said parties of the second part that they, the Wardens and Company and their successors, would at all times thereafter pay unto the said parties of the second part, their executors, administrators, and assigns, the annual sum of 290l. clear of all deductions (including the property or income tax if any) by equal half-yearly payments at Michaelmas and Lady-day, commencing at Michaelmas 1860, and that the said parties of the second part should stand possessed of the said moneys as an endowment for the benefit of the said school, and upon trust to the intent that the same should be applied as part of the income of the said schools, applicable to the maintenance and support thereof in accordance with the said scheme. And the said parties of the second part thereby covenanted that within two months after the 12 elective trustees mentioned in the said scheme should be duly constituted, they the said parties of the second part would assign and transfer the said annual sum of 290l. and the interest that the same may be vested in the said 12 elective trustees upon the trusts therein-before declared, and the deed provided that if the Wardens and Commonalty transferred a sufficient sum of stock to the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds the dividends whereof should produce the said sum of 290l., the said covenant should be deemed to be satisfied.

By a deed of even date between the same parties reciting certain indentures of lease and release of the 22nd and 23rd September 1837, made between George Lees, George Ashton, and the said Wardens and Commonalty, reciting and setting forth the said order and scheme of the 20th January 1860, and reciting that the said Wardens and Commonalty had determined and agreed to grant and convey the pieces or parcels of land therein mentioned to the parties of the second part for the purposes of the said school, it was witnessed that the said Wardens and Commonalty did then voluntarily grant and convey to the said mayor and town clerk (the parties of the second part) First, all that plot, piece, or parcel of land situate and being in Stockport aforesaid, delineated in the plan thereof, drawn in the margin of the now stating indenture marked with the letter A, and being theretofore part and parcel of a certain plot called the Dole in the Longshutt, bounded on the easterly side thereof (being 80 yards in length or there abouts) by land and premises belonging to the Grammar School aforesaid and by the Wellington Road, south of the westerly side (being 77 yards 12 inches in length) by land then or late belonging to Lady Vernon on the northerly side, being 27 yards 27 inches in length by other part of the premises belonging to the Grammar School and on the southerly side thereof, being 28 yards and 18 inches in length by land, formerly conveyed to one Thomas Fitton, together with the dwelling-house and buildings erected and being thereon. Secondly, all that plot, piece, or parcel of land, or ground situate in Stockport aforesaid, bounded on the northerly side thereof, being 18 yards in breadth in part by Greek Street, and in other part by the Grammar School aforesaid, on the southerly side thereof, being 27 yards in breadth by land, then or late belonging to Henry Coppock, on the easterly side thereof, being 76 yards in length by other part of the said Grammar School premises, and on the westerly side thereof, being 114 yards and 12 inches in length, in part by land and premises then or late of Mr. Joseph Rayner, and on other part by land belonging to the said Henry Coppock, and containing in the whole 1,880 superficial square yards of land or thereabouts be the same more or less. All which plot of land was more particularly described in the plan thereof drawn in the margin of the now stating indenture and distinguished by the letter B.

Under the new scheme and the several instruments the school has, I apprehend, become a local foundation, and has ceased to be one of the charities under the management of the Goldsmiths' Company.

Smith's Charity.

John Smith, on the 1st May 1703, paid to the Company 420l. in consideration that they should pay 21l. yearly for ever, viz.:—

£
To five poor widows10
For apprenticing two poor boys10
Clerk of the Company1

The Company charge themselves with 21l. a year, of which they apply 10l. a year to the account of the gifts to the Acton almswomen, and 1l. to the church. On the apprenticing fund there was at Lady-day 1862 a balance of 55l. In the year 1861–2 three boys were bound at an expense of 5l. a year each.

Strelley's Charity.

