Report on the Charities of the Haberdashers' Company
Part II

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

457-477

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'Report on the Charities of the Haberdashers' Company: Part II', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 457-477. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69728 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


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HABERDASHERS' COMPANY. PART II.

Hamond's Charity.

Edmond Hamond, by will of the 25th February 1638, gave 400l. to the Company to purchase ground for building almshouses for six poor old men.

And he gave a rentcharge of 80l. issuing out of houses in Tower Street and Mincing Lane, in trust, as to 60l. a year for the almsmen and the remaining 20l. for 20 poor men or women of the Company on St. Katherine's day.

And he also gave 1,000l. to the Company to purchase so many rectory or rectories, parsonage or parsonages impropriate, as might be therewith purchased in fee simple, in the names of 12 or more persons of the said fraternity, and that to and for every one of the said rectories and parsonages, the said master and wardens and their successors should provide a learned and godly minister, there to be resident, to expound the word of God, and to preach there twice or once at the least every Sabbath day and there to celebrate divine service, and to perform christian duties, and that the yearly profits of the same parsonages or rectories should be given to such minister as should so continue there. And his will was that the said master and wardens, and their successors, should for ever have the nominating and appointing of the ministers to the said rectories and parsonages, and that they should provide such only as should have no spiritual living out of that parish for which he should be so provided, nor any cause of non-residency there, nor that shall absent himself above 40 days in any one year during the time that he should enjoy such rectory or parsonage impropriate, without the license or consent in writing of the master and wardens for the time being.

And he also gave to the Company 500l., to be lent gratis to five young men of the Company, 100l. apiece for five years, silkmen, if any, to be preferred.

The almshouses which were erected on Snow Hill, and existed at the time of the last inquiry were pulled down in the year 1830. They were situated at the back of the stables in Cock Lane, and were approached through a narrow court leading out of King Street, Snow Hill. The site occupying about 65 feet in length, and 33 feet in breadth, was demised to R. A. Smith, under an agreement for a lease for 61 years from Lady Day 1830, at a rent of 18l., with a covenant to build a house and a carpenter's shed. The lessee built upon the site five tenements or cottages having a small garden in the front; and the lease which had previously been taken up was granted to the lessee of the Company on the 30th September 1846, whereby the tenements described as situated and numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Smith's Place, Snow Hill, in the parish of St. Sepulchre, in the city of London, were demised to Roddam Alethen Smith for 45 years from Lady Day 1846, at the said rent of 18l., with covenants by the lessee for insurance and repairs. The inmates of the almshouses at the time of their removal were allowed 2s. a week each for lodgings. No appointments of Hamond's almsmen have been made since the almshouses were pulled down, but six poor freemen who must be single men are now elected as Hamond's pensioners. They each receive 10l. a year in quarterly payments, and in addition in lieu of lodgings five of them receive 1l. 9s. per annum, and the oldest pensioner receives 5l. 4s. a year in quarterly payments making together 12l. 9s.

Twenty poor of the Company also receive 20s. a year at the October court. The pensions and gifts exhaust the rentcharge of 80l. a year, which is received from the trustees of Capt. Briscoe, the proprietors of 15 houses forming the angle of Mincing Lane and Tower Street, and surrounding Hamond's Court.

The income and expenditure of the Charity appears, therefore, to be as follows:—

Income.

£s.d.
The rentcharge8000
The rents of the houses in Smith's Place1800
£9800

Disbursements.

£s.d.£s.d.
Six pensioners6000
Twenty poor of the Company2000
8000
Allowances for the lodgings of pensioners1290
£9290

The remainder of the fund is exhausted by—

A quitrent of the Snow Hill property payable to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster0130
The charges of management at 5 per cent. taken by the Company4180
£9800

The gift for the purchase of impropriate rectories and the appointment thereto by the Company of godly ministers, was laid out in the purchase of the advowsons of the rectory of Awre and the chapelry of Blakeney, both in the county of Gloucester on the banks of the Severn.

The Company reserve to themselves the rectory and present to the vicarage.

£s.d.
The vicarage of Awre was, previously to the year 1854, estimated at the annual value of56003
The perpetual curacy of Blakeney at the same time was estimated at290611
Making together£85072

This includes all the rectorial and vicarial tithes. The habit was formerly on the presentation to these livings, for the Company to demise the rectorial tithes to the incumbent reserving a rent to themselves. This rent was in 1826 a sum of 400l. This reservation was not continued after the presentation of Mr. Jordan to the curacy in 1831.

In 1854 a new ecclesiastical arrangement was made with the sanction of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners by which a portion of the vicarial tithes of Awre was annexed to the district chapelry of All Saints. By a lease of the 29th March 1854 the Company demised the tithe rentcharge in lieu of great tithes of Awre and Bledesloe and of part of the fishing of Haytor in the parish of Awre, to the present vicar, the Rev. Joseph Henry Malpas, until March 1863 at a peppercorn rent. By a deed of the same date, made between the vicar of the first part, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol of the second part, the Haberdashers' Company of the third part, and the Rev. Charles Brooksbank, described as the late chaplain, and now perpetual curate of the district chapelry of Blakeney, of the fourth part, reciting an Order in Council of the 8th August 1853, whereby a particular district was assigned to the church or chapel of All Saints in Blakeney. It was witnessed that the vicar in pursuance of his agreement therein mentioned and the Act of Parliament, thereby assigned to the Rev. Charles Brooksbank the tithes and glebe therein mentioned, to hold the same as perpetual curate of the district chapelry. Mr. Malpas was presented in 1826, and Mr. Brooksbank in 1843. The vicarage, however, has been rebuilt and enlarged during the incumbency of Mr. Malpas.

The presentations are made in cases of vacancy by the majority of the total number of members of the court present.

The vicar enters into a bond in the penal sum of 2,000l. to reside in the parish, to repair the house and chancel of the church and chapelry of Blakeney, and not to have any spiritual living out of the parish, nor absent himself above 40 days without the consent of the master and wardens, according to the terms of the will. I do not find that any bond has been entered into by the chaplain (and perpetual curate). There is no house belonging to the incumbent of the chapelry.

The sum of 500l. forms part of the loan fund which is lent without interest, under the scheme of the Court of Chancery mentioned in my Report on "Loans without Interest." (fn. 1)

W. and M. Harrison's Charity.

William Harrison, by will of the 4th March 1619, gave to the Company 150l. for bread and clothing for poor aged or impotent persons of Allhallows Staining, London.

And Mrs. Mary Harrison, by her will of the 15th October 1656, gave 150l. to the Company for coals for poor aged women of Allhallows Staining.

The Company appropriate 391l. 13s. 4d. 3l. per cent. consols, as producing an annual dividend of 11l. 15s., which is paid annually at Michaelmas to the clerk of the parish of Allhallows Staining.

Hazelfoot's Charity.

Henry Hazlefoot, by indenture of the 22nd August 1646, conveyed to the use of the Company an estate called Pitley Farm of the yearly value of 70l., to be distributed as follows:—
and the rest and residue for the further increase of the Company's stock of corn.

£
To the parish of St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London8
To the Company's poor20
To buy corn8
To St. Thomas's Hospital8
To Christ's Hospital5
To Bridewell Hospital3
To St. Bartholomew's Hospital4
To release prisoners10
To the wardens 2l., clerk and beadles 2l.4

The Commissioners of Inquiry suggested a question whether the surplus income of the estates devised by the donor were devised to Charity, or whether the charitable gifts were no more than a charge to that extent. On the 3rd June 1831 an information was filed by the AttorneyGeneral at the relation of George Shoebridge, against the master and wardens of the fraternity of the art or mystery of Haberdashers within the city of London, stating, that the rents and profits of the said estate and premises had become of great yearly value and much more than sufficient for the purposes in the said indenture of release mentioned, and that in consequence of the increased and increasing revenues derived from the said estate and premises, it had become expedient that the said several and respective charities should be increased in proportion to the increased rents and profits of the said estates, and that a scheme or schemes should be approved of by one of the Masters of the Court for such purpose.

And praying that an account might be taken of the estates and premises belonging to the said Charity, and of all the particulars whereof the same consist, and also an account of the rents and profits, and the accumulations thereof from such time as the Court should think fit, and of their application, and that the same might be administered according to the intentions of the said H. Hazlefoot, or as near thereto as circumstances would admit. And that it might be referred to one of the Masters of the Court to approve of a scheme for the future application of the increased and increasing rents and profits of the said Charity estates, and if necessary that the said estates and premises might be conveyed and vested in trustees for the benefit of the said Charity.

The Court, by its decree of the 12th November 1832 dismissed the information, with costs. From this decree, the relator appealed to the Lord Chancellor, who by his judgment of the 12th March 1834 (order drawn up 9th April 1834), affirmed the decree of the 12th November 1832.

I have perused the shorthand notes of the Lord Chancellor's judgment, and the decision appears to be placed on the ground that the direct object of the gift of 8l. and the residue, was merely to assist the Company in providing stacks of corn for sale, which it appeared the great companies had been formerly required by the Corporation of London to do at periods of apprehended scarcity.

The Company are still in possession of the estates in Essex, which produce an annual income considerably exceeding the charge.

In the administration of the Charity the 8l. given to buy corn, and the 20l. given to the poor of the Company, are added together and given away in gifts of 20s. each to 28 poor of the Company at the January court.

The respective sums are paid to the several hospitals, and to the parish of St. Nicholas. The 10l. for the release of prisoners has been hitherto paid over to the account of a "Fund for the Relief of Prisoners," which comprises, however, only this Charity. The application has been made by prisoners for debt in the London prisons, and sums varying from 20l. to 25l. have been given in late years; formerly not more than 10l. was given. One prisoner was released in 1854, another in 1856, another in 1858, and the last in 1860. There is, at present, a balance of 75l. to the credit of this division of the Charity.

Hewes' Charity.

A loan gift by John Hewes of 100l., of which 75l. was lost at the time of the last inquiry. The borrowers were to be four, who were to pay 10s. a year each to the poor of the Company.

The Company in respect of the remaining 25l. set apart 16l. 13s. 4d., 3l. per cent. consols, producing one sum of 10s. a year, which is given to a poor person of the Company at the January court.

Heydon's Charity.

John Heydon, by will of the 6th March 1579, gave 100l. to the Company to be lent to two young men at 3l. 6s. 8d. per cent., to be paid to the Mercers' Company.

The Company reserve 111l. 2s. 3d., 3l. per cent. stock as the supposed capital of this gift, which has not been lent for more than a century, and they pay 3l. 6s. 8d. annually to the Mercers' Company.

Hobby's Charity.

John Hobby, by will of the 12th March 1674, gave 3,000l. to purchase lands of 170l. a year, of which 60l. a year was to be applied annually in clothing for 30 poor aged persons, of whom 12 were to be free of the Haberdashers' Company.

The settlement of the scheme for the administration of this Charity will be found in my Report on the Charities under the management of the Clothworkers' Company.

The Company is entitled to twelve-thirtieths of sixseventeenths of the income of the Charity for the clothing of 12 poor Haberdashers.

The portion of rents received by the Company has on the average of nine years been 67l. 7s. In the year 1861 it was 82l. 15s. 1d.

The Company in 1855 increased the number of recipients of clothing from 12 to 14, who receive clothing in the same manner, and nearly to the same value, as the clothing mentioned in Bond's Charity. There was a balance in favour of the Charity of undistributed funds of 169l. 0s. 6d. In reply to the question whether the Company would be allowed to increase the number of recipients, I have said that I had no doubt of the competency of the Company to do so, or of the propriety of doing it.

Holden's Charity.

Josh. Holden, in November 1680, gave to the Company 110l. to pay on the 5th November 10s. each to 10 poor people free of the Company.

This is represented by 166l. 13s. 4d., 3 per cent. consols, part of the stock standing to the account of the Company.

The gift is made to five poor persons in sums of 1l. each at the October court, with Arnold's, Hazlefoot's, Hamond's, Kelke's, Hewe's, Somers', and Peacock's Charities.

Huntlowe's Charity.

Thomas Huntlowe, by indenture of the 28th January 1543, gave to the Company 50l. to pay 1l. 6s. 8d. amongst 10 almspeople in the almshouses in Staining Lane, and in 1547 he gave 200l. for the 10 poor almshouses. The almshouses in Staining Lane have not existed since the Fire of London. The Company had commuted all these payments by an increased payment to 10 poor freemen's widows of 3l. a year each.

Since the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, pp. 189, 190), the Company have revised the account of this Charity and charged themselves with as much or somewhat more than the sum of 250l. would produce if invested at 5 per cent., and nominally secured it by appropriating 422l. 4s. 5d., 3l. per cent. consols, the dividends of which, amounting to 12l. 13s. 4d., they distribute in pensions of 3l. a year each to four widows of freemen, paid quarterly; the same persons also participating frequently in other gifts. The 10 pensioners mentioned by the Commissioners of Inquiry were reduced by request of the court of assistants of 14th January 1833 to four persons, as vacancies occurred.

The sum of 13s. 4d. is paid to the clerk and beadle.

Hutchinson's Charity.

A loan gift by John Hutchinson, in respect of which the Company received 68l. and for which they charge themselves with 66l. 13s. 4d., 3l. per cent. consols, and pay 2l. a year to Christ's Hospital.

Jeston's Charity.

Roger Jeston, by will of the 2nd April 1622, gave his messuages and lands in St. Giles', Cripplegate, to the Company, charged with the yearly sum of 102l. 12s., as follows:—

£s.d.
To 6 poor old men of the Company15120
" clerk of the Company200
" beadles and porter200
" his sister-in-law, and remainder to her three daughters and their heirs2000
" the parish officers of Lambeth for the poor300
" the parish officers of Kinver, Staffordshire, for the poor500
" three poor scholars of Trinity College, Cambridge2000
" Christ's Hospital800
" St. Thomas and St. Bartholomew (4l. each)800
" wardens of the Company400
" Bridewell Hospital400
" preachers at St. Paul's Cross500
" lecturer at Lambeth600

The will then contained directions for the application of the surplus, and also on certain contingencies of a portion of the above payments in maintenance of the buildings on the charity estate, with directions for an intermediate application of the same surplus in loans without interest to trimmers of hats and caps free of the Company:—

£s.d.
The estate of this Charity consists of—
Nos. 1 to 6, Milton Street (Cripplegate), let to John Nesham on a building lease for 60 years from Lady Day 1830, at 50l. a year5000
Nos. 1 to 18, Haberdashers' Square, at the back of the last-mentioned houses, let to Mr. G. A. Smith on a repairing lease for 30 years from Lady Day 1860, under the order of the Board, of the 3rd July 186012000
3,031l. 1s., 3l. per cent. Reduced annuities, the accumulations of the surplus income of the estate90186
260186
There is out of this a charge of 4l. 4s. for the surveyor and 8l. 10s. to the account of the comptroller as charges of management at 5l. per cent. on the rental (not on the stock)12140
24846
The fund is thus administered:—
To six freemen of the Company, pensions of 2l. 12s. a year each in quarterly payments15120
The sum given annually by the master of the Company at the January court to some clergyman of the Church of England of his selection, in place of the gift to the preachers at St. Paul's Cross500
The sum of 6l. 13s. 4d. each to three scholars of Trinity College, Cambridge, at the selection of the Bursar of the College, who inserts their names on his receipt2000
The churchwardens of Lambeth300
The rector of Lambeth, in respect of the gift to the lecturer600
The hospital of Bridewell400
The St. Thomas' Hospital, by their Treasurer400
The Bartholomew's Hospital, by their Treasurer400
The churchwardens of Kinfare or Kinver, Staffordshire500
The Company appears to have purchased of Christ's Hospital the annuity of 8l. a year payable to that institution, and it is now carried to the account of the Company800
The gift of 20l. a year to the sister-in-law of the testator, with remainder to the three daughters and their heirs has been purchased by the Company2000
94120
The wardens, clerk, beadles, and porter of the Company receive800
£102120

The residue is annually invested. The present amount of accumulations is above stated.

There is no probability that any occasion for the literal application of the fund will ever arise. There are not any persons of the class referred to likely to require the loans, and unless some useful application of the fund be devised, there is nothing to prevent the accumulation from continuing indefinitely. (fn. 2)

Johnson's Charity.

Thomas Johnson, by will of the 3rd September 1563, gave to the Company 50l. to distribute quarterly to the neediest of the Company, 20s. in bread, &c. The Company appropriate 133l. 6s. 8d., 3l. per cent. consols to meet a disbursement of 4l. a year, which they divide equally amongst four poor persons free of the Company at the Midsummer quarter's distribution.

1. Jones' Charity.

William Jones, by his will of the 26th December 1614 (proved 6th October 1615), gave to the Company 9,000l. to ordain a preacher, a free school, and almshouses for 20 poor old diseased people of the town of Monmouth. The charity was established by letters patent of King James the First, of the 16th March 1614–5, whereby the Company was specially incorporated as "Governors of the possessions, revenues, and goods of the almshouses and free grammar school of William Jones, in Monmouth, in the county of Monmouth."

The buildings necessary for the preacher or lecturer, the school, the schoolmaster, and under master, and almshouses for 10 men and 10 women, were erected on land in Monmouth, purchased at the time of or soon after the foundation, and occupy the angle of Bridge Street and Almshouse Street, in the town of Monmouth.

The fund appropriated for the endowment was laid out in the purchase of the manor and estate of Hatcham Barnes, in the parish of St. Paul, Deptford, which I have in this report shortly distinguished from the other property of the Charity by the name of the Metropolitan Estate. This property has now become of great value, and having regard to its increasing magnitude, as the site of railway stations and vast building operations, its future importance must be enormous, and at present beyond the reach of calculation. It comprises a large portion of the district on the London side of Deptford, where the London and Greenwich, London and Croydon, and the London and Brighton Railways, the South Eastern Railway, and the Thames Junction Railway, approach and intersect each other; and portions of the purchase money, which the several railway companies have paid for the land which they have taken, have been invested in the purchase of estates in Kent and Staffordshire. The acreage of the metropolitan estate north of the Kent Road, was 218a. 2r. 33p., and south of the Kent Road, 104a. 1r. 26p., making altogether 323a. 0r. 19p. This has, however, been reduced to about 300 acres by the quantities taken by the railways.

The condition and rental of the property of the Charity, as it is now held and let, will appear in the following table:—

Metropolitan Estate.

£s.d.
Land, 90a. 2r. 2p., on the south side of the Kent Road, held under the lease to C. J. Holcombe, mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, pp. 203, 204)12030
Fine of 36l. every 7 years, average5210
Garden ground, 23a. 1r. 25p., next to Drake's land, on the west of the Brighton Railway, and 0a. 2r. 36p. land of the angle cut by the intersection of the Bricklayers' Arms Branch Railway and the Grand Surrey Canal, let to John Avann, yearly tenant9500
The lease to the executors of John Vanham (Rep., Vol. 10, p. 203), became vested in —Isaac, who after an agreement of the Company, which became the subject of a suit for specific performance, ultimately compromised the question between him and the governors of the Charity, by the order of the Board of the 19th January 18583100
The same land is let in three portions, as follows:—
The house and garden.
The Warehousemen and Clerks' School, on agreement, March 186310500
Coach-house, stables, and 14a. 3r. 5p. land, let to James Wilson, yearly tenant (the Charity paying the rates and taxes)7000
A lodge, let to a weekly tenant at 3s. per week7160
The Five Bells tavern and cottages, part of which was formerly held by the representatives of Henry Brougham, let to Messrs. Calvert or to the City of London Brewery on a building lease for 71 years from Michaelmas 18387000
The Railway Tavern (part of the premises formerly comprised in the last-mentioned demise), let to the same company on a building lease for 71 years from Midsummer 18393600
House and basket-maker's shop, near the turnpike on the Kent road, let to Stephen Packer for 71 years from Midsummer 1839880
The farm and land formerly let to the executors of William Holcombe, on lease, expiring in March 1859, has been let as follows:—
House and 10a. 1r. 15p. land, in the Kent Road, let to William Spavin on lease for 14 years from Michaelmas 185912000
House and 7a. 3r. 26p. land, let to Henry Bunning on lease for 21 years from Michaelmas 185912000
Cottage and garden, let to Thomas Fox Penton, as yearly tenant5500
Farm, house and buildings, and 63a. 2r. 7p. land, on the north side of the Kent Road, let to James Wilson, yearly tenant25000
Three cottages on the north side of the Kent Road, let to weekly tenants (say)2000
Land or garden ground at the back of the cottages, 3a. 2r. 0p., let to Edward Mote, yearly tenant, determinable at a month's notice1200
Carried forward£1,0971910
Brought forward1,0971910
Hatcham House (formerly let to J. Hardcastle), and 16a. 0r. 0p. land, let on a building lease, 1846, to Joseph Alfred Hardcastle, under the order of the Court of Chancery, for a term expiring at the same time as the old lease of 176310000
Added for redeemed land tax326
House and outbuildings, land 10a. 1r. 25p., held on the lease for 150 years from 1763, by R. W. Edwards, mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry17110
Fine every seven years of 5l. 17s.0166
Manufactory of animal charcoal and 17a. 0r. 26p. land, on the north of the Kent Road, let to George Torr for 21 years from Michaelmas 185924000
Garden ground, 24a. 1r. 22p., on the north side of the Kent Road, let to William Brown on lease for 14 years from Michaelmas 1856127190
Garden ground, 17a. 0r. 35p., ditto, let to James Hargood for 21 years from Michaelmas 185910200
Garden ground, 5a. 1r. 21p., ditto, let to William Atherton, yearly tenant3460
Garden ground, 6a. 0r. 15p., ditto, let to James Brown, yearly tenant4000
Four cottages in Chapel Place, let to Thomas Martin, yearly tenant1000
Houses facing Kent Road on the North side.
Nos. 11, 12, and 13, Monmouth Place, let to Thomas Howard for 70 years from Midsummer 1840300
No. 6, Hatcham Terrace, let to W. R. Marshall for 69 years from Midsummer 1841700
No. 7, Hatcham Terrace, let to C. Burtwell for same term700
No. 5, Hatcham Terrace, let to H. Taylor for same term7120
No. 1, Hatcham Terrace, let to E. S. Judkins for the same term7120
Nos. 2, 3, and 4, Hatcham Terrace, let to J. Nathan for the same term22160
Nos. 1 and 5, Albert Terrace, let to J. Albert for 69 years from Michaelmas 18411840
(5l. a year for some additional land added to the original rent of 13l. 4s. a year, under order of the Board of December 1861.)
Carried forward1,8461810
Brought forward1,8461810
Nos. 2 and 3, Albert Terrace, let to F. C. Hills for the same term1340
No. 4, Albert Terrace, let to J. Nathan for the same term6120
Nos. 3 and 4, Victoria Cottages, let to R. Howard for same term1000
No. 2, Victoria Cottages, let to J. Matthews for the same term200
No. 1, Victoria Cottages, let to J. Pickering for the same term600
No. 1, Monmouth Place, let to J. Harnden for the same term600
No. 2, Monmouth Place, let to J. Brighton for 62 years from Midsummer600
Nos. 3, 4, and 5, Monmouth Place, let to J. Crowhurst for same term1600
Nos. 14, 15, and 16, Monmouth Place, let to J. Packer for same time800
Five houses in 5 Bells Lane, opposite the "5 Bells," let to J. Brighton for 62 years from Midsummer 18482000
No. 1, Orange Grove, let to J. Clack for 21 years from Christmas 18503500
No. 2, Orange Grove, let to — King, as yearly tenant2200
A piece of ground, 1a. 2r. 1p., let to William Dennis, on building lease, for 81 years from Michaelmas 1862; first year at peppercorn rent, second year at 33l. 5s., and third and following years at66100
As sanctioned by the Board.
Nos. 1 to 5, Amelia Terrace, let to Joshua Wilson, on lease for 62½ years, from Christmas 18472400
Land in the Kent Road, at the angle of the estate, near the New Cross Station, abutting on the spare carriage depôt, let on building lease for 80 years from Michaelmas 18536000
£2,148410
Brought forward2,148410
Staffordshire Estate.
In the year 1856 the governors, with the sanction of the Court of Chancery, expended 5,788l. cash, in the purchase of an estate called Palin's, at Knighton, in the parish of Adbaston, in Staffordshire, consisting of farm buildings and cottages, and 107a. 1r. 20p. land. (See my Report on Adams' Charity, Table of Property, No. 5.)
Palin's Farm is now let to Thomas Lycett, on lease for 21 years (determinable at 14 years) from Michaelmas 1861, at20500
In 1858, a sum of 349l. 17s. 4d. consols was sold out, and the produce, 335l. cash, and 16l. 10s. 9d., invested in the purchase from Joseph Hayward of two freehold cottages, and 1a. 3r. 29p. of meadow land.
Two cottages are let to Thomas Clark, on lease for 21 years, from Michaelmas 18611100
One cottage, let to Henry Clark on a like lease400
The meadow land, 1a. 3r. 29p., is let to Joseph Hayward, a yearly tenant4100
2,3721410
Kent Estate.
In 1855 the sum of 4,570l. cash was invested by the order of the Court of Chancery in the purchase of 99a. 1r. 36p. of meadow land in the parishes of Willesborough and Sevington, in the county of Kent (adjoining the Kentish estate of the Aske's Charity).
The estate is now let to William Scott on lease for 16½ years, from Lady Day 185515000
The school, the lecturer and the master's houses, almshouses, and gardens, in the town of Monmouth, in hand.
The real estate (gross rental)2,5221410
The stock, now belonging to the governors (as before stated), is as follows:—
Standing in the name of the AccountantGeneral of the Court of Chancery, ex parte the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway, 5,277l. 15s. 7d., 3l. per cent. consols15864
Do. Exparte London and Croydon Railway Company, 1,231l. 1s. 8d., 3 per cent. consols36187
In the corporate name of the governors of the Monmouth Charity, 2,712l. 14s. 2d., 3 per cent. consols8177
(This constitutes the balance of accumulations for the 10 last years.)
£2,79974
The outgoings on the estate are:—
Salaries.
£s.d.
Clerk, Mr. Curtis10000
Surveyor, Mr. Snooke5000
Mr. Snooke is the surveyor of the London property, and in addition to his salary, which comprises a general attention to the estate, or as it is expressed in the order of the governors "to survey and report generally to the governors upon the state of repair and condition of the buildings, premises, and land belonging to the Charity estate, and the drainage thereof, the observance by the tenants of the covenants in their leases, and of all encroachments, obstructions, or nuisances, to give the requisite notices of repair, and otherwise, and to see the same be effectually complied with, to attend all courts and committees, and the master and wardens of the Company when required on the business of the Charity." He is to be paid specially for all new buildings and plans, as well for special surveys and business not included in the above.
Carried forward15000
Brought forward15000
The extra payments to the surveyor under this head, for two and a half years from July 1858 up to Christmas 1860 was 172l. 2s., or average about7000
The governors insure a portion of the metropolitan property, but this is to be considered a matter of arrangement with the tenants in future.
Commission on the receipt of the rents of the Kent Estate (Scott's rent)7100
Surveyor to the Staffordshire Estate (J. Cobb) salary, lately raised to1000
Labour in the woods100
Sewers and other rates on the Metropolitan Estate in 18623000
Deputation, consisting of the Estates' Committee (15 or 17) of the court and clerk and surveyor, visiting the New Cross Estate annually, and also a deputation of three members of the court to Monmouth every second year2100
£289100

A scheme for the entire reconstruction of the Charity was settled by the Court of Chancery on the 26th July 1854, and is recorded in this office.

The disbursements on account of the Charity, under the new scheme now are:—

Lecturer.

£s.d.
The Rev. J. D. Watherston, the lecturer, was appointed by the governors in 1859 (he was previously the head master of the school)17500
He is provided with a good dwelling house.
The lecturer has the general superintendence of the Charity at Monmouth. He examines and reports to the governors the state of the school twice a year, and he has immediate superintendence of the almspeople, visiting them weekly, and keeping a report book. He has to perform a full service twice on Sundays, and on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and Ascension Day, and administer the Sacrament four times a year, with spiritual attendance on other occasions. (See clause 6 of the Statutes appended to this Report.)
The services are to be performed in the church, if it can be had for that purpose, and if not, it is to be performed in the schoolrooms, where the almspeople attend. The services are open to the public, and it is proposed to build a chapel, to contain not less than 250 persons.
Total Lecturer£17500
School.
£s.d.
On the 13th July 1832 the salary of the lecturer was raised from 140l. to 150l., and 10th May 1841 from 150l. to 175l. These advances were under orders of the Court of Chancery of those dates.
The Rev. C. M. Roberts, the head master of the school, was appointed in 1859. He is provided with a good dwelling-house.
The salary of the master was raised by the order of July 1832 from 120l. to 170l., and by the order of the 10th May 1841 to 230l.23000
The masters are elected by the governors on probation, and remain on trial for six months, at the expiration of which period the visitors are to report to the governors their opinions upon the character and abilities of the masters. (See Clause 36, p. 9, of the Statutes, which I append). The Statutes were settled by the Court of Chancery in 1854, and Clause 37 precludes the masters from taking boarders.
Mr. W. Pitt, the usher, or second master, was appointed in 1853 third master, and in 1857 second master.
The salary of the usher was by the order of the Court of Chancery of the 13th July 1832 raised from 60l. to 80l., and by order of 10th May 1841 from 80l. to 130l.13000
He is also provided with a dwellinghouse.
Mr. W. Rogevear, is the third master; he was appointed in 1858. This office was constituted by the Court of Chancery by its order of the 26th July 1854, at a salary of 100l. The governors in consideration of the third master having no house, have increased the salary to 120l.12000
The writing master.—This office was constituted by the order of the Court of Chancery of the 5th August 1828, at a salary of 60l., which was increased on the 10th May 1841 to 90l.9000
The present writing master is Mr. Robert Earle, who was appointed in July 1862.
He has no dwelling-house allowed him by the Charity.
The examiner.—This office was constituted by the order of the 13th January 1852, and confirmed by the scheme of the 26th July 1854. Under the scheme of 26th July 1854 he is to be allowed 10l. for each halfyearly examination, besides his travelling and other expenses. His qualifications are defined by Clause 34 of the Rules appended hereto. The last Report of the examiner on the school is appended4100
Books and stationery, average of nine years4900
Coals, clock, and sundries4000
The exhibitions.—The sum applicable to this purpose is uncertain, inasmuch as the class of youth attending the school is not such as can afford a maintenance at the University, with the small assistance which the exhibition affords3000
At present there is only one exhibitioner. In 1858 there were two.
£73000

The Almshouses.

£s.d.
The nurse.—Her duties are to give constant attendance to the poor men and women. She has no residence3140
The surgeon.—This includes medicine and attendance upon the almspeople2000
The 20 almspeople.—They consist of 10 men and 10 women, none of them being married, each receives 8s. a week41600
Ten cloaks, annually1500
£48240

General expenses of the school and almshouses, and on the dwellings of the lecturer and masters:—

£s.d.
Insurance (on 4,500l.)1026
Water and gas1900
Repairs on an average of the last nine years (79l.), say8000
£10926

The aggregate charity disbursements may, therefore, be thus stated:—

£s.d.
Lecturer17500
School73000
Almshouses48200
General expenses10000
£1,48700

The formation of several railways crossing the line of the estate, as before observed, led to various sales of portions of the estate to the different companies.

The following table exhibits the times at which these various plots were alienated, the several companies by which they were taken, the quantities of land, and the amounts in stock and in cash paid or invested to the account of the governors in respect of such land.

Sales to Railways.

A.R.P.£s.d.
1833London and Greenwich022Cash7500
1836November 15London and Croydon11221Stock3,605303 per cent.
1837April 15Do.2,72315consols
1838November 10Do.137"895176"
1844July 9South Eastern31"1,052128"
1846—3rd November (300l. 15s. sold, and in 1850 the remainder).
1846March 24London, Brighton, and South Coast for land and six cottages, lately let to Martin. (Cormack's rent reduced from 75l. to 67l. 15s., and Brown's from 75l. to 49l. 11s.)4014"5,1741211
1847July 21Thames Junction Railway, now London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway1116"905110
The above sums have been reduced by various sales and investments, as follows:—
1855MarchWillesboro', Kent, purchaseStock12,3981410Consols
4,369185
8,028165
1855JulyRedemption of land tax on the Metropolitan Estate228104
7,80061
1856Staffordshire, Palin's purchase, 5,788l.6,060148
1,739115
Interest63119
1,675198
1857FebruaryRedemption of land tax on the Staffordshire Estate9508
1,580190
1858AugustHaywards349174
The amount still remaining in respect of the foregoing alienations of the Charity1,23118
There has been also a further sale, as follows:—A.R.P.£s.d.
1856London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway Company53155,277157
(This sum has not yet been dealt with for re-investment.)

The surplus of the income of the Charity will, therefore, amount to upwards of 1,000l. a year.

It is expected that there will be a disbursement of about 100l. in repairs on the farm buildings on Lycett's farm, in the Staffordshire estate, in the present year.

The directions of the scheme of 26th July 1854 for the application of the income of the Charity and the surplus are as follows:—

The governors shall pay out of the income of the Charity the necessary repairs and outgoings in respect of the Charity estates and buildings, and the costs, charges, and expenses properly incurred by themselves, and the visitors, in and about the performance of their duties as governors and visitors; and also the following stipends; that is to say,—

To the lecturer, 175l. per annum.

" head master, 230l. per annum.

" second master, 130l. "

" third master, 100l. "

" writing master, 90l. "

" examiner, 20l. per annum, and his travelling and other expenses not exceeding 21l. per annum.

To the two exhibitioners, 30l. per annum.

To the clerk of the Haberdashers' Company for receiving the rents and dividends and transacting the ordinary business of the Charity, including attendance on all committees, both ordinary and special, a salary not less than 90l. nor more than 135l. per annum, at the discretion of the governors.

To the surveyor of the Company, for surveying the Charity estates and buildings and reporting thereon, including attendance on the courts and committees when required by the governors, a salary of not less than 50l. nor more than 75l., at the discretion of the governors.

Provided, that it shall be lawful for the governors, if they shall think fit and the funds shall be sufficient for that purpose, to increase the salaries of the lecturer and masters, including the writing master, or any of them, by any amount not exceeding 25l. per cent. on the stipend herein-after directed to be paid to them respectively, and to increase the number of exhibitioners to any number not exceeding four, and the stipend of each exhibitioner to any sum not exceeding 50l. per annum.

After making the payments mentioned in the last clause, and paying the allowances to the almspeople, and paying to a nurse for the almspeople 10s. a week, and to an apothecary for the almspeople 15l. a year, and providing cloaks for the almspeople, and applying such sum not exceeding 30l. in any one year as the governors shall think fit in purchasing books for the school library, and such sum not exceeding 20l. per annum as they shall think fit, for prizes, not exceeding 5l. for each prize, the remainder of the income shall be invested by the governors in Government stock by way of addition to the property of the Charity, and the dividends of the stock so purchased shall be considered and dealt with as income of the Charity property.

The present visitors are:—

Archdeacon Crawley, Bryngwin.

Rev. J. L. Dighton, The Garth, near Monmouth.

Rev. E. F. Arney, Monmouth.

Rev. J. Burdon, English Bicknor, Gloucestershire.

Rev. Edwd. Machen, Staunton, near Coleford.

J. E. W. Rolls, Esq., The Hendre.

J. F. Brickdale, Esq., Newland.

S. R. Bosanquet, Esq., Dingeston Court.

H. M. Clifford, Esq., M.P.. Llantillio.

Owen Jones, Esq., Newnham.

Captain James Davis Garth.

George Griffin Tyler, Esq.

It has been suggested on behalf of the town council, that the mayor, ex officio, should be a visitor; but on this point, I am informed that the inhabitants are not unanimous. The Rev. E. F. Arney is the vicar of Monmouth, but is not ex officio visitor. The admission of both, the vicar and the mayor, as visitors, ex officio, would be a proper regulation.

Under the scheme of 1854, the school is limited to 100 boys, who are to be of the borough of Monmouth, and the counties of Monmouth, Hereford, and Gloucester (clause 12). The 100 boys are to be educated entirely free of expense.

The school is divided into the classical and the commercial divisions, the respective courses of instruction in which are settled by the clauses 27, 28, and 29 of the rules, appended to this Report. I am informed that the number of boys in the classical school is 19, of the average age of 13 years; and the number in the commercial school 81, of the average age of 11. The boys, however, are kept altogether in one schoolroom. The schoolroom, as far as I can ascertain by a scale on the map, is about 62 feet by 38 feet.

There are constantly more applicants for admission to the school, than there are vacancies. At the last election there were 22 candidates, and only six vacancies. There is no payment whatever made by the boys, who are admitted by the visitors at their quarterly meetings, the Company exercising no control over their nomination. The last scheme in increasing the exhibitions to four, extended them to the University of Durham and St. David's College, Lampeter, as well as to the English Universities. I append a letter of the head master in reply to my inquiry on the condition of the school, together with the last report of Mr. Seeley, the examiner.

The governors have intimated their intention, at the instance of the visitors, to hire a field on the estate of the Duke of Beaufort on the other side of the Wye, as an exercise and cricket ground for the boys. It has also been proposed to build a chapel on the land belonging to the Charity for the use of the lecturer, capable of containing not less than 250 persons.

A deputation of inhabitants of Monmouth who attended my inquiry, stated that the people of the town were anxious that these plans of improvement should be greatly extended, that instead of the chapel being built in a confined situation, restricting also thereby the space which they required as desirable to form a site for the extension of the school buildings, they wish the chapel to be a building of much greater capacity, and to be erected on the opposite side of St. Mary Street, where it would in their opinion form a great public improvement in the town. It is stated that what is now the site of an old malthouse might be procured on easy terms, and would be a good position for the new building.

The municipal council of Monmouth nominate three candidates for any vacancy in the almshouses, returning the number of votes for each candidate. The almspeople consist of 10 men and 10 women, and a vacancy when it occurs is reported to the Company by the lecturer. On the receipt of the three names the court of the Company elect one.

It is customary, I am informed, although I do not see anything in the rules on the subject, to exclude any applicants to the almshouses who have received parish relief during the preceding two years. It might, I should think, be desirable if the governors approved of it, to release them from this restriction, and also from the clause which confines the almspeople to those who are sole and unmarried.

There is a national school at Monmouth, supported by voluntary contributions, and other donations, the number of scholars in which is much diminished by their being drafted off to this school, to avoid the payment of threepence per week, and the consequence is, that the class of boys attending the endowed school in the largest numbers is so low, that the school is rendered of comparatively small value to the classes of the inhabitants who are in better condition. I am told that there were formerly 110 boys in the national school, and they are now reduced to 60.

The girls' school, which is not thus interfered with, maintains its number of upwards of 100.

The master of the endowed school has often had excuses for non-attendance of the boys on the ground that they had not shoes to wear.

The professional men in the town, I am informed, habitually send their sons to other places of education. It is greatly desired that the school should be raised and made one of the highset class, and the respectable inhabitants are perfectly willing that capitation fees of two or four guineas a year should be imposed for instruction of the best and most comprehensive character.

The funds arising from this endowment even at the present time, and the income which may hereafter be expected, are so large that I forbear any consideration of what might be done for the improvement of schools of the limited character of those which have been already established in Monmouth. There are ample means of establishing educational institutions in the town of Monmouth to render it a great collegiate centre for the adjacent English and Welsh counties. Not only school buildings, halls for instruction of large numbers of all classes, and in all subjects and kinds of study and exercise may be established, but houses might be erected for the habitation of boarders, from a distance, which may be let to fitting persons, retaining the control in the heads of the college, to secure the moral and physical welfare of the scholars. The inhabitants of every class may at the same time obtain the best teaching that the kingdom can offer at the most moderate rates of payment, which will be far more beneficial to them than the establishment of schools free of payment. It is sufficient, at present, to point out the opportunity which this endowment affords of adopting at Monmouth the most comprehensive scheme of public education which has ever yet been devised; and one which may lead the way to national improvement.

After all has been done that can be effected by means of the best institution that can be established in Monmouth at no distant time, the funds of the endowment will probably far exceed all that needs to be or can be properly expended in its maintenance. It will then be for the Legislature to consider the principles which should be applied to the government of endowments. A cypres system might of course cover the whole of South Wales with free schools and almshouses, but it may be hoped that no such pernicious waste will be permitted. The whole of this Charity might form an experiment and an example for the future. It contains most of the elements which are offered for consideration in such cases, an estate originally devoted to limited purposes, becoming disproportionately large in comparison with its objects, the establishment of a free school at a period when nothing was done by the State for the general education of the people, and provision for a certain number of the aged poor of a small country town, before the Poor Law had come into general operation.

The estate dedicated to these purposes lies in what is in modern times the centre of a vast population, standing as much in need of aid as any in the kingdom, whilst the locality for which the benefit was designed does not greatly differ, or not more than the average of other places, from its original condition. The question to be decided is, whether the exceptional law which sets apart this portion of the soil and property of the kingdom for perpetual uses for youth and age requiring special assistance, shall be administered in a literal and servile compliance with the dictates of a testator who lived two centuries and a half ago, or according to the wants and the judgment of the generation in which we live.

2. Jones' Charity.

William Jones also by Will gave to the parish of Newland, Gloucestershire, for the poor and for the preacher 5,000l. to be paid into the hands of the Company.

The parish of Newland is about six miles from Monmouth, where the other great portion of the founder's Charity is situated.

The decree of the Court of Chancery of the 13th December 1701, adjust the claims of this Charity as against the other investment of the Company, and the Company was thereby charged with 200l. per annum in respect of this gift, and it was thereby further ordered that the Company should set out of their own lands of inheritance, or else purchase as much lands of inheritance as would effectually answer to the said Charity 200l. per annum, and that were not subject to any other charities or incumbrances.

No lands have been purchased, but the Company appropriate 6,666l. 13s. 4d., 3l. per cent. consols, part of the stock belonging to them producing 200l. per annum to meet this charge.

There are 10 almshouses in the parish of Newland with a small garden, together with a house for the lecturer. The buildings are old, having been erected not long after the foundation upon two acres of land purchased in 1617. The Charity was incorporated by the Charter 17 Jas. 1st, and the Haberdashers' Company were thereby appointed governors of the possessions, revenues, and goods of the almshouse of William Jones, in the parish of Newland, in the county of Gloucester."

The governors appoint a lecturer, who is at present the Rev. George Ridout, and who has filled the office more than 50 years. He is also the vicar of the parish. He receives annually a stipend of 69l. 2s. 10d.

There are 16 almspeople consisting of an equal number of men and women. Some of the 10 houses are double, and are inhabited by two men or two women. The almspeople receive 3s. a week each, making altogether 124l. 16s. To this the governors have lately added a donation of five tons of coals, at an expense of about 2l. 15s.

Once in two years the Company give them cloaks and gowns. In 1860, the Company expended in this way 18l. 2s. 4d., and on the visits of the deputation they generally receive 2s. 6d. apiece.

A nurse is occasionally employed for attendance on the people. The expense of this varies from 4l. to 10l., according to circumstances.

The repairs of the almshouses vary from 3l. to 6l. The governors also pay 3l. 15s. a year for insurance.

These charges constantly exceed the liability of 200l. a year.

In 1861, when there were no cloaks and gowns, and no deputation, the payments amounted to 209l. 12s. 10d. (fn. 3)

3. Jones' Charity.

William Jones also by his will gave to the Company 1,440l. for the maintenance of nine poor of the Company, at 8l. a year each.

The Company nominally appropriate 2,400l., 3l. per cent. consols, producing 72l. a year for the payment of nine pensioners, freemen of the Company.

4. Jones' Charity.

William Jones, by his will, gave to the Company a house in Size Lane, which cost 1,000l., and a sum of 600l. to some learned and faithful preacher, to be appointed by the Company.

The endowment of this lectureship, which is called the "Golden Lecture," and is delivered now at the church of St. Margaret, Lothbury, on every Tuesday morning throughout the year, consists of the house devised by the testator, and another house purchased by the Company, partly with the 600l. which he bequeathed.

The estate is—

£s.d.
No. 14, Size Lane, let to George Cox for 21 years from Lady Day 18517500
No. 15, Size Lane, let to Alfred Jones for 21 years, from Lady Day 18515000
No. 16, Size Lane, let to F. Wishton for 21 years from Lady Day 186120000
£32500
£s.d.
Carried over32500
No. 202, Fleet Street, let to James Parrot's executors on a building lease for 61 years from Christmas 18324000
Nos. 7 and 8, Apollo Court, Fleet Street, let to Robert Hanbury for 48½ years from Midsummer 18454000
Easement on Apollo Court, paid by the proprietor of the "Cock" Tavern026
A sum of 26l. 19s. 4d., 3l. per cent. Reduced Annuities, forming part of a larger sum belonging to the Company, part of the produce of a fine0162
£405188

The income of the Charity, deducting the property tax, is paid by the Company to the lecturer, who is appointed by the majority of the court present and voting at the election.

The present lecturer is the Reverend Daniel Moore. (fn. 4)

Kelke's Charity.

A sum of 66l. 13s. 4d. stock is reserved by the Company as applicable to this gift of 50l. to be lent at interest (see Loan Charities), and 1l. a year is paid by the Company to Mr. Temple, the officer of the city, for the use of the prisons. The remaining 1l. is paid to a poor freeman with the Michaelmas gifts.

Loans with Interest

An information was filed by the Attorney-General, at the relation of George Shoobridge, a freeman, against the Haberdashers' Company, which came on to be heard on the 8th June 1835, when the Defendants submitted to be charged with the following sums (i.e.):—

£s.d.
John Hutchinson6800
John Whyte5000
Thomas Bowcher6600
Richard Gourney30000
William Bower20000
Dame Mary Ramsay15000
Mary Monox15000
Giles Crowch4000
Catherine Hall5000
John Hewes37100
Clement Kelke5000
£1,161100

And the other sums (mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry, Vol. 10, page 231) being stated to be lost, the Court charged the Company with the sums so admitted accordingly, and ordered the costs to be taxed, and it was referred to the master to settle a scheme for the future application of so much of the said sum of 1,161l. 10s. as should remain after the payment of the costs.

The Court made an order on further directions of the 27th February 1836, confirming the scheme of the 21st December 1835, which scheme was as follows:—

Scheme.

1. That so much of 1,161l. 10s. mentioned in the decree as shall remain after payment of costs be set apart as a fund to be called the "Loan Fund bearing Interest," and that the management of the said fund, and all matters incidental thereto, be vested in the court of assistants.

2. That 500l., part of said fund, be lent by way of loans to young freemen of the Company in sums of 100l. and upwards, but not exceeding 200l., to each freeman for five years, bearing interest at 5l. per cent. upon bond, with two or three good securities for the repayment, to be approved of by the court of assistants.

3. That the residue of the said fund be lent in sums of 100l. to 200l. to young freemen for five years at interest at 3l. per cent. on bond, with two or three good sureties.

4. That each applicant for the loans shall at the respective times of the same being made give a bond, with two or three sureties, as may be required, whereby they shall become jointly or severally bound to the Company in a penalty of double the amount of the sum borrowed, conditioned for the repayment of the said principal sum within three calendar months from the lending thereof; but the calling in of the said loan is not to be made, nor the said bond put in force, until the expiration of five years from the date thereof, unless it shall be manifest to the Company upon good grounds that any of the obligors or sureties are not responsible or are unable to satisfy the same, in which case it shall be lawful for the said Company to call in the money, and in case of non-payment to put the said bond in force unless the borrower being or continuing solvent can procure another surety or other sureties of substance as the case may require, and the Company shall judge necessary; and in the event of the borrower becoming insolvent, or in distressed circumstances, or in the opinion of the court of assistants unable to discharge the said loan, that then it should be lawful for the Company immediately thenceforth to put the said bond in force against the said borrower and his sureties, or such of them as the said Company shall think fit.

5. That on the death of any borrower before the said five years shall expire the said Company shall call in the money, and in case of non-payment put the said bond in force against his representatives and sureties, and all persons liable thereon.

6. That the respective borrowers shall bear and pay all proper and necessary charges and expenses of and attending the making and executing the bonds and other matters relative thereto.

7. That a book shall be provided and kept by the clerk of the said Company, in which shall be entered the names and residences of the respective borrowers and their sureties, their profession or business, the sums lent, the time for making the loans and when payable, and any other particulars which may be thought necessary.

8. That at the expiration of each and every year of making the said loans, or within 21 days afterwards, the respective borrowers do, if thereunto required by the Company, attend at the common hall of the Company, in order to give an account of the state and circumstances of themselves and of their sureties.

9. That from and immediately after any of the moneys called in shall be received, notice shall be posted up in the common hall of the Company and advertised in two or more of the London daily newspapers of the greatest circulation, that such moneys are ready to be advanced on loans to young freemen of the said Company.

10. That notice of the said funds or such part thereof as are or is now in hand shall be immediately in like manner posted and advertised as ready to be advanced on loan to young freemen of the said Company at such rates of interest as aforesaid.

11. That all reasonable and necessary expenses incidental to the carrying out this scheme (except such as shall be properly chargeable to the borrowers) shall be borne and paid out of the Trust fund, or out of any interest to be made therefrom while in hand, until the same shall be so sent out as aforesaid.

12. That the articles of this scheme shall be printed and put up in the hall of the Company.

13. That the said book shall be open to the inspection of all or any of the members of the said Company at all reasonable times without expense.

The order then proceeded to direct that the interest to be received in respect of such loans should be appropriated to the purposes directed by the several donors.

After the taxation of the costs the sum was reduced to 945l. 10ss. 11d. cash, which was invested to the purchase of 944l. 7s. 3d., 3l. per cent. consols. In obedience to this scheme, the Company, when they had lent the whole of the funds without interest in 1838, published advertisements of the fact that the funds were to be lent at interest, but no application for it on these terms has ever been made, and there has therefore been no occasion to repeat the advertisement.

The benefactions to which the interest was to be applied are, however, provided for by the Company as stated under the head of several donations.

Loans without Interest.

The Commissioners of Inquiry report (Vol. 10, p. 230) the various bequests of sums to be lent gratis by the Company.

They consist of the following, after deducting certain portions which have been lost at different times:—

£s.d.
Nicholas Culverwell6000
William Bond103139
Ann Bressie10000
Robert Offley15000
Elizabeth Taylor5000
Robert Clarke5000
Sir William Romney5000
Lady Romney10000
Sir Richard Fenn5000
Edmond Hammond50000
Martin Bond5000
Adrian Moore5000
William Palmer5000
Edward Skeggs20000
Richard Smith10000
William Whitmore40000
£2,063139

These were the subject of an information by the AttorneyGeneral of the relation of Wm. Shoobridge, a member of the Company against the Haberdashers' Company, and were the subjects of an inquiry before the Master; and a report of the 3rd August 1833, in which the sums given in such trusts were found, and the loss of various portions of them were also found. And by a decree of the ViceChancellor of England of the 29th April 1834, it was declared that the defendants were chargeable with the sum of 1,546l. 13s. 4d., being the amount of gifts received by them after deducting certain losses amounting to 703l. 6s. 8d. And it was ordered that it be referred back to the Master to tax the costs of the suit to be paid out of the said 1,546l. 13s. 4d. And it was ordered that the Master should settle and approve of a proper scheme for the future regulation of the funds.

The Master approved and certified a scheme by his report of 23rd December 1834, and having taxed the costs of the parties, the said fund was reduced to 1,105l. 10s. 10d., and when the subsequent costs were taxed the ultimate residue was 1,028l. 10s. 3d.

The scheme settled as aforesaid for the administration of the residue was as follows:—

Scheme.

1st.—That so much of the said 1,546l. 13s. 4d. mentioned in the said decree as shall remain after payment of the costs of the suit be set apart as a fund to be called the "Loan Fund," and the management of the said fund and all matters incidental thereto be vested in the court of assistants of the said Company for the time being.

2nd.—That the said fund be lent by way of loans to poor freemen of the Company in sums of 100l. and upwards, but not exceeding 300l., for five years without interest upon bond, with two or three good securities for any sum to be approved of by the court of assistants.

3rd.—That each applicant for such loans shall at the respective times of the same being made give a bond with two or three sureties as may be required, whereby they shall become jointly and severally bound to the said Company in a penalty of double the amount of the sum borrowed, conditioned for the repayment of the said principal sum within three calendar months from the lending thereof, but the calling in of the said loan is not to be made, nor the said bond put in force, until the expiration of five years from the date thereof, unless it shall be manifest to the said Company upon good grounds that any of the obligors or sureties are not responsible or are unable to satisfy the same, in which case it shall be lawful for the said Company to call in the money, and in case of nonpayment to put the said bond in force unless the borrower can procure another surety or other sureties of substance, as the case may require, and the Company shall judge necessary; and in the event of the borrower becoming insolvent or in distressed circumstances, or in the opinion of the court of assistants unable to discharge the said loan, that then it shall be lawful for the said Company immediately thenceforth to put the said bond in force against the said borrower and his sureties, or such of them as the said Company shall think fit.

4th.—That on the death of any borrower before the said five years shall expire, the said Company shall call in the money, and in case of non-payment, put the bond in force against his representatives and sureties and all persons liable thereon.

5th.—That the respective borrowers shall bear and pay all proper and necessary charges and expenses attending the making and executing the bonds, and all other matters relative thereto.

6th.—That a book shall be provided and kept by the clerk of the Company, in which shall be entered the names and residences of the respective borrowers and their sureties, their profession or business, the sums lent, the times of making the loans and when payable, and any other particulars which may be thought material or necessary.

7th.—That at the expiration of each and every year of making the said loans, or within 21 days afterwards, the respective borrowers do attend at the common hall of the Company in order to give an account of the state and circumstances of themselves and of their sureties.

8th.—That from and immediately after any of the money called in shall be received, notice shall be posted up in the common hall of the said Company and advertised in two or more of the London daily newspapers of the greatest circulation, that such moneys are ready to be advanced on loans to freemen of the said Company.

9th.—That such part of the said fund as is now in hand, shall be immediately in like manner posted up and advertised as ready to be advanced on loans to freemen of the said Company.

10th.—That all expenses incidental to the carrying this scheme into effect (except as shall be properly charged to the borrowers) shall be borne and paid out of the said trust funds.

11th.—That the articles of this scheme shall be printed and put up in the hall of the Company.

12th.—That the said books shall be open to inspection of all or any of the members of the said Company at all reasonable times without expense.

The Company advertise the loans according to the scheme, and the money now lent is as follows:—

£s.d.
A. Osmond30000
J. K. King30000
George Childs15000

At the end of 1861 there was a balance of 277l. 11s. 5d. The sum had been reduced in the expense of advertising, which of course must ultimately exhaust the fund.

Monox's Charity.

The gift was of a sum of 200l. to be lent out, of which 50l. was lost, and the Company were therefore charged by the Court of Chancery with 150l. (see "Loan Charities") in respect of which they appropriate 150l., 3 per cent. consols, to pay 4l. 10s. a year to four poor widows of freemen at 1l. each, and one widow at 10s. annually at Midsummer.

Morgan's Charity.

Owen Morgan, by will of the 31st March 1604, gave his lands and tenements (subject to certain life estates) to the Company to pay 20l. a year for the relief of the poor of Oswestry.

The Company have still a tenement in White Lion Court, Fleet Street, let at 200l. a year to Messrs. Bohn, on which the rentcharge of 20l. per annum to the poor of Oswestry is charged.

The sum is annually paid without deduction to the churchwardens of that town.

Offley's Charity.

Robert Offley, by will of the 9th April 1596, gave to the Company 200l. to be lent to four young men.

And he also gave 200l. to the Company to pay 10s. each to 20 poor people.

And also 200l. to the Company for founding two scholarships at Oxford and Cambridge of 5l. each.

In respect of the first 200l., the Company are charged with a part of the 1,546l. 13s. 4d. to be lent without interest.

The 200l. the interest of which was to be distributed to the poor (of which 150l. only remained as a loan fund), is administered by the distribution of 10s. each to 20 poor freemen or widows annually at Lady Day; and the interest on the other 200l. having fallen into arrear for a long period previous to the last inquiry, the Company now nominate one exhibitor of 10l. a year, and the corporation of Chester appoint another exhibitioner of 10l. a year, who is paid by the Company. They are both full, the present exhibitioners are E. D. Whitmarsh and W. H. Parry.

The 30l. a year thus paid is nominally attributed as the produce of 1,000l., 3 per cent. consols.

Paradyne's Charity.

Mary Paradyne, by indenture of the 4th September 1629, gave 300l. to the Company, they covenanting to pay 16l. a year as follows:—

£
To four poor preachers10
To the poor of St. Andrew Ward robe, London3
To poor freemen of the Company3

The Company appropriate 533l. 6s. 8d., 3l. per cent. consols, as the source of this 16l. a year, and apply 10l. a year equally amongst four poor preachers, clergymen of the Church of England, chosen annually in January by the four wardens. Three pounds are divided in sums of 15s. each among four poor freemen on St. Thomas' Day, and 3l. paid to the churchwardens of St. Andrew's by the Wardrobe annually.

Peacock's Charity.

Sir Stephen Peacock, by will of the 3rd November 1535, gave to the master and four wardens of the Company, and their successors for ever, lands in St. Sepulchre, Newgate, for the performance of certain obits, with a devise over, in case the same should not be held, to the parish of St. Martin, Ludgate, upon the like conditions.

The charitable gifts, apart from the superstitious uses, amount as follows:—

s.d.
To 12 poor men of the Company120
" poor of St. Martin's, Ludgate134
" clerk and beadle of Company34
" poor prisoners of Newgate and Ludgate two loads of charcoal at 12s. a load
" master and wardens168

The property which under certain sales and re-investments now consists of a house, No. 24, Crutched Friars, with stables in French Horn Yard, let to Mrs. Blackett, and others, at a rent exceeding 100l. a year, has been since the Reformation held absolutely by the Company, subject only to the charitable uses. It is probable that, as between the Crown and the Company, the latter became the purchaser of so much of the property as was subject to the superstitious use under the instruments and Act of Parliament of James 1st, which I have mentioned in my other Reports on the Charities of the City Companies.

£s.d.
This Company pays to the churchwardens of St. Martin, Ludgate0134
To the officers of the Company100
To one poor freeman or widow of a freeman at the Michaelmas distribution0120
The gifts to the prisoners have been increased as the price of coals has advanced. It is to Mr. Temple, the hall keeper at the Guildhall800
£1054 (fn. 5)

Sir Nicholas Rainton's Charity.

Sir Nicholas Rainton, by his will of the 2nd May 1646, bequeathed to the Company two messuages and premises, in the parish of St. Edmond the King, Lombard Street, to pay out of the rents as follows:—

£s.d.
To 25 poor men and widows, 26s. at St. Catherine's tide32100
To the master and wardens500
To the clerk and beadle of the livery1100
To the beadle of the yeomanry and porter0134
To the St. Bartholomew's Hospital1200
To put out poor children apprentice, and to clothe poor people at Lincoln1000
To put out three children apprentice at Enfield1000
To the poor of the parish of Washingboro' and Heighington, Lincolnshire, 5l. 4s. each in bread1080
To the parish officers of said parishes100
To the poor of St. Edmond the King200
To the poor of St. Mary Woolnoth200

And the residue of the said rents for the Company.

The property consists of Nos. 2 and 3, Plough Court, Lombard Street, and No. 37, Lombard Street, still belonging to the Company.

£s.d.
The Company pay annually to 25 poor freemen or freemen's widows of their Company, 1l. 6s. at Midsummer32100
The treasurer of St. Bartholomew's Hospital1200
The treasurer of the municipal charities of the city of Lincoln1000
The churchwardens of the parish of Enfield1000
The rector and churchwardens of Washingboro'-cum-Highington, Lincolnshire1180
The churchwardens of the parish of St. Edmond the King200
The churchwardens of St. Mary Woolchurch200
The master, four wardens, clerk, beadles, and porter of the Haberdashers' Company734
£8714

Dame Mary Ramsay's Charity.

This was a gift of 200l. for loans, of which 50l. appears to have been lost, and for the residue no application is now made under the scheme. The Company, however, nominally appropriate 250l., 3l. per cent. annuities as the capital of the Charity, and pay the dividends, amounting to 7l. 10s. a year, annually to a poor liveryman of the Company. (See "Loan Charities" with interest.)

Lady Romney's Charity.

Dame Rebecca Romney, by indenture of the 4th September 1629, gave 1,200l. to the Company on condition that they should lend out 200l., part thereof, to four young men, and also pay 48l. a year as follows:—

£
To four poor scholars of Cambridge24
To two poor men (6l. apiece)12
To four poor women (3l. apiece)12

In the proceedings before the court on the loan charities to be made gratis, the Company admitted 50l. to be remaining in their hands on account of the 200l. given by Lady Romney on that account, and were charged with such sum of 50l. accordingly as will appear by reference to my statement of the proceedings in that case. The Company adopted the recommendation of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, p. 216), and in consideration of the arrears not applied in respect of exhibitions, have since doubled the amount, and pay annually four exhibitions of 12l. each to students at the Universities, two at Emmanuel College and two at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge.

The exhibitioners are elected by the court of the Company, and hold their exhibitions until they take their degree, but not for a period exceeding four years.

The present exhibitioners are Messrs. Marsh, Crosswell, Williams, and Harper.

The Company also pay two pensions to freemen of the Company of 6l. a year each, and four pensions to freemen's widows of 3l. a year each.

The whole distribution amounts therefore to 72l. a year, for which the Company appropriate nominally 2,400l., 3l. per cent. stock, a part of the fund belonging to them.

Seabrook and Harrison's Gifts.

William Seabrook, by a codicil to his will of the 12th June 1747, gave to the Company 100l. to be invested and to be reserved as a fund to supply the deficiency upon the charities which the Company paid beyond their income.

Sir Thomas Harrison in 1753, gave 50l. for a similar purpose.

The sum of 150l., 3l. per cent. consols, part of the Company's own funds, is attributed to these gifts, and the Company credit themselves with 4l. 10s. "for assisting deficient charities." I do not apprehend that this can be properly regarded as a charity or as anything else than gifts to the Company.

Shingler's Charity.

Thomas Shingler by indenture of the 22nd March 1616, gave the Company 100l., they covenanting to pay 5l. a year as follows:—

£s.d.
To the town of Rugby for bread to the poor and a sermon4150
To the Company's officers050

The Company appropriate nominally 158l. 6s. 8d. stock 3l. per cent. consols, the dividends of which amounting to 4l. 15s., which is paid annually to the rector and churchwardens of Rugby.

Somer's Charity.

Henry Somer, in the 16th century, gave to the Company a tenement in St. Dunstan's-in-the-East, of the yearly value of 3l., for a yearly obit of 30s., for 12s. to 12 poor men of the Company and 2s. to the clerk and beadle.

Nothing is known of the property charged. The Company have appropriated 23l. 6s. 8d., 3l. per cent. consols, of which they give in respect of the dividends, 12s. to one poor freeman at their Michaelmas distribution, and the remaining 2s. to their officers.

Taylor's Charity.

John Taylor, by will of the 13th November 1600, gave to the Company 200l. to be lent to four young men, 50l. each, and each young man should give every Sunday 6d. in bread at the church of St. Stephen, Coleman Street, for the poor of that parish.

The loan fund does not form any part of that with which the Company was charged in the proceedings before the Court of Chancery in the loans with interest.

The Company have, however, continued to charge themselves with the gifts to be made at the church of St. Stephen, Coleman Street. These were increased in 1836 to 5l. 4s. a year, which is paid annually to the churchwardens of the parish. The Company attribute 173l. 6s. 8d. of the 3l. per cent. stock as nominally producing this dividend.

Trotman's Charities.

Throckmorton Trotman, by will of the 30th October 1663, gave to the Company 2,000l. to purchase a 100l. a year to be disposed of as follows:—

£s.d.
For a lecture at Dursley, Gloucestershire1500
For a school in Cripplegate, London8000
For the poor of the Company500

And he gave a further sum of 400l. towards the accomplishing thereof.

It appears that the schoolhouse and master's house, No. 103, Bunhill Row, Cripplegate, and the site, was provided by the Company, at an expense of 923l.

The testator also gave to the Company other 2,000l. to purchase lands of 100l. a year, for the uses following:—

£s.d.
To a Sunday lecturer at St. Giles', Cripplegate2000
To a lecturer on Thursday afternoon, or some other day, at St. Giles', Cripplegate2000
To the clerk and sexton (2l. each)400
To the Company, to give to those who take pains600
To find candles at the time of preaching the lectures400
To the poor of Cripplegate1600
To the poor of Cam, Gloucestershire3000

The Company executed their mortgage of property, including the hall of the Company and other estates belonging to them, formerly called Flying-horse Court, and Staining Lane, and now Gresham Street West (together singularly enough with the premises they had purchased in Bunhill Row for the purposes of the Charity).

The Company, however, nominally appropriate 5,795l., 3 per cent. consols, sufficient to produce annually a dividend of 173l. 17s. for the purposes of this Charity. The sum thus appropriated is thus arrived at—

£s.d.
The original gift of Trotman was4,40000
The expenses of building and establishing the school92300
which being deducted, leaves£3,47700

and that at 5 per cent. would be 173l. 17s., as represented by the amount of capital stock referred to. The Company submit, that in this appropriation they have exceeded the charge they are legally subject to, inasmuch as about 700l. was expended in 1769 in rebuilding the school. This, however, would no doubt be a voluntary payment.

The income of the Charity is—

£s.d.
The dividends of the supposed stock173170
A house in Twister's Alley, Bunhill Row. let to Wm. Lyons on a building lease for 61 years from Christmas 1824 (including 5s. a year for an easement)10150
£184120

The disbursements of the Company on account of this Charity are—

£s.d.
Salary to the master, Mr. J. Bradlaugh6000
Gifts of pence to the scholars, 3d. at each half yearly examination, say126
Stationery and books for the school (1861)15138
Coals3150
Insurance206
Repairs of school and master's house, average for 9 years, say3000
Rates and taxes, say1300
Total annual disbursement in respect of the school125118

I append a copy of the last report made by the schoolmaster of the state of the school, and a copy of the form of application made to the Company for admission to it.

I may also here refer to my report on Trotman's Free School, when it came under my notice in my inquiry into the charities of St. Luke's parish, Middlesex, and which forms part of my report on that occasion.

The Company pay in respect of the gifts of the second branch of the Charity—

£s.d.
Rev. J. L. Turner, lecturer at St. Giles', Cripplegate, appointed by the Company. Under an arrangement with the rector, the lecture is delivered in the church on Sunday afternoon and Thursday evening5000
The churchwardens of the parish of St. Giles1600
Clerk and sexton do.800
The churchwardens of the parish of Cam, Gloucestershire3000
To the curate of the parish of Dursley for a lecture1500
(This has been the subject of a correspondence with the Board, see file, No. 6,045.)
The poor of the Haberdashers' Company in gifts to five poor freemen or widows of 1l. each at the Midsummer distribution500
£12400

The Company also pay in respect of the gift to those of the Company who take pains in the business, a sum of 6l. to their clerk, and they also give to the surveyor a salary of 5l.

The average expenditure on the entire charities founded by Trotman, beyond the annual payment with which the Company can properly be charged, have in the nine years 1852–61 amounted on an average to about 88l. a year. This annual deficiency will in future be somewhat greater, inasmuch as the Company in 1860 increased the salary of the schoolmaster from 50l. to 60l. a year. (fn. 6)

Lady Weld's Benefaction.

Dame Mary Weld, by will of the 12th of February 1623, gave to the Merchant Taylors' Company 2,000l. (if the Merchant Taylors would take the same, or otherwise to such Company as her executors should think fit) to purchase one or so many rectory or rectories, parsonage or parsonages, impropriate, as might therewith be purchased in fee simple; and her will was that to and for every one of the said rectories and parsonages so purchased, the Company should provide a learned and godly minister to preach twice every Sabbath day, and to celebrate Divine service and perform Christian duties and administer the sacrament, and that out of the profits of the said rectories and parsonages, they should pay to every such minister a yearly stipend as they should think fit, not exceeding two-thirds of the whole yearly profits of the said rectory or parsonage; and concerning the residue of the said profits, that they should increase and keep the same until they should have made up thereby and by the increase thereof, together with the residue of the said 2,000l., and the increase thereof remaining in their hands, the full sum of 2,000l.; and the said sum being so made up, the whole clear yearly tithes and profits of such rectories or parsonages should be bestowed upon such minister, to be provided as aforesaid, who should be resident in the parish where such parsonage or rectory should be; and as concerning the said 2,000l. which should be raised as aforesaid, her will was that the Company should, with convenient speed, employ the same in like manner as the first 2,000l., and the same course for buying impropriations and the continual raising of a stock to 2,000l. should for ever be observed unto the world's end.

And the testatrix directed the Company to pay 5 marks yearly to Christ's Hospital, in consideration of their requiring and taking a yearly account of the administration of the fund.

The Merchant Taylors refused to accept the trust, and the Haberdashers' Company obtained it by a decree of the Court of Chancery.

Under a decree of the Commissioners of Charitable Uses, in 1702, the Company was charged with 4,000l. as then unapplied under this gift. Under a decree of the Court of Chancery of the 3rd May 1708, made at the suit of Christ's Hospital, the Company were discharged from all claims in respect of this trust on the terms therein mentioned, and it was proposed and agreed and ordered that the Governors should, out of the children educated at Christ's Hospital, nominate alternately to the impropriations already purchased, and the Company submitted to be charged with 2l. 10s. per cent. per annum for the interest of the floating balance in their hands, towards the accumulating fund.

The Charity still proceeds under this agreement and decree.

The ecclesiastical property acquired at several times under this endowment, is set forth in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (Vol. 10, pp. 214, 215).

1. The Wigston Tithes, and the advowson and right of patronage of the vicarage of Wigston, Leicestershire.

The vicar is the Rev. W. Trollope, who was nominated by Christ's Hospital, and is now absent from his rectory, which is under sequestration. It is valued at 200l., but is considered worth more. There is a residence occupied by the curate, and 90 acres of glebe.

2. Leiston Rectory, a perpetual curacy, Suffolk.—The incumbent is the Rev. C. C. Blathwayt; he was presented by the Company. The living is valued at 435l. without a residence.

3. The Bitteswell Rectory, Leicestershire.—The incumbent is the Rev. G. Monnington; he was presented by the Company. The living is valued at 400l. with a house.

4. The Rectory of Albrighton, Shropshire.—The Rev. W. Woodhouse; was presented by the Company in 1836; valued at 600l. with a house and 36 acres of glebe.

5. The vicarage and tithes of Diseworth, Leicestershire, the Rev. C. F. Cook is the vicar, Mr. Nash was presented by the Hospital, and exchanged with Mr. Cook with the consent of both bodies; valued at 190l. and a house.

6. The Vicarage of Chertsey.—The Rev. Lawrence W. Till; he was presented in 1857 by the Company; valued at 273l. and a house. The house has lately been re-built by the aid of Queen Ann's bounty. It is not supposed now to be worth more than 200l., the surplus fees having gone to district churches.

The great tithes of Chertsey are received by the Company. They are let at 14l. 0s. 6d. since the tithe commutation. This sum is received by the Company and forms what is the accumulating fund under the direction of the will. At the end of the year 1852, there was an accumulating fund amounting to 120l. 15s. 9d., the Company having for several years charged themselves with 2l. 10s. a year in respect of interest, which charge was continued until 1858. Continuing that account up to the end of 1861, the Company charging annually for the disbursements for the chancel, and the annual payment of 3l. 6s. 8d. to Christ's Hospital, and 5l. a year to the clerk, and 5l. incidental expenses, there was a balance of 62l. 13s. 8d. to the credit of the accumulating fund. The fund had been reduced at this time owing to the Company having in 1859 as rectors of Chertsey been called upon to repair the chancel, which involved putting in a new window, which was effected at an expense of 59l. 14s. 6d. In the same year, the Company paid a sum of 10l. 10s. surveyor's charge, for valuing part of the Wigston Glebe, which the Leicester and Hitchin Railway Company had given notice to take. The land was taken, and the purchase money paid into the Court of Chancery. The Company have no knowledge of the amount which has been paid, or the sum it produces. It is probably received by the sequestrators of the living. This does not agree with the accounts for 1861 as rendered to the Charity Commissioners, which erroneously represent a balance of 49l. 1s. against the Charity. This is explained by the Company as having arisen from the omission in the account of the balance on the accumulating fund, when the returns were first made to the Board.

It is obvious that if the whole accumulating fund be made to arise from the 14l. 0s. 6d. a year rectorial tithes of Chertsey, and that this sum is subject to the annual charges of 13l. 6s. 8d., together with the repair of the chancel, the idea of accumulation is delusive.

I have perused the deed of conveyance of the 22nd March 1819, of the tithes and advowson of Chertsey, from Sir John Gibbons and others to the Company, and by that deed, the vendor, Sir John Gibbons, reserves to himself the vault of Sir Joseph Mawby in the chancel of the parish church of Chertsey, but makes the purchasers covenant that notwithstanding this reservation the vendors shall not be liable to repair the chancel, but shall indemnify them therefrom. I apprehend that this is not an absolute indemnity, and at the utmost goes no farther than against the possible effect of the reservation of the vault.

Mrs. Whitmore's Charity.

Mrs. Ann Whitmore, by a codicil to her will of the 21st January 1613, gave to the Company certain messuages in Bishopsgate Street, to pay thereout—

£s.d.
To the poor of St. Edmund the King, for coals500
For gowns, etc., for 10 poor widows1400
To the wardens200

and the residue for the Company.

The Company are still in the possession of the property, No. 18. Bishopsgate Street, on which the Charity is charged.

They pay annually 5l. to the churchwardens of St. Edmund the King, and they apply about 30l. a year (in 1861, 32l. 3s. 4d.) for entire garments for 10 widows of freemen of the Company, together with 2l. to the wardens of the Company.

Whyte's Charity.

This sum of fifty pounds was given by this donor as a Loan Charity, the interest to be given away in charcoal.

The Company admit the possession of the fund in the proceedings before the Court of Chancery, it not being now lent out, as before stated; they attribute 50l., 3 per cent. consols, as representing the gift, and give 1l. 10s. a year to one poor member of the Company, annually in the month of July.

Wynne's Charity.

Richard Wynne, gave to the Company 200l., to pay 5l. a year to the poor of St. Chad's, Shrewsbury, and 5l. a year for apprenticing a freeman's son of the Company. The Company attribute 333l. 6s. 8d., 3 per cent. consols to this Charity, and pay 5l. to the churchwardens of St. Chad, Shrewsbury, annually, and carry 5l. a year over to the apprenticeship fund. There is now a sum of 40l. on this account. It is applied in premiums of 10l. when proper applications occur.

All which I submit to the Board,

Thos. Hare, Inspector of Charities.

3rd June 1864.

Footnotes

1 Edmond Hamond's Charity
File 25445.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners, dated the 7th January 1876, a scheme was established for the regulation and management of the Charity of which the following is a copy.
Haberdashers' Company.
General Charity.—Edmond Hammonds.
H./25,445.
Charity Commission.
In the Matter of Hammond's Charity, created by the will of Edmond Hammond, dated the 25th day of February 1638.
The Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, having considered an application in writing made to them on the 31st day of December 1874, in the matter of the above-mentioned Charity, by
The Master and Wardens of the Fraternity of the Art or Mystery of Haberdashers, in the city of London, being the Trustees of the said Charity acting by John Curtis, Esquire, their Clerk, duly authorised in that behalf.
And it appearing to the said Board, That it is desirable that a Scheme should be established for the future regulation of the said Charity, in manner herein-after mentioned:
And upon notice of the intention of the said Board to make an Order for that purpose, having been given, according to the direction of the said Board, more than one calendar month previously to the date hereof, by advertisement in the "Times" newspaper, on the 20th and 27th days of November and the 4th day of December 1875 respectively, and in the "Guardian" newspaper on the 24th day of November, and the 1st and 8th days of December respectively:
Do hereby order, That the Scheme set forth in the Schedule hereto be approved and established as the Scheme for the future regulation and management of the said Charity.
Schedule.
Scheme for the Regulation and Management of the abovementioned Charity.
Trustees.
1. The master and four wardens of the Fraternity of the Art or Mystery of Haberdashers, in the city of London, usually called "The Haberdashers' Company," shall continue to be the Trustees of the Charity, and shall manage and administer the same, and its endowments, in conformity with the provisions of this Scheme.
Clerk,
2. The Trustees may pay to their clerk, out of the yearly income of the Charity, an annual salary not exceeding 5l. as a remuneration for his services in connection with the administration of the Charity, which shall consist in attending the meetings of the Trustees, keeping the accounts of the Charity, and the minute book of the Trustees and the register of the recipients, receiving the rents and income and making the several payments thereout, keeping a list of the applicants for the benefit of the Charity, and inquiring into and examining their respective characters, and circumstances and carrying on all necessary correspondence relating to the Charity.
Application of income; Annual pensions or sums not more than 20l.
3. The clear yearly income of the Charity, which shall remain after the payment thereout of the clerk's salary and all other necessary and proper outgoings and expenses of management, shall be applied by the Trustees (subject to such reasonable regulations as they shall from time to time prescribe) in the payment of annual pensions or sums of not more than 20l. each to the pensioners herein-after mentioned.
Appoint ments and qualifications of pensioners.
4. The pensioners respectively shall be selected and appointed from time to time by the Trustees assembled at a meeting, and shall be deserving poor persons, liverymen or freemen of the said Company, who from age, ill health, accident, or infirmity shall be unable to maintain themselves by their own exertions, or the widows of such persons with a preference for those who being otherwise qualified as aforesaid shall have become reduced by misfortune from better circumstances.
Special donations.
5. The Trustees shall, however, be at liberty to grant and pay out of the said income unto any person having the qualifications aforesaid, or unto the widow of such person, under circumstances of peculiar misfortune or distress a special donation of not more than 5l., provided that no pensioner shall be eligible as a recipient of any such donation, and that every such recipient shall be selected and appointed by the Trustees assembled at a meeting.
Questions to be referred to Commissioners.
8. If any doubt or question shall arise as to the construction or proper application of any of the provisions of this Scheme, or the management of the Charity, application may be made by the Trustees to the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales for their opinion or advice, which when given shall be conclusive upon all persons claiming under the trust who shall be affected thereby.
Sealed by order of the Board this 7th day of January 1876.
L.S.
Henry M. Vane,
Secretary
2 Roger Jeston's Charity.
By a certificate of the Board of Charity Commissioners, dated 8th December 1876, Company were authorised to take legal proceedings against Mr. D. F. Cooke, for the purpose of restraining him from continuing erection of buildings in Silk Street, London, affecting prejudicially property of the Charity.
3 Jones' Monmouth Charity.
23 July 1861.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date, the Company were authorised to construct certain new roads through a portion of the Trust estate at Hatcham, at a cost not exceeding 530l. to be provided out of surplus income of the Charity.
10 May 1864.
By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were empowered to erect and fit up new schoolroom, chapel, and other buildings for the purposes of the Charity at a cost not exceeding 4,800l., to be provided out of funds arising from accumulations of surplus income.
29 July 1864.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an Agreement was sanctioned for the grant by the Company to Mr. Robert Wallbutton of building leases of 4a. 0r. 4p. of land in Kent Road, Hatcham, for 81 years, at the ultimate annual rent of 200l.
Several orders authorising the grant of leases under the foregoing Agreement were subsequently made by the Board.
20 June 1865.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an Agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. Thomas Letts of building leases of 0a. 1r. 12p. of land in Hatcham, for 81 years, at the ultimate annual rent of 32l., and orders authorising leases thereunder were subsequently made.
25 June 1867.
By four certificates of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to take proceedings against (1) the East London Railway Company for enforcing the completion of the purchase at the sum of 20,500l. of 22a. 3r. 20p. of land, at Hatcham; (2) the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway Company for enforcing the completion of the purchase at the sum of 850l. of 3a. 0r. 26p. of land, at Hatcham; (3) the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway Company for enforcing the payment of 6,500l. assessed as the amount of purchase and compensation money for land taken by them at Hatcham, and for recovering possession of certain additional pieces of land which had been taken by them at the price of 250l.; and (4) the Crystal Palace and South London Junction Railway Company for enforcing the payment of the sum of 4,006l., being the assessed amount of the purchase and compensation money for 11a. 1r. 7p. of land taken by them at Hatcham aforesaid.
7 Apr. 1868.
By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to effect the purchase of the leasehold interest of Mr. Joseph Alfred Hardcastle, in premises at Hatcham aforesaid, at the sum of 4,000l. with such moneys as should be placed at the disposal of the Company for that purpose by the Court of Chancery.
26 June 1868.
By an order of the said Board of this date, the following scheme was established for the future regulation of the Charity:—
Scheme for the Regulation and Management of the above-mentioned Charity.
Governors.
Governors.
1. The Haberdashers' Company, in the City of London, and their successors (herein-after called "The Governors"), shall be the Trustees or Governors of the Charity, subject to and in comformity with the provisions of this scheme.
Clerk and Surveyor.
Clerk and Surveyor.
2. The Governors may appoint and employ a Clerk and Surveyor to the Charity, at reasonable annual salaries to be fixed by them, and to be paid out of the income of the Charity, and may prescribe the duties to be performed by such Clerk and Surveyor respectively.
Buildings.
Insurance, repairs, and expenses of administration.
3. All rates and taxes chargeable upon the Almshouse, School buildings, and Chapel, and the Lecturer's and Masters's residences shall be paid by the Governors out of the income of the Endowment; and the same premises, together with all other houses and buildings belonging to the Charity which the lessees or tenants shall not be bound to insure and repair, shall be insured against fire and maintained and kept in substantial repair by the Governors, and the cost of such insurance and repairs, and the proper expenses attending the management and administration of the Charity and its property, shall be defrayed by the Governors, in the first instance, out of the income.
Visitors.
4. There shall be a body of Visitors who shall have the local superintendence and direction of the affairs of the Charity, subject to and in comformity with the provisions of this scheme. The full number of Visitors shall be twelve. The Vicar of Monmouth and his successors for the time being shall be a Visitor ex officio, and shall be entitled to act in that capacity during his tenure of the Vicarage, upon his signing a memorandum, to be entered in the minute book of the Visitors, signifying his wish to accept the office of Visitor. The other eleven Visitors shall be fit and competent persons, two being resident in the Borough of Monmouth, and the remaining nine within the distance of twenty-five miles from the school-house in Monmouth belonging to the Charity, measured in a straight line upon the Ordnance map, and shall be nominated and appointed from time to time by "The Governors." The present Visitors shall continue to hold the office, subject to the provisions of this scheme.
5. If any Visitor (other than the Vicar of Monmouth) shall become bankrupt or incapacitated to act, or shall cease to be resident as aforesaid, or shall not attend any meeting of the Visitors during a consecutive period of two years, a memorandum or minute to that effect shall in any of such cases be entered in the Minute Book of the Visitors, in pursuance of a resolution of their body, and signed by their Chairman, and such Visitor shall thereupon immediately vacate and cease to hold his office; and thereupon, or upon the death or resignation of any Visitor, a new Visitor, qualified as aforesaid, shall be appointed, by a resolution of the Governors, as soon as conveniently may be after the occurrence of such vacancy.
6. The Visitors shall hold meetings in a room to be provided and appropriated for that purpose in the buildings belonging to the Charity, or in some other convenient place in Monmouth, as often as may be found necessary, and at least in each year, upon some convenient day to be appointed by them from time to time, in the months of March, June, September, and December respectively. One of the Visitors, to be appointed by the Governors as soon as conveniently may be after the establishment of this scheme, shall be the Chairman, and when present shall preside at every meeting of the Visitors. In the absence of the regular Chairman from any meeting, one of the Visitors to be elected by those present, shall act as the Chairman at such meeting; and in the event of the death, resignation, or incapacity of the first or any subsequent Chairman, or upon his ceasing to be a Visitor, another Chairman shall be appointed, in like manner, by the Governors. Four Visitors shall form a quorum at any meeting. Any two Visitors, or their Secretary, at their request, may summon a special meeting, giving ten days' previous notice in writing to each of the other Visitors, and specifying in such notice the object of such meeting.
All matters and questions shall be determined by the majority of the Visitors present at any meeting; and in case of equality of votes, the Chairman shall have a double or casting vote.
The Visitors shall cause proper minutes of their proceedings to be prepared and kept in suitable books to be provided for the purpose. They shall send an authenticated copy thereof half-yearly to the Governors.
Secretary and expenses of Visitors.
7. The Visitors shall be at liberty, from time to time, to appoint a Secretary for their assistance in the performance of their duties, at a yearly salary, to be fixed by them with the approval of the Governors. The Secretary's salary, and all other reasonable and proper charges and expenses of the Visitors incidental to the discharge of their duties, shall be paid by the Governors out of the income of the Charity. The Lecturer may, if the Visitors so think fit, be appointed to the office of Secretary. The Secretary may be removed at any time by the Visitors; who may also fix and pre scribe, from time to time, the duties to be performed by him.
The Almshouses.
8. The Almshouse buildings belonging to the Charity shall be appropriated and used for the occupation of twenty almspeople, ten of whom shall be men and ten women, being respectively poor single persons of good character, widows, or never having been married, who shall have resided in the town or borough of Monmouth, without having received any parochial relief during the period of not less than two years next preceding the time of their appointment, and who from age, ill-health, accident, or infirmity, shall be unable to maintain themselves by their own exertions, with a preference for those persons who, being otherwise qualified as aforesaid, shall have become reduced by misfortune from better circumstances. For want of a sufficient number of duly qualified candidates resident in the town or borough of Monmouth, residents (having the like qualifications) in the county of Monmouth, shall be eligible for appointment.
9. There shall be paid to each alms-person out of the income of the Charity such a weekly sum being not less than 8s., and not more than 12s., as shall be fixed and determined from time to time by the Governors; and each alms-person, in addition to such weekly stipend, shall be provided by the Governors with two tons of coal annually, and with a cloth cloak and escutcheon or badge (such as has been heretofore worn) at Christmas in every alternate year. The cloak of each alms-person, with the escutcheon or badge worn thereon, shall however remain the property of the Governors, and shall be delivered to the successor of such alms-person upon his or her appointment.
10. Within the period of three calendar months from the occurrence of every vacancy in the Almshouses, the Visitors shall elect a duly qualified person to fill such vacancy, at a special meeting to be held for the purpose; and shall cause every such election to be forthwith notified to the Governors for approval and confirmation, without which the same shall not be complete. In default of such election being so made and notified by the Visitors to the Governors before the expiration of three calendar months after the occurrence of a vacancy in the Almshouses, the appointment shall, for that occasion, be made by the Governors.
11. No election shall be made by the Visitors to fill a vacancy in the Almshouses until a notice of such vacancy, specifying the qualification required from candidates, shall have been affixed to or near the principal outer door or entrance-gate of the Chapel, and of the Parish Church of Monmouth respectively, for the period of fifteen days at the least, which notice shall be given in every case before the expiration of one calendar month from the occurrence of the vacancy.
12. A book shall be provided and kept under the direction of the Visitors, in which shall be entered the names, ages, and descriptions of all persons appointed to the Almshouses, together with the dates of their respective appointments, and the date and occasion of every vacancy.
13. Applications for admission to the Almshouse, shall be made to the Visitors or to their Secretary, in writing; and every applicant must be prepared with sufficient testimonials and other evidence of his or her qualification for the appointment.
14. The Visitors may, if they so think fit, provide a nurse or nurses for the almspeople or any of them, in case of illness or infirmity, and they may also appoint a Medical Officer to attend upon the almspeople and to supply them with medicines and such medical appliances as may be necessary, at a yearly salary not exceeding 30l.; such salary to include the cost of such medicines and appliances, and such salary and the remuneration to be assigned by the Visitors to any nurses shall be provided and paid by the Governors out of the income of the Charity. In case of emergency the appointment of a nurse may be made temporarily by the Lecturer until a meeting of the Visitors shall be held, at which such appointment may be confirmed or otherwise.
15. No alms-person shall be absent from the Almshouse for a period exceeding 24 hours, without the consent in writing of the Lecturer, or of some one of the Visitors, but in special cases such consent may for any sufficient reason be given retrospectively after the absence has occurred.
16. The Almspeople shall attend Divine Service together in the Chapel of the establishment, once at least on every Sunday, and on every Good Friday and Christmas Day, unless prevented by illness or infirmity, or some other sufficient cause to be approved by the Lecturer.
17. If any alms-person shall be guilty of insobriety, insubordination, breach of rules, or immoral or unbecoming conduct, or shall in the opinion of the Visitors, from any cause become disqualified from retaining his or her appointment, or if in any case it should appear that any alms-person has been appointed without having the required qualifications, the Visitors, upon proof thereof to their satisfaction, may remove such alms-person, and take possession of the house or tenement occupied by him or her, and may proceed to elect another alms-person in his or her place; or in any such case (except that of disqualification) the Visitors may, if they so think fit, direct that the payment of the stipend of such alms-person shall be suspended, either wholly or in part, during such time as they shall think fit and expedient.
18. No alms-person shall be permitted to let or part with the possession of the room or rooms allotted to him or her, or to suffer any stranger to occupy the same, or any part thereof.
The Lecturer.
19. There shall be a Lecturer for the purposes of the Charity, who shall be appointed as often as there may be occasion by the Governors, and who shall be a graduate of Oxford or Cambridge, and a clergyman in priest's orders of the established Church.
20. Every future Lecturer, previous to entering into Office, shall be required to sign a declaration to be entered in the Minute Book of the Visitors in the following terms, viz.:—
"I, A.B., declare that I will always discharge to the best of my abilities the duties of Lecturer of Jones' Monmouth Charity, and that in case I am removed by the Governors I will thereupon relinquish all claim to the office and its future emolument, and will deliver up possession of the Chapel of the Official Residence to the Governors as they shall direct; and also that it shall be lawful for them to take possession of the Chapel and my Official Residence and of all property of the Charity held by me, without ejectment or process of law."
21. The duty of the Lecturer shall be to perform Divine Service in the Chapel of the establishment twice on Sunday, Good Friday, and Christmas Day, and once at least on every Ash Wednesday and Ascension Day, and to administer the sacrament of the Lord's Supper in the Chapel to the alms-people and others, six times at least in each year; to afford religious consolation to the almspeople upon all fitting occasions; to visit and inspect the rooms and domestic arrangements of the alms-people weekly, or at such intervals or times as may be directed by the Visitors; and to report in writing to the Visitors all matters connected with the Almshouses or alms-people which may require correction or notice, which Report shall be entered upon their Minutes.
22. A yearly stipend of 200l. shall be paid to the Lecturer by equal half-yearly payments out of the income of the Charity, and he shall also have the use and enjoyment, rent-free, of the Official Residence to be provided for him by the Governors, which shall be maintained in substantial repair at the cost of the Charity. The Lecturer shall continually reside in and occupy his Official Residence, and shall not let or permit any other person, not being a member of his own family, to reside in or occupy the same or any part thereof, and he shall not accept or hold any other office or appointment (except that of Secretary to the Visitors), or absent himself from his residence for more than six weeks, continuously or incontinuously, during any one year, except with the express permission of the Governors.
23. The Lecturer may be removed at any time from his Office by the Governors, either upon representation made to them by the Visitors or otherwise, for neglect or breach of duty, legal incapacity or unbecoming conduct, or any other sufficient cause, of which the Governors shall be the sole and final Judges.
The Schools.
Upper and Lower Schools.
24. The School belonging to the Charity shall be separated into two branches or divisions consisting of "The Upper or Classical School," and "The Lower or Commercial School."
Head Master.
25. There shall be a Head Master, who, subject to the superior authority of the Governors and Visitors, shall have the general superintendence and control of both branches of the School, and the Masters and Teachers thereof, and shall be responsible for the conduct of the entire School.
Lower Master.
26. There shall also be a "Lower Master," who shall have the immediate conduct of the Lower or Commercial School, subject to the superintendence of the Head Master, and to the authority of the Governors and Visitors,
Qualification of Head and Lower Masters.
27. The "Head Master" and the "Lower Master" shall be members of the Church of England, and competent to discharge the duties required of them respectively by this scheme. The Head Master shall be a graduate of one of the English Universities, or of the University of Dublin. The Lower Master shall either be such a graduate, or shall hold a certificate of competency from the Committee of Council on education.
Declaration to be signed by Masters on appointment.
28. Every future Head Master and Lower Master, previously to entering into office, shall be required to sign a declaration to be entered in the Minute Book of the Visitors, in the following terms:—
"I, A.B., declare that I will always discharge to the best of my ability the duties of Head Master (or Lower Master) of Jones's endowed School at Monmouth, and that in case I shall be removed by the Governors, I will thereupon relinquish all claim to the Office and its future emolument, and will deliver up possession of the School and Official Residence (if any) to the Governors as they shall direct; and also that it shall be lawful for them, if occasion shall be, to take possession of the School building and my Official Residence (if any), and of all property of the Charity held by me, without ejectment or process of law."
Appointment and removal of Head and Lower Masters.
29. The appointment of the Head Master and the Lower Master respectively shall rest with the Governors, who, in every case, shall give reasonable public notice by advertisement in the local and University newspapers, or by other sufficient means, before making the appointment, inviting all persons who may wish to be Candidates to apply and send testimonials of their qualification. The Head Master and Lower Master respectively shall be removed by the Governors, upon any representation addressed to them by the Visitors, in pursuance of a resolution adopted at a meeting of the Visitors by not less than two-thirds of the entire number of Visitors for the time being, stating that in the judgment of the Visitors the removal of such Master has become necessary or desirable in the interest of the Schools. The Visitors shall, however, in every such case, cause a copy of such resolution, authenticated by the signature of their Secretary or of the Chairman of the meeting, to be delivered or sent to the Master affected thereby; and no Master shall be removed under the aforesaid provisions (except for some specific misconduct inquired into and established to the satisfaction of the Visitors), until after the expiration of six calendar months after the delivery or transmission to him of the said copy of the said resolution. The Governors shall also have the power of removing any Master if they shall so think fit, without any such representation from the Visitors, for any reasonable cause to be judged of and determined by the Governors.
Residence &c., of Masters
30. The Head Master and Lower Master respectively shall be required to reside constantly in their respective Official School residences, except during the vacations; and they shall not be at liberty to let or part with the possession of their said residences; and they shall personally instruct the Scholars free of any charge, except as herein-after mentioned; and shall devote their whole time and attention to the duties of their respective offices (except as after mentioned).
Neither the Head Master nor the Lower Master shall be at liberty to hold any ecclesiastical benefice with cure of souls, or, except with the permission of the Governors, any other office of emolument during their respective tenure of office.
Assistant Masters.
31. The Head Master, with the consent and approval of the Visitors, may, from time to time, appoint any Assistant Masters or Teachers, as may be found necessary for the conduct of either branch of the School, but the scale of salaries to be paid to such Assistant Masters and Teachers respectively out of the income of the Charity shall, in the first instance, be submitted to and approved by the Governors. Every such Assistant Master and Teacher may be at any time removed by the Head Master, with the consent of the Visitors.
Admission to School.
32. So far as the extent of accommodation will admit, and subject to the control of the Visitors, and to such regulations as they shall from time to time prescribe for testing the proficiency of candidates for admission in subjects of primary or elementary knowledge, the School shall be open, as to each of its branches, for the reception and instruction of boys between the ages of 8 and 16 years applying for admission, and not suffering from any infectious disorder; but no boy shall be entitled to remain at the School after he shall have completed the age of 18 years, without the permission of the Visitors, to be given after consulting the Head Master.
33. The Upper or Classical School shall be open to applicants from any part of England or Wales, preference being given between Candidates, in other respects equally eligible, to those born or whose parents or guardians reside within the Town or Borough of Monmouth.
The Lower or Commercial School shall be open to applicants born, or whose parents or guardians reside within the Town or Borough of Monmouth, or one of the Counties of Monmouth, Hereford, and Gloucester, preference being given between candidates, in other respects equally eligible, to those of the said Town or Borough.
34. All applications for admission to either branch of the School shall be made to the Head Master, who shall cause a Register to be kept of such applications and also of the Scholars in each branch of the School, specifying their respective names and ages and the places of residence and descriptions of their Parents, and the dates of their admissions.
Suspension or expulsion of Scholars.
35. Any Scholar guilty of insubordination or other misconduct, whether in or out of School hours, may be suspended by the Head Master, but every such suspension shall be forthwith reported by the Head Master, together with a statement or explanation of the circumstances attending the same, to the visitors, who may thereupon expel or continue the suspension of such Scholar.
Instruction.
36. The subjects to be taught in the Upper or Classical School, shall comprise the Greek and Latin languages, mathematics, algebra, arithmetic, practical geometry and surveying, English grammar and literature, history, geography, and writing, the French and German languages, and drawing.
The subjects to be taught in the Lower or Commercial School shall comprise reading, writing, spelling, English grammar, arithmetic, elementary mathematics, bookkeeping, land mensuration, general history and geography, French, and the elements of Latin; and in both Schools the Elements of Natural Philosophy and the Physical Sciences. Instruction may also be given in each branch of the School in such other subjects as the Visitors after due consultation with the Head Master shall from time to time determine and direct. In addition to the foregoing subjects, religious instruction shall likewise be given to the Scholars in each branch of the School, according to the principles and doctrines of the Church of England; and they shall be required to attend Divine Service in the chapel attached to the Schools, accompanied by the Masters, regularly on Sundays, and on such other days as the Visitors may direct or approve, except such of them as shall reside in another parish than Monmouth who may be allowed by the Head Master to attend their Parish Church with their parents or friends. But no Scholar shall be compelled to receive instruction in the peculiar doctrines or principles of the Church of England, or to attend Divine Service in the Chapel, whose Parents and next friends shall declare in writing that they entertain conscientious objections thereto.
Capitation Fees.
37. Every boy admitted to the School after the establishment of this scheme (including those boarding with the Masters) shall be required to pay capitation fees, to be fixed from time to time by the Visitors, according to the following scale, namely,—
In the Upper or Classical School, a sum of not less than 25s. or more than 40s. per quarter.
In the Lower or Commercial School, a sum of not less than 5s. or more than 20s. per quarter.
The Visitors shall, however, be at liberty to remit the same capitation payments, either wholly or in part, in special cases, upon the ground of the poverty of any boy or his parents, or as a reward for merit, or for any other sufficient cause; but the Governors shall cause the amounts payable to the Head and Lower Masters out of any fees so to be remitted to be made good to such Masters out of the income of the endowment.
Application of Capitation Payments.
38. The capitation fees shall be paid in advance quarterly by each Scholar or his parents or friends, as the Visitors shall direct; and the Visitors shall cause an exact account to be kept of the same payments, distinguishing those received from the Scholars in each branch of the School, and they shall cause one-half of the amount of all such capitation payments received from Scholars in the Upper School to be paid to the Head Master, and onehalf of the amount of all such payments received from Scholars in the Lower School to be paid to the Lower Master, in augmentation of their respective salaries, and the remainder of such payments shall be appropriated as part of the general income of the Charity.
Boarders.
39. The Head Master and Lower Master, and the Assistant Masters and Teachers, may, with the approval of the Visitors, and subject to such regulations as may be prescribed by them, receive boys in their respective residences as boarders, who may be placed for instruction in either branch of the School in common with the other boys in all respects.
Arrangements may also be made by the Head and Lower Masters, respectively, or by any Assistant Master or Teacher, subject to the approval of the Visitors, for receiving boys attending the School as day boarders.
40. Subject to the control and regulation of the Visitors, and with their license, which may be at any time suspended or revoked by them, houses may also be established and opened in Monmouth, or the immediate vicinity, in which boys attending either branch of the School may be placed and received as boarders upon such terms as shall be sanctioned or approved by the Visitors. Provided that every such boarding house shall be open to the visitation and inspection, at all reasonable times, of every Visitor, and of the Head Master of the School. Every boy attending the School who shall not reside with his parents, or persons standing in loco parentis, or who shall not be a boarder in the residence of the Head or Lower Master, or one of the Assistant Masters or Teachers, shall be placed in a boarding house to be licensed as aforesaid, and shall not be at liberty to reside elsewhere.
Masters' Salaries.
41. The Governors shall cause the following annual salaries and sums to be paid to the Head Master and the Lower Master respectively, by equal half-yearly payments, out of the income of the Charity, viz.:—
To the Head Master, a fixed annual salary of 200l., and a further half-yearly sum of 2l. 10s. for every boy (not being a boarder in his own house) exceeding the number of 40, and not exceeding the number of 100, who shall have bonâ fide attended the Upper School for a period of not less than three calendar months during the then preceding half-year; and
To the Lower Master, a fixed annual salary of 100l., and a further half-yearly sum of 1l. for every boy (not being a boarder in his own house) exceeding the number of 50, and not exceeding the number of 100, who shall have bonâ fide attended the Lower School for a like period.
General Regulation of School.
42. The periods and length of the vacations shall be determined and fixed from time to time by the Visitors, but the course of instruction, the hours of attendance, and occasional holidays, and all other matters of internal arrangement and discipline shall be under the direction of the Head Master,—subject nevertheless to the superior authority and control of the Visitors, in the event of their seeing occasion to exercise the same.
Examinations.
43. An annual examination of the Scholars in each branch of the School shall take place on some day or days in the months of June or July, to be appointed by the Visitors, and communicated by them to the Governors. Such examination shall be conducted by some duly qualified person or persons, being a graduate or graduates of one of the English Universities, to be appointed by the Governors, and to be remunerated out of the income of the Charity; and upon the occasion of every such examination suitable prizes may be provided, which shall be distributed by the Chairman of the Visitors amongst the Scholars who shall be adjudged to be the most deserving thereof, according to the report of the Examiner and of the Head Master, who shall certify to their respective merits in point of conduct and character.
The salaries paid to the Head and Lower Masters before the establishment of this scheme shall, however, continue to be paid to them for three years afterwards, in lieu of the above-named fixed annual salaries of 200l. and 100l. respectively.
Exhibitions.
44. The Governors, whenever the income and other circumstances of the School shall in their judgment render it proper or expedient, may establish and pay out of the income of the Charity, any number of Exhibitions not exceeding four at any one time, and not exceeding the annual amount of 60l. each, which, when vacant, shall be open to the competition of all boys in the Upper School at the annual examination, and shall be awarded to the boys who shall be adjudged by the Examiner and certified by the Head Master to be the most deserving candidates, having regard to the result of the said examination and to their general character and conduct; but no boy shall be eligible for any such Exhibition who shall not have bonâ fide attended the Upper School for a period of two years at least immediately preceding the election. Every Exhibition shall be tenable for four years, or for any less period to be determined from time to time by the Governors, after consultation with the Visitors, provided that the holder shall continue to be resident for the purposes of instruction at one of the English Universities, or at St. David's College, Lampeter, or to be a bonâ fide student of some learned or scientific profession, or of the fine arts, with a view to the professional practice thereof, and shall continue to conduct himself with propriety, and to the satisfaction of the Governors, who shall be at liberty to suspend or wholly withdraw the payment of any Exhibition, for any cause which shall in their judgment be reasonable and sufficient. No Exhibition shall be awarded, unless there shall be a Candidate sufficiently qualified, according to the Report of the Examiner and the Head Master, to receive the same.
Scholarships.
45. The Governors may also, if they so think fit, establish and pay four Scholarships—two in the Upper School of the annual amount of 15l. each, and two in the Lower School of the annual amount of 10l. each—which, when vacant, shall be open to the competition at the annual examination of all boys attending the said Schools respectively, subject to such regulations as to the age and standing in the School of the Candidates as shall be prescribed from time to time by the Visitors after consultation with the Head Master, and shall be awarded to the most deserving Candidates accordingly, in the same manner as is herein-before provided with reference to the Exhibitions aforesaid; and that every such Scholarship shall be tenable for a period not exceeding three years, if the holder shall so long continue at the School, and shall conduct himself to the satisfaction of the Head Master, but not otherwise.
Foundation Scholars in Upper School.
46. There may also be eight Foundation Scholars in the Upper School, who shall be elected at the annual examination from boys in the Lower School offering themselves for such election, who shall be adjudged by the Examiner to be deserving thereof: Provided that not more than two such Scholars shall be so elected at any one time. The Foundation Scholars to be so elected shall be admitted to the Upper School, and shall be entitled to receive all instruction therein, and to enjoy the other benefits thereof, without being liable to any capitation fee or other payment; but the amount of the capitation fee which would be otherwise payable to the Head Master under the foregoing provisions for each such Scholar shall be made good to the Head Master by the Governors out of the income.
47. The number and amounts of the said Exhibitions and Scholarships, and the number of the said Foundation Scholars, may be increased by the Governors, with the approval and sanction of the Charity Commissioners.
48. The Visitors may, from time to time, prescribe such reasonable regulations as they may consider expedient for the conduct and management of the Almshouses and the Inmates and Officers thereof, and also of the School, the Scholars, and the Masters; provided that no such regulation be at variance or inconsistent with any of the provisions of this scheme, and that all such regulations be previously submitted to the Governors for approval and confirmation, without which the same shall not be complete or binding.
49. All books and stationery required for the use of the boys in the School shall be provided by or at the expense of their parents or friends, except that the Governors may, if they so think fit, cause the costs of such books and stationery required for the Foundation Scholars to be paid out of the income of the Charity.
50. The Governors shall be at liberty to pay out of the income of the Charity any annual sums not exceeding 10l. for the establishment and maintenance of a School Library which shall be under the control and regulation of the Head Master.
51. This scheme shall be printed, and a copy thereof shall be given to every Visitor and Master upon his appointment.
2 Jan. 1869.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. Henry L. Holloway of building leases for 81 years from 25th December 1868 of 3a. 0r. 24p. of land at Queen's Road, Hatcham, aforesaid, at the ultimate annual rent of 130l., and orders authorising leases thereunder were subsequently made.
30 July 1869.
By an opinion of the Board of this date, the Company were authorised to effect an arrangement with the lecturer for the relinquishment of his official residence, upon the payment to him of the present sum of 125l. and the future yearly sum of 100l.
29 Jan. 1870.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Joseph Wm. Windred of building leases of land on the north side of and having a frontage of 500 feet to Hatcham Park Road, Hatcham aforesaid, for the term of 81 years from Christmas 1869, at the ultimate annual rent of 100l., and orders authorising leases thereunder were subsequently made.
25 Apr. 1873.
By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to sell to the Kent Waterworks Company a piece of land containing 1 acre, part of Hatcham Manor Estate at New Cross, on the south side of the road leading from London to Greenwich, for the sum of 1,000l., subject to the terms of an agreement dated 2nd August 1872.
9 Dec. 1873.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. Joseph Windred of a building lease for the term of 81 years, from Midsummer 1873, of land having a frontage of 55 feet to Five Bells Lane, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 6l., and an order authorising a lease of Nos. 13, 14, 15, and 16, Five Bells Lane aforesaid, was subsequently made under such agreement.
9 Dec. 1873.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. J. W. Windred of building leases for 81 years, from Midsummer 1873, of land having a frontage of 96 feet to an intended new road at Hatcham aforesaid, to be called Brocklehurst Road, at the ultimate annual rent of 18l., and orders authorising leases thereunder were subsequently made.
14 July 1874.
By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to construct a new road through part of Hatcham Manor Estate (in continuation of road authorised to be constructed by order of 23rd July 1861) at a cost not exceeding 2,278l., to be provided by realisation of several sums of stock therein mentioned, subject to a proviso for the replacement of the amount to be so realised within 10 years out of the income of the Charity, and such replacement is in progress by means of periodical remittances to the banking account of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
27 Oct. 1874.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. John Anderson of building leases for 81 years of land in Cold Blow Lane, New Cross, at the ultimate annual rent of 27l. 4s.
19 Feb. 1875.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. J. W. Windred of building leases for 81 years, from Christmas 1874, of land having a frontage of 96 feet to Brocklehurst Road, New Cross, at the ultimate annual rent of 18l.
23 July 1875.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. J. W. Windred of building leases for 81 years of land having a frontage of 204 feet 6 inches to North Road, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 36l.
23 July 1875.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. George Simmonds of building leases for 81 years of three pieces of land having frontages of 90 feet, 125 feet, and 50 feet respectively, to New Cross Road, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 95l.
23 July 1875.
By an order of the said Board of this date an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. Daniel Petty of building leases for 81 years of land having a frontage of 275 feet to Billington Street, New Cross Road, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 63l.
(N.B.—The foregoing agreements to Messrs. G. Simmonds and Daniel Petty were modified by subsequent orders of the Board, dated 22nd March 1878.)
11 Jan. 1876
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. John Anderson of a building lease for 81 years, of land on the south-east side of and having a frontage of 102 feet to Brocklehurst Street, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 18l.
By orders of the said Board of the following dates, the under-mentioned several agreements were sanctioned for the grant of building leases for 81 years, of portions of the Hatcham Park Estate:—
17 Nov. 1876.
£s.d.
1. To Mr. John Anderson, at the ultimate rent of5200
2. " " Edward Davidson do.8200
3. " " George Simmonds do.5500
4. " " Frederick John Oldman do.8000
5. " " Wm. James Humphries do.272100
6. " " Hy. Foale Edwards do.10000
10 July 1877.
1. " " John Anderson do.40100
2. " " Edward Davidson do.91160
3. " " John Wheeker do.5776
4. " " Fredk. John Oldman do.6500
5. " " George Simmonds do.4500
24 July 1877.
1. " " Wm. Stotesbury do.9026
2. " " Wm. James Humphries do.3486
24 July 1877.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned of the grant to Messrs. Croaker and Searle of a building lease for 81 years, of portions of the Hatcham Manor Estate, at the ultimate annual rent of 316l.
2 July 1878.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. William Walker of building leases for 81 years, of five plots of land, containing 14 acres, on the south side of Queen's Road, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 680l.
7 Oct. 1879.
By orders of the said Board of this date, the undermentioned several agreements were sanctioned for the grant of building leases for 81 years, of portions of the Hatcham Park Estate:—
£s.d.
1. To Mr. Henry Foale Edwards, at the ultimate annual rent of10800
2. " " James Humphries do.3600
3. " " Edward Davidson do.6000
4. " " George Simmonds do.7800
5. " " Fredk. John Oldman do.9600
6. " " John Anderson do.7430
7. " " John Wheeker do.9900
2 Dec. 1879.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. H. J. Searle of a building lease for 81 years from Christmas 1879, of a plot of land containing 2 roods 24 perches, on the south side of Queen's Road, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 52l. 5s.
10 Feb. 1880.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. Henry John Searle of a building lease for 81 years, of property on the east side of Pepys' Road, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 57l. 15s., the lessee undertaking to expend 5,000l. in building.
16 July 1880.
By an order of the said Board of this date (endorsed on deed), the Company were authorised to effect an exchange with the London, Chatham, and Dover Railway Company of 300 square feet of land at Nunhead, for 6,200 feet of land at the same place.
3 May 1881.
By orders of the said Board of this date, the undermentioned several agreements were sanctioned for the grant of building leases for 81 years, of land in Edric Road, portions of the New Cross Estate, containing 3a. 1r. 22p.:—
£s.d.
1. To Mr. Henry Foale Edwards, at the ultimate annual rent of5500
2. " " W. J. Humphries do.9250
3. " " George Simmonds do.5000
4. " " Fredk. John Oldman do.4400
Further orders authorising leases under such agreements were subsequently made.
3 May 1881.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. Samuel Chafen of building leases for 81 years, of part of the New Cross estate, containing 3 roods 36 perches, situate on the west side of Trundley's Lane, at the ultimate annual rent of 45l., the lessee undertaking to erect 21 houses on the property, at a minimum cost of 250l. each.
Orders authorising leases under such agreement were subsequently made.
20 Jan. 1882.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. Wm. Stotesbury of building leases for 81 years, of land on the south side of the Grand Surrey Canal, Hatcham, containing 13a. 1r. 0p., at the ultimate annual rent of 550l., the lessee undertaking to expend 62,500l. in building. Orders authorising leases under such agreement were subsequently made.
21 Apr. 1882.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Messrs. Wm. Henry and Fredk. Croaker, of building leases for the term of 81 years, of land on the east side of Erlanger Road, Hatcham, at the ultimate annual rent of 80l., the lessees undertaking to erect 18 houses at a total cost of about 9,000l.
19 May 1882.
By an order of the said Board of this date, an agreement was sanctioned for the grant to Mr. H. L. Holloway, of building leases for 81 years, of 5 acres of land in Hatcham, part of the Hatcham Manor Estate, at the ultimate annual rent of 400l., the lessee undertaking to erect at least 100 houses at a minimum cost of 300l. per house.
7 Nov. 1882.
By an order of the said Board of this date, the Company were authorised to effect an exchange with Mr. W. H. de Rodes and Mr. W. A. Sanford, of certain small pieces of land at New Cross, adjoining the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway, for the purpose of facilitating intercommunication of roadways.
4 Wm. Jones' Lectureship.
The funds of the Charity having very considerably increased by reason of the sale of house property in the city of London, application was in the year 1870 made to the Board of Charity Commissioners for the transfer of the stock belonging to the Charity to the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds, and the establishment of a suitable scheme.
On the 13th January 1871 the sum of 32,236l. 2s. 2d. Consolidated 3l. per cent. annuities was, pursuant to an order of the Board, dated the 16th December 1870, transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds, in trust for the Charity:—
By a further order of the said Board, dated the 1st August 1871, the following scheme was established for the future regulation and management of the Charity:—
Scheme for the future Regulation and Management of the above-mentioned Charity.
Trustees.
1. The Charity shall be managed and administered by the master and wardens and court of assistants of the Haberdashers' Company, in the city of London, as the trustees thereof, subject to and in accordance with the provisions of the scheme.
Stipend of 400l. per annum to present lecturer.
2. The trustees shall pay to the Rev. Daniel Moor, the present lecturer, out of the yearly income of the Charity, the annual stipend or sum of 400l. so long as he shall continue to hold the office of lecturer and to perform the duties thereof as heretofore.
Payments out of Charity Funds and Income.
3. Subject to and after making sufficient provision for the last-mentioned annual payment, the trustees shall be at liberty to appropriate and apply out of the funds and income of the Charity to and for the purposes herein-after mentioned such sums of money not exceeding the respective amounts herein-after mentioned, as shall be approved and sanctioned by the Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, that is to say,—
For erection of new church and parsonage at Hatcham.
To and for the erection of a church and parsonage house at Hatcham, New Cross, in the county of Surrey, a sum of not more than 9,000l.
For endowment of incumbent of same church.
To and for the endowment of the minister or incumbent of the same church, a yearly sum of not more than 150l.
For completion of All Saints Church, Hatcham.
To and for the completion of All Saints' Church at Hatcham, a sum of not more than 1,500l.
For erection of new church at St. Peter's, Hatcham.
To and for the purchase of a site and the erection of a new church in the Ecclesiastical District of St. Peter, Hoxton, in the county of Middlesex, a sum of not more than 4,000l.
Residue for stipends "Jones' lecturer and Jones' preachers."
4. The residue of the clear yearly income of the said Charity, after payment thereout of all necessary and proper outgoings and expenses of management, shall be applied and expended by the trustees in paying the several sums hereinafter mentioned to the "Jones' Lecturer," and "Jones' Preachers," herein-after also respectively mentioned.
Lecturer and preachers to be appointed by the trustees.
5. The "Jones' Lecturer" and "Jones' Preachers," respectively shall be appointed by the trustees, and shall respectively be clergymen in priests' orders of the Church of England, having the respective qualifications herein-after mentioned.
Qualification of Jones' lecturer.
6. Every person to be appointed to the office of "Jones' Lecturer "shall be the incumbent with the cure of souls of a parish or parochial district, the church whereof shall be situated within the distance of 10 miles from the hall of the Haberdashers' Company, in the city of London, measured in a straight line on the Ordnance map.
Duties.
7. The Jones' Lecturer shall be bound to preach a sermon or lecture once in every month at some church in or near the city of London, to be fixed from time to time by the trustees, with the assent of the incumbent of such church, and upon such days, and with such interval or intervals of recess, as shall from time to time be determined and appointed by the said trustees.
Stipend.
8. The trustees shall pay to the "Jones' Lecturer" during his tenure of office the annual stipend or sum of 150l., by equal half-yearly payments, out of the income of the Charity.
First appointment of Jones' lecturer.
The first appointment to the office of "Jones' Lecturer" shall be made by the trustees as soon as conveniently may be after the avoidance by the said Rev. Daniel Moore of his present office of lecturer under the Charity.
Qualification of Jones' preachers.
10. Every person to be appointed to the office of "Jones' Preacher" shall be the incumbent with cure of souls of a parish or parochial district, the church whereof shall be situated within the distance of five miles from the said hall of the Haberdashers' Company, measured as aforesaid, and the population whereof, according to the last census taken before the appointment, shall number not less than 7,000, but no person shall be eligible for appointment as a "Jones' Preacher" whose annual stipend or emoluments arising from endowment or other certain and fixed sources attached to his incumbency, shall exceed 300l.
First appointment of Jones' preacher.
11. The first appointment to the office of "Jones' Preacher" shall be made by the trustees as soon as conveniently may be after the establishment of this scheme, and the number of such preachers to be appointed shall be determined by the trustees, according to the amount of the available income which shall then be at their disposal for the purpose.
Stipends and number of Jones' preachers.
12. The trustees shall be at liberty to assign and pay to each Jones' preacher, by equal half-yearly payments, out of the annual income of the Charity, a yearly stipend or sum of not less than 60l. or more than 80l., as may from time to time be determined by the trustees, who shall also be at liberty to fix, from time to time, the number of the "Jones' Preachers," according to the amount of income which shall for the time being be available for their remuneration.
Removal and fresh appointment of lecturer and preacher.
13. The trustees shall have full power to deprive any "Jones' Lecturer" or "Jones' Preacher" of his office and the future stipend and emoluments attached to it, or to suspend such lecturer or preacher from the receipt of such stipend or emoluments for omission or neglect of duty, or other good and sufficient cause, to be judged of and determined conclusively by the trustees after a sufficient hearing by them of the case, and upon any such deprivation or upon death or resignation of any such lecturer or preacher, or his ceasing to have the qualifications aforesaid, or becoming incapable to perform the duties of the office (each of which last-mentioned circumstances shall operate to avoid the appointment), to appoint another duly qualified person to fill the vacancy so to be created.
Power to vary stipends.
14. The trustees shall be at liberty, with the sanction of the Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, to vary from time to time the amount of the annual stipends hereby assigned to the "Jones' Lecturer" and "Jones' Preachers" respectively.
Offices of lecturer and preacher not to be held by same person.
15. The offices of "Jones' Lecturer" and Jones' Preacher" shall not be held together by the same person.
Residuary income to be invested.
16. The residue or surplus (if any) of the annual income of the said Charity shall be from time to time invested by the trustees in the Government funds in augmentation of the endowment of the said Charity.
Questions to be referred to Commissioners.
17. If any doubt or question shall arise amongst the trustees as to the construction or proper application of any of the provisions of this scheme or the management of the Charity, application shall be made by them to the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales for their opinion and advice, which when given shall be conclusive.
Report of Mr. Good.
Jones' Lectureship Charity and Jones' Monmouth Charity.—Proposed Church and Parsonage House at Hatcham.
9th November 1878.
Sir,
In submitting my Report to the Board hereon, I wish to mention, with reference to the Chief Commissioner's special instructions which accompanied the order for the inquiry, that I have ascertained from the clerk that neither the Haberdashers' Company, nor any member of it, has any property within or near the proposed district.
I wish also to mention that, at my interview with the master and wardens, I raised the question whether any assistance might be expected to be obtained from other proprietors in the district, or from the inhabitants, now or at some future time, and also whether assistance might not be obtainable from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in aid of the endowment fund and the parsonage house. I also suggested whether, in the event of any difficulty as to the funds, part only of the church—probably the nave—should for the present be proceeded with. It appeared, however, to be the desire of the master and wardens to act independently, and without having recourse to extraneous assistance, at least for the present. It was also their desire that the building should be proceeded with at once in its entirety.
A wish was also expressed by the master that he might be enabled to make arrangements for laying the first stone of the building before going out of office, towards the end of the present month.
Yours faithfully, Wm. Good,
Inspector.
Henry M. Vane, Esq.,
Secretary, &c.
CHARITY COMMISSION.
In the matter of William Jones's Lectureship Charity, The Almshouse and Free Grammar School of William Jones at Monmouth, and the proposed Church and Parsonage House at Hatcham. Haberdashers' Company, Trustees.
Pursuant to the Order of the Board in this matter, dated 9th August 1878, I have inspected the site of the church and parsonage house, intended to be erected at Hatcham by means of funds proposed to be provided by the above-mentioned charities, and I have conferred with the Master and Wardens of the Haberdashers' Company, the trustees of the charities, and with their clerk and architect, upon the subject, and as to the necessity for the erection of a church upon the large scale contemplated; and also with reference to other points which have occurred to me as proper to be brought before the Board in the consideration of this matter.
It will be remembered that the scheme by which William Jones's Lectureship Charity is governed, dated 1st August 1871, provides for the following payments, viz.:—
1. To the present lecturer, an annual stipend of 400l.
2. For the erection of a church and parsonage house at Hatcham, New Cross, a sum of not more than 9,000l.
3. For the endowment of the minister of such church a yearly sum of 150l.
4. For the completion of All Saints' Church, Hatcham, a sum of 1,500l.
5. For the purchase of a site and the erection of a church in the district of St. Peter, Hoxton, a sum of 4,000l.
6. The scheme further provides that the residue of the income of the charity shall be applied to the payment to the Jones's Lecturer (whose stipend is to be reduced to 150l. a year on the next avoidance), and Jones's preachers to be thereafter appointed, as therein directed, and that any surplus shall be invested in augmentation of the endowment of the charity.
The following payments have since been made, out of the funds of the charity, pursuant to the scheme, viz.:—
£
1. Towards the completion of All Saints' Church, Hatcham Park1,500
2. Towards the purchase of a site and the erection thereon of a church for the district of St. Peter, Hoxton4,000
And two "Jones's preachers" have been appointed with stipends of 60l. a year each.
Arrangements have also been made for the formation of a new ecclesiastical district to consist of part of the existing new parish of All Saints, Hatcham Park, in the neighbourhood of a large and increasing population, including part of the locality called "New Cross," mentioned in the scheme, and having Deptford and Greenwich on the north and north-east, Peckham on the west, and Lewisham. Sydenham, and Dulwich on the south-east, south, and south-west.
A large portion of the valuable estate at Hatcham, belonging to Jones' Monmouth Charity, is situated within the proposed district, and is considered to be well suited for building purposes on account of the dryness and healthiness of the locality, the short distance from the City, the convenience of the four railway stations at or near the four corners of the district, and the educational advantages to be obtained from the large schools for boys and girls, connected with Aske's Foundation, which have been recently erected in the district.
The property has been laid out for streets and roads, and numerous applications have been made for portions of the land for building. It contains also a large quantity of excellent brick earth, which is now being worked out.
The district is approved by the Bishop of the diocese, and the boundaries have been settled by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, who will be prepared to submit a scheme for its constitution, for ratification by an Order of the Queen in Council, upon payment of the intended endowment fund.
The population of the district at present is comparatively small, and does not probably exceed 1,500, but it is the deliberate opinion of the trustees' surveyor (Mr. Snooke), who is also the district surveyor, under the Metropolitan Board of Works, that, within a few (about 10) years, the contemplated building operations will have been completed, and the population will be increased to not less than 17,000.
A piece of land has been chosen for the site of the intended church and parsonage house, in a central and elevated part of the district, and nearly adjoining Aske's Schools. It is charity land, and it is intended to be conveyed freely to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for the purpose of the church and parsonage, under the Church Buildings Acts.
The plans of the church, which is intended for the accommodation of 800 persons, have been prepared and approved by the master and wardens, and excavations have already been made for the foundations, and have been filled in with concrete, but the further progress of the works has been suspended for the present.
£
A tender has been accepted by the trustees for the building of the church according to the approved plans for16,000
The estimated cost of the parsonage house is2,500
Architect's commission and expenses, about1,500
(It is probable, I think, that these estimates will be considerably exceeded.)
Total estimated cost£19,000
It has been proposed to postpone for the present the building of part of the tower and spire of the church, and thus to reduce the cost by2,500
£16,500
To provide for the requisite expenditure it is now desired by the trustees to appropriate to these objects, in addition to the sum of 9,000l. authorised by the scheme, the whole residue of Jones's Lectureship Charity Fund, amounting at present to 4,958l., and a sum of 5,250l., belonging to Jones's Monmouth Charities, arising from the sale of about three acres of the charity land at Hatcham to the London and Brighton Railway Company, making together 19,208l., or so much of that sum as may be needed.
A map of the proposed district, showing the charity property within it—and how it is intended to be laid out with streets and roads—and showing also the parts of the land which have been built upon and which have been let or are in course of being let for building purposes—and also the site of the intended church and parsonage house—is submitted herewith; and subjoined are statements showing the financial condition of the charities now proposed to be dealt with; viz.—
Jones's Lectureship Charity.
Sources of Income.Annual Income.
£s.d.£s.d.
Consols with official trustees26,32000789100
New 3l. per cents. in name of master and wardens6,51700195100
3l. per cent. Reduced ditto701002100
Rents of real estate8000
33,538001,08600
Estimated accumulation for 1878 to be invested56000
34,09800
Appropriation of the Charity Funds according to the recent Scheme.
Annual Income.Stock.
To provide for—££
The present lecturer (400l.), and two Jones's preachers (60l. each = 120l.).
Rents of real estate80
Dividends on stock44014,666
520
Church and parsonage at Hatcham9,0009,474
Endowment fund, 150l. per annum5,000
Estimated surplus, applicable by the scheme for more Jones's preachers4,958
34,098
Jones's Monmouth Charity.
Sources of Income.Annual Income.
££
Rents of real estate4,014
Government stock20,812624
Capitation fees428
Ordinary annual income5,066
Ordinary annual expenditure4,288
Surplus778
To meet extraordinary building expenses at Monmouth the trustees have a balance of 11,000l. obtained from the Court of Chancery.
There is also the sum of 5,250l., the proceeds of the sale to the London and Brighton Railway Company, proposed to be applied towards the erection of the intended church and parsonage.
Estimated future amount of the annual rents of the charity property in the district by letting the land for building purposes and likely to be realised within the year, 11,000l.
After full consideration of all the circumstances of the case—and assuming that the projected building operations will be carried out—I am inclined to think that the site of the church and parsonage has been judiciously chosen, and, assuming also that a large population (17,000) will, by reason of such operations, be brought within the district at no distant period, I am further inclined to think that the approved plans are not on too large a scale.
The erection of the church and parsonage house may, I think, be fairly regarded as an essential part of a great and comprehensive building and improvement scheme for the development of the value of the charity property within the district, to the ultimate advantage of the trust, and, looking to the present and probable future financial position of the charities affected by the arrangements, I am disposed to think that the surplus funds of these charities now proposed to be dealt with might properly be applied towards the promotion of such scheme.
The case appears to me to come within the provisions of the Charitable Trusts Act, 16 & 17 Vict. c. 137. sec. 21, and is, I think, deserving of the favourable consideration of the Board.
All which I submit, &c.
Wm. Good,
Inspector.
9th November 1878.
By an order, dated the 9th September 1879, the Board of Charity Commissioners declared their approval of a sum or not more than 1,000l. being appropriated by the Company out of the funds of the Charity towards the cost of certain works which had been commenced in connexion with the erection of a new church for the contemplated new district of St. Catherine, Hatcham.
The sum of 1,000l. was subsequently realised by sale of stock and remitted for the credit of the Company.
5 Sir Stephen Peacock's Charity.
File 13818.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners, dated the 18th May 1866, the Haberdashers' Company were authorised in consideration of the sum of 309l. 5s. (which had been previously transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds in trust for the Charity) to effect the sale of the three above-mentioned yearly sums of 12s., 13s. 4d., and 8l., formerly charged upon the aforesaid property known as 24, Crutched Friars and French Horn Yard.
6 Throckmorton Trotman's Charity.
26 May 1865.
By an order of the Board of Charity Commissioners of this date, made upon the application of the master and four wardens of the Company, a scheme was established directing that in lieu of the two lectures theretofore required to be delivered respectively upon Sunday morning or upon the afternoon of Thursday or some other week day in the parish church of St. Giles' Cripplegate, there should be in future one lecture only every Sunday evening.