America and West Indies
March 1675

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1893

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180-201

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'America and West Indies: March 1675', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9: 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674 (1893), pp. 180-201. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70092 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Contents

March 1675

March 1.
Whitehall.
452. Sir Robt. Southwell, Secretary to the Committee for Trade and Plantations, to Secretary Sir Joseph Williamson. The Lords of the Committee desire some information from St. Malo, touching the number of ships set forth this year for Newfoundland, their tonnage and number of men, the profit of that adventure estimated at percent., and the public and private Rules and Regulations of the Fishery; and, if possible, to know what is done in other ports of France, that an estimate may be made of the whole numbers of men and ships, the capital stock, and the product thereof yearly to the public and to the King's Revenue; and next to know what garrisons are maintained on that island, and particularly whether it be true that the plantation there is encouraged for the beaver trade, and defence against the Indians, and does not at all meddle with the fishing, but leaves that wholly to the ships and hands that yearly come there. 1 p. (Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 17.]
March 1–2.
Falmouth, Antigua.
453. Two Acts passed by Col. Philip Warner, Governor, and the Council and Assembly of Antigua, viz.: An Act for reforming Abuses in Storehouses, March 1. An Act for augmenting the Yearly Allowance for Col. Philip Warner, the present Governor of the Island, March 2, 1674–75. Endorsed, "Recd by the post under cover from Col. Warner, then on board the Phenix, 18 April 1676." Together, 6½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 18.]
March 2–12.
Middleburgh.
454. The States of Zealand to their Deputies at the Hague. In compliance with theirs of the 7th inst., send enclosed (as has been already done to the Heer Ambr. Van Benninghen) copy of their letter of the 16th Feb. to Capt. Peter Vorsterre, Governor of Surinam, by several vessels, that they may make use thereof for the Public service. Enclosed,
454. i. Same to Capt. Peter Vorsterre, Commander of Surinam. Send herewith all the Resolutions made by the States General, with concert of the Ambassador of the King of Great Britain, concerning the bringing off from Surinam of the English who are willing, with order precisely to govern himself thereby. 1675, Feb. 6–16. Together, 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVIII., pp. 54–55.]
March ?455. Mem. that the Prince of Orange's letter to the Governor of Surinam was sealed up and so could not be here entered. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVIII., p. 56.]
March 3.
Weymouth and Melcombe Regis.
456. Tobias Burr, Mayor of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, to the Committee of Council for Trade and Plantations. Has received their order of 25th Feb., and summoned the magistrates, with the owners and masters of ships trading at the Newfoundland, and taken an account of all the ports and places of that Plantation, with the number of planters; and also an account of the fittest harbours to be fortified, which is now sent; and has appointed a correspondent to attend their Lordships in this affair. Endorsed, "Letter from the Vice-Admiral." Enclosed,
456. i. An account of the harbours on the North Coast of Newfoundland and of the planters resident there, all His Majesty's subjects, viz.:—In Trinity Bay, 10 harbours, of which Trinity is fit for a fort, and 17 planters with their families; in Conception Bay, 13 harbours, of which Harbor de Grace is fit for a fort, and 29 planters and families; and in the Middle and South Coasts, 16 harbours, of which St. John and Ferre Land [Ferryland] are fit for forts, and 44 planters and families. Every planter keeps two boats with 5 men to each; in the whole 900 men. Endorsed, "3 March 74/5." Together, 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, Nos. 19, 19 i.]
March 7.
Whitehall.
457. The King's instructions to Edward Cranfield, his Majesty Commissioner for Surinam. As soon as he has dispatched the business at Surinam, to embark for such other plantations as he shall judge convenient, observing the following general rules: (1) Not to pretend any power of taking any account from any Governor, but as a journey to satisfy his own curiosity, and on some design of adventuring where he shall see the greatest likelihood of the plantations prospering; (2) under which pretence he may easily inform himself of the value of plantations and of the taxes, trades, oppressions, hazards, and profits, legal or illegal under the several Governments, and particularly as dexterously as he can satisfy himself in the following particulars. Then follow 22 inquiries, being those usually sent by the Council of Plantations to Governors of same, and in particular as to New England, to inquire, What differences are depending between the Massachusets and the rest of the Colonies about boundaries? What differences in religion as to doctrine and discipline? How the generality of New Englanders stand affected to appeals to His Majesty? Whether liberty of conscience, trade and votes to elections be allowed equally to all the people? And, whether the Common Prayer be allowed or used by any? He shall see St. Christopher's before his return, and strive to inform himself of the true state of the difference betwixt his Majesty's subjects and the French. 3½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 20.]
March 7.
St. Jago de la Vega.
458. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present, Sir Thos. Lynch, Governor, Sir Henry Morgan, Col. Chas. Whitfield, Col. Thos. Ballard, Lt.-Col. Robt. Byndlosse, Maj. Anthony Collier, Sam. Long, and John White. On reading the revocation of Sir Thomas Modyford's Commission, it was the opinion that Sir Henry Morgan, being constituted Lieut.-Governor under his Majesty's Sign Manual, was, by a clause in said revocation under the Great Seal, sufficiently invested with authority to assume the Government; whereupon Sir Thos. Lynch made a demission of the Government to him, and it was ordered, that a proclamation immediately issue to continue all persons in their employments, military and civil, till further order. On notice given by Sir Henry Morgan of the shipwreck of Capt. Knapman on the Isle de Vaca, it was the opinion that sloops and boats be speedily sent to save so much of his Majesty's stores as can possibly be preserved. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXV., 386–388.]