Philip Strelley, by will dated the 6th September 1603, after reciting that he had been seized of a manor and estate at Ulkerthorpe, alias Ogarthorpe, alias Hogarthorpe, Derbyshire, and that he had levied a fine of the said estate to the use of certain members of the Goldsmiths' Company, declared the uses of such fine to be upon trust to demise the said estate for 99 years at 55l. a year and no more, on the provisoes and conditions therein mentioned to his wife, then to his father, and then to his brother Ralph Strelley, if he survived the father, for the term of 99 years, with limitations to determine the same lease at such of the feasts of All Saints or May Day as shall next happen after the end of one year next after the decease of his brother Ralph, and after their decease to such person as at the time of the decease of the survivor of the father and brother should be the next heir male of the body of his brother Ralph for the like term to begin immediately after the end of the next preceding lease at the like rent, and with the like provisoes, conditions, and limitations, and after the decease of the same heir male then to the next heir male of the body of his said brother Ralph, and so every heir male of the body of his said brother Ralph successively one after another so long as there shall be any heir male living of his said brother to have the like lease, and for default of heirs male of the body of his said brother Ralph, or if his said brother or his heirs male should wilfully forfeit the estate by nonperformance of the conditions or otherwise determine the name then George Strelley, his brother, should have the like lease, and then such person as should be for the time being heir male of his body, with similar limitations successively in favour of his brother John Strelley the heir male of his body, and so from heir male to heir male with like directions for demising the same to several other persons successively and their successors heirs male. And the testator directed that the persons from time to time seized of the said hereditaments should, after the termination of certain gifts for life therein mentioned, employ and dispose of the said yearly rent of 55l. as follows:—

£s.d.
For apprenticing poor men's sons in the counties of Derby and Nottingham, the town of Nottingham or city of Worcester2000
For two exhibitions to Oxford and Cambridge for poor men's sons from the same counties and city1000
For the relief of poor maimed soldiers1000
For the relief of poor people of St. John Zachary parish200
For poor workmen of the Company800
The Wardens and Clerk500

The Company receive applications annually about Midsummer every year from persons or families in the two counties of Derby and Nottingham and the city of Worcester for the two sums of 10l. for assisting apprentices who have served their apprenticeship to set them up in business. The sums are given away upon the testimonials or recommendations furnished by the applicants.

The sum of 20s. a year is given to each of 10 poor maimed soldiers. Since the Crimean war there have been abundant applicants for this fund; they continue on the list as long as they need the assistance. 2l. a year is paid to the churchwardens of St. John Zachary, and 5l. to the wardens and clerk of the Company. The Company give 10s. a year to 16 poor freemen of the Company independently of the other and casual gifts, the same persons remaining on the list from year to year. The Company support 34 exhibitioners at the Universities, the minimum and ordinary amount of which is 30l. a year each. There have been no applicants for exhibitions so small as 5l. a year, but the Company propose to write off the balance of 172l. by attributing one of the exhibitions especially to this gift for the future.

New trustees of the Goldsmiths' Company were from time to time appointed of the estate, and the leases were made to the persons designated from time to time. About 1834 difficulties arose from the refusal of Benjamin Strelley the heir male of Ralph the testator's brother then in possession, to execute the lease, and also from his putting forward a claim to a larger estate in the premises than that which the lease would confer. In 1837 the trustees for the time being, acting at the instance of the Company, filed their bill against Benjamin Strelley and the AttorneyGeneral, praying a decree against the former for execution of the lease, or if the Court should think the trusts so far as to granting the said leases to be void, then that the same might be carried into effect under the directions of the Court. The cause was heard on the 27th June 1840, when the Court declared that the trust for granting successive leases to the heirs male of Ralph Strelley and the others mentioned in the will was void as tending to a perpetuity, and that the real intention of the testator was that Ralph Strelley and the others named in the will should have an estate in tail male subject to a rent of 55l. per annum for the charitable purposes mentioned in the will. And it being admitted that the defendant Benjamin Strelley was heir male of the body of Ralph Strelley and heir-at law of the testator, it was ordered that the trustees (the plaintiffs) should convey the premises mentioned in the pleadings, so that a legal rentcharge of 55l. per annum should be secured to the Charity, with powers of entry, distress, and perception of rents and profits, and subject thereto, to the use of the Defendant Benjamin Strelley in tail male with proper remainders over. And it was directed that the conveyance should be settled by the master, and that the costs of the trustees and of the Attorney-General should be paid and raised out of the corpus of the estate with liberty for all parties to apply.

