Report on the Charities of the Clothworkers' Company
Part II

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

City of London Livery Companies Commission

Year published

1884

Pages

599-614

Citation Show another format:

'Report on the Charities of the Clothworkers' Company: Part II', City of London Livery Companies Commission. Report; Volume 4 (1884), pp. 599-614. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69738 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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PART II.

Lese's Charity.

Samuel Lese, by his will dated the 26th April 1634, after reciting that the parishioners of St. Andrew Holborn, had theretofore recovered of him 40s. yearly for the use of the poor of that parish declared that he was willing to confirm the same, and that the said yearly payment was to issue out of the house near Holborn bridge occupied by Mr. Cox. And he gave the house wherein he then lived near Holborn Bridge together with the said house in the occupation of William Cox and a house in Mutton Lane to the Clothworker's Company. And by a codicil dated 30th April 1639, he desired that his lands, &c. should be bestowed towards the charitable uses following: viz., to be lent to honest young men of the Company and the profits thereof paid to the poor and aged women of the Company, that a sermon should be preached every year, and he gave to his executors and their successors 5s. a piece for ever for their pains.

An information was filed after the last inquiry, in 1833, by the Attorney General at the relation of Thomas Spencer Hall against the Clothworkers' Company, praying that the said charity might be established, and that the property and funds vested in the said Company might be ascertained and that the trusts of the said Samuel Lese might be made available and carried into execution, and that to that end the said real and leasehold estate so derived from the testator and then vested in the said Company might be sold, and that the produce when so realised might be laid out or otherwise disposed of as the Court should think fit, and that in case of need it might be referred to one of the masters to settle a scheme for the application of the funds, so as to effectuate and secure the due performance of the said trusts and purposes for making loans to young men of the said Company and others in case of need with such directions as might be requisite and that an account might be taken from such period as under the circumstances might appear necessary of such part of the said estates so given to the said Company as should have been by the said Company converted or disposed of to their own use and also of the yearly interest upon the same, and also in particular of the increased rent of the said freehold messuage and that all such accounts might be taken as under the circumstances appear requisite.

By the decree on the hearing of the information, made the 24th March 1835, it was ordered that the defendants the Company should continue to apply the yearly rents and profits of the premises devised under the will of Samuel Lese the testator in the pleadings named to and for the benefit of the persons to whom such benefits are thereby given, and according to the trusts and purposes of such will and as the same had been hitherto applied, and the costs of all parties including the costs of the memorial to the attorneygeneral were ordered to be taxed and paid.

The loan portion of the gift was subsequently included in the order of the 31st July 1840 (see Heydon's Charity) made on the petition of Mr. Henry Ball and Mr. Charles Larkins Francis, two members of the Clothworkers' Company, and the fund forms part of the present loan funds.

The payments are as follows:—

£s.d.
To the churchwarden of St. Andrew's, Holborn200
To the chaplain of the Company for a sermon at Saint James' in the Wall at which the Company attend on the 2nd May110
To the master warden and ten assistants attending3150
To printing summonses for 2nd May addressed to all the livery066
To the poor of the Company (in 1858)94133
101159

The distribution is made in pensions and gifts, and forms part of the fund given away as mentioned in my report on Rogers' Charity.

Elizabeth Love's Charity.

Elizabeth Love, by her will dated the 12th March 1805, gave 200l. stock in the Old South Sea Annuities standing in her name, to the governors and trustees of the Clothworkers' Hall, for the benefit of blind persons, subject to the life interest of Jane Clements and Margaret Hebbert therein named. The Company by their resolution of the 18th August 1858 appointed Mr. Orton to act with Christ's Hospital, also legatees under the will to obtain letters of administration de bonis non. On the 24th November 1858, Mr. Orton remitted to the court a cheque for 258l. 16s. 1d. their proportion of the estate of the testatrix. This sum was invested in 269l. 4s. 9d., 3l. per Cent. Reduced Annuities, the income of which is 8l. 1s. 8d. The Company have resolved that the annual dividends deducting 5l. per cent. for management, shall be paid to one blind person to be nominated by the master for the time being annually in the month of May. The nomination is to be annual by a different master and it will not therefore follow that the same person will be chosen a second time. (fn. 1)

Lute's Charity.

John Lute, by his will of the 12th May 1585, devised four messuages in the parish of St. Dionis, Backchurch, a messuage in St. Lawrence, Old Jewry, and a messuage in St. Michael's, Cornhill, to the Clothworkers' Company, and from the profits thereof lend out 200l., 100l. thereof to five young men free of the Company, and the other 100l. to ten honest householders freemen of the Company. And he directed the said Company to pay to some learned man for a sermon on St. Luke's day at the church of St. Michael, Cornhill, 6s. 8d., and to every person of the livery present thereat 4d., and to provide yearly 12 men's gowns and 12 women's gowns, 12 men's shirts and 12 women's smocks, 12 pair of shoes for men and 12 for women on St. Luke's day, six men and six women to be free of the Company, and six men and six women to be of the parish of St. Michael, Cornhill, the master and wardens to have 3s. 4d. each, and the clerks and beadles 3s. 4d. each, and the rest of the yearly profits should remain towards the reparations of the premises and the affairs and relief of the said Company.

After the last inquiry an information was filed in the Court of Chancery by the Attorney-General at the relation of T. S. Hall and Effingham Wilson against the Company defendants praying that the said defendants might answer the premises, and make a full disclosure of all the matters aforesaid. And that an account might be taken of all such sums of money paid by the said Company as ought to have been applied in making such loans as were directed to be made by the said will, and that it might be decreed that such part of the said sum of 200l., as had been lost ought to be made good out of the estate aforesaid. And that the said defendants might be charged with interest on such sums respectively during such time as they should appear to have misapplied or kept the same nonapplied and that if necessary an inquiry might be directed of what the hereditaments and property of the said charity consisted, and the yearly rental thereof, and whether the existing leases were properly made and for the benefit of the said charity, and that if necessary it might be referred to one of the masters to approve of a scheme for the future management of the charity estates, and the application thereof.

The Company by their answer said that the surplus of the said annual rents was given by the said testator towards the charges, affairs, and relief of the said Company of Clothworkers according to the discretion of the said defendants.

By the order of the court made at the hearing of the cause on the 17th July 1833, it was ordered that the defendants, the Clothworkers' Company, should carry to the credit of an account to be opened in the books of the said Company, under the head of John Lute's charity, the principal sum of 200l. so bequeathed by the will of the said John Lute, and also the further sum of 100l. being the amount of 10 years' interest on the said principal sum of 200l., making together 300l., and it was ordered that one moiety of the said sum of 100l. be added by the said defendants to the loans to the five young men free of the Company, and the other moiety to the loans of 10 honest householders free of the Company, and that advertisement of such loans being available should be made as therein mentioned, and without dismissing any portion of the bill, the court ordered that the costs should be taxed and paid by the Company.

It does not distinctly appear by the pleadings or by the order of the court whether any questions with reference to this charity other than the application of the loan fund came under the consideration of the court. The prayer of the information seems to have been framed with the view of avoiding to put forward a case affecting the surplus, and thus to avoid any point of costs if such a case should fail, and yet to entitle the relators to ask for as wide a relief as possible. The defendants raised the question by their answer, but no portion of the bill was dismissed, and it therefore appears to me that the question of the extent of the charitable trust has not been disposed of by the court. Under the decisions which have taken place, it does not, however, appear to me that any case against the Company with reference to the dedication of the surplus could be successfully raised.

The loan fund has been since dealt with under the order of the Court of Chancery of the 31st July 1840 (confirming the master's report of the 21st July 1840) relating to the loan fund. (See Heydon's case.)

The sermon is annually preached on St. Luke's day in St. Michael's Church, Cornhill, and the Company pay to the rector 1l. 1s.

The court proceed in procession with so many of the livery as choose to attend, and every one who attends receives a paper of cakes of the value of 2s., which is not, however, charged to the fund.

The clothing distributed by the Company in respect of this charity in the year 1858 was 93l. 9s. 4d., and is included in the aggregate sum of upwards of 700l. applied in these gifts, as stated in the report on Hobby's Charity.

The premises comprised in the gift are now Nos. 47, 48, 49, 53, and 54, Moorgate Street, paying ground rents amounting together to 718l. a year.

The balance applied by the Company to their own use after the gifts are paid was in 1858 930l. 11s. 11d. (fn. 2)

Lyon's Charity.

Dame Elizabeth Lyon, by her will of the 10th January 1556, gave 40l. to the Company to the intent that the same should be employed in a stock by the Company being out of the livery, whereof every such poor young man to have 20l. a piece for two years upon good sureties, and so from two years to two years, the same stock to be employed unto two poor young men, being out of the livery, for ever without any money to be paid by such young men other than only 10s. to be paid by either of the said young men unto the said Company for a drinking or otherwise to be divided between the said master and wardens. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury on the 21st January 1569, and the sum of 40l. was received by the said Company. This is one of the charities included in the loan fund, administered according to the report of the Master in Chancery. It forms part of the moneys comprised in the schedule to that report.

Machell's Charity.

John Machell, by his will of the 26th July 1558, gave 100l. to the Company, on trust, to deliver out the same to four young men of the Company for three years, to every of the said four young men 25l. a piece, the Company at the time of delivering the said money to take sureties for the repayment thereof at the end of the three years. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury the 10th October 1558, and the said 100l. was paid to the said Company.

This charity is included in the loan funds administered according to the report of the master of the 21st July 1840, referred to under Heydon's Charity. It forms part of the moneys comprised in the schedules to the master's report.

Samuel Middlemore's Charity.

Samuel Middlemore, by will prior to 1647, gave to the Company 800l. to purchase lands of the yearly value of 40l., to provide cloth for 20 gowns, linen for 20 shirts and smocks, 20 pairs of stockings, 20 pairs of shoes for 20 poor aged men and women, four whereof to be of the parish of Saint Clement's, and 16 free of the Company, and further to provide 10 chaldron of coal for 20 poor people; and he willed that only 33l. should be bestowed out of the 40l., and if the 33l. was not sufficient there should be a deduction out of the coals, and he directed that out of the residue of the 40l. should be paid to the preacher at St. Clement's church 13s. 4d. for a sermon, to the two younger wardens 10s. each, to the clerk, 6s. 8d., to the beadle 5s., parish clerk 3s. 4d., and sexton 1s. 8d. Also to the churchwardens of St. Clement's 3l. for coals to the oldest poor people, and 30s. residue of the 40l. to remain to the Company towards charges arising about the said business.

Subsequently to the inquiry of the Commissioners an information was filed by the Attorney-General at the relation of Thomas Spencer Hall against the Clothworkers' Company, praying that by reason of their neglect to invest the sums of 800l. and 100l. in the purchase of real estate in part, and also in not having in any manner set apart or appropriated the same two sums or any specific fund, or securing the said several charitable uses and purposes of the said donors as directed by the said will of said Samuel and John Middlemore respectively, had made default and acted in breach of the said trusts in them in that behalf reposed, and that the said defendants might be decreed to make good to or for the said charitable uses the loss or injury sustained by the said default, and neglect of the said Company in not having made the said investments in land, and that defendants might be compelled to set apart and appropriate some specific real estate, or else some specific public funds or stocks of competent value or amount belonging to and vested in them as part of the general corporate property or stock of the said Company, or otherwise to provide so much so as to yield such yearly income as might appear proper, and so and in such manner that the same might be adequately charged and secured for the future performance of said charitable uses; and, further, to make suitable compensation for the benefit of the said charitable objects for and in respect of the loss sustained by reason of such neglect in not having made such investment in land, and that the said defendants might be decreed to pay to the relators their costs of the suit.

