America and West Indies
September 1679

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury and J.W. Fortescue (editors)

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1896

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411-423

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'America and West Indies: September 1679', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 10: 1677-1680 (1896), pp. 411-423. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=69993 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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September 1679

Sept. 4.1109. Account of the store in His Majesty's magazine at Fort Charles, showing amount taken into store and expended from the 1st January to 4th September 1679. It appears that all matchlock muskets were returned into store and snaphance muskets issued in their place in July. Signed, Cha. Morgan. Endorsed, "Recd. from the Commrs. of the Ordnance, 18 Dec. 1679." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 113.]
Sept. 9.
Windsor.
1110. Duke of Monmouth to Lord Culpeper or officer in chief commanding his company. He is forthwith to embark the company of foot under his command at Gravesend or other convenient place on board the vessels appointed to receive them in order to their transportation to Virginia, and to be careful that the quarters of said company be duly satisfied. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. LVIII., p. 53.]
Sept. 9.
Windsor.
1111. Duke of Monmouth to the Commissioners for executing the office of Master of the Ordnance. Desires they will order the usual proportion of ammunition to be furnished to Lord Culpeper's company of foot designed for Virginia, from 1st May last to end of December next, and that two barrels of powder extraordinary with ammunition in proportion be furnished to said company to carry along with them to sea for their defence in case of any rencontre. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. LVIII., p. 53.]
Sept. 10.
Windsor.
1112. The King to Thomas Lord Culpeper. At his earnest and reiterated instances, and in contemplation of the condition of affairs in Virginia, where his presence is highly necessary, His Majesty has condescended to his speedy repair thither, notwithstanding the great and urgent occasions the King has of his service here. He is hereby granted full power to repair back to the King's presence as soon as in his discretion the state of affairs in Virginia will in any sort permit his absence, as well in person to give an exact account of the same and continue his services to His Majesty here, as for some short time to take care of his own private concerns, which his constant attendance on the King has hitherto hindered him from sufficiently providing for. After which the King will give orders for his speedy return thither again to perfect the settlement and welfare of that colony. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 380, 381.]
Sept. 10.
Barbadoes.
1113. Governor Sir Jonathan Atkins to Lords of Trade and Plantations. The apprehensions of the French at present removed. The fortifications being finished, this Island is the strongest in these parts of the world; four-fifths of it are naturally fortified and inaccessible, the other part is well fortified, and has two hundred guns and everything necessary for defence, all at the country's charge, with ten thousand men. Is informed of the petition of the farmers of the 4½ per cent, to the King concerning an Act passed to their great prejudice, upon which he comments, but is well assured they have no reason to complain, for they have not been hurt nor can be by it. If they complain of a good bargain, for such they have got of the King, thinks they mistake the point. 1 p. "Recd. 28 Nov. Read 4 Dec." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 114, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VI., pp. 291, 292.]
Sept. 13.1114. Muster roll of Captain John Barrow's Company in Colonel Thomas Fuller's Regiment:—1 captain, 1 lieutenant, 1 ensign, 2 sergeants, 1 drummer, 50 privates, "mustered at Cabberetta." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 115.]
Sept. 15.1115. Muster roll of Captain James Davis's company in Colonel Thomas Fuller's regiment:—1 captain, 1 lieutenant, 1 ensign, 2 sergeants, 50 privates. (Taken at Surinam.) [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 116.]
[Sept.]1116. Muster roll of Colonel Thomas Fuller's company in his own regiment: Richard Matthews captain-lieutenant, 1 ensign, 2 sergeants, 1 gentleman-at-arms, 36 privates. "The above-named soldiers are well armed and indifferently well furnished with powder and bullets." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 117.]
Sept. 15.
St. Jago de la Vega.