March 11.
Port Royal.
459. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present, Sir Henry Morgan, Lieut.-Governor, Sir Thos. Lynch, Col. Chas. Whitfield, Lieut.-Col. Robt. Byndlosse, Maj. Anthony Collier, Sam. Long and John White. Resolved that the Great Seal of the Island be placed in Sir Henry Morgan's hands as being the present Commander-inChief. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXV., 388.]
March 12.
Whitehall.
460. Order of the King in Council. His Majesty, having dissolved his late Council of Trade and Foreign Plantations, has thought fit to commit what was under their management to the Committee of the Privy Council appointed for matters relating to trade and plantations, whose names follow; that five be a quorum, and meet at least once a week and report their proceedings to the King from time to time. Sir Robert Southwell constantly to attend said Committee. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCVI., pp. 1–2.]
March 12.
Whitehall.
461. Order of the King in Council. Appointing certain of the Privy Council a Committee for matters relating to Trade and Foreign Plantations, five of them to be a quorum, to meet at least once a week and report to the King in Council their proceedings from time to time, with power to send for all books, papers, and writings, with a list of the Lords so appointed concerning said plantations. 2½ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., p. 1.]
March 12.
Whitehall.
462. Copy of the preceding with this mem: "In pursuance whereof their Lordships, on 11 August 1675, signed a circular letter to the Governors of his Majesty's plantations. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCVII., p. 7; also Vol. XCVI., p. 1.]
March 12.
Whitehall.
463. List of the Lords of the Privy Council appointed a Committee for Trade and Foreign Plantations. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV.]
March 12.
Whitehall.
464. Order of the Committee of Trade and Plantations. That all books and papers which were lately in possession of the Council of Plantations be enquired after and taken into the Council Office and a list made. Also that enquiry be made for globes, maps, sea charts, and journals. That Mr. Slingesby, Dr. Worseley, and Mr. Locke attend their Lordships to give account herein. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., p. 9.]
March 12.
Plymouth.
465. William Weekes, Mayor of Plymouth, to the Committee of Council for Trade and Plantations. Has communicated their orders of the 25th February to the Corporation and all others concerned in the Newfoundland trade, who have unanimously concurred in, and sent up their opinions to be presented to their Honors, and have appointed two correspondents to attend them. The like remonstrance and reasons were presented to the Lords of the Council in 1670, since which there is nothing new to offer. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 21.]
March 13.
Falmouth.
466. Wm. Arundel, Mayor of Falmouth, to Sec. Sir Joseph Williamson. Has, in order to the commands of the Privy Council, consulted with the inhabitants of this Corporation, concerning the state of Newfoundland, the number and force of the planters, and the situation of the ports and harbours, a short narrative whereof is enclosed. Endorsed, "R. 19, 1674/5." Enclosed,
466. i. A description of the harbours of Newfoundland, with their inhabitants from Cape Bonavista to Cape de Race, being as much as is at present inhabited by the English. Bonavista, with 15 or 16 inhabitants, road very foul; Trinity, with 10 or 12 inhabitants, a very safe harbour; Bay of Veares, with 3 or 4 families, a small dangerous cone; Carboneare, with 5 or 6 families, an indifferent good harbour; Harbour Grace, with 14 or 15 families, a harbour of great safety, but dangerous without a pilot; Port Grave, a small harbour with 3 or 4 families; Harbour Maine, in Conception Bay, with 2 or 3 families; Belle Isle, an island without inhabitants; Tor Bay, a small fishing cove with 5 or 6 families; St. John's, with 50 or 60 families, the best port in the whole land, and of very great security if fortified with a castle; many ships load there, and more would if it were fortified, for then merchants would have encouragement to leave their estates there, who now adventure no more than needs must; Pettye Harbour, a small port with 3 families; Bay of Bulls, with 10 families, a large bay where the convoys make up their fleets in time of war; Capelyn Bay, with about 6 families; Cape Broyle, a good harbour with no inhabitants; Trepastye, 10 leagues west of Cape de Race, with 5 families, a bold harbour and farthest to the west in possession of the English. Together, 2½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, Nos. 22, 22 I.]
March 15.
Port Royal.
467. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present, John Lord Vaughan, Captain General, &c., Sir Henry Morgan, Col. John Coape, Col, Chas Whitfield, Lieut.-Col. Robt. Byndlosse, Lieut.-Col. Thos. Fuller, Maj. Anthony Collier, and John White. His Excellency's Instrument of government under the Great Seal read, wherein his Majesty's Council were likewise appointed. The Oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy administered to him by five of the Council according to his Majestys' command, also the oath as Captain General and Governor-in-Chief of this Island. The Oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy administered to the Council, also an Oath to be just and faithful Councillors, disclosing none of his Excellency or his Majesty's secrets, and revealing whatever they shall find prejudicial to his Excellency or tending to the disturbance of the Island or Government; an Oath as Lieutenant-Governor; Sir Henry Morgan likewise took an oath. Ordered, that all officers, military and civil, continue in the execution of their several offices till further notice. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXV., 389–391.]