By a decree of the Court made at the hearing of this cause on the 24th March 1835, the defendants, by their counsel submitting to the prayer to be charged with the principal sums of 800l. and 100l., as of the gifts of Samuel Middlemore and John Middlemore respectively, the testators in the pleadings named, and undertaking to pay interest for the same at 5l. per cent. It was ordered that the amount of such interest be thenceforth applied to, and for the purposes declared in the wills of the said Samuel Middlemore and John Middlemore respectively. And that the costs, &c. of the relator and of the defendants, including the memorial to the Attorney-General, to be taxed by the master of the Court in rotation, be paid by the defendants. And it was ordered that the said defendants be at liberty to retain their own costs, and what should be paid for the relator's costs out of the charity funds in question in the cause.

By an order of the Court of the Company of the 14th October 1658, this and Barbara Burnell's Gift were charged upon the lands at Islington. This order does not appear to have been known at the time of the last report, and it would seem to have been lost sight of at the making of the deed of 1734 (vol. 6, page 231).

The sum of 40l. a year is now applied by the Company as follows:—

£s.d.
Carried to the clothing account and distributed with Hobby's Charity3200
To the churchwardens of St. Clement's, East Cheap, for sea coals300
To the Company1100
The rector of St. Clement's, East Cheap110
The warden, clerk of Company, beadle, parish clerk, and sexton and organist290
£4000

In 1853 the sum expended in clothing was 91l. 19s. 5d. including the specific gifts above stated, and John Middlemore's gift of 5l. a year. (fn. 3)

John Middlemore's Gift.

John Middlemore, by his will of 22nd June 1647, gave 100l. to the Company, to be laid out in the purchase of land, 5l. a year for 20 poor members of the Company. This was one of the subjects of the suit instituted by the Attorney-General at the relation of Thomas S. Hall, against the Company stated in the report on Samuel Middlemore's Charity.

The sum of 5l. a year is given away in sums of 5s. a piece to 20 poor recipients of the clothing, which is distributed on the 11th of October as mentioned in Hobby's Charity, when they attend at St. Clement's Church. (fn. 3)

Newnam's Charity.

Thomas Newnam, by his will of the 9th July 1800, gave to the Company 10,000l. Consols, the interest to be disposed of in equal shares among 15 poor blind men and 15 poor blind women. The legacy was subject to 1,000l. legacy duty, and the remainder was transferred, and is still invested in Consols in the name of the Company. The dividends amounting to 270l. a year, are distributed annually amongst 30 blind persons in sums of 2l. 5s. a quarter.

The pensioners are appointed by the members of the Court in rotation; they must, according to the regulation of the Company, be 50 years of age, and have been blind for three years. The applicants are very numerous. (fn. 4)

Ormston's Charity.

Thomas Ormston, by his will of the 24th February 1556, gave 3l. yearly to the churchwardens of St. Bartholomew, Royal Exchange, for bread to the poorest householders every Sunday, and 6l. equally to the three hospitals—Christ's, Bridewell, and St. Bartholomew's. (fn. 5)

Osmotherlaw's Gift.

John Osmotherlaw, by his will of the 1st June 1642, gave to the Company 50s. a year for five poor clothworkers at Christmas. This money is received annually from the Merchant Taylors' Company and distributed with Rogers' gift. (fn. 6)

Dame Anne Packington's Charity.

Dame Anne Packington, by her will of the 24th November, 1559, gave certain lands to trustees of the yearly value of 16l. 16s. 9d. to permit the Clothworkers' Company to receive the rents and distribute 3l. 13s. 4d. among the poor of St. Dunstan's in the West, between the 1st November and 1st February; to distribute 8l. to the poor of the parish where she should be buried (St. Botolph, Aldersgate), viz., 3l. for finding of poor men's children to school, 3l. to be distributed among the poor of that parish from the 1st November to 1st February, to cause a sermon to be preached at St. Dunstan's on the 15th February, and another sermon in St. Botolph, Aldersgate; to distribute unto the poor, in alms, 40s. residue of said 8l., and to each preacher 6s. 8d. over and above the said 40s., and the said Company to retain for themselves the residue of 4l. 10s. 1d. a year.

After the reports of the commissioners of inquiry suggesting doubts as to the actual extent and the due administration of this estate (see vol. 2, page 59, and vol. 8, page 293) an information was filed by the Attorney-General, and a decree and scheme obtained, which is set forth in a further report of the Commissioners of inquiry (vol. 20, pages 260–61), and the substance of which is as follows:—

That the yearly rents should in future be divided into sixteen parts, and be applied by the Company in manner following:—

Four sixteenths thereof to be distributed yearly among the poor inhabitants of St. Dunstan's in the West, between the 1st February and 1st November, as the Company should think necessary.

Eight sixteenths to be distributed yearly among the poor of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, viz., 3/16ths towards the finding of poor men's children of the same parish to school and learning, 3/16ths to be yearly distributed among the poor of the parish between the 1st November and 1st February, and 2/16ths to poor people in alms by the said Company on such days as the sermons should be preached.

That the Company should procure two sermons to be yearly preached on such days and places as the said testatrix had by her will pointed out and should pay to each of such preachers 1l. 1s. for each sermon.

Four sixteenths, after paying the preachers, to be retained by the Company for their use in consideration of their pains and trouble in the execution of the premises and expenses attending the management of the estate and distribution of the said charity.

Preference to be given in the distribution to such persons as had never received parochial relief, and had been the longest without such relief.

That accounts should be kept of the receipts and expenditure of the charity to be audited once a year and signed by the master and wardens.

That the estate of the charity should be distinguished from the land belonging to the Company by bound stones, and that the same should be managed and let to the best advantage by the Company.

Upon a petition of the Clothworkers' Company to the Court of Chancery, heard on the 23rd May 1844, presented under Sir Samuel Romilly's Act, to which petition the Attorney-General and the churchwardens and overseers of both parishes were respondents, it was referred to the master to inquire whether an agreement of the 19th April 1844, with any and what variations should be carried into execution.

The master reports on the 11th April 1845 in favour of the agreement and his report was confirmed by the order of the court of the 25th April 1845.

The terms of this agreement for enfranchisement were carried into effect by a deed dated the 4th August 1846, between the Venerable William Hale Hale, Archdeacon of London, of the first part, the Ecclesiastical Commissioners of the second part, the Copyhold Commissioners of the third part, the master, wardens, and commonalty of the Clothworkers' Company of the fourth part, and Henry Rutt and others, citizens and clothworkers and trustees as therein mentioned, of the fifth part. Reciting the agreement of the 19th April 1844, the master's report of the 11th April 1845, and the order confirming the same: And reciting that in pursuance of the said order the said Company had paid the sum of 32l. 3s. 9d. into the bank in the name of the accountant-general "exparte the account of the Copyhold Commissioners," and that the said Copyhold Commissioners had agreed to the deed: It was witnessed that in consideration of a piece of pasture land surrendered to the said William Hale Hale by the parties of the fifth part, and intended to be forthwith surrendered to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and of the said 32l. 3s. 9d. paid as aforesaid. And also of the sum of 119l. 6s. 3d. to be placed to the account of the Accountant-General "ex parte the Copyhold Commissioners," and which said piece of pasture ground, together with the said sums of 32l. 3s. 9d. and 119l. 6s. 3d., making together 151l. 10s., were the full consideration for the enfranchisement of the pieces of land and hereditaments therein-after described, the said William Hale Hale and the said Ecclesiastical Commissioners bargained, sold, enfranchised, and released to the said parties of the fifth part, all those five messuages or tenements, and also 21 acres 1 rood 11 perches in Islington aforesaid, and also a piece of land of 2 roods 11 perches and 3 other roods lying in another close; and also 1 acre 3 roods of meadow land, to hold the said messuages, lands, and hereditaments unto and to the use of the said parties of the fifth part in trust for the said Clothworkers' Company and their successors for ever.

The houses mentioned in the Report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 20, p. 260) and described there under Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 and let to T. Pearson and others, were taken down by the sanction of an order of the court of the 31st May 1850, whereby it was ordered that the Company should be at liberty to enter into an agreement with Mr. Samuel Rhodes for letting to him for building purposes the same piece of land as now comprised in and demised by the indenture of lease therein referred to, upon the terms and conditions in the proposal and the master's report of the 8th April 1850, with liberty for the Company to execute leases from time to time in conformity with the terms of the agreement. And the master was to settle the draft of the proposed agreement with James Rhodes and of one the leases to be granted thereunder, and the Company were to execute such agreement and leases in conformity therewith.

The agreement, which is dated the 31st July 1850, and made between the Company of the one part and James Rhodes of the other part, recited the order of the court of the 31st May 1850, and the agreement between the Company and James Rhodes to take the Crown field at Islington, containing 4 acres 2 roods 13 perches, and the prebend field, containing 14 acres 0 roods 5 perches, as the same with the general scheme of the said intended buildings were delineated on a map thereon with the easements and appurtenances for 90 years from Michaelmas 1846 at an aggregate rent of 800l. a year distributable as thereinafter mentioned, with such additional rent or payment in respect of sewerage, and otherwise as therein mentioned with such stipulations touching roads, ways, and buildings as therein mentioned. That the said James Rhodes was already in possession of the premises under a previous lease therein mentioned (but then cancelled) and that the master had approved of the now stating agreement. And the said James Rhodes thereby covenanted with the Company to construct the roads, drains, &c., as therein mentioned and within two years from Midsummer 1850, to build 30 houses, and within the then seven following years, 10 additional houses in each year, in the five then next succeeding years 40 additional houses in each year, and in the then next succeeding year 43 additional houses, making a total of 343 houses, which said houses should not be less than third and fourth rate houses, and contain not less than six or eight rooms each, but with power to diminish the number of houses proportionately if any of such houses were built of a higher rate according to the certificate of the surveyor, and that the said James Rhodes should be at liberty to dig brick earth and remove certain old buildings, and that they would grant to the said James Rhodes such sufficient leases not exceeding 20 in the whole as therein mentioned at such apportioned rents as would amount to the said sum of 800l. And the agreement prescribed the form of the said leases and counterparts and the covenants and provisions therein contained.

The only variation from this agreement has been made by a subsequent order of the court of the 11th January 1859, permitting the Company to vary the form of the covenants.

The benefit of the agreement has been assigned by Mr. Rhodes to John Jay. The building on the estate was found to be much impeded by the objectionable form of the covenant which made one portion of the property liable for defaults of the other, and the Court of Chancery ordered that the said Company should be relieved from the restrictions, whereby the total number of leases to be granted was by the said agreement of the 31st July 1850 limited to 20, and the rent to be reserved in respect of any one lease was not to be less than 20l., and that the said Company should be at liberty to demise the said houses with the appurtenances then completed but not leased to the said J. Jay, his executors, &c., by any one or more lease or leases or 10 additional houses being completed pursuant to the agreement of the 31st July 1850. And it was ordered that the Company and the said John Jay, and John Hebb, and James Rhodes should execute a deed or deeds for transferring to John Hebb all the benefit and liability of the said agreement of the 31st July 1850, exclusive of the premises already demised, and of the said houses and releasing and exonerating the said J. Rhodes from all liability under the said contract, and in addition that all leases to be granted by the said Company to Jay and Hebb respectively should contain reservations of separate rents in respect of each house with the appurtenances to be comprised in such lease and in such leases should be contained provisions authorising a re-entry of the Company into so much only of the said demised premises with the buildings thereon in respect whereof nonpayment of rent or nonobservance of covenants by the lessee should respectively happen, but so that the residue of the said demised premises be not affected by such re-entry. This order was obtained at the expense of the lessees and assignees.

The five houses which were taken down as before mentioned, were comprised in an agreement with John Hebb, under an order of the Court of Chancery of the 6th June 1856, in consideration of building 30 houses for a term of 80 years from Michaelmas 1856 at 150l. a year. The Company have since redeemed the land tax, and in consideration thereof there is an addition to the rent of 6l., making together 156l. a year, and the property is held under Mr. Hebb as follows:—

£s.d.
Mr. Barker has built eight houses in Queen's Head Lane, and pays an apportioned rent of4200
The Postmaster General is the lessee of the corner premises in Packington Street and Lower Street at the apportioned rent of3700
A portion of the property has been converted into a street which runs through it and forms part of Packington Street
The remainder of this portion of the estate which fronts chiefly in Packington Street and partly in Lower Street, is on lease to Mr. Hebb under five leases for the same term at the apportioned rent of7700
A piece of ground containing 1a. 1r. 11p., bounded by Rydon Street, Linton Street, and Church Street, Islington, let to Henry Rydon for 80 years from Midsummer 1857 at a rent of6500
The whole of the remainder of the estate is comprised in the agreement with Mr. Rhodes and the subsequent leases under the same, and the order of the 11th January 1859, and comprising houses in Arlington Street, Dame Street, Packington Street, Linton Street, St. Paul's Street, and Queen's Head Lane, as shown in a plan of which I caused a copy to be made
Carried forward22100
Brought forward22100
Five leases are held by Mr. Jay at a total rent of 200l. a year, and the remaining leases are in course of being made to Mr. Hebb as the buildings are completed at the aggregate rent of80000
1,02100

The 1,237l. 13s. 8d. Consols found due to the charity at the time of the master's report of November 1827 (vol. 20, p. 260) in respect of the land taken by the Canal Company, and the sum of 1,436l. 9s. 7d. reduced stock bought under an order of the court, have been subsequently expended in the payment of the costs of the various proceedings in Chancery, the stock having been sold out at different times under the order of the court.

Under the scheme, 8/16ths of the income of the charity goes to the parish of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, 4/16ths to the parish of St. Dunstan's in the west, and the remaining 4/16ths to the Company for the expense and trouble of the administration.

The Company attend at St. Dunstan's Church on the 15th February, when a sermon is preached, and on that occasion 135l. has usually been distributed amongst 88 persons selected by the churchwardens and overseers, in sums varying from 10s. to 1l. 10s., and the Company usually in the month of October, give the churchwardens and overseers a cheque for the balance.

The Company also attend at the church of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, on the 25th August, when 2/16ths of the fund, amounting in 1858 to 120l. 18s. 3d. was distributed to persons selected by the officers of that parish, 3/16ths (181l. 7s. 1d.) was paid to the churchwardens, and by them handed over to the treasurer of the schools, and the balance (181l. 7s. 1d.) was paid in the February following, and was distributed according to a list of persons furnished by the churchwardens. (fn. 7)

Dame Anne Packington's Bread Charity.

By an indenture of the 23rd November 1570, Dame Anne Packington gave 100l. to the Company to pay 4l. 13s. 4d. to the churchwardens of St. Botolph Without, Aldersgate, to the intent that 4l. 6s. 8d., part thereof, should be applied by the churchwardens in weekly payments on every Sunday in the year to five poor people of the parish 4d. each, and the residue to the churchwardens for the time being for their pains about the receipts and distribution, or in default made in such payments the same to be paid to the Dean of Westminster, and in default thereof to the Dean of St. Paul's, and 6s. 8d. to the Dean of St. Paul's for the due performance of the trusts committed to them.

The sum of 4l. 13s. 4d. has not been paid since 1827. It appears that this payment ceased upon the increased payment having been made under the other charities of this lady.

An application was made to the Company by the churchwardens of St. Botolph, Aldersgate, on the 15th October, 1847, to which the Company replied that they were advised that they could not safely pay the money under the circumstances.

The payment of 6s. 8d. a year was made to the receiver of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's up to Michaelmas 1856 (paid 27th February 1857) and has since been discontinued on the ground that the duty has not been seen to.

The parish officers who attended at the time of my inquiry propose, with the concurrence of the Company and the dean and chapter, to lay a scheme before the board, and to request their advice and direction. (fn. 8)

Peake's Charity.

Sir William Peake, by his will of the 2nd October 1672, gave 100l. to the Company to pay 10s. a piece to 10 poor men of the Company at Michaelmas yearly. The 100l. forms part of the fund charged as a portion of the King Street and Cheapside Estate (see Heath's Almshouses). The 5l. a year is out of that income carried to the St. Thomas' Eve Distribution Fund, (for which see the report on Watson's Charity).

Pennoyer's Gift.

William Pennoyer, by his will of the 25th May 1670, devised his lands in Norfolk to trustees to pay 10l. a year to 10 of the blindest, oldest, and poorest clothworkers and their widows.

The governors of Christ's Hospital pay to the Company annually 10l., which the Company apply to the general relief fund (for which see Roger's Charity).

Pilsworth's Gift.

Edward Pilsworth, by his will of the 7th July 1603, gave his messuages, &c. in London to the Company to pay 16l. as follows:—12l. 14s. to the churchwardens of Shitlington, Bedfordshire, viz.:—

£s.d.
To the minister yearly for four sermons100
To reparations of the parish church0160
To six of the poor, every Sunday 4s., that is to say, 8d. a piece after morning prayer1080
To the churchwardens for their pains0100

And 3l. 6s. residue of the said 16l. should remain to the use of the said Company, and the said Company should also pay 5l. a year towards the maintenance of a poor scholar at Magdalen College, Oxford.

The devised premises being a house in Bartholomew Lane, belong to the Company and produce a rent of 233l. 15s. as stated in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (vol. 6, page 228).

The sum of 12l. 14s. is paid to the vicar of Shitlington annually by half-yearly payments, and a certificate received from him that he has distributed the money according to the directions of the will.

The gift for an exhibition at Magdalen College, Oxford, has been by the Company (with all other such gifts) increased to 20l. a year. The applications are made from persons at the University, under the form and with the certificates (printed examples of which I append). The Company are bound by the deeds and instruments to dispose of the following exhibitions:—

Pilsworth's£5
Burnell's5
Heath's (two)5
And Hewitt's5

But they altogether have 13 exhibitions, which amount together to 260l. a year, and gratuities on academical success as specified in another printed form, which I also append.

There are generally more applicants for the exhibitions than there are such benefits to dispose of, and much effort is used to obtain success in the competition. (fn. 9)

To the Master, Wardens, and Court of Assistants of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers, London.

State name, residence, and profession of parent.

The humble petition of, aged years, the son of

Sheweth,
That your petitioner is a resident poor scholar at College, in the university of and is of studious habits and good conduct, as by the accompanying certificate will appear.

That your petitioner being dependent on his friends for his means of support, whose assistance is not ade quate to the expenses attendant on the studies of the university, is desirous of obtaining one of the exhibitions given by your Worships to poor university students.

And humbly prays that your Worships will take his case into consideration, and appoint him to one of the said exhibitions, and thereby enable him to pursue his studies at the aforesaid university.

And your petitioner will ever pray, &c.

Questions to be answered.

Where educated?

Has the applicant passed a college examination?

In what class?

Whether pensioner or sizar at Cambridge?

Commoner or servitor at Oxford?

What means of support?

We, the undersigned, certify that we have personal knowledge of the pecuniary means of the petitioner and his friends, and that they are such as to justify his application for an exhibition, to enable him to prosecute his studies more efficiently at the before-mentioned college.

Clothworkers' Hall, London, 185.

Sir,
I Have the pleasure to inform you of your appointment by the court, the to an exhibition of 20l. per annum (in the gift of the Clothworkers' Company) from last for the term of six years, provided you shall continue so long actual resident in college, and without any preferment in the church. The exhibitions are payable half-yearly at Midsummer and Christmas. On the other half sheet you have forms of declaration, and certificate (required to be filled up prior to each application for payment of the exhibition), also copy of a recent order of court.

I am, Sir,
Yours obediently,

Form of Certificates to be delivered to the Clothworkers' Company, of London, on application for the payment of an Exhibition.

Declaration to be signed by the Exhibitioner.

Any student having, or becoming possessed of such income cannot receive the exhibition.

I do declare that I have not received, nor am I entitled to receive, any annual income exceeding 80l., from to last [the time for which the exhibition is due].

As witness my hand this day of 185.

To be signed by the head or next senior officer of the college, and by the tutor of the exhibitioner.

This is to certify, that now a [rank in college] of College, in the university of hath kept between and last [the time for which the exhibition is due] each term by actual residence in the said college, and that he hath conducted himself soberly, regularly, and studiously.

As witness our hands this day of 185 .

The exhibition is granted to the scholar to hold for six years, provided he continues so long actually resident in college, and without any preferment in the Church.

It is particularly requested that the exhibitioner upon discontinuing his residence in college, or becoming ineligible to hold the exhibition, will give immediate notice to Mr. R. B. Towse, the clerk to the Company.

Clothworkers, London.

(Copy) Order of Court, 4th March 1854.

"That it is at all times a matter of great satisfaction to the court when their exhibitions at Oxford and Cambridge prove to be of special advantage to the students who hold them, and that for the purpose of offering encouragement to their exhibitioners,

It is resolved:—

That whenever a gentleman upon his final examination, takes a first or second class in classics or mathematics at Oxford, or is a wrangler or first class classic at Cambridge, he shall receive a complimentary grant of 20l., this arrangement to be continued during the pleasure of the court."

Clothworkers' Hall, London, 185

Sir,
I am instructed to inform you as applicant for an exhibition in the gift of the Clothworkers' Company, at the university of, that in the event of its being your intention to become a candidate for one of 20l. per annum, now vacant, a certificate of college residence and declaration by yourself as to income in the words of the accompanying forms should be sent here prior to the proximo, the appointment to the exhibition will take place at the court on the

I am, Sir,
Yours most obediently,

This is to certify that was admitted a (fn. 10) of College, in the university of on the day of 18, and that he is now a (fn. 11) of such College, and a resident therein, and that he is of studious and good conduct.

To be signed by the two principal officers of the college, and by the tutor of the candidate.

As witness our hands this day of 18
— — — —

Declaration to be signed by the Petitioner.

I do declare that I have not, nor am I entitled to, any annual income exceeding 80l.

As witness my hand this day of 185.

The exhibition is granted to the scholar to hold for six years, provided he continues so long actually resident in college, and without any preferment in the Church.

Sir James Robinson's Gift.

Sir James Robinson, by his will dated prior to 1679, gave to the Company 100l., the profits thereof, and of 200l. formerly given to them, to be applied towards the augmentation of the yearly pension of the eight poor women in the Whitefriars Almshouse. This is considered to be a part of the endowment of the Countess of Kent's Almshouses, and is not separately paid. It must be considered as included in the 20l. a year paid to the almspeople. The 300l. is made a charge or apportioned share of the property in King Street, Cheapside, under the deed of the 13th June 1734. (See Heath's Charity.)

Rogers' Gift.

John Rogers, by his will of the 5th May 1551, gave to the Company his four houses in St. Mary Woolchurch Haw parish, to distribute the rents among the poor people of the said Company.

This is converted into a rentcharge of 20l. a year on the Mansion House, under the Act of Parliament of 1737, stated in the former report (p. 218). It is distributed with Bayworth's and others amongst the poor of the Company.

The poor of the Company consist of freemen and widows of freemen.

£s.d.
In the year 1858 there were 50 ancient pensioners, men and women, all over 60 years of age, who received 10l. a year each50000
Two persons at 6l.1200
Six pensioners at 4l.2400
Two do. at 10l.2000
(Almsmen's widows.)
Four do. at 18l.7200
The annuitants consist of a decayed liveryman and widows of decayed
Carried forward62800
Brought forward62800
members of the Court and livery, the sums varying from 100l. to 15l.40500
Casual relief in occasional sums, for funeral and other emergencies, which does not, except in special cases and under special circumstances, exceed 3l. in one case27700
£1,31000

The Company have a relief book in which is entered the names of all persons who are applicants for relief. There are always persons waiting for admission on the pension list. Inquiries are made according to printed form (copy of which I annex).

Each applicant procures a member of the Court to bring the case before it, and that member is expected to pledge himself that the case is a deserving one.

The pension applications are brought before the quarterly court, and the casual petitions before the monthly courts.

Clothworkers' Hall.

2nd November 1825.

The Court having found it necessary to check effectually the frequent misrepresentations which are made by some of the poor members of the Company who solicit relief, and who thus deprive others of it who are greater objects of charity, have come to the following resolutions, viz.:—

That in future no bounty be in any instance given without the persons applying having first delivered a full statement of their respective cases, set forth in the following printed form, signed with the names (or mark witnessed) of the individuals, and each case attested (except as to age) by at least two respectable housekeepers, who well know the facts.

The Court have further determined, that strict inquiry shall from time to time be made as to the truth of the different statements; and in case wilful misrepresentation is detected the name of the petitioner is to be registered in a book, as unworthy to receive future relief from the Company.

The form of application on the following sheet, properly filled up, signed by the petitioner, and certified by two resident householders, as under-mentioned, accompanied by copy of City freedom, and certificate of baptism (with, in the case of widows, that of marriage) must be lodged with the clerk at Clothworkers' Hall, ten days or more before the ensuing Court day.

We,, resident householders of the parish wherein the petitioner resides, do hereby certify to the master, wardens, and assistants of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers, London, that we have known the petitioner for years, or thereabouts, and we believe that the allegations and answers to the particulars on the following sheet are true—and that the petitioner bears the character of being a person of sober life and conversation, and, we believe, is in every respect a proper object to partake of the relief dispensed by the Clothworkers' Company.

Dated this day of 18,
residing at
residing at

Note.—All persons receiving clothing are to appear in the same whenever they attend at the Hall. All persons selling, pawning, or otherwise disposing of any gift of clothing from this Company, will be excluded from all future bounty of the Company.

[Form of Application for Relief.]

Clothworkers' Company, London.

The following questions are necessary to be answered by freemen of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers, or their widows, applicants for relief from the Company.

1st. Name and age of applicant?

Answer—

2nd. Residence?

Answer—

3rd. When free of the Company? If widow, her husband?

Answer—

Here state what occupation petitioner follows, and the weekly earnings on the average of the last two months.

4th. Whether married? and, if so, what family? State their names, ages, and other circumstances, and whether dependant upon applicant or not?

Answer—

5th. What income—and how arising?

Answer—

6th. On what ground relief required?

Answer—

Signature of applicant

Dated

Clothworkers' Company.

Ordered—
That all pensioners do attend at the hall two days before each quarter day to receive their pensions, and that no pension be paid unless the pensioners so attend, except in cases of illness, old age, or resident beyond 10 miles from London. And that then certificates of their being alive, signed by some person of respectability resident in the neighbourhood, but to be (if possible) the minister or some parochial officer of the parish in which they may reside, be produced by the party applying for the pension, or if received by a member of the court, then on the certificate of such member.

R. B. Towse,
Clerk.

Form of the Certificate (referred to above) to be produced when the Pensioners do not attend to receive their Pensions.

I, of the parish of in the county of do certify that now resides in this parish, is wholly destitute of sight, is years of age, and is of sober life and conversation, and is not entitled to any estate, annuity, salary, pension, or income for life, to the amount of twenty pounds a year over and above his pension received of the Clothworkers' Company.

Witness my hand this day of 18.

Minister of the parish, officer or party, signing the above.

Note.—Pensioners not attending within one calendar month after each quarter-day, cannot receive payment of their pensions until the following quarter becomes payable. Also, any pension not received at the expiration of one year from the time of its being payable, the pensioner will, on the expiration of one month therefrom, be considered as dead; the pension will be declared vacant, and another person appointed thereto.

[Form of Application for Funeral Expenses.]

Clothworkers' Company, London.

The following questions are necessary to be answered by persons applying for the funeral expenses of freemen of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers, or their widows.

1st. Name and residence of applicant?

Answer—

2nd. Whether any, or what relation to deceased?

Answer—

3rd. Name and age of deceased, and where last resident?

Answer—

4th. When free of the Company? If widow, her husband?

Answer—

5th. Amount of pension (if any)?

Answer—

6th. Whether any, and what family? Their names, ages, and other circumstances?

Answer—

7th. On what ground application made?

Answer—

Signature of applicant Dated

N.B.—The above form, properly filled up, and signed by the petitioner, accompanied by the undertaker's account, copy of city freedom, and certificate of bap tism (also in the case of widows, that of marriage), must be lodged in the clerk's office, Clothworkers' Hall, not later than the Saturday preceding court day.

Sir Thomas Rowe's Charity.

By an indenture bearing date the 4th March 1568, between the master and wardens of the Merchant Tailors' Company of the one part and the Clothworkers' Company of the other part, reciting that the said Clothworkers' Company had, on the day of making thereof, received of Sir Thomas Rowe, Knight, the sum of 100l., to be by them disposed of in the form following, that is to say, to 10 poor honest householders of the Clothworkers' Company, 10l. a piece, to have the use thereof for three or four years, and so to have continuance from one to another for ever, and every one of the said poor householders to find three able persons to be bound with them as sureties for the repayment of the said 10l. at the end of the three or four years. And further reciting that the said 100l. was received by the said Clothworkers' Company, and that the same was held by them upon the trusts mentioned in the said indenture.

This charity is included in the Loan Fund, administered according to the scheme settled in the master's report of the 21st July 1840, referred to under Heydon's Charity. It forms part of the moneys comprised in the schedule to that report.

Shales' or Skales' Charity.

Peter Shales or Skales, by his will of the 13th January 1584, bequeathed 100l. to the Clothworkers' Company, in trust, to deliver out the same in manner following, 50l. unto two young men of the said Company, being merchants or retailers for three years, and the other 50l. to be delivered out to five honest men of the said Company for three years, to each of them 10l. a piece, such seven persons to give security for the repayment thereof. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury the 26th April 1585, and the money is included in the Loan Fund, administered according to the scheme in the report of the Master in Chancery of the 21st July 1840, referred to under Heydon's Charity.

Southall's Charity.

John Southall, by his will of the 4th October 1590, gave 40l. to the Clothworkers' Company, to be lent to four poor men of the said Company, to have the use thereof freely for three years, giving security for the repayment of the same. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury in May 1592, and the money is included in the Loan Fund, as described under Heydon's Charity.

Staper's Charity.

Richard Staper, in the year 1610, gave 110l. to the Company, to pay yearly on the eve of St. Thomas, to five poor men of the Company 20s. a piece. This is a portion of the fund forming the investment or apportionment of the King Street and Cheapside estates (see Heath's Almshouses). The Company attribute 5l. of the rent of that estate to this charity. For the general distribution of charities of this kind on St. Thomas' Eve. (See Watson's Charity.)

Stoddard's Gift.

James Stoddard, by his will of the 4th October 1607, gave 100l. to the Company to be lent out to young men of the said Company, and to pay yearly from the interest 20s. to the poor's box of St. Martin, Ironmonger Lane, 30 sacks of charcoal to St. Martin's and 30 sacks to St. Olave, Jewry.

The capital of 100l., which was lost long ago, has since been replaced by the Company, and dealt with under the order of the 31st July 1840, confirming the report of the master of the 21st July 1840. (See Heydon's Charity.)

£s.d.
The Company pay to the churchwardens of St. Martin, Ironmonger Lane, in respect of the gift to the poor's box and for charcoal2100
To St. Olave, Old Jewry, for 30 sacks of charcoal1100
£400

These gifts, though insufficient for the purchase of the quantity of charcoal above mentioned, are no doubt the extent of the Company's liability, as more could not be afforded from the interest of the money bequeathed. The gift had not been paid or demanded for five years until the 23rd of January last.

Stone's Charity.

Sir William Stone, Knight, of his good will gave 50l. to the Clothworkers' Company before his death, to be lent out to two young men free of the said Company by two equal proportions for three years. This money is also included in the loan fund as described in Heydon's Charity.

Thwaytes' Charity.

William Thwaytes, late of Fenchurch Street, grocer, by his will of the 24th March 1831, bequeathed to the master and wardens of the Clothworkers' Company 20,000l. to be distributed to poor blind persons in the way they might think most proper, but none to have more than 10l. annually. The will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury the 6th January 1835 by Ann Thwaytes, William Henry Hawkins, Richard Oliverson and Thomas Warren.

The sum of 20,000l., deducting legacy duty, was laid out almost immediately after the death of the testator in 19,591l. 16s. 9d. 3l. per Cent. Consols which stands to the account of the Company. The first payment of the dividends to poor blind persons was on the 15th July 1835. The dividends amounting to 587l. 15s. are distributed to 58 pensioners at 10l. a year and one of the balance of the fund. The Company charge nothing for the administration. There is no limitation of the class of the blind who participate in this gift, except that laid down by the rule of the Company requiring each person to be 50 years of age and three years afflicted with blindness. The Company pays the dividends before they become due, but the pensions falling in and not demanded, generally almost equalize the account. (fn. 12)

Sir Thomas Trevor's Charity.

Sir Thomas Trevor, by deed of the 29th March 1622, gave 100l. to the Company, to pay yearly by quarterly payments to six poor women 20s. a piece. The 100l. is treated as a part of the investment of the King Street and Cheapside estate (see Heath's Almshouses), 6l. a year is carried to the account of the poor of the Company, for pensions, annuities, and casual relief. (See Rogers' Charity.)

Trussell's Charity.

James Trussell, by his will of the 10th October 1635, gave 400l. to be laid out in the purchase of a house of the yearly value of 20l., which he gave to the Clothworkers' Company to the end that they should pay yearly,—

£s.d.
To the treasurer of Christ's Hospital500
To the poor of the parish of St. Faith300
2s. 6d. a piece to the clerk and sexton thereof050
2s. 6d. a piece to the clerk and beadle of the Company050
To the parson of the parish for a sermon0100
The like payments to the parish of St. Bride400

and the residue to the poor members of the Company, allowing out of it 10s. to the officers of the Company.

The house in Lovell's Court, Paternoster Row, is held on lease of 1,000 years mentioned in the report of the Commissioners of Inquiry (page 230) at a rent of 20l. subject to 3l. a year deducted for land tax, thus leaving 17l. really for the Company.

The payments to the parishes of St. Faith, St. Bride's, and Christ's Hospital are made as directed, and the balance remaining applied to the benefit of the poor of the Company, forming part of the gifts, under Rogers', Bayworth's, and other benefactions. (fn. 13)

Watson's Gift.

John Watson, by his will of the 16th December 1555, charged three houses in Basing Lane, with the annual payment of 20s. to the parish of St. Mary, Aldermary, and the residue to the poorest freemen of the Company the week before Christmas. It appears by the will that only three houses were devised to the Company, but that perhaps from the site having been covered with smaller houses, or some other unexplained cause, the Company have credited the trust with the rents of seven houses, viz., Nos. 1, 2, and 3, St. Thomas Apostle, 34, Bow Lane, and 9, 10, and 20, Basing Lane; the first six houses have been taken by the Corporation of London, for City improvements, and the purchase money 3,897l. invested in 3,971l. 9s. 3d. Reduced Annuities in March 1852.

The sum stands in the name of the AccountantGeneral of the Court of Chancery and the dividends are received of 119l. 2s. 10d. The rent of 20, Basing Lane, or (25, Cannon Street, West) 50l.

The sum of 1l. is paid to the churchwardens of the parish of St. Mary, Aldermary.

The residue is distributed on St. Thomas' eve to the poor of the Company, with Hussey's, Staper's and West's Charities.

The sum is distributed in money not exceeding 20s. to any one person. The poor freemen, or widows of freemen, attend at the Hall of the Company and receive—

£s.d.
136100
Four artizan clothworkers (persons acting in that trade) at 3l. 16s.1540
Almsmen and women1200
Total£163140

A sum of 5l. also was paid to the officers under the will.

Webb's Gift.

John Webb by an indenture of the 23rd December 1697 purchased for 1,600l. three full eighth parts of a 36th part or share of the king's moiety of the New River waterworks which was conveyed to the Clothworkers' Company upon trust after the death of the said John Webb, to supply clothing to 44 poor men and women, 40 to be free of the Company and 4 of the parish of St. Mary at Hill, to pay to the minister of the said parish 20s. yearly, to the clerk 2s. 6d., to the sexton 1s. 6d., to the churchwardens 20s. yearly for the poor of the parish, 5s. a piece to the master and wardens if present at the sermon, to each of the liverymen 6d. a piece, to the clerk of the Company 3s. 4d., to the beadle 2s. 6d., to the beadle of the yeomanry and porter 1s. 6d. a piece, and the residue for cakes and wine for the master, wardens, and livery present at the distribution.

The share of the New River Company comprised in this assignment produces at this time 331l. a year.

£s.d.
The half-yearly dividend is now15626
Land tax976
165100

The land tax was redeemed by the Company on the 6th November 1805. 399l. 12s. was laid out at the price of 58l. per cent. for Consols to redeem the land tax on the share. It has not varied since the year 1852. The first dividend in 1699 was 35l. 3s. 11¼d., the second, in 1700, 73l. 5s. 6½d. The whole amount, after deducting the charges, as follows—

£s.d.
Poor at St. Mary at Hill100
Sermon, organist, clerk, sexton, and beadle236
The Company's clerk, beadle, and porter0810
Charity children, 50 at 6d.150
21 members attending church1106
Bread 5s., beer 4s. cheese 7s. 9d., porterage of books 2s. 6d., to governors 2s. 6d., street keeper 2s. 6d., beadle's breakfast 1s. 9d.160
17310

—is carried to the general clothing fund for the administration, of which see Hobby's Charity. The livery who attend on that day receive a paper of cakes value 2s., and the wine is taken from the Company's stores and not charged. The sum of 16l. or 17l. is paid for cakes and wine distributed to the gentlemen who attend on that day. The payments for the sermon and to the parish officers, organist, clerk, sexton, and beadle are made. The assistants of the Company attending the sermon receive 10s. 6d. each. (fn. 14)

Webster's Gift.

Sir Godfrey Webster by will in 1720, gave to the Clothworkers' Company 700l. in trust that they should yearly for ever on the 4th November pay to 20 poor working clothworkers or their widows one guinea a piece. The Company nominate 20 poor persons in October, and the 1l. 1s. a piece is paid to them in respect of this endowment. At the last distribution about 10 of the recipients were also pensioners of the Company. The members of the court of assistants alternately nominate the recipients, beginning generally in one year at the point in the list where they left off in the preceding year.

Charities of John and Frances West for Artizan Clothworkers.

John West and Frances his wife, by an indenture of the 9th January 1713, gave certain messuages in the parish of St. Helen's, London, on lease for 1,000 years at 30l. per annum to the Clothworkers' Company, to distribute the rents on St. Thomas' Day every year among 15 of the poorest and most ancient artizan clothworkers, and 15 poor widows of such clothworkers.

And John West and Frances his wife, by an indenture of the 15th February 1717, gave a fee farm rent of 9l. issuing out of the manor of Sutton, Somersetshire, and also another fee farm rent of 17l. 7s. 1d. issuing out of the manor of Michaelcreech, Somersetshire, to the Clothworkers' Company upon trust on St. Thomas' Day to distribute the same among 13 of the poorest and most ancient artizan clothworkers, and 13 poor widows of such clothworkers.

The rentcharge of 30l. on the premises Nos. 16, 17, 18, and 19, in Great St. Helen's, is received as to one moiety from Bartholomew's Hospital, and as to the other from a Mrs. Fincham.

The fee farm rents on the Somersetshire estate are as follows:—

£s.d.£s.d.£s.d.
The rentcharge is paid by Mr. Reeves of Gray's Inn1771
£s.d.
Deducting land tax395
Poundage0175
4610
1303
Rentcharge of 30l. on the houses in Great St. Helen's3000
Rent charge of 9l. out of the Sutton estate received from Mr. Tuson, solicitor, Ilchester, Somerset, deducting 1l. 16s. property tax740
5043

The distribution of this fund is made on St. Thomas' Eve, with the fund mentioned under Watson's Gift. The poundage of 5l. per cent. is charged.†

West's Charities for the Blind of Newbury and Reading.

No. 1.

John West and Frances his wife, by indentures of the 23rd and 24th May 1718, granted certain premises and rents to the Clothworkers' Company in trust, to apply the rents unto so many honest poor blind persons as the same after the rate of 5l. a year would extend, half to be men and half women, the kindred of the grantors to be preferred, and after such kindred the poor blind persons of Newbury and Reading.

The property under this endowment consists of the following:—

£s.d.
1. Piece of ground in Walbrook, city of London, a part of the site of the mansion, demised to the corporation for 21 years, renewable for ever without fine at the rent of1400
(The lease, the first of which was granted in 1748, describes the extent of the ground as 23 feet from north to south, and 12 feet 6 inches from east to west at the widest part. It is, I think, obvious that the covenants for renewal could not be enforced. The last lease was dated the 27th August 1831, the subsequent one not being yet taken up.)
2. Two houses, Nos. 3 and 4, at the northeast corner of Red Lion Passage, Fleet Street, let to Mr. Judge on lease for three years, expiring Lady Day 18603000

3. The Hammersmith Estate.

1. A messuage, wharf, and premises, Hermitage Row and the River Thames, on lease to Sawyer for 21 years, from Christmas 1852, at3500
2. Several small houses in Dove Place, New Street, and Hog Lane, on lease to H. W. Keys for 21 years, from Lady Day 1855, at5500
3. Four plots of building ground on the south side of Hermitage Row, agreed to be let to H. W. Keys for 60 years, from Lady Day 1855, with covenants to build2000
(Some buildings have been erected, but the lease has not yet been granted. It is proposed to apply to the Commissioners for their authority before granting the lease.)
4. The Twickenham Estate.
1. The Queen's Head public-house (opposite Twickenham Ait) having the church passage on the north side and land approaching the Thames on the other side. It is let to Bowyer for 21 years, from Lady Day 18464800
(This lease is assigned to Mr. Cooper, a brewer at Richmond.)
2. A small piece of ground in front on the Thames side, for which the tenant of Queen's Head pays yearly0100
3. Mr. Mayo, the lessee of the Ait, pays for the right to land on the ground050
4. A small cottage adjoining the Queen's Head, and land in front where formerly stood a barnIn hand.
5. A piece of common ground allotted to the Company in respect of the Queen's Head, let to Mr. Collins at100
Rentcharges and Stock.
£s.d.
5. Two rentcharges received from the Drapers' Company on property in Cornhill474
And on property in Lombard Street0124
4198
6. A sum of 83l. 6s. 8d. Consols, arising from the investment of a balance in July 1857 of 76l. 11s. 3d. cash, a course adopted by the Company instead of exercising the power of distributing the amount on other charities2100
21148

The distribution which up to 1853 had not extended to more than 24 persons, now embraces 42 blind persons of Newbury and Reading, or in London and other places. There is at present one blind person claiming to be of kindred. If there be no application from Newbury or Reading it is given to persons elsewhere, so as to complete the distribution of the even sums of 5l. When there are vacancies notice is sent to the churchwardens or to the town clerk of Reading, and to Mr. Turner, a private gentleman at Newbury.

The expenses attending the management are charged at 5l. per cent. on the gross income, and in the year 1858 were 11l. 3s. 6d. Of the 42 pensioners at present on the books of this charity there are of—

Newbury—11 pensioners; six men and five women.

Reading—Three pensioners; two men and one woman.

London and other places—28 pensioners; 12 men and 16 women. (fn. 15)

West's Charity for Twickenham, Isleworth, and Richmond.

No. 2.

John West and Frances his wife, by indentures of the 23rd and 24th December 1718, granted certain other premises to the Clothworkers' Company in trust to apply the rents for poor blind men and women of Twickenham and Isleworth in Middlesex, and Richmond in Surrey, the kindred of the grantors to be preferred.

The property of the trust is described by the Commissioners of Inquiry, volume 32, part 2, page 393.

Nos. on former Report.£s.d.
No. 1.No. 24, Old Street, let to Wm. Reynolds for 21 years, from Christmas 18505000
" 4.No. 25, Old Street, let to Wm. Burgin for 61 years, from Michaelmas 1822 (this is the property described as the piece of ground on the north side of Old Street in the former report)4000
" 2.No. 149, Whitecross Street, let to John Hammond for 18¼ years, from Michaelmas 1853 (to expire at the same time as the next)5000
" 3.No. 150. Whitecross Street, let to John Hammond for 21 years, from Christmas 185010500
24500

The distribution of this charity, which in 1853 extended to 34 persons now extends to 48 persons, who receive 5l. a year each.

The pensioners chosen from each of the three places are—

From Twickenham1 man and 2 women.
" Isleworth1 " 2 "
" Richmond2 men and 2 "
The others from London and other parts of the kingdom20 " 18 "
24 men 24 women.

The universal rule is that, except as to the kindred, and except as to the specified place, they must be 50 years of age and three years blind, but for the kindred and the specified places there is no limitation except being of the age of 21 years. The notices of vacancies are sent to the churchwardens, and the payments are made through them or some of the parish officers. If the person appointed under the age of 50 removes from the subscribed parish, the name is taken off the books. If the person were beyond the prescribed age they would not be taken off. None are to have an income of more than 20l. a year.

The deduction of 5 per cent. for the expense of management is made. This in 1858 was 12l. 17s. 9d.

West's Charity for Blind persons generally.

No. 3.

John West and Frances his wife, by an indenture of the 28th December 1719, gave certain premises in the Poultry, London, to the use of the Clothworkers' Company in trust, to distribute the rents among poor blind men and women generally, in pensions of 5l. each with a preference to the kindred of the grantors.

The property, frontage 31 feet 5 inches on the Poultry (including the gateway), Nos. 23 and 24 is now demised by lease for 61 years from Midsummer 1855 to John Baldwin Wheeler, under the authority of the Charity Commissioners dated the 23rd March 1858 at a rent of 300l.

The charge for Michell's Almshouse is an original charge of 1l. 11s. 6d.

There is also 140l. 3l. per Cent. Consols belonging to this endowment, consisting of an investment of the small balances, and producing yearly 4l. 4s.

The distribution is to 56 persons who are nominated by the members of the court, by applications from all parts of the kingdom. In 1858 there was an expense of 2l. 2s. for a surveyor, and 58l. for law expenses, and the general charge of 5l. per cent., amounting to 15l. 14s. 8d. The balance in that year was 12l. 5s. 8d.

Frances West's Charity.

No. 4.

Frances West, by indentures of the 8th and 9th January 1723, granted two messuages in the Poultry, in the parish of St. Mary Woolchurch, London, to the use of the Clothworkers' Company upon similar trusts as in the deed of the 24th May 1718 (No. 1) for the benefit of honest poor blind men and women living in the city of London or its liberties, as the said rents after the rate of 5l. a piece would extend to pay.

One of the above-mentioned houses was in the year 1834 taken by the Corporation of London for improving the approaches to London Bridge, and the purchase money of 3,000l. was invested in 3,143l. 12s. Consols in the name of the Accountant-General of the Court of Exchequer. In March 1845, 1,702l. 3s. 8d. of this stock was sold for 1,697l. 18s. 7d. being a portion of 3,300l., the purchase money for premises Nos. 42 and 43, Mincing Lane, leaving a balance of 1,441l. 8s. 4d. Consols in court.

The property under this endowment consists now of the following:—

£s.d.
The sum of 1,441l. 8s. 4d. Consols in the Court of Chancery4340
Mincing Lane Houses.
The Board by their order of the 23rd March 1858 sanctioned the demise of the site of Nos. 42 and 43 to Messrs. Tapply & Co., for a term of 61 years at a yearly rent of 316l. 14s. 6d. The purchase money of this property was derived as follows:—
£s.d.
From this endowment1,697187
From other funds under the administration of the Company1,61215
3,30000
(Subject merely to rentcharges for charitable purposes, the main portion being at the disposal of the Company.)
The apportioned rent belonging to this endowment is considered to be162132
The remaining house in the Poultry is let to George Hastings Heppel for 63 years, from Lady Day 1836, and is now occupied by the Britannia Life Insurance Company20000
A sum of 86l. 13s. 4d. Consols, the produce of small balances in excess of the pensions2120
Carried forward408100
Brought forward408100
The house in the Poultry is subject to a quitrent to Earl Somers of0108
Expense of management (1858)2086
Surveyor3156
Law expenses1101
Printing0164
2711
Leaving a clear income of381811

At present there are 76 blind persons pensioners on this fund, who receive altogether 380l. In the beginning of the year 1858 the number was 66.

Frances West's Apprenticing Charity.

No. 5.

Frances West by indentures of the 11th and 12th December 1723 granted certain messuages to Sion College, London, in trust out of the rents to put forth apprentice yearly two poor boys, orphans, whose fathers were ministers of the Church of England, with premiums of 10l. each: and to pay 50l. to the clerk of Sion College for keeping the books of the charity; and then to distribute one third of the residue to as many poor men and women, kindred of John and Frances West, and if no kindred, then to poor blind men and women at 5l. a year each; to distribute one other third part to honest poor blind men and women at 5l. each; and the remaining third part to poor ancient men and women at 5l. a piece, the kindred of the said John and Frances West to be preferred, and after them one fourth of the said ancient persons to be of Twickenham, and three fourths of Reading.

The trust was not accepted by Sion College, and was by the Court of Chancery settled as under the administration of the Clothworkers' Company in 1736.

It appears that the charity was the subject of a suit, Attorney-General v. Clothworkers' Company, which came on to be heard on the 28th July 1796, and by the master's report in the same cause, dated the 23rd July 1800, he found that there had come to the hands of the defendants of the savings of the said two yearly sums since 1771 the several sums of money set forth in the first schedule to his report, amounting together to 625l. 3s. 4¼d., wherewith he had charged the said defendants; and he found that the said defendants had paid and applied to certain objects agreeable to the directions of the said indenture of 12th December 1723 the several sums mentioned in the second schedule to his report, amounting together to 158l. 6s. 0d., which he had allowed the said defendants, and the same being deducted out of the said sum of 625l. 3s. 4¼d., the total of the said first schedule as aforesaid, he found there remained in the hands of the said defendants of the savings of the said two yearly sums of 10l. and 10l. the sum of 466l. 17s. 4¼d.; and a scheme had been laid before him on behalf of the relator for the application of the savings of the said two yearly sums of 10l. and 10l., and also for the future savings, whereby it was proposed that out of the said 466l. 17s. 4¼d. in the hands of the defendants the costs of the suit of the parties, relator and defendants, already taxed, and their subsequent costs, when taxed, be paid by the defendants to the respective solicitors of the parties, and that what should remain of the said 466l. 17s. 4¼d. after deducting such several costs as aforesaid be laid out in the purchase of Old South Sea Annuities in the names of the defendants; and that the interest of the said South Sea Annuities so to be purchased, as also 2l. 18s. 1¾d., being the yearly interest of the said 96l. 18s. 7d. Old South Sea Annuities then standing in the name of the defendants, and the said two yearly sums of 10l. each should yearly for ever be paid and applied by the master and wardens for the time being of the said Company in putting forth apprentice or to service two poor boys, legitimately born, coming under some or one of the descriptions, and with the preference following, that is to say, boys whose parents should be both dead and whose fathers or mothers were freemen or freewomen of the City of London and of the said Company; boys whose fathers or mothers dying such freemen or freewomen as aforesaid should be dead; and boys whose fathers or mothers were living and such freemen or freewomen as aforesaid; preferring, in the first place, boys, the sons of freemen, whose parents should be both dead; in the second place, boys, the sons of freewomen, whose parents should be both dead; in the third place, boys, the sons of freemen, whose fathers should be dead; in the fourth place, boys, the sons of freewomen, whose fathers should be dead; in the fifth place, boys, the sons of freewomen, whose mothers should be dead; in the sixth place, boys, the sons of freemen; and in the last place, boys, the sons of freewomen. And that two poor boys withinsome or one of the descriptions aforesaid, and with such preference as aforesaid, should at a court of assistants of the Company be yearly for ever thereafter elected and put forth apprentice or to service.

The report was confirmed by the order of the court of the 5th August 1800.

The Property of the Charity is—

£s.d.
No. 29, Ludgate Hill, let to Messrs. Samuel for 21 years, from Christmas 185022000
No. 65, Cannon Street, let for 21 years, from March 18507500
Ground in Walbrook, a part of the site of the Mansion House, which first appears to have been leased in 1754 to the corporation of London, at a rent of 30l. a year for 21 years, with covenants for perpetual renewal, continued down to the present lease3000
(These covenants are open to the same objections as those of a lease of the adjoining property belonging to West's Newbury and Reading Blind Charities (No. 1).
£32500

The sum payable for apprentice fees was regulated by the Court of Chancery in 1800 as above stated by a decree directing that two annual sums of 10l., and the dividends of 96l. 8s. 7d., Old South Sea Annuities, 616l. 19s. 2d. like stock should be appointed for that purpose. The two sums and the dividends amounted together to 41l. 10s. 2d. The Commissioners found that the whole of this stock had been sold and applied to the redemption of the land tax on the Charity Estate. The scheme was settled by the Court of Chancery for the choice of the boys to be apprenticed.

In 1858 there were two apprentices and in 1859 there was only one. The premium is paid to the master. The trades have been miscellaneous. The Company has lately been in the habit of paying the fee in instalments of half at the first, and half after a year's service.

There was a balance on account of the apprentice fund (to which 41l. 10s. 2d. annually is carried) unapplied at the end of 1858, of 93l. 0s. 4d. of which one half year's premiums remained to be paid.

The boys are selected by the court on the application of the parents. They are all children of freemen or freewomen.

£s.d.
There are 18 blind persons who receive 5l. a year a piece9000
Also 18 persons of the 6th degree of kindred to John and Frances West9000
Also 18 persons of kindred not comprised in the 6th degree to do9000
£27000

The charge for expenses of the management at 5 per cent., in 1859, were 16l. 14s. 6d.

A balance of 15l. 18s. 11d. was then carried to the next year.

Frances West's Charity for Reading, Newbury, Twickenham, and the City of London.

No. 6.

Frances West, by a codicil to her will of the 24th March 1723–4, bequeathed to her executors 2,650l., to be in invested in the purchase of lands for paying to 10 poor blind men and 10 poor blind women of the city of London 5l. a year each, with a preference to the relations of her late husband and herself, and after such kindred, poor blind persons of Reading, Newbury, and Twickenham to have a preference before those of the city of London.

By the decree of the Court of Chancery of the 1st June 1736 it was ordained that 2,650l. Orphan Stock should be transferred to the Company, such stock being paid off, the following sums were purchased,—

1,085l. 15s. 3l. per cent. Consols.

1,316l. 6s. 7d. Old South Sea Annuities.

1,909l. 3s. 11d. 4l. per Cent. Stock.

£s.d.
The 1,316l. 6s. 7d. Old South Sea Annuities have since been converted into 1,526l. 3s. 8d. 3l. per Cent. Reduced Annuities45158
(On the 8th May 1854 the Company received the principal of the South Sea Annuities and there with purchased the present sum of Consols.)
1,085l. 15s. 3l. per Cent. Consols32116
1,909l. 3s. 11d. 4l. per Cent. Stock, were converted into New 3l. per Cent. Stock5756
63l. 6s. 8d. Consols the produce of small balances accumulated as in the other cases1180
£137108
On this endowment there are 26 pensioners receiving 5l. each13000
The expenses attending the management of the usual allowance of 5 per Cent. amounts to6176
And with the small balance of 4l. 19s. 2d. carried forward in 1858 exhausts the income (fn. 16) 4192

Frances West's Charity to the Blind of Henley.

No. 7.

Frances West, by another codicil to her will of the 12th November 1724, gave to her executors 650l. to be laid out in the purchase of lands, the rents to be applied to five poor blind men and women living in Henley-onThames as the same would extend to pay at the rate of 5l. per annum a piece, preference being given to relations; and if there should not be in Henley so many poor blind men and women as the said rents would extend to pay, poor and ancient men and women of Henley should have 5l. a year a piece in the stead of such blind persons as should be wanting to complete the number.

By the decree of the 1st June 1736 it was ordered that 650l. Orphan Stock should be transferred to the Company; such stock being paid off, the following sums were purchased:—

£s.d.
33240Consols.
45166Old South Sea Annuities.
634324l. per Cent. Annuities.

Which are now as follows:—

Dividends.
£s.d.
332l. 4s. 3l. per Cent. Consols9194
451l. 6s. 6d. Old South Sea Annuities were paid off in 1854 and invested in 523l. 5s. 6d. 3l. per Cent. Reduced Annuities15140
53l. 6s. 8d. Consols, an accumulation of small balances as in the other cases1120
634l. 3s. 2d. 4l. per Cents. converted into New 3l. per Cents.1906
£46510
The pensioners on this fund are eight, and at present all are blind persons4000
The expenses of management are263
Balance (in 1858) carried to the next account composed partly of a balance of 3l. 1s. 2d. brought from the preceding account, and the amount of the increase of the balance of the preceding years709
£4970

I

of

If married, state to whom.

do solemnly and sincerely declare, that the certificate, of my baptism hereunto annexed, is a true and just certificate, and duly signed by the several persons who have subscribed their names thereto; and that I am related, by consanguinity, to

State whether related to Mr. or Mrs. West.

West, late of Stocks Market, in the City of London, deceased, in such manner as by the pedigree or account of the same hereunder stated appears: And that I am not at this time seized or possessed of any real or personal estate of the value of twenty pounds per annum, neither doth any such estate to me belong. The pedigree above-mentioned is as follows:—

And I make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true, and by virtue of the provisions of an Act made and passed in the fifth and sixth years of the reign of His late Majesty, King William the 4th, entituled, "An Act to repeal an Act of the present session of Parliament, entituled, An Act of for the more effectual Abolution of Oaths and Affirmations, taken and made in various departments of the State, and to substitute Declarations in lieu thereof; and for the more entire suppression of voluntary and extra-judicial Oaths and Affidavits; and to make other provisions for the abolition of unnecessary Oaths."

Solemnly declared by the said at this day of 18 .

Before me

Certificate of Baptism.

Note.:—The Certificate of Baptism to be signed by the Minister, or Clerk.

Copy of certificates of marriage of claimant's parents, and of claimant's marriage (if a female) are requested to be furnished herewith.

Charities to the Aged Blind, distributed by the Clothworkers' Company, London; being bequests of the late John and Frances West, Thomas Newnam, William Thwaytes, Mrs. Hannah Acton, and George Cornell.

Memoranda for the information of Applicants.

Qualifications.—Applicants must be 50 years of age, of sober life and good morals; have been totally blind for three years; not be entitled to any estate, annuity, salary, pension, or income to the amount of 20l. a year; nor be an inmate of a workhouse, or public institution; nor publicly solicit or receive alms.

Blank petitions are issued from the Company's office, between the hours of eleven and three o'clock.

Certificates of age, blindness, circumstances, and marriage (if married) must be annexed to the petition.

The petition, the certificate or declaration of age, the certificate of the surgeon, and the certificate of facts properly filled up and signed, are to be delivered gratis, at the Company's office, at their Hall, Mincing Lane, London.

Robert Beckwith Towse,
Clerk.

Form of Bequest for Charities to the Blind, distributed by the Company.

I also give and bequeath to the master, wardens, and commonalty of freemen of the art or mystery of Clothworkers of the city of London, the sum of the interest whereof is to be applied to the use of blind persons, in such portions and under such regulations and restrictions as to them the master and wardens and court of assistants of the said Company of Clothworkers for the time being shall seem proper; the said sum to be paid exclusively out of such part of my personal estate as I can lawfully charge with payment of legacies to charitable uses; and I desire that the same be paid to the master and wardens for the time being of the said Company, whose receipt shall be a good discharge for the same.

Petition to the Master, Wardens, and Court of Assistants of the Worshipful Company of Clothworkers, London.

Here insert name, residence, and business.

The humble petition of of in the parish of in the of by business a

If married, insert what family petitioner hath; if single, the condition of petitioner's parents, if living.

Sheweth, that petitioner is years of age, is wholly destitute of sight, and hath been so for the space of years.

That petitioner

That petitioner hath no estate, annuity, salary, benefaction, pension, or income, excepting and hath never received alms or support in any way from any parish or place, as a pauper, and neither is or ever hath been a common beggar, or in a poorhouse.

Here insert by what means petitioner is supported; any circumstances may be added that may tend to strengthen the application.

That petitioner bears the character of being a sober and honest person, and of good morals.

Your petitioner therefore humbly prays to be admitted a partaker of one of the charities for blind persons, distributed by the Clothworkers' Company, so long as may be though to be a fit object thereof.

To be signed by the petitioner.

Dated at this day of 185 .

the petitioner.

Certificate of Blindness.

This to be signed by a surgeon.

I do hereby certify that I have examined the eyes of the above petitioner, and find h to be totally blind.

Surgeon.

Certificate of the Facts and Circumstances contained in Petition.

We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, do certify, that we have made full inquiry concerning the allegations contained in the foregoing petition: that we believe them to be true; and that the petitioner bears the character of being a person of sober life and conversation, and of good morals; and we believe is in every respect a proper object to partake of the charities established for blind persons.

To be signed by the minister and churchwardens of the parish in which the blind person resides; and if the party's residence is extra parochial, by the minister and churchwardens of an adjoining parish.

Witness our hands this day of 185.

Rector, vicar, or curate of Churchwardens of the same parish.

If the petitioner is unsuccessful, the application must be renewed at the end of three years.

Notice of removal of residence must be left at the clerk's office. (fn. 17)

Blue Coat School, Reading.

No. 8.

John West, by his will of the 2nd March 1688, devised that as soon after his wife's decease as a purchase of lands (such as the Clothworkers' Company should approve) could be had, 1,000l. of his stock, called Orphan Stock, should be sold to purchase lands to be conveyed to the said Company under trust, that the yearly rents should be applied in maintaining and educating six boys born in Reading in the Blue Coat School at Reading; and by a codicil of the 9th January 1719 he ordered that a fee farm rent in the county of Northampton of 6l. 5s. 5d. per annum which he intended should be conveyed to him and his wife should by the survivor be conveyed to the Company upon trust to pay the same to the mayor and burgesses of Reading for the purposes therein mentioned.

A fee farm rent of 6l. 8s. 9½d. (called by mistake 6l. 5s. 5d.) was conveyed to the Company on the 21st January 1719, and by another codicil of the 8th June 1721 he devised 200l. Orphan Stock to be added to the said 1,000l. likewise to be laid out in land for the said trust.

In 1800, 392l. 10s. 3d., portion of the 1,200l. Orphan Stock, was sold and invested in 613l. 6s. Consols, and in 1816 807l. 9s. 9d., balance of the said 1,200l., was likewise sold and invested in 1,078l. 8s. 11d. 4l. per Cent. Annuities.

The sum of 613l. 6s. is still in Consols, and the sum of 1,078l. 8s. 11d. is now in the New 3l. per Cent. Stock.

£s.d.
On this the dividends amount to501410
The fee farm rent of 6l. 8s. 9d. is received from Mr. Edward Reeves, which, after deducting land tax and poundage, amounts to523
£55171

The entire sum is paid over by the Company to the treasurer of the Blue Coat School, or clerk to the trustees of the municipal charities (Church List) at Reading. (fn. 18)

Wilcox's Charity.

Roger Wilcox, by his will dated (it is stated prior to 1603), gave to the said Company 120l., to the intent to lend the same to three honest young men free of the Company for three years equally amongst them, and after the same three years ended likewise to three honest young men free of the said Company for other three years, and so from three young men to three young men free of the said Company from three years to three years for evermore; and he willed that every of the said three young men before he or they should have the same money should put in for himself two good sureties, freemen of London, to the said master and wardens not only for the repayment thereof to the said Company from time to time at the end of every three years to the intent above said, but also to deliver yearly for the use thereof between Michaelmas and Christmas 60 sacks of grate coals, that is every of the same young men 20 cwt. sacks a piece, the said coals to be distributed amongst the poorest people of the said Company, viz., to every poor person one sack at the appointment of the said master and wardens.

The sum of 120l. is included in the loan trust (see Heydon's Charity), and the income at the rate of 4l. a year is distributed to the poor of the Company according to the method described under Rogers' Charity.

All which I submit to the Board.

Tho. Hare,
Inspector of Charities.

18th November 1860.

Footnotes

1 Elizabeth Love's Charity.
13th Nov. 1877.
Under an order of the Board of this date, the abovementioned sum of 269l. 4s. 9d., reduced, was transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
2 John Lute's Charity.
16th No. 1877.
By an order of the Board of this date, the abovementioned annual payments were redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 3,658l. 6s. 8d. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
29th Jan. 1878.
By an order of the Board of this date, a scheme was established for the future regulation of this charity (other than the Loan Charity founded by John Lute) and of the charities of Samuel and John Middlemore.
A copy of the scheme is annexed.
The above-mentioned scheme for the Clothworkers' Loan Charities was approved by Her Majesty's in Council on 26th March 1878. (See Heydon's Charity.)
6th January 1880.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to apply the sum of 2,210l. 14s. 1d., to be produced by the sale of a sufficient portion of the said sum of 3,658l. 6s. 8d. Consols, in the purchase of freehold ground rents, at West Hackney, producing 91l. 10s. per annum.
28th July 1882.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to effect the purchase of freehold ground rents at Shacklewell, producing 58l. 10s. per annum, at the price of 1,500l. sterling, to be provided in part by the sale of the sum of 1,396l. 14s. 10d. Consols, and as to the residue by means of a loan from the Company not bearing interest and repayable within seven years.
Charity Commission.
In the matter of the charities of John Lute and Samuel Middlemore and John Middlemore, under the management of the Clothworkers' Company, in the City of London; and
In the matter of "The Charitable Trusts Acts, 1853 to 1869."
The Board of Charity Commissioners for England and Wales, having considered an application in writing made to them on the 11th day of December 1877, in the matter of the above-mentioned charities, under the seal of the above-mentioned Company as the Trustees of the said charities:
And it appearing to the said Board to be desirable that a scheme should be established for the future regulation of the said charities:
And upon notice of the intention of the said Board to make an order for the foregoing object, having been given by the affixing of the same, according to the direction of the said Board, to or near principal outer doors of the parish churches of St. Michael, Cornhill, and St. Clements, Eastcheap, and of the Clothworkers' Hall all in the city of London, on the 25th day of December 1877, being more than one calendar month previously to the date hereof:
And no notice of any objection to the said proposed order having been received by the said Board:
Do hereby order, that the scheme set forth in the schedule hereto be approved and established as the scheme for the future regulation of the said charities.
SCHEDULE.
Scheme for the Management and Regulation of the above-mentioned Charities.
1. The master and wardens of the Company of Clothworkers of the city of London, usually called "the Clothworkers' Company," and who are herein-after referred to as the Trustees, shall continue to be the Trustees of the said charities, and shall manage and administer the same and their several endowments in conformity with the provisions of this scheme.
2. The charities founded by the will of the abovementioned John Lute, other than the Loan Charity thereby founded, and the charities of Samuel Middlemore and John Middlemore shall hereafter be administered as one charity.
3. The dividends or other income of the said charities, shall subject to the existing interests of the present recipients, be applied in making the several payments, and providing the several articles of clothing to the several persons qualified in accordance with the wills of the respective founders, but the Trustees shall nevertheless be at liberty to vary the several antique articles of apparel heretofore given in favour of other and more modernised articles of clothing.
4. The said clothing and other gifts shall from the date of this scheme be distributed, and the anniversary of the said charities shall be celebrated on the feast of St. Luke annually, or within seven days thereafter, in or at the church of St. Michael, Cornhill, and St. Clement, Eastcheap, in alternate years, but without prejudice to the claims of the beneficiaries entitled to the benefits of the said charities respectively, so nevertheless that one sermon only shall be preached in each year on the day appointed for the celebration of the said charities, and that there shall be paid out of the income of the said charities to the minister by whom the said sermon shall be preached the sum of 3l. 3s. in lieu of the fees prescribed in the wills of the respective founders.
5. Subject to the provisions aforesaid, and so far as there shall be any surplus income belonging to the said charities arising from the absence of duly qualified recipients, or otherwise, the residue of the said income shall be applied by the Trustees in promoting the technical education (either by the institution of exhibitions to Art Schools or other avenues to art culture and higher industrial training or otherwise) of persons to be selected by the Trustees, having preference to the claims of persons belonging to the following classes, namely,—persons free of the said Company or in their employment, or of persons who shall as principals or on their own account have carried on any trade or business in the said parishes of St. Michael, Cornhill, and St. Clement, Eastcheap, or have practised any profession therein, or who shall have served for not less than five years as clerks or managers or assistants to any person or persons carrying on any trade or business or practising any profession in the said parishes.
Sealed by Order of the Board this 29th day of January 1878.
Henry M. Vane,
Secretary.
3 Samuel and John Middlemore's Charities.
16th Nov. 1877.
By an order of the Board of this date, the above-mentioned annual payment or charge of 45l. was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 1,500l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
29th Jan. 1878.
By an order of the Board of this date a scheme was established for the future regulation of these charities. (See John Lute's Charity.)
28th July 1882.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to effect the purchase of freehold ground rents at Shacklewell, producing 62l. per annum, at the price of 1,600l. sterling, to be provided in part by the sale of the said sum of 1,500l. Consols, and as to the residue by means of a loan from the Company, not bearing interest, and repayable within seven years.
4 Thomas Newnam's Charity.
10th August 1880.
Under an order of the Board of this date, the sum of 9,000l. Consols, representing the endowment of this charity, was transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
16th Sept. 1881.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to effect the purchase of freehold ground rents at Hammersmith, producing 382l. 10s. per annum, at the price of 8,950l., to be provided by the sale of the said sum of 9,000l. Consols.
5 Thomas Ormston's Charity.
18th July 1876.
By an Order of the Board of this date, the abovementioned yearly payments, amounting in the aggregate to the sum of 9l., were redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 300l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
6 John Osmotherlaw's Charity.
18th Nov. 1873.
By an order of the board of this date, the above-mentioned yearly payment of 50s. was redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 83l. 12s. 6d. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
7 Dame Anne Packington's Charity.
31st March 1879.
By an order of the board of this date, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of a piece of ground containing 4,000 square feet with the buildings thereon, situate between Canal Terrace and Arlington Street in the parish of St. Mary, Islington, for 58¾ years from Christmas 1877, at the annual rent of 7l.
The income of this charity now amounts to 1,028l. per annum.
8 Dame Anne Packington's Bread Charity.
Under the authority of the board the sum of 282l. consisting of the endowment fund of 100l. and 182l. the amount of accumulations of income was paid to the banking account of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds, and, in pursuance of an order of the Board of 27th November 1866, the sum of 313l. 6s. 8d. Consols purchased therewith was transferred to the Official Trustees on the 29th of the same month.
30th Nov. 1866.
By an order of the Board of this date, made upon the application of two inhabitants of the parish the incumbent and churchwardens of the parish of St. Botolph Without, Aldersgate, for the time being, were appointed trustees of this charity, and it was directed, by way of scheme for the future regulation of the charity, that the clear annual income thereof, which should remain after payment thereout of the yearly sum of 6s. 8d. to the dean and chapter of the cathedral church of St. Paul's London, in pursuance of the terms of the foundation of the charity, should be applied to the benefit of the most deserving and necessitous inhabitants of the aforesaid parish of St. Botolph Without. Aldersgate, to be selected for this purpose by the said trustees. by providing them with clothes, bedding, fuel, medical or other aid in sickness, food or other articles in kind, or with pecuniary aid in special cases as should be considered by the trustees to be most advantageous to them, and that either directly or by aiding the funds of any provident or friendly associations to which they should belong, or any public institutions of which, respectively it should be the object to provide them with like benefits, and so that no funds of the charity should be applied directly or indirectly to the relief of the poor rates of the said parish.
9 Edward Pilsworth's Charity.
18th July 1876.
By an order of the Board of this date, the above-mentioned yearly payments of 12l. 14s. and 5l. were redeemed by the transfer into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds of the sum of 590l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities.
10 Commoner (or as the case may be).
11 Present rank in College.
12 William Thwaytes' Charity.
August 10th 1880.
Under an order of the Board of this date, the above mentioned sum of 19,591l. 16s. 9d. Consols was transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
28th July 1882.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to effect the purchase of freehold ground rents at West Hackney, producing 402l. per annum, at the price of 10,500l. sterling to be provided by the sale of the sum of 10,591l. 16s. 9d. Consols part of the said sum of 19,591l. 16s. 9d. Consols.
13 James Trussell's Charity.
8th May 1874.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to sell, for not less than the sum of 680l. Consolidated 3l. per Cent. Annuities, the reversionary interest of the charity, of and in certain messuages and premises situate in Lovell's Court, Paternoster Row, in the parish of St. Faith in the city of London, then known as Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4, Lovell's Court, subject to a lease of the same for 1,000 years from the 24th day of August 1642, at the rent of 20l. per annum.
Under an order of the Board of the same date, the said sum of 680l. Consols was, on 3rd November 1874, transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
8th June 1877.
Under an order of the Board of this date, the sum of 108l. 6s. 8d. Consols, part of the said sum of 680l. Consols was transferred to the St. Bride's Parochial Charities Fund, and the dividends thereon are paid direct to the trustees by the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds.
14 John Webb's Gift.
The above-mentioned share of the New River Company, together with 13 new shares purchased by the Company as the trustees of the charity by the application of bonus and surplus income belonging to the charity, now produces 1,074l. 4s. 1d. per annum.
Charities of John and Frances West for Artizan Clothworkers.
4th June 1875.
By two orders of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to sell all the estate and interest of the charity of and in the above-mentioned messuages, Nos. 16 and 17, and 18 and 19, Great St. Helen's, for not less than the sums of 600l. and 600l. Consols, which were accordingly transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds on the 23rd November and the 21st December 1875 respectively.
22nd March 1878.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to apply the sum to be realised by the sale of the said sums of 600l. and 600l. Consols towards the purchase of the hereditaments next mentioned, namely:—
Description of Property.Term of existing Leases.Total Ground Rents. (Apportioned.)Purchase Money.
£s.d.£s.d.
The sites and appurtenances of messuages at West Hackney being:—
1, Alvington Crescent99 years from Lady-day 1867.600
3, " "Do.600
5, " "Do.600
Ground at rear of the same messuages and right of way.96 years from Lady day 1870.001
Nos. 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 Cranbrook Terrace.99 years from Christmas 1873.3000
48011,17500
15 John and Frances West's Charities for the Blind of Newbury and Reading.
13th Aug. 1867.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of several pieces of land, with the four houses then newly erected thereon numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4, Hermitage Row, Hammersmith, also two cottages and a dwelling-house in the rear, with a right of way thereto through the passage running from Hermitage Row, for 60 years, from Lady Day 1855, at the yearly rent of 20l. 13s. 6d.
26th April 1870.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to grant a lease of a piece of ground containing 26 perches (being the above-mentioned piece of common ground under No. 4, the Twickenham estate) situate on the north side of the road leading from Twickenham to Hampton, in the county of Middlesex, together with two messuages, being Nos. 3 and 4, Burton Villas, Twickenham, for 80 years from Michaelmas 1867, at the yearly rent of 4l.
28th April 1874.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to sell the above-mentioned piece of ground in Walbrook for not less than the sum of 500l. Consols, which was accordingly transferred into the name of the Official Trustees of Charitable Funds on the 20th October 1874.
3rd August 1875.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to apply the sum to be realised by the sale of the said sum of 500l. Consols towards the purchase at the price of 500l. sterling of a piece of land situate at West Hackney, in the county of Middlesex, with the factory, offices, warehouses, and other buildings belonging thereto, known as Tolkein's Piano Factory, standing thereon, then demised for 98 years from Lady Day 1868, at rents amounting in the whole to 22l.
16 Frances West's Charity for Blind Persons of Reading, Newbury, Twickenham, and London.
22nd March 1878.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to apply the sum to be realised by the sale of the said sums of 1,149l. 1s. 8d. (1,085l. 15s. and 63l. 6s. 8d.) Consols, 1,526l. 3s. 8d. Reduced, and 1,909l. 3s. 11d. New 3l. per Cent. Annuities, towards the purchase of the hereditaments next mentioned, namely:—
Description of Property.Term of existing Leases.Total ground rents. (Apportioned.)Purchase money.
£s.d.£s.d.
The sites and appurtenances of Messuages at West Hackney being:—
Nos. 2 and 4, Alvington Crescent.99 years from Lady day 1867.1200
No. 6, Alvington Crescent.99 years from Christmas 1867.600
Nos. 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20, Alvington Crescent.99 years from Lady day 1867.4600
Nos. 22, 24, and 26, Alvington Crescent.96 years from Lady day 1870.1800
Nos. 28, 30, 31, 29, 33, and 35, Alvington Crescent.90 years from Lady day 1876.3600
Nos. 37, 39, 41, and 43, Alvington Crescent.96 years from Lady day 1870.2400
Nos. 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, and 55, Alvington Crescent.90 years from Lady day 1876.3600
178004,45000
17 Frances West's Charity for blind persons of Henleyupon-Thames.
22nd March1878.
By an order of the Board of this date the trustees were authorised to apply the sum to be realised by the sale of the said sums of 385l. 10s. 8d. (332l. 4s. and 53l. 6s. 8d.) Consols, 523l. 5s. 6d. Reduced, and 634l. 3s. 2d. New 3l. per Cent. Annuities, towards the purchase of the hereditaments next mentioned, namely:—
Description of Property.Term of existing Leases.Total ground rents. (Apportioned.)Purchase money.
£s.d.£s.d.
The sites and appurtenances of messuages at West Hackney being:— Nos. 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, and 27, Alvington Crescent.99 years from Lady day 1867.66001,60000
18 Blue Coat School, Reading (John West's Charity).
22nd March 1878.
By an order of the Board of this date, the trustees were authorised to apply the sum to be realised by the sale of the said sums of 613l. 6s. Consols, and 1,078l. 8s. 11d. New 3l. per Cent. Annuities, towards the purchase of the hereditaments next mentioned, namely:—
Description of Property.Term of existing Leases.Total ground rents. (Apportioned.)Purchase money.
£s.d.£s.d.
The sites and appurtenances of messuages at Clapton, being:—
A messuage at the corner of Nightingale Road.99 years from Christmas 1873.800
Eleven messuages adjoining south, and Nod. 62, 60, 58, 56, 54, 52, 50, 48, 46, 44, and 42, Nightingale Road.Do.6500
73001,77500
9,00000