Taylor's Charity.

Roger Taylor directed the Company to pay annually 5l. to the poor of St. Boltoph, Aldersgate. The sum is annually paid to the churchwardens.

Sir Thomas Vyner's Charity.

Sir Thomas Vyner, by will of the 16th March 1664, gave the Company 200l. to pay 7l. to seven poor men of the Company, and to the clerk 12s. The Company charge themselves with 7l. 12s. a year, paying 7l. to the Pensioners Account, Class D., and 12s. a year to the clerk.

Walker's Charity.

By indenture of the 10th October, 3rd and 4th Philip and Mary, in consideration of 100l. paid by William Walker to the Company, they agreed to pay 1s. 4d. a week to a poor man of the Company, and a gown of 8s. value once in three years. The Company charge themselves with 4l. a year, which is carried to the account of the Hackney almsmen.

Walter's Charity.

Anthony Walter, by his will about 1664, gave to the poor of St. John Zachary 100l. in the hands of the Company, and the interest paid annually to such poor. The sum of 5l. a year is paid to the churchwardens of St. John Zachary.

Walton's Charity.

William Walton, by will of the 20th November 1458, gave to the Company his tenements in Wood Street and Goderon Lane, and two messuages in Fenchurch Street in trust to pay,—

s.d.
For an obit on the 16th September, in St. Peter Westcheap Church68
For the poor of that church34
To four poor goldsmiths 1s. 2d. each weekly, and to each 4 yards of cloth at 2s. a yard
To the Wardens68

And the residue for the support of poor goldsmiths.

In the year 1832, an information was filed by the Attorney-General at the relation of P. Upjohn, and another against the Goldsmiths' Company, upon which a decree was made on the 1st January 1833 by Sir John Leach, then Master of the Rolls, whereby it was referred to the Master to whom the decree in the cause Attorney-General against the Goldsmiths' Company in the Charity of Thomas Atte Hay was referred to inquire and state what lands, messuages, or tenements and hereditaments had been possessed and were then held by the defendants under the will of William Walton the testator in the pleadings named. And if the said Master should find the account of such lands, messuages, or tenements and hereditaments set out in the defendants' answer as being then in their possession to be a correct account and description of the same, or if the parties should agree as to the said lands, tenements, and hereditaments before the said Master, then he was to take an account of the rents and profits of such lands, tenements, and hereditaments since the time of the filing the information received by the defendants or by any person by their order or for their use. And it was ordered that the said Master should inquire whether such rents and profits had been substantively applied by the defendants in and for purposes justified by the will of the testator. And it was ordered that the said Master should settle and approve of a scheme for the application of the said rents and profits, and the future rents and profits, having regard to the said testator's will and to the other trusts of other charitable estates and property vested in the defendants for the use of the poor of the Goldsmiths' Company. And it was thereby further ordered that His Majesty's Attorney General should have notice to attend the Master thereon.

The cause was referred to Master Wingfield, who on the 23rd February 1835, made his general report as follows:—