March 17.
Weymouth.
468. Nath. Osborne to Sec. Sir Joseph Williamson. Yesterday came in a small vessel from Newhaven, Wm. Serrell master, who says that on Monday last there were 2 men-of-war there to convoy their Newfoundland ships, who were to call at St. Malo for the fishing ships and to have 8 men.of-war more from Brest to attend the fishermen going from several places of France, who will be very numerous this year. Endorsed, "Weymouth, 17 March, R. 19, 1674/5." ½ p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 23.]
March 17.
Nevis.
469. Governor Stapleton to the Council for Plantations. Beseeches them in behalf of the officers and soldiers of his Majesty, two standing companies in St. Christopher's, to move his Majesty to pay their arrears and establish some fund for their future subsistence. They live in a most miserable condition amongst the poor inhabitants who are not able to give them any subsistence, and it is a disparagement rather than anhonour to the nation to have soldiers naked and starving in the eyes of the French, who have officers and soldiers in good equipage and very well paid. Prays they may be paid, continued and recruited, for should there be a breach, their neighbours are four to one on St. Christopher's. The Lieutenant who presents this, goes on purpose to know his Majesty's pleasure herein. Endorsed, "Read at the Commtte, 17 June "75." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 24.]
March 17.
Weymouth.
470. Reasons tendered by Geo. Pley for a settled government in Newfoundland, for the prevention of several abuses and for security and encouragement of trade. The yearly destruction of 250,000 young trees and 50,000 bigger trees, the burning of the woods and throwing overboard press-stones into the harbours (see "Capt. Robinson's Paper" in preceding volume, No. 369). After the "caplew-scull" used for bait is gone, the fishermen shoot their lance seines for bait, and take an infinite number of young cod, which are of no use, enough to load all the ships in the land. The French have harbours in the north at the Bays of Foggs and St. John's, and round all the land to the south as far as Trepasse, with a strong fort at the Harbour of Plaisance, but 12 miles from the English at the bottom of the Bay of Trinity. It is therefore offered that Trinity, Harbor de Grace, St. John's, and Ferryland are the most fit harbours to fortify; that no fires be made in the woods in summer time when they go to fetch "dinnidge" for their ships, in regard the grass and moss is then so dry that many miles of woods have been burnt, so that in some harbours they are forced to go many miles for timber; and that the articles made for regulation of the country may be sent to the mayors of the port towns to deliver each master a copy, and that in the articles a strict order be made to the Admiral of every harbour to charge each master to observe them, the harbours being so distant that a governor cannot inspect all. 1½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 25.]
Mar. 17–18.
St. Jago de la Vega.
471. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Present: John Lord Vaughan, Governor, Sir Henry Morgan, Lieutenant Governor, Col. Thos. Freeman, Col. John Coape, Col. Chas. Whitfield, Col. Thos. Ballard, Lt.-Col. Robt. Byndlosse, Lt.-Col. Wm. Ivey, Lt.-Col. Thos. Fuller, Maj. Anthony Collier, Hender Molesworth, and John White. Col. Thos. Freeman, not being named a Councillor in the Instrument of Government, his Excellency produces a Privy Seal for the admission of him into the Council, who thereupon took the usual oaths. Col. Thos. Ballard, Lt.-Col. Wm. Ivey, and Hender Molesworth, Esq., likewise sworn of the Council. His Excellency's instructions, received from his Majesty with the Instrument of Government, read. Ordered, on reading the 14th Instruction for the encouragement of persons of different opinions in matters of religion, &c., that proclamation be forthwith issued, that his Majesty's indulgence may be known; and on reading the 17th and 18th concerning the re-enacting of the laws and transmitting them to England, &c., ordered, that writs be immediately issued for calling another Assembly at St. Jago, 26th April, and that the following proclamation be forthwith published by beat of drum: Whereas by his Excellency taking upon him the government of this island, the Assembly called by the late Lieutenant Governor, Sir Thos Lynch, to meet on the 18th Feb., became immediately dissolved; nevertheless, to avoid all scruples, his Excellency hereby dissolves said Assembly. Ordered, upon the 21st and 22nd Instructions, that Sir Thos. Lynch, on notice given him, deliver to his Excellency and this Board an account of all arms, stores, and ammunition remaining in this island; and, upon the 28th Instruction, that he attend the Board ten days hence with all accounts and papers relating to his Majesty's 15th and other duties, and all other public monies which have been passed through his hands. Ordered, on reading a proclamation from his Majesty concerning the Royal African Company, with a letter from the Privy Council of 2nd December last, importing the speedy publication thereof, that said proclamation be forthwith published by beat of drum, and set up in some public place.
March 18.Proclamation, in accordance with his Majesty's instructions: That no persons in this island be molested by reason of difference in opinion or practice of religion, nor be compelled against the scruple of their conscience to take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, they, by some other form of asseveration, securing their allegiance to his Majesty and the Governor of this island, then all such shall enjoy the same rights and privileges as any other of his Majesty's subjects; provided always, that they be content with a quiet and peaceable exercise of their own religion, and presume not by reviling language or other indecent actions to disturb those of different persuasions; and that nothing herein be construed to excuse any person from performing all duties and services, military and civil, for better security of this island. Proclaimed by beat of drum at St. Jago and Port Royal, Mar. 19th, 1675. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXV., 391–397.]