1117. Governor Lord Carlisle to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Your letters of 25th March, 4th April, and 31st May (see ante, Nos. 961, 1012) were received on 26th August. Your orders and reports on the laws and Government of Jamaica I communicated to the Council on 27th August (the Assembly then sitting to continue the expiring Revenue Bill), and on the same day the Council being present I commended His Majesty's letter of 31st May and your Order and Report of same date to the Assembly, which came to me as seasonably as they received them surprisedly, making me the next morning the enclosed address (see ante, No. 1105). Upon this, having passed a Bill of Impost for six months, I prorogued them by advice of the Council until the 28th October next, hoping that in that time they would fall off of their heat, and upon recollection better bethink themselves of their duties and allegiance, and on my offering them again the laws, which I purpose to do on their first meeting, better demonstrate their obedience by consenting to them. But from what I can learn from their leaders I find the same averseness as formerly; they aver that they will submit to wear, but never consent to make, chains (as they term this frame of Government) for their posterities. I am surprised that your Lordships found the Bills so unagreeable to what you expected for His Majesty's approbation, considering the care that I took myself to correct them, having had them examined at the Council Board. But on enquiring from my Secretary I find that the Attorney-General, upon whom I chiefly leaned, with the Chief Justice, who assured me that in what I questioned they agreed with the laws I brought over, had the last examination thereof. The Attorney-General is dead within these three weeks, so that I can have no further satisfaction, but they were unhappily the occasion of these errors, which I did my best to avoid. I trust, therefore, that I may keep your good opinion and escape your censure. I regret to have incurred your displeasure for neglecting to answer thirty several enquiries, wherein I may seem to have been more negligent than I have been. Since my arrival I have had so many difficulties from the untowardness of a dissatisfield people and the danger from the French fleet, that I have had work enough to compose their fears and encourage them to keep up and repair their fortifications, as the enclosed copy of report from two Committees of both Chambers will attest (see ante, No. 1111). This I do for the security of Port Royal, though the revenue fell short of the expense by a thousand pounds last year, having been forced to continue martial law owing to the appearance of the French fleet before the harbour. Since my arrival I have not let a ship go for England without writing, but chiefly to Secretary Coventry, thinking that your Lordships will be overburdened with trouble from the plot. Of the thirty enquiries, some I have answered, the numbers of horse and foot and fighting men, and our present state with the French and the Spaniard to Secretary Coventry; details of exports and growth of the Island to the Commissioners of Customs every six months, and the magazine to the Master of the Ordnance. Other answers are a making ready.
In obedience to His Majesty's Orders of 29th March I issued a proclamation inviting all his subjects home from privateering, and prohibiting the cutting of logwood in Spanish territory. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 118, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., p. 327.]
Sept. 15.
St. Jago de la Vega.
1118. Governor Lord Carlisle to Secretary Coventry. Have received your letters of 4th April and 22nd May (ante, Nos. 961, 1002), the latter, which brought with it one from the King, arriving most seasonably on the sitting of the Assembly for containing the Bill of Impost, which six days after would have expired. Since the 30th. August, I have been three days at the Point, and on Friday morning went with Sir Henry Morgan to Three Rivers, some twelve miles from the Point, and thence round the Cod of the Great Harbour to the Rocks, where we observed the properest passes to secure both the Point and Liquania in case of attacke by land. A hundred more negroes are to be added to the slaves of the Point to carry on the fortifications there. On Monday, 1st instant, Sir Thomas Modyford died; and his son Sir Thomas is not like to live long after him. Mr. Wright the Attorney-General died a few days earlier. Have appointed one Roger Elletson, Esq. Their Lordships of the Committee have charged me severely with neglecting to answer 30 several inquiries. Some were not fit to be answered, viz., the number of fighting men on the Island, which I sent to you as a great secrecy not fit to be known by any but the King and yourself. Some could not be answered but by length of time and much charge upon general surveys and better settlements, which are as yet in their infancy. Parishes without churches; few people and those at a great distance one from another; registries of christenings and burials unsettled, most families burying their dead about their private houses. I send an account every six months to the Commissioner of Customs, and another to the Master of the Ordnance; from home we want a supply of gunpowder of which I hope Sir Francis Watson will take care. The Lords' questions are generally answered in a book called the State of Jamaica. In a former letter I conjectured our force of listed men at 4,000 whites and 50,000 blacks and Indians, of which last there are some in most plantations, excellent fishermen and fowlers, and skilful with cattle. I have since had lately returned to me lists of the general musters through the Island, which few men can have escaped, the law requiring all to be within a certain time listed at their place of residence. The total is little above 4,000 fighting men, though we