That William Walton, the testator in the pleadings in this cause named, by his will bearing date the 20th day of November 1458, gave and devised to the Wardens and Commonalty of the Art and Mystery of Goldsmiths of the City of London all his lands and tenements situate and being in Wood Street and Gooderon Lane, in the parish of St. Peter, West Cheap, in the City of London, therein particularly described, and also those two messuages with the appurtenances situate in Fenchurch Street, in the parish of St. Mary Fenchurch, therein also particularly described, To hold the same for ever as regards the residue of the said income of the said hereditaments after making some inconsiderable payments specified in the will of the said testator as well for the reparation of the said lands, tenements, and messuages as for the sustentation of the poor men of the art or mistery aforesaid as it should seem best to them to be done. And he found by the answer of the said defendants to the said Information filed in this cause on the 21st November 1832, and from the examination of the said defendants to certain interrogatories exhibited before him on the part of the relators, that it appeared that the lands, messuages, and hereditaments constituting the charity estate of the said William Walton, the testator, consist of three houses with their appurtenances in Wood Street, numbered respectively 4, 5, and 6, and a house in Gutter Lane, numbered 8, and the half of a house at the corner of Gutter Lane aforesaid, and a house, No. 142, Fenchurch Street, which said premises were the same as stated in the answer of the said Defendants as composing the charity estate aforesaid, and that other than and besides the said several messuages and tenements with the appurtenances last mentioned the defendants were not seized or possessed of any lands, messuages, tenements, or hereditaments under, upon, and subject to the trust of the said will of the said testator William Walton. And he found by the answers of the said defendants put into said Information, and from the examination of the said defendants before him, that it appeared that the rents and profits of the aforesaid lands, messuages, or tenements and hereditaments held by the said defendants upon the trusts of the said will of said testator yield a clear yearly income of 388l. 16s. 8d., or thereabouts, applicable to the said charitable trusts and purposes of said testator's will, according to the scheme to be settled and approved in pursuance of the said decree. But he certified that inasmuch as it appeared from the answer of said defendants to said Information that the said defendants had made no other specific application of said rents and profits than the payment of a small annual sum, but had been in the habit of putting together the funds of the several charity estates, the income of which was vested in them to or for the use of the poor of their Company, and paying and administering from such common fund all such charities, he was of opinion that he could not report that the rents and profits of the charity estate had been applied to or for purposes justified by the said testator's will without taking an account not only of the rents and profits of this particular charity estate but also of all other estates, funds, and property vested in the said defendants to or for the use of the poor of their Company, and therefore he allowed certain interrogatories to be exhibited before him for the examination of the said defendants with a view to ascertain what was the annual income of the several charity estates, funds, and properties so vested in them for such uses and purposes. And it appeared to him from the examination of the said defendants to such last-mentioned interrogatories, and by the schedule to the examination to similar interrogatories exhibited in the suit relating to the Charity of Thomas Atte Hay then remaining in his office that the annual income of the several charity estates funds and property so vested in the said defendants for the use of the poor of their Company was about 3,791l. 19s. 7d. And he certified that from the answer of the said defendants and the account therein set forth it appeared that the annual expenditure of the said defendants in charities to the poor of their Company amounted to about 5,000l. And he further found that from the said first-mentioned examination of the said defendants it appears that since said decree the said defendants had changed the mode of keeping their accounts, and that in the accounts then kept by the said defendants the funds and income of each and every of the estates and properties which were vested in the above-named defendants either wholly or in part for charitable purposes were separately credited in an account opened to each and every of their benefactors, each and every of which said accounts was debited with the payments which the defendants are bound to make in pursuance of the trusts reposed in them for or in respect of the same, and which accounts commence from Lady-day 1833. And it appeared to him that the account opened to the said testator, William Walton, contained on the credit side the annual rents of said messuages and hereditaments so appearing by said answer and examination as aforesaid to be hereditaments devised by his will, amounting to the annual sum of 388l. 16s. 8d., and on the debit side the following items, viz.:—
to be appropriated to the Christmas donations. And it was stated to him that the first class of almsmen composed of 26 poor freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company of the age of 55 years and upwards, who received the sum of 17l. per annum each as a settled pension, and the second class of almsmen was composed of 20 poor freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company of the like age and upwards who received the sum of 15l. per annum and as a settled pension, and the third class of almsmen was composed of 63 poor freemen of Goldsmiths' Company of the like age and upwards who received the sum of 12l. per annum each as a settled pension, and he certified that it had been submitted to him on behalf of the said defendants that the then application of the rents and profits of the said charity estate of the said testator would be a proper scheme for the application of the future rents and profits of such charity. And he certified that upon consideration of the several matters aforesaid he found that the rents and profits of the said charity estate of the said testator since the filing of this Information had been substantively applied by the defendants to or for purposes justified by the will of the said testator. And he further certified that he approved of the present application of the funds of the said charity estate as stated in the said account as a proper scheme for the application of the future rents and profits thereof having regard to the said testator's will, and to the other trusts of other charitable estates and property vested in the said defendants for the use of the poor of the Goldsmiths' Company, and that he was of opinion that the separate account so opened to the said testator should be continued, and that when and as any vacancy should occur among the objects of the said charities public notice of every such vacancy should forthwith be affixed at the hall of the said Company, and that a subsequent notice should in like manner be given of the person selected to fill up such vacancy immediately after such selection.

£s.d.
To payments to seven almsmen of the third class at 12l.8400
To 20 almsmen of the second class at 12l. 8s.24800
To 12 almsmen of the first class at 11l. 2s. each5426
Leaving a balance2142

The present state of the property is as follows:—

£s.d.
No. 7, Gutter Lane, let to James Evans for 21 years from March 18578000
No, 10, Gutter Lane, let to George Lock for 21 years from Lady-day 18577500
Nos. 4 and 5, Wood Street, let to F. W. Coates for 21 years from March 185835000
No. 6, Wood Street, let to Messrs. Hatton and Hardy for 21 years from Christmas 184316000
No. 141, Fenchurch Street, let to Messrs. Fleet Brothers for 21 years from Michaelmas 185116000
£82500

The churchwarden of the parish of St. Peter, West Cheap, receives 3s. 4d. annually, and the residue is applied for the men pensioners of the Company.

£s.d.
Class B.25141
Class C.494127
Class D.7900
£824168 (fn. 10)

Sir J. Wollaston's Charity.

Sir John Wollaston, by his will of 15th June 1658, gave to the Company two messuages to pay yearly out of the rents:—

£s.d.
To Bethlem Hospital2000
To two poor almsmen of the Company1000
To the poor of St. John Zachary540
To the parish officers0100

And the residue for buying gowns for the two almsmen.

The messuages devised by this will were taken by the Government for the site of the new post office, and a sum of 2,521l. 10s. was paid to the Company.

An information was filed by the Attorney-General in 1833 at the relation of Peter Upjohn and John Hitchin, freemen of the said Company, against the Wardens and Commonalty of the Company, the Governors of Bethlem Hospital, and the Churchwardens and overseers of St. John Zachary Parish, and a decree was made by the Master of the Rolls on the 29th January 1834, whereby it was declared that the Defendants the Goldsmiths' Company were trustees of the principal sum of 2,521l. 10s. the proceeds of the sale of the messuages or tenements and premises devised to them by the will of Sir John Wollaston in the pleadings mentioned, the amount paid by them for the redemption of land tax having been deducted, and also of interest thereon at the rate of 4l. per cent. per annum from the filing of the information in the cause for the objects and purposes expressed by the said testator in his said will. And it was ordered and decreed that the surplus or residue of the increased income of the said charity fund, after payment of the costs therein-after directed to be paid thereout, beyond the specific sums mentioned in the said testator's will, be from time to time annually applied proportionably among the different objects of the Charity. And it was ordered that the gift of the residue for gowns to the two poor almsmen be taken as at the date of the will at 3l. per annum. And it was ordered that the apportionment to be made for or in respect of the said 3l. per annum, after providing thereout the said almsmen for gowns be held and applied by the said defendants, the Goldsmiths' Company in trust and for the benefit of the poor of their Company. And it was ordered that it be referred to Mr. Wingfield, the master, to whom three former causes of Attorney-General against the Goldsmiths' Company stand referred in case the parties differ, to make the said apportionment and to compute interest at 4l. per cent. per annum on the said sum of 2,521l. 10s. from the time of filing his said information, and to tax the relators their costs between party, and party and also their extra costs between solicitor and client, and also the costs of the defendants the Governors of Bethlem Hospital, and of the defendants Thomas Tanner and William Watson. And it was ordered that the defendants the Goldsmiths' Company should pay the relators what should be taxed for the said relators' first-mentioned costs. And it was ordered that they should pay what should be taxed for the said relators' extra costs out of the charity fund. And it was ordered that what should be taxed for the costs of the said several defendants be paid by the relators, who were to have them over again against the Goldsmiths' Company. And it was ordered that the defendants the Goldsmiths' Company should pay such last-mentioned costs accordingly.

By the general report made by Master Wingfield, dated 9th May 1834, the master certified that he had computed the interest on the said principal sum of 2,521l. 10s. at 4l. per cent. And that the said interest amounted to the annual sum of 100l. 17s. 2d., and he certified that he had made the proper apportionment of the said yearly sum of 100l. 17s. 2d. as and for the future interest on the said principal sum of 2,521l. 10s. to and among the several objects named in the above decree in manner following, that is to say,—

£s.d.
1st. To the Governors of Bethlem Hospital522
2nd. To the said two poor almsmen in respect of the said gift of 10l.261
To ditto for gowns716
3rd. To the said churchwardens and overseers of St. John Zachary for the use of their poor inhabitants147
4th. To the said churchwardens and overseers for their care and pains0100
£100172

Under this scheme the Company appropriate the income of the charity fund, 2,521l. 10s. at 4l. per cent. 100l. 17s. 2d. amongst the several objects as follows:

£s.d.
To the account of the Acton almsmen2612
To Bethlem Hospital5226
To the churchwardens of the parish of St. John Zachary14172
A certain sum is applied in every year by the Company in the purchase of gowns for the almsmen in the almshouses, and also for some of the pensioners who are called gownsmen, and of this expenditure there is charged to this Charity7164
£100172

All which I submit to the Board.

Thomas Hare,
Inspector of Charities.

15th December 1863.

Footnotes

1 Thomas Atte Hay's Charity.
By an order of the Board of 16th July 1880, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of part of Anderton's Hotel, comprising the sites of Nos. 164 and 165, Fleet Street, for 80 years from Lady-day 1878 at a peppercorn rent for the first year, and the annual rent of 1,031l. 12s. 6d. during the remainder of the term, and also the annual sum of 18l. 7s. 6d. in respect of redeemed land tax.
2 Peter Blundell's Charity.
This charity is now administered by the trustees of the prison charities acting under the provisions of a scheme approved by an order of the High Court of Justice (Chancery Division) dated 8th December 1876.
By an order of the Board of 30th April 1878, the abovementioned yearly payment of 2l. was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 66l. 13s. 4d, Consolidated 3l. per cent. annuities.
3 Roger Mundie's Charity.
By an order of the Board of the 26th August 1870, the trustees were authorised to sell 11 houses, numbered from 25 to 35, both inclusive, situate in Primrose Street, Bishopsgate, for 9,325l.
One moiety of this sum belonging to the Charity was invested in the purchase of 5,067l. 18s. 8d. Consols, in the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
4 Harry Osborn Cureton's Charity.
By an order of the Board of 17th November 1868 the following scheme was established for the future regulation of this Charity.
Scheme.
i. The income of the charity shall be received by the Goldsmiths' Company and applied by them towards the support and assistance of poor blind persons residing in the county of Middlesex. The county of Middlesex is to be taken as including the cities of London and Westminster.
2. The objects of the Charity shall be selected by the Goldsmiths' Company according to the necessities and deserts of the candidates.
3. In selecting the recipients the Goldsmiths' Company shall have regard to the following qualifications, and shall give preference to candidates (being otherwise deserving objects) in the following order:—
a. Freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company who are of the craft.
b. Other freemen of the Goldsmiths' Company and their widows.
c. Freemen of the city of London and their widows.
d. Other poor blind persons residing in the county of Middlesex.
4. If any recipient not specially qualified under the classifications A., B., and C. ceases to reside in the county of Middlesex, it shall be in the discretion of the Goldsmiths' Company, upon consideration of all the circumstances of the case, whether he or she shall continue to receive any and what amount of benefit from the Charity.
5. The benefit of the Charity shall be conferred on the recipients either by way of direct pension or money gift, or indirectly as in the shape of clothing, payment of rent, schooling of children, or in any other mode of assistance as the Goldsmiths' Company may determine in each case.
6. The Goldsmiths' Company shall be at liberty to discontinue the benefit, pension, gift, or other payment on misbehaviour or change of circumstances rendering the recipient an unworthy or improper object of charity.
5 John Hille's Charity.
By an order of the Board of 2nd February 1869, the trustees were authorised to grant a building lease of No. 124, Wood Street, for 60 years from Michaelmas 1869, at the annual rent of 250l.
By an order of the Board of 16th July 1880, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of part of Anderton's Hotel, comprising the sites of Nos. 162 and 163, Fleet Street, for 79¾ years from Midsummer 1878, at a peppercorn rent for the first year, and the annual rent of 533l. 7s. 6d. during the remainder of the term, and also the annual sum of 16l. 12s. 6d. in respect of redeemed land tax.
6 Minute of Court, 8th August 1828.
7 Sir Hugh Myddelton's Charity.
By an order of the Board of 28th November 1876, directions were given by way of scheme that the Wardens and Assistants of the said Company of Goldsmiths, or the major part of them, should out of the poorer members of the said Company, and the widows and unmarried or widowed daughters of the poorer members of the said Company, elect so many pensioners as the income of the Charity would from time to time permit, to be called "Sir Hugh Myddelton's Pensioners," and that their pensions should be of such amounts as the said Wardens and Assistants should from time to time think fit, but should in no case exceed 40l.; and that in the administration of the said Charity the Wardens and Assistants should have regard to the preference given by the will of the founder to such poor men of his name, kindred, and countrymen, as should be free of the said Company, and that the said Wardens and Assistants, or the major part of them, should have power at their discretion to remove any pensioner, but that every such pensioner unless so removed should continue in the number of pensioners for life.
8 John Perryn's Charity.
By an order of the Board of 3rd May 1878, the trustees were authorised to make an agreement with Mr. George Wright for the sale and working of the brick earth upon and under two pieces of land at East Acton, containing 39½ and 10 acres respectively, to a depth of six feet.
By another order of 8th July 1879, the trustees were authorised to make a further agreement for the working of the brick earth in certain parts of the land to a greater depth than six feet.
The amount of the royalties received in respect of the bricks for 1878, 1879, and 1880, were invested in the purchase of 2,829l. 5s. 6d. Consols in the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
The Board have approved a building agreement of the above-mentioned land for 90 years, from Lady-day 1879, at the annual rent of 35l. an acre, the lessee covenanting to expend not less than 800l. on each house, which, with the garden and appurtenances, is not to occupy less than a quarter of an acre of land. No leases have yet been granted under this agreement.
By another order of 16th January 1880, the trustees were authorised to grant a repairing lease of the house known as "The Beeches," for 50 years, from Midsummer 1879, at the annual rent of 50l.
The Board have approved a building agreement of a piece of land at Acton, containing 1a. 2r. 10p., and having a frontage of 465 feet to East Acton (now Churchfield) Road, for 99 years, from Lady-day 1879, at a peppercorn rent for the first year, 39l. for the second year, and the annual rent of 78l. during the remainder of the term, the lessee covenanting to build not less than twelve private dwelling-houses, and to expend not less than 600l. on each such house.
Under this agreement the Board have by orders authorised the grant of leases of the 12 houses.
The Board have approved two building agreements of a piece of land at Acton, containing 4a. 0r. 9p., and having a frontage of 749 feet to Myrtle Road, for 99 years, from Michaelmas 1879, at the total annual rent of 170l., the lessee covenanting to build not less than 22 private dwelling-houses, and to expend not less than 600l. on each such house.
Under this agreement the Board have already, by orders, authorised the grant of leases of 16 houses, numbered 1 to 16, Goldsmiths' Gardens.
The Board have approved a building agreement of a piece of land situate in Perryn Road and Shaa Road, Acton, containing 12a. 2r. 17p., for 99 years, from Ladyday 1880, at the rent of a peppercorn for the first year, 73l. for the second year, 147l. for the third year, 220l. for the fourth year, 294l. for the fifth year, 367l. for the sixth year, and the annual rent of 441l. during the remainder of the term, the lessee covenanting to build not less than 87 private dwelling-houses and to expend not less than 600l. on each such house.
Under this agreement, the Board have already by orders, authorised the grant of leases of 30 houses.
By another order of 1st November 1881, the trustees were authorised to expend 2,550l. in constructing a road from the Uxbridge Road to East Acton village.
Of this amount the sum of 1,737l. 7s. 4d. has already been expended, which was provided partly by the appropriation of 883l. 16s., being royalties received in respect of bricks for 1881, and the remainder by the sale of 856l. 15s. 7d. consols.
The Board have approved a building agreement of a piece of land at Acton, containing 9a. 2r., and having a frontage of 550 feet to the Uxbridge Road, for 99 years, from Lady-day 1880, at the rent of a peppercorn for the first year, 77l. for the second year, 154l. for the third year, 231l. for the fourth year, 308l. for the fifth year, and the annual rent of 388l. during the remainder of the term, the lessee covenanting to build not less than 46 private dwelling-houses, 10 of which are to be of not less value than 900l. each, and the remainder of not less value than 600l. each.
No leases have yet been granted under this agreement.
Under order of 21st July 1882, the sum of 1,402l. Consols was transferred to the Goldsmiths' Company, as the consideration for the release of the Charity estate at East Acton from the annual payment of 42l. 2s. 10d. in respect of land tax, which was redeemed by the Company in 1799. out of their corporate property.
By order of 2nd January 1883, the trustees were authorised to expend 1,200l. in the purchase of an additional or improved ground rent of 60l. to be secured upon the last 10 houses to be erected in Myrtle Road. The sum of 1,200l. is to be provided partly by the sale of the sum of 570l. 9s. 11d. Consols the residue of the said sum of 2,829l. 5s. 6d. Consols and partly out of the royalties to be received for bricks, and is also to be replaced out of income within 30 years.
The Board have approved a building agreement of a piece of land at Acton, containing 12a. 1r. 28p., and having frontages to Perryn Road and Friarsplace Lane, for 99 years, from Midsummer 1882, at the rent of a peppercorn for the first year, 67l. 10s. for the second year, 135l. for the third year, 202l. 10s. for the fourth year, 270l. for the fifth year, 337l. 10s. for the sixth year, and the annual rent of 405l. during the remainder of the term, the lessee covenanting to erect not less than 82 private dwelling-houses, and to expend not less than 600l. on each such house.
No leases have yet been granted under this agreement.
9 Five miles from Cromer.
10 William Walton's Charity.
By an order of the Board of 19th January 1877, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of No. 5, Wood Street for 80 years from Lady-day 1876, at a peppercorn rent for the first year, and then at an annual rent of 520l. until Christmas 1885, and subsequently at an annual rent of 673l.
The Board have also approved the grant of a building lease of Nos. 8, Goldsmith Street and 10, Gutter Lane, for 80 years from Lady-day 1877, at a peppercorn rent for the first 9 months, and then at an annual rent of 350l.