March 18.
Whitehall.
472. Journal of the Committee of Trade and Plantations. A list given in by Mr. Locke, late Secretary of the Council of Plantations, of all papers he had received from Dr Worseley, but for globes and maps he never had any. Ordered, that Dr. Worseley give account whether he knows of any other papers than these. Discourse with Mr. Cranfield about some points of his instructions; a mistake in a master's name, viz., Simon Orton for John Broad to be amended. Also with Messrs. Child, Perrot, Scut, and others touching the business of Newfoundland. Letter read from Mr. Gould, showing the necessity of a colony for fishing cheap, and for the safety of the island, against which all urged many reasons. [Col. Entry Bk., No. CIV., 10.]
March 20.
Derby House.
473. Saml. Pepys to Sir Robert Southwell, Secretary to the Committee of Council for Plantations. Has come back a little out of sorts, otherwise had visited him and his Doomesday Book. Enclosed is copy of the Charter party of one (which, with the notes annexed, serves for the other two also) of the ships hired for Surinam; and also copy of the instructions to the masters, which is what his letter of yesterday commands. Finds in said papers the master of the Hercules called George (not John) Broad, and does not know why it is not Simon Orton; but if the Dutch papers call him Orton he must be contented to go by that name for this turn, as he believes another ere this obliged to do in behalf of Baker, master of the Henry and Sarah, whose illness at his departure left little hopes with his merchants of his surviving half the voyage. But more of this and everything else when he sees him on Monday. Enclosed,
473. i. Charter party of affreightment of the ship America, of London, of 494 tons burden, between the Commissioners of the Navy and Roger Paxton, master, hired for 6 months certain and 6 months uncertain for a voyage from London to Surinam, where Paxton is to take on board all such of his Majesty's subjects, their families, servants, negroes, goods and chattels, and transport them to such port in the West Indies as shall be appointed by said Commissioners or their agents. Said ship to be manned with 40 men, and furnished with 20 pieces of ordnance, sufficient ammunition, 40 tuns of water cask extraordinary for passengers, and 2 good boats; and to be ready by the 1st Jan. next to take in such stores as said Commissioners shall think fit (provided they be no more than the ship may reasonably carry), and to be at Gravesend by 5th Jan., ready to sail with the next good wind and weather. In consideration whereof said master is to receive 285l. per mensem during the voyage, two months in advance, viz., 285l., and the value of 285l. in sea victuals provided for his Majesty's ships. On breach of covenants he is bound to the Commissioners in the penalty of 1,000l.
Like charter party, the 20th Nov., with Gregory Page and George Broad, Master of the ship Hercules of 484 tons burden, with 36 men, 10 pieces of ordnance, sufficient ammunition, and 30 tuns of water cask.
The like charter party with John Baker, master of the Henry and Sarah flyboat, of 300 tons burden, with 28 men, 10 pieces of ordnance, sufficient ammunition, and 20 tuns of water cask. 1674, Dec. 4.
473. ii. Abstract of above charter party for the ship America.
473. iii. Instructions for Capt. John Baker, Master of the Advice Boat (Henry and Sarah) appointed to go to Surinam, being the same as the Draft of 22nd Dec. with an additional clause that he is to take care not to use any threats to such of His Majesty's subjects as shall not be willing to come off. 1675, Jan 20. Together, 8 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, Nos. 26, 26 I., II., III.; also Col. Entry Bks., No. XCIII., pp. 124, 125, and No. LXXVIII., pp. 23–26.]
March 20.
London.
475. James Houblon to [Sir R. Southwell]. Begs pardon that he did not wait on the Lords as desired, though mighty unwilling to talk in public, but was prevented. Is altogether a stranger to the point at issue, though Mr. Sec. Williamson told him there was an intention to send a Governor and Colony to Newfoundland to retrieve that trade. The reasons of the decay of this trade are: (1.) The infinite losses sustained by taking English vessels at sea for want of protection, this trade being driven in vessels of little defence, especially in the Spanish Wars 1657 to 1660, when were lost 1,200 ships, a great number being fish ships, to the great impoverishment of Plymouth, Dartmouth, Lyme, Poole, and other fishing towns, which they have never recovered, but are forced to take up moneys on Bottomry at 20 and 22 per cent., so that in bad years more than all the profit goes to the usurer, and in good years they cannot get a step forward, and so in time will dwindle to nothing. (2.) The mighty increase of the French in this trade since their treaty with Spain, the French merchants being mightily encouraged by the King, with money out of his Treasury, towards building ships, and convoys allowed them; their wages, shipping and materials are cheaper, and the most mighty men of St. Malo, Rouen, Dieppe, Nantes, Rochelle, Bourdeaux, and Bayonne, employ their stocks this way, and have good defensive ships of 12 to 24 guns; so that by supplying the Spanish and Italian markets better and cheaper, they increase and we dwindle; for before their peace with Spain, all the markets of France were supplied with dry fish by the English, but now they not only supply all their own markets, but mate the English in Portugal, Spain, and Italy. It seems a necessity for the State that this trade be not lost; and hearing that all particular interests, even of the west country towns, must not be in competition with the general good, is afraid that any new contrivances to continue in the old way by sending ships and men yearly out will not counterpoise the weakness in stock of those in possession; and therefore if those who propound making a plantation of Newfoundland can make out that it will but set us on even ground with the French, it would be to be embraced. There are seeming advantages of a plantation, viz.: (1.) Fish may be cheaper made employing far less stock; for whereas a vessel with 60 or 80 men takes up 1,200l. or 1,500l. stock, and spends five months out of nine going and returning, building