have reputation with our neighbours for 20,000 and thus are formidable to them; so silence in this particular is a great security. This number of whites is one-fifth short of the proportion required by law, viz., one white to ten blacks, which cannot well be made up by servants that come hither, for that they make good no more than the deaths and departures of others from the Island. It must be by removal of families and the growth of youth here, "very hardy and much delighted in arms," that our necessities must in time be answered. From what I can gather from the leaders, the Assembly will abide by their former resolutions, and on their meeting on 28th October will not be prevailed with to pass the laws. They will submit, they say, to wear what His Majesty shall please to order, but they will not make chains for their posterities. The revenue therefore, when the Revenue Bill expires six months hence, must be kept on foot by my order and the Council's, which will rouse great opposition. I hear that they purpose to address the Commons-of England, who, as it is reported here, are about making an Act to punish any levying of money but by consent of Parliament. Whether they include the Plantations I know not, but as this may become ground of complaint against me, pray send me timely such positive and clear orders as may justify the Council and myself. It is not safe to refer me to Colonel Doyley's government, for his council was elected, though some aver the contrary. The inhabitants are in great dread of danger from the French men-ofwar in these seas. Report states that Count d'Estrées, now to leeward, as we suppose, at Havanna, and another squadron to windward, will rendezvous a month hence at Hispaniola. Their hunters there have orders to have such a supply of dried provision ready for them as shows their purpose on us or the Spaniard. The Spaniards have lately given them a just provocation by taking a small vessel, called a snow, with thirty men belonging to Count d'Estrées. The same Spanish man-of-war shortly before took a sloop belonging to Port Royal and carried the men prisoners to Porto Bello, where the English were not only relieved with money but by the friendship of the Bishop of Panama discharged and their sloop delivered to them, and the thirty Frenchmen put on board her to be transported hither; when on their application to me I furnished them with money and a sloop to go to windward to Petit Guavos with them. Since that a sloop of the Royal African Company has foundered at sea upon the coast of Hispaniola with negroes. The Agent of the Company sent to Petit Guavos and M. de Pouancay immediately despatched a sloop with provisions to them, but arriving too late (most of them having been fetched off by a sloop sent from here by the Company's factors) the French sloop came down hither with a letter to me and Sir Henry Morgan to help the master to his freight from the Company's factors. So we and the French are as yet very friendly. We are less well treated by the Spaniards, who have lately taken many of our ships laden with logwood and cacao, sparing none that they can overpower at sea. One Paul Abney was lately taken, with his sloop and passengers, prisoners by a Spanish man-of-war belonging to a squadron of five called the Barlovento fleet, commanded by the Vice-Admiral of Carthagena; and the sloop, having only cacao on board, was plundered. Abney produced my pass to the Vice-Admiral who wiped his breech with it and threw it at him again, converted the cargo of the sloop to his own use, and forced him to sign a receipt of having received money for the same (which indeed he had not) or else not to be discharged. Abney has sworn that when on board the Vice-Admiral he saw five other masters of ships on board, lately taken prisoners by the Spaniards, and one of them in irons. He brought letters from them to their relations at the Point complaining of their barbarous usage, which exasperates the people much against the Spaniards, who at the King's pleasure might be so easily humbled. I find on examinatiom that the Revenue this year is above 1,100l. short of the expenditure; the account shall be sent to their Lordships when passed by the Council. Am consequently much straitened in my condition of living, everything except fruit being at excessive rates. What troubles me still more is the great arrear in the pay of the two foot companies; their impatience for the same grows greatly upon me; their necessities force them to complain, and the poor soldier's life grows uneasy in his quarters and occasions the death of many. The establishment for the government being also in arrear much pinches me. I must therefore entreat their Lordships for their good offices with the Commissioners of the Treasury in this matter. We have now 108 guns mounted at Port Royal and but 100 barrels of powder, out of which some must be spared for H.M.S. Hunter. Pray move the Master of the Ordnance, to whom I have written sending full particulars. It is very unpleasant to me to add to your many troubles and cares, but my duty must be my excuse. "Read 15 Dec. 1679." 8 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., p. 331.]
Sept. 15.
St. Jago de la Vega.
1119. Governor Lord Carlisle to [the Master of the Ordnance]. I enclose Captain Charles Morgan's account of stores for Jamaica (see ante, No. 1109). We have 108 cannon mounted at Port Royal, and 14 at Point Morant. We have but 100 barrels of powder; other deficiencies you will see from the return which I beg you will hasten to make good to us. The small arms damaged by Captain Knapman I found eaten up with rust, and not worth repairing. Field-carriages for field-pieces are also badly wanted. Much of the powder is decayed. Copy. Recd. from the Commrs. of Ordnance 18th December 1679. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 119, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXLX., p. 339.]
Sept. 15.1120. List of ordnance, stores of war, &c., in Jamaica. Guns mentioned are, the cannon of 7, demi-cannon, culverin, demi-culverin, minion, falconet, sacker, and 12-pounder. Copy. Recd. from the Commissioner of Ordnance 18th December 1679. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 120.]
Sept. 15.
John's, foundland.
1121. Charles Talbot to Sir Robert Southwell. We came so late to Newfoundland that the season for boats to adventure to the northward was past, neither could we get any. What I could learn in answer to the enquiries I have enclosed. Annexed,
1121. i. Answers to enquiries respecting Newfoundland. (1.) The Colony consists of about 1,700 men, women, children, and servants. Trade in summer fishing; in winter sawing of boards, building boats and making oars for the Adventurers. After the ships are gone they generally fish till All Hallowtide. There is furring to the north, but little to the southward. They observe the rules of their charter more than the Adventurers, for they preserve their stages, while the Adventurers people destroy theirs for firewood for the homeward voyage. (2.) The inhabitants are not able to subsist, and the less for want of a government to protect them in their labours. From England they get their bread, clothing, malt, flesh and pease, from Ireland both provisions and clothing, from New England tobacco, sugar, molasses, rum, flesh, bread, and flour. What relates to the fishery comes solely from England in English ships. (3.) They make no use of the wood except for purposes of the fishery, and building &c.; they do their best to secure the Adventurers' concerns which are left with them, but it is a common practice for the Adventurers to rifle the stages and rooms and boats to fit themselves, so I am informed, and the fact is not denied by some of the masters. (4.) Few of the Colony keep above three boats, and none of them take up more room than is convenient; far from being prejudicial the trade could not be so well managed without them. (5.) The boat-keepers left behind must be esteemed part of the Colony, but there are many that pay their passages out and home, and fish the season. These cannot be prejudicial to the Adventurers' concerns, though when the stages are ruined by the ships' companies I suppose the colonists make bold with the rest for firewood. (6.) The Colony and bye-boats are supplied with brandy, wine, salt, &c., from France, Spain, and Portugal, but only in English ships. (7.) The country is mostly barren and cumbered with wood. Winters are so severe and long as not to afford winter corn. In summer they might do somewhat, but servants' wages are so excessive that clearing ground and sowing corn would not be profitable. It is a Colony not of husbandmen but fishermen. (8.) New England trades with Newfoundland for fish. It is false that the fishermen are debauched by the Colony and forced to hire themselves for satisfaction of their debts; but as some of the servants return yearly to England when the summer voyage is over, they hire others in their places, thereby gaining their passages the year ensuing. (9.) It is supposed that the Colony own a fourth part of the fishing boats and generally make better voyages, but their expenses being greater they cannot afford to sell cheaper. (10.) Those of New England fish little on this coast, but their own fisheries increase, for they steal fishermen every year from Newfoundland. (11 and 12.) Referred to Captain Wright's report. (13.) The masters are glad to have the provisions of such men as are willing to stay with the Colony. (14.) The Adventurers' people break up their stages, and were beginning at St. John's when we were there, until forbidden. In short, they offer so many abuses to the Colony that some have removed to the French and more threaten to do so.
As to the French,—
They manage the trade as we do by a colony and fishing ships. Placentia is fortified, garrison of twenty men; ten families of English and French and more at other ports in the south; at least 40 ships fish on that side, come sooner, and go for the Straits a month before us. Northward at least 150 ships fish, according to Christopher Martin. They sail for St. Malo and thereabout. No information as to Colony or fortifications. They have a great trade for beaver in Canada and Nova Scotia. As to the present state of the fishery at large:—The trade is prejudiced for want of government. The fishermen are negligent and insolent. If the masters are severe the men desert to New England. The stages are generally destroyed; a great waste of wood and abuse to the Colony. (2.) The island is a possession of the British Crown. The Colony preserve it, having been settled by patent as a colony of fishermen with liberty to build stages, houses, or forts if they would, but not to make plantations within six miles of the fishery places so as to preserve the woods necessary for the fishery. (3.) If the Colony be not allowed to follow the fishing trade, the King's Customs will suffer, and many of his subjects be lost by removal to the French, to which several have been driven already. (4.) In case of war with France one ten-gun frigate might burn all the boats and destroy the Colony. St. John's and a few other harbours may be made impregnable. (5.) The way to secure Newfoundland is to settle a Governor and Government, fortify some of the choice harbours, and maintain good garrisons which may be done at little cost to the King. (6.) The Colony has declared its willingness to contribute, but the Adventurers and sack ships should contribute also, as they will profit, say, one penny per quintal or two quintals per boat, and the sack ships to find ammunition as in New England. (7.) The sum thus raised will pay for fortifications and garrisons. 3 pp. Endorsed, Recd. 13 Feb. Read 21 and 26 Feb. 1679–80. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 121, 121 i.]
Sept. 17
St. Jago de la Vega.
1122. Governor Lord Carlisle to Mr. Secretary Coventry. Since mine of the 15th, Sir Henry Morgan has certain intelligence from a master of a sloop arrived in Port Royal, that seven days since six sail of French ships of war passed by the Isle of Ash, whereof four very large and two of smaller rates. Undoubtedly they come to join with the Count d'Estrées according to our first accounts. This suiting with the time of their appointed rendezvous much increases the fears of the people here, of whose warm entertaining them I doubt not if our powder answer but our time of service. 1 p. Recd. 9th Dec. Read 15th 1679. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 122, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., p. 339.]
Sept. 19.1123. Account of the pretensions of the Proprietors of New Jersey to pay no customs dues at New York. The Dutch while in possession of the territory called New Netherland in America levied 10 per cent. duty on all merchandise. In 1664 when the Fort of New Amsterdam (now New York) was surrendered to Colonel Nicholls, the same payments were consented to, and the privileges of the inhabitants reserved to them. Colonel Nicholls held the post of Governor under the Duke of York (to whom the King had granted this territory), and Colonel Lovelace after him till 1672. The Duke granted that portion known as New Jersey to Sir G. Carteret and Lord John Berkeley, which they enjoyed as proprietors of the soil until 1672, when by the chance of war the territory passed again in the hands of the Dutch, but was restored in 1673. All this time the 10 per cent. duty continued without interruption. In 1674 the Duke of York sent out Sir E. Andros as Governor and lowered the duty from 10 to 5 per cent., Sir G. Carteret dividing New Jersey with the Quakers under grant from the Duke, as he had formerly with Lord John Berkeley, which partition was confirmed by the Duke of York. Sir E. Andros continues to demand five per cent. customs, which the Quakers refuse to pay. Query: Are Sir G. Carteret and the Quakers by the grant of the soil empowered to erect different Governments and Commonwealths within their respective lands, or are they not like all the other people in the territory subject to the laws enforced in New York ? 2½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. from Sir John Werden. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 123.]
Sept. 19.
Whitehall.
1124. Order of the King in Council. The new Government for New Hampshire having been appointed by Royal Commission, dated 18th September 1679, Ordered, that the seal herewith sent be the seal of the Province for all public documents, and that the portrait of His Majesty likewise sent herewith be kept and exposed to view in the places appointed for the meeting of the Council. 1½ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXI., pp. 9, 10.]
Sept. 19.
Whitehall.
1125. Order of the King in Council. Upon reading letter from Sir Jonathan Atkins, Governor of Barbadoes, of 6/16 June last, concerning the Dutch Colony of Surinam (see ante, No. 1015), he is directed not to make any compact or agreement with the Dutch for the Surrender of Surinam upon any account whatsoever. Draft, with corrections, and fair copy. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 124, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VI., pp. 289, 290.]
Sept. 23.
Whitehall.
1126. Petition of the Earl and Countess of Lichfield to the King. Pray for a lease in reversion of the farm of the duty of 4½ per cent. of all commodities exported from Barbadoes, after the expiration of the present lease, for 31 years, and at the same rents and covenants. With reference to Lords of the Treasury to report what His Majesty may fitly do. ½ p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. LV., p. 45.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
1127. Order of the King in Council. For the addition of a clause to Lord Culpeper's instructions, giving, in case of the absence or death of the Governor, a seat in the Council and a power of veto to the Secretary, and in case of the Secretary's absence the same powers to the Major-General. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 125, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 365, 366.]
Sept. 24.
Whitehall.
1128. The King to Governor Sir Jonathan Atkins. Understands by his letter of 6/16 June last (see ante, No. 1015) that the Dutch colony upon Surinam, being much oppressed by the Indians, are brought to such extremity that they are ready to quit their plantations there, and have made overtures to him for delivering that place and people to His Majesty. These are to signify the King's pleasure that the Governor of Barbadoes makes no compact or agreement with the Dutch for the surrender of Surinam to His Majesty upon any account whatsoever. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VI, pp. 290, 291.]
Sept. 24.
St. Jago de la Vega.
1129. Governor Lord Carlisle to Secretary Coventry. This comes by the same ship as mine of the 17th, she having been driven back by tornados and tempestuous weather. Having learned the Assembly's temper by the nature of the vote, whereof I enclose copy (see ante, No. 1098), I intend to be no more a stranger to their proceedings but to appoint one of my own servants to be their clerk, whereas hitherto I gratified them in their electing one of their own. On the 22nd instant His Majesty's frigate Success, Captain Tyte, arrived in Port Royal, and on the day before the Carlisle, Captain Swan. The Success takes the place of the Hunter, which I am sending to Carthagena to demand some English prisoners taken since my arrival in this place, which I could not do if the Success were not here to "countenance the harbour," where the people still dread the appearance of the French fleet. 1 p. "Recd, 7th Dec., read 15th Dec. 1679." [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 126, and Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., p. 340.]
Sept. 25.1130. Edward Randolph's receipt for the following papers from William Blathwayt, Esq., to be delivered in New England:—Four letters for the Governors of the four colonies, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay, from the Committee of Trade and Plantations, and one letter from His Majesty to the Governor and Company of Massachusetts, dated the 24th of July last; as also His Majesty's picture and Royal Arms, with a seal and press, and an Order of Council for authenticating the seal; four commissions for swearing the Governors of the colonies, and commissions for the Government of New Hampshire; map of Boston Harbour. Signed, Ed. Randolph. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 127.]
Sept. 26.
Whitehall.
1131. Secretary Coventry to Governor Winslow. The King has received his letter of 1st July, and commands him to let him know they are the first letters received from him, and is very thankful; for the present he never received, nor the letters, the copies of which he has sent. The King is very sensible of the dutiful respects declared in them, and assures him that his kindness and protection will never be wanting to such of his subjects as honestly and conscientiously declare their submission and obedience in them. The things required in the letter are referred to the Committee of Council; Mr. Randolph, who brings this letter, will tell him there was no time to debate then, but he shall receive an answer by the next opportunity. Encloses the Order in Council upon it, asks him to receive Mr. Randolph civilly as a person the King believeth very well of. Duplicate. 1 page, with seal. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 128.]
Sept. 29.
Narragansett.
1132. Richard Smith to Sir R. Southwell. Thanks him for his kindness relating to the furthering of his petitions. Was in hopes that Mr. Randolph would have gotten out orders on both, but understands he hath not. It is probable Randall Holden and John Greene, Warwick messengers, might obstruct it by giving false information, as they have done in many other things relating to the Narragansett country and the rest of the colonies in New England and to Mr. William Harris, whom they have most notoriously abused and forced a possession on his interest, and those of Rhode Island comploys (accomplices) with them. They do now since the coming home of those two base fellows, Holden and Greene, force possessions on several of their lands there in the King's province at Narragansett, notwithstanding His Majesty's letters commanding the colonies, all of them, the contrary; which made them, the first settlers and "ainchant" inhabitants draw up a remonstrance and petition to the King. It was directed in a letter to Mr. William Harris for him to deliver, but he is arrived in Narragansett before it came, so that it lies enclosed in that letter at his landlord's, one John Stokes, a baker, in Wentworth Street, near Spitalfields. Copy of the letter is enclosed. Requests Southwell's favourable aspect thereon, that the King and Council may have the sight of it and grant an order for their release. Are now governed by men's wills, and most of them Quakers, and of such and worse does Rhode Island consist; they were left by the King's Commissioners as Justices, till His Majesty's pleasure were farther known, and instead of that they exercise their patent right. Rhode Island has lately writ to the King begging the Narragansett country, which, if granted, they will dispossess the inhabitants here of their rights. If it is to be procured, wishes his Honour would get the "signoroty" of it, which would in time be very profitable. Has requested Squire John Lewen to take up the petition and to advise with him as to getting it presented; if that should miscarry the enclosed is the same. Was lately arrested at Rhode Island (a copy of their warrant is enclosed (see ante, No. 1067), on no charge, and then detained from Saturday to Monday in the afternoon; and then they met the Governor and Council and drew up a charge, (1) for presenting a petition in England tending to the subversion of their government, (2) for denying the King's authority, (3) for charging their court with injustice. The petition presented he (Sir R. Southwell) had seen. About six or seven years since they came over to Narragansett to keep court and sat in the King's province; which he (Smith) forbade them to do, as the Commissioners had ordered no one to exercise jurisdiction there but those appointed by themselves, and if that order was void then Connecticut had precedency. As for charging them with insults, did not; but might very well, relating to one Mr. John Saffin, a very fine discreet person, a proprietor in Narragansett country, who, for putting up an advertisement about sale of lands there, was arrested at Rhode Island on Sunday night. Saffin was tried at the next court in May last by a jury, several of whom had forced possession on his lands, and the foreman had prejudged the cause beforehand; all which he challenged of, but could not have it granted. So he was brought in guilty of what they have no law for, that his estate should be forfeited to their colony and he fined 30l.; and if this be not injustice, knows not what is. Must come to a trial before them next October, and if they abuse him at that rate shall move to England to have the question re-heard. Is emboldened to acquaint Southwell with these facts, and to request so great a favour of him by his good nature and inclination to help the wronged, and by his commands to inform him of the affairs of the country. Here is peace, the heathen most killed and taken; some are fled and do no damage. A prodigious and dreadful fire has lately happened in Boston, in which is consumed at least 200,000l.; some think it set on fire by design by Papists, but it is not known. It broke out between twelve and one o'clock. Are alarmed at the French fleet in the West Indies. A great year for fruit and corn, cider in abundance. Endorsed, "Recd. 5th March 16 79/80." 3 pp. [Col Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 129.]
Sept. 30.1133. Minutes of the Council of Barbadoes. Ordered, that Colonel William Bate, at the next meeting of the Council, produce the order for delivering arms out of the public stores to the companies called the Auxiliaries, and give an account why they were not paid for. That writs issue for the election of an Assembly on Monday, 20th October, the Members elected to meet at the usual place the next day. That the Treasurer pay Samuel Norris, gunner at the Hole Fort, five thousand pounds of Muscovado sugar for a year's salary. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XI., p. 302.]
[Sept.]1134. [Henry Jocelyn to Sir E. Andros.] My Lord Sterling's Nova Scotia ordered by King Charles II. to be delivered to the French in 1633, was thus bounded; C. Breton the E. bounds, and thence westward to Ste. Croix right against the E. end of the Grande Munhane, and a line E. from Pascattamaguade. Captain Walter Neale made Governor by the Council of Plymouth in 1631 of all of New England that was not granted to others; the W. bounds began at the E. end of Boston Patent, and went E. as far as Sta. Croix. All his time the French never claimed any land W. of Nova Scotia, but two years after he left M. Donee was sent by M. Commander Rasilio living at Lahane, E. from Cape Sable some 40 leagues, with a ship to discover the coast of Nova Scotia and New England. And in Penobscot Bay in a great fog Thomas Willett coming from Pemaquid to his house at Penobscot in a small shallop came foul of Donee's ship. Donee took him and made him pilot him to his house at Penobscot, and forced him to give him a bill of sale of his land and house, but sent him away in his shallop. Willett coming to his owners at Plymouth, they procured him a ship of 32 guns, an Ipswich man, to go and retake Penobscot with some land forces of their own, Captain Standish being commander of them. In the meantime Donee had fortified himself, and planted on a mount four or five great guns. The Plymouth forces demanding a surrender, he seemed willing upon honourable terms; but they refusing, Donee told them they must win it before they should enjoy it, and played his part so well (that) the great ship and Plymouth soldiers were forced to quit the place. Endorsed, "Sept. 79. Mr. Henry Joselin of Eastern County. For his "Excellence Sir E. Andros, Gov. Gen. of all his Royal Highness "territories in America." 1p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XLIII., No. 130.]