stages and catching bait, during which they do nothing for the provisions they eat, this will be saved if only planters made fish, and the ships going yearly to fetch fish would carry salt provisions and other necessaries. (2.) Fish would be made with much greater care, every planter striving to outdo his neighbours to get customers, and prevent its being left on his hands. (3.) Fish being better and cheaper, merchants would be more invited to deal in it, the west countrymen make contracts for fish before their ships go out, so if they miscarry or have a bad fishing, this contract is void and the poor contractor bears the damage of sending his ship to Newfoundland and back for nothing; and the planters being sooner at work and having all things fitted to their hand and their whole livelihood depending upon it should catch more fish. But there must be mighty care in choosing a Governor, he must be a plain industrious man cut out for his business, for such a trade will not endure tyranny or charge; and in his judgment the planters should choose a Governor amongst themselves and make their own laws. The main objection may be the clamour of the West Country Corporations, who may plead that they will be put out of a trade at once, which it is certain in time would be left not only to them but to the whole nation; but thinks the interest of a few towns must not come into competition with the whole; besides, they or their agents will be the first planters, and may profit much more by this undertaking than by the old, and is sure it will better answer their small stock. Is of opinion that so far from causing us to have less shipping and seamen, we should in time have more, as being the only probable means to get this trade from the French, without which it will be in a few years given up to them; and of what consequence that would be, is troubled to think. But having never heard the arguments on both sides, begs leave hereafter to be of another opinion when better informed, being indifferent as to his particular. 8 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 27.]
March 21.476. Sir J. Williamson to John Leverett, Gov. of Massachusetts. Has received his favour of 30 Dec., in his and the Council's name concerning the Expectation, but, the interested having not yet appeared, nothing further has been done save to have it read before his Majesty and the Foreign Committee; will give him notice, as any thing further is resolved, so far as it may concern him or his colony. Offers his services in anything for the interest of his colony or himself. Hopes he will oblige him now and then to let them hear what passes in those parts of any kind. 1 p. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 93, p. 129b.]
March 21.
Southampton.
477. Th. Farr, Mayor of Southampton, to the Committee of Council for Trade and Plantations. In obedience to their order of 25th Feb., has convened the Corporation and others concerned in the Newfoundland trade, and some Masters that have used that employ above 20 years, who say that the English Plantation from Trapazi to Bonavista is about 80 leagues, within which are many convenient harbours which are named, wherein about 1,000 English Planters are commonly resident all the winter, and in summer 4,000. The French Plantation is in the Bay of Placentia, with a fort with 14 guns and 40 or 50 soldiers; and being not above six miles by land from the English at the bottom of the Bay of Trinity, the French draw away many English, intermarry with them, and bring up much of their fish against the coming of their ships. They also say that the stages they build to cure their fish are broken down by the planters in the winter, causing the merchants to send their ships a month sooner than otherwise they need to make new ones. The masters last year at Newfoundland positively affirm that five ships of St. Malo were laden at Bonavist and Trinity Bay, and that as many more are this year designed under the disguise of Jerseymen, to the great prejudice of English navigation. Assures them this formerly flourishing but now decayed town in trade will always be ready to their utmost to advance his Majesty's interest, and would think themselves happy to receive encouragement. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 28.]
March 22.478. Proposal of Edward Cranfield about distribution of provisions (to be sent to Surinam). Presumes the principal consideration moving his Majesty to send the provisions was to accommodate the poorer sort of people and not to feed the richer planters or their negroes, or indeed any, while at sea which would be no kindness to rich or poor, for all people in plantations have always sufficient provisions in the ground to support them till the season for producing new, which being taken up will serve them during their transportation and be more eligible when fresh; but when their own are spent, these provisions will support them till they can procure new, which will be the greatest encouragement to overseers, millwrights, carpenters, and other artificers, the useful men in settling new Colonies to come, for otherwise they would become a prey to any that would take advantage of their indigence. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 29.]
Mar. 23–24.
Whitehall.
479. Minutes of the Committee of Trade and Plantations. Mar. 23, Surinam. On reading over his Instructions, on the proposition of Mr. Cranfield, his 10th Instruction was quite altered, so as to leave it to the Commissioners' judgment what provisions to be allowed, to whom, and when. Ordered, that Mr. Pepys give the masters of the vessels orders to issue the provisions as the Commissioners shall direct.
Mar. 24, Surinam. Messrs. Cranfield and Brent attended. The 10th Instruction was quite changed, and with the rest read and approved, and the blank in the Commission was filled up, for now came that letter from Zealand which the Lords thought so necessary, as appears by their order of the 11th Feb. (see ante, No. 433). Ordered, that in the letters to the Governors abroad, where double the quantity of land is promised to those who remove, that expression be omitted in the letter to the Governor of Barbadoes, all the land there being in property already. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. CIV., 11, 12.]
March 24.480. New method of Instructions for the Masters of the merchant vessels Henry and Sarah, America, and Hercules, hired for Surinam, as to the distribution of provisions, being to the same effect as the Mem. (see ante, No. 446); but Masters are to be directed, in lieu of the method already given them from the Officers of the Navy, to issue said victuals to such persons only, in such proportions, and at such times, dressed or undressed, whether at their coming aboard, during the passage, or after their being landed in the respective colonies, as they shall be directed in writing before their departure from Surinam by one or more of the Commissioners. If their Lordships approve this, the Commissioners must be directed to see that their warrants to the Masters for issuing these provisions answer to the particulars herein stated, and to attest a list of the passengers with the Master of each ship; the Governors of the respective colonies also attesting other lists of the passengers landed, with certificates to the Masters of any provisions put to sale, and the proceeds, with express directions to notify to the Lords of the Committee or Officers of the Navy any complaints by passengers of failure in the Masters to execute said warrants. Endorsed, "Recd from Mr Pepys, 24 March 1674/5." 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 30.]
March 24.
Jamaica.
481. Lord Vaughan, Governor of Jamaica, to the Lords of the Council. Received on arrival their Lordships letter of 2nd Dec. last, with his Majesty's Proclamation concerning the Royal African Company, which he has ordered to be proclaimed, and will do his utmost to see punctually observed. "Reced. and read in Council, June 23, '75." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 31.]
March 25.
Whitehall.
482. Minutes of the Committee of Trade and Plantations. Several Newfoundland merchants appeared to debate about the fishery of Newfoundland, as Messrs. Child, Jas. Houblon, Newland, Scut, and Perrot (who had been often in New England), Mr. Rider, the Recorder of Dartmouth, and the Agent from Weymouth; also a letter read from Mr. Gould, still opposing the present way of sending our ships, advising a colony, which also Mr. Houblon urged by many arguments, presenting accounts of charge attending the way of fishing by ships. A large letter from him of the 20th inst. to Sir R. Southwell read (see ante, No., 475) great debate thereon; he condemns the present method, proposes more advantage by inhabitation as the way to catch more fish, and much cheaper. That the French would inhabit too, and this would help to extinguish our nursery of seamen, to which he answered that, if so, it would extinguish that of France, which were to our advantage, since they had no other nursery, but we had several, as Newcastle, &c. Against this opinion two papers were given in by Mr. Perrot, showing the mischiefs of inhabitants, that the French manage their trade as we do, and proving by accounts that our Adventurers catch fish cheaper than the inhabitants, who are forced to idleness and debauchery a great part of the year; also that we keep a superiority over the French in all the foreign markets, except in France, where we vend none, the French catch more green fish on the bank, and at Bilboa the Spaniards affect their dry fish as looking somewhat fairer than ours. The debate put off till the 30th inst. 1½ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. CIV., 13, 14.]
March 25.483. "Some modest observations and queries upon the last debate before the Committee of Lords for Newfoundland, by an Englishman only concerned for the public good of his King and country." It is agreed by all parties that the interest of England in relation to Newfoundland consists in keeping up and improving the fishing trade, for advancing his Majesty's customs, increasing seamen and ships, vending English commodities, enriching English merchants and consequently the nation, and hindering the French in all these particulars. The question is, then, whether these ends will be best effected in case the fish be taken by the inhabitants of Newfoundland or by the summer traders and English merchants, or by both as formerly without a Governor. His Majesty's customs arising from merchandise purchased by the fish, the English must take such quantities and at such cheap rates as to undersell and discourage the French, as instanced in the sugar trade with Portugal. Arguments on the fish query, whether the inhabitants on the place may not afford to sell to our merchants cheaper than the merchants can catch fish, which the Western Merchants deny, and say that the inhabitants lying idle all winter is equivalent to their summer charge; that, if they come only to buy, the inhabitants will exact upon them, and say it is all one to buy of the French; that there will not be so much English provision spent, nor so many seamen nurtured. Replies to these objections. It will easily be resolved whether the best cure will be by taking away the inhabitants and leaving the possession for the French, or by encouraging inhabitants, sending force, and settling a Government. When there was no king in Israel, every man did what was right in his own eyes; where no Governor, no government; laws are of no effect where no magistrate; and where no order is confusion. Answers to the objections that a Governor was useless because he cannot go to all places in his charge by land. As to the merchants' particular gain, the particular must submit to the general good; but is it not the most gain to the merchant to buy so cheap that he can undersell his neighbours, utter the greatest quantity, make the quickest returns without men and ships lying idle, sell the provisions he would spend, and avoid the grievances he complains of? But if the fishing be carried on as now, a Governor will be necessary to see good order between merchants and inhabitants, or if by the fishing ships alone, yet, to preserve his Majesty's propriety, force and fortifications will be necessary. It were much pity that in this case any English heart or head should take up the fancy of the Irish, who articled against Lord Stafford for a great oppressor, because he would not let them draw their horses by the tails as they were wont, but enjoined them the better way of harness; for all the arguments against encouragement to inhabitants and settling a Governor seem strongly to imply a necessity of both. Endorsed, "March 25th 1675." 5 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 32.]
March 25.
St. Jago de la Vega.
484. P. Beckford (Deputy Secretary of Jamaica?) to Sir Joseph Williamson. Lord Vanghan arrived on 13th inst. at night and landed at Port Royal; next day his commission was read, and he was entertained as well as the island could afford; 15th, he remained on Port Royal, viewing the fortifications; came next day to St. Jago, being received at the seaside by 150 horse and a company of foot, besides the gentlemen of the country and 7 coaches, all which attended him to the town, where he was received with 2 companies of foot, and dined with Sir Thos. Modyford. After dinner his Commission was read with great solemnity. Since then he has been wholly entertained by Sir Thos. Lynch and Sir Thos. Modyford to both of whom he shows great respect. Within two days his Lordship called his Council, where it was ordered that there should be proclaimed the King's Proclamation concerning the Royal Company, toleration of religion, dispensing with the oaths of allegiance and supremacy where there was scruple of conscience, and the dissolution of the former Assembly. Writs were also issued for an Assembly to meet 26th April next. Being informed that his Lordship resolved to curtail the Secretary's place all he could, told him the injury would lie on Beckford and not on the Patentee of whom he had rented the place for 3 years; but what did the greatest service was Sir Joseph's letter, his Lordship promising not to do any injury to the place so long as his time lasted in it. Prays him once more to write to his Lordship. 1½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 33.]
Mar. 25–26.485. Minutes of the Assembly of Barbadoes. The Assembly having sat 3 several times by adjournment, according to the rules of the House, Col. Chris. Codrington was re-elected Speaker. Upon reading a petition and complaint of Edwyn Stede, Provost Marshal of this Island, to his Majesty against one of his Majesty's judges of the Common Pleas of this island, wherein the Assembly are falsely and scandalously reflected on, resolved, that the House address themselves to his Excellency and Council for reparation for said abuses; and that the foregoing vote, with copies of the petition and complaint therein mentioned, be presented to his Excellency. Edwyn Stede's petition to his Majesty, with a reference from his Majesty to the Council of Trade and Plantations, dated 19th Nov. 1673, and statement of "the case of Edwyn Stede" annexed; and also the opinion of the Council for Trade and Plantations, dated 8th March 1674 (see preceding volume, No. 1238). An Act for taking off the 80 days after execution for future contracts, passed with the addition made by his Excellency and Council. Three members nominated a Committee to prepare and present to the House in the morning a petition to his Majesty concerning the many grievances put upon the island by the Royal African Company, and to move for the uses of the 4½ per cent. and trade with Scotland.
March 26.Voted that the Speaker in behalf of the House request his Excellency and Council that Edwyn Stede, Deputy Secretary, be suspended from all his public offices in this island till he have justified or cleared himself of the false and scandalous reflections on the Assembly in his petition and complaint to his Majesty. Ordered, that the Treasurer inspect the account of Benjamin Dweight for accommodation of a Committee of the Council and Assembly for one day, and pay what shall appear due out of the Excise on liquors imported. An Act for regulating the gauge of sugar cask read and passed. Answer to the collection of the defects of the laws of Barbadoes, drawn up, read, passed, and communicated to the Council. Voted, that the Treasurer may disburse 10,000 lbs. of sugar for the needful repair of the house of John Stanfast. That the Treasurer inspect the account of Paul Gwynn for accommodation of the Assembly, also the charge of the former Assembly at his Excellency's arrival, and pay what shall appear due out of the Excise on liquors imported. 7½ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XIII., 157–164.]
March 28.486. Warrant to the Attorney or Solicitor General. Whereas Sir Peter Colleton, Bart., has informed his Majesty that his brother JamesColleton, Gent., having been violently assaulted and wounded by Elisha Bridges, alias Blackney, a Constable at Bridge Town in Barbadoes, happened to kill Bridges, and that several concerned in the fact have been acquitted, it is his Majesty's pleasure that a Bill be drawn to pass the Great Seal containing a grant of pardon to said James Colleton for killing said Elisha Bridges, alias Blackney, and of all penalties and forfeitures by reason thereof, with a non obstante of the Statutes of 13 Richard II. and 14 Edward III., and such other clauses as are usual (see ante, Nos. 421, 425). [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 28, p. 151.]
March. 28.487. The King's Commission to Edward Cranfield, Edward [Richard] Dickinson, and Mark Brent. Whereas by Articles of Surrender of the Colony of Surinam, agreed upon between Col. Wm. Byam, late Lieutenant-General of Guiana (sic) and Governor of Willoughby Land, and Commander Abraham Crynsens, Admiral of a squadron of Zealand ships, dated on board the ship, Zealand, 16 March 1667, it was provided that if any of the inhabitants should at any time intend to depart, they should have power to sell their estates, and the Governor should procure them transport at moderate freight with their estates, which Articles were confirmed by the Treaty of Breda, and fully ratified by said Crynsens and others at Surinam, the 20/30 April 1668; but not having been performed were, by the late Treaty of Westminster, of 9/19 Feb. 1673, agreed to be executed without any manner of tergiversation or equivocation for which purpose the States General have at length issued their Orders of the 8/18th and 18/28th Jan. 1675, and the States of Zealand likewise issued their orders of 16 Feb. 1675 to the Commander of Surinam, Captain Peter Vorsterre (to conform to said Order of the States) that it shall be lawful for the King to send one, two, or three ships at a time to Surinam, and thereon to embark his Majesty's subjects there, their estates, goods, and slaves. His Majesty has constituted the above-named Commissioners to demand and effect the entire execution of said Articles and Orders, and particularly of what is agreed as to the liberty of his Majesty's subjects to transport themselves thence with their slaves, goods, and estates; and in order hereto to treat and conclude with the Governor of Surinam or such Commissioners as he shall appoint, on all differences arising in the execution of the premises, and to do all other things necessary thereto, His Majesty promising to ratify whatever shall be concluded by them. Draft with corrections. 4 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 34.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
488. Fair copy of preceding with blanks filled in. [Col. Entry Bks., No. XCIII., 130–131., and No. LXXVIII., 5–9.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
489. The King's Instructions to Edward Cranfield, Richard Dickinson, and Mark Brent, for the execution of his Majesty's Commission for bringing off his Majesty's subjects with their slaves, goods, and estates from Surinam. To use their best endeavours speedily to arrive at the River of Surinam, and there arrived, to give notice to the Governor of their arrival, deliver the letters from the States General, Prince of Orange and States of Zealand, and acquaint him with the tenor of their Commission, and demand a time and place of meeting to settle all things necessary for the transport of his Majesty's subjects, their slaves, goods, and estates, and that he publish within 3 days the orders now sent him as directed by the States General. But before such meeting, to desire a convenient time of conferring with his Majesty's subjects, and to insist on a speedy permission to notify to the planters their errand; and accordingly send ashore discreet persons acquainted with the planters, to acquaint them with his Majesty's gracious provision of shipping and conveniences for bringing them, their slaves and estates, from Surinam to such of his Majesty's plantations as they shall think fit to settle in, and particularly how his Majesty has written to the Governors of the Caribbees and Jamaica, to use them kindly, and proportion to all double the quantity of land by the head usually allowed to planters, and to take care that they be furnished with provisions and other necessaries at moderate rates till they can produce them themselves. No one of them to be liable to satisfy debts that were confiscated to the Province of Zealand by virtue of the Articles of Surrender made by Col. Wm. Byam. To adjust with his Majesty's said subjects the time for embarking; who must each one give in his name to the Governor ten days before embarking to avoid threats to any who shall not be willing to leave the place, and to see that the Governor observe that the States directions against menaces or other means to procure their stay. To press punctual payment of debts owing to his Majesty's subjects by the Dutch, which the Governor is directed to endeavour to do, and prrticularly to press for satisfaction for cattle, provisions, and other goods taken from them by the Governor during the war, and for which he became debtor in his books, and to prevent any artifice for obstructing them on this pretence. The greatest difficulty his Majesty can foresee will be in adjusting the debts due from his subjects to the Dutch, for the adjusting and determining of which directions in detail are given. To make the best accommodation the shipping will permit for his Majesty's subjects, their families, servants, slaves, goods, and utensils for making sugar, endeavouring with the Governor's assistance the hiring of other ships at moderate rates if necessary. But if on the contrary, by the unwillingness of his Majesty's subjects to depart, there is no occasion to employ all the ships sent, to dismiss such of them as are not needed; if stay of his Majesty's subjects should arise from any obstruction from the Officers of the Colony to protest against the Governor, as in all cases where they fail in the execution of those orders, delivered to the Governor from his superiors. As soon as they are freed from Surinam, to sail for Barbadoes, St. Christopher's, Jamaica, or other of the Leeward Isles as his Majesty's subjects shall respectively desire, and they have promised at Surinam for their settlement, and there land them with their goods, hiring other conveniences in case any of them desire to be scattered to such places as their shipping cannot supply. Directions concerning the supply of his Majesty's provisions for the relief and support of his subjects, whether on the voyage or when they land, having especial regard in the distribution to the poorer sort, as overseers, millwrights, boilers, carpenters, and other artificers. And because the masters will account for said provisions, to prepare lists of the names of persons put on board each ship, with the date of embarkation, and how to be victualled, which lists, with certificates of the respective Governors where the persons land, shall be a sufficient voucher to the masters when they come to pass their accounts before the officers of the Navy; directions in case of complaints by passengers if the masters fail in the execution of their orders, or if there be any surplus victuals. Lastly, to make diligent dispatch, giving information from time to time to the Secretaries of State, sending duplicates of all that occurs, pursuing such further instructions as they shall receive, and when the ships are emptied, leaving them to the prosecution of their sailing instructions. Draft with corrections. 14 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 35.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
490. Two fair copies of preceding. [Col. Entry Bks., No. XCIII., 131–134, and No. LXXVIII., 10–20.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
491. Additional private instructions to the above-named Cranfield, Dickinson, and Brent. Although directed in the 7th Article of their Instructions to protest against the Governor if he obstruct the coming away of any of his Majesty's subjects, they are to make it their principal care to accommodate all things in an amicable manner, making the best benefit of the orders now sent in favour of his Majesty's subjects, and to urge thereon any further fair and reasonable demands, but not to make any breach on refusal; and though they are to protest against the Governor for refusal of any point wherein he ought to consent, not to omit to accept performance where the Governor complies with what he is ordered. If they find any of his Majesty's subjects refusing to quit that place unless they may be transported for England, Virginia, or other his Majesty's Colonies below Jamaica, to agree to their desires, as Mr. Baker in the Advice boat had instructions to make them such promise, but as much as possible to persuade them to go to the other plantations with their companions. Draft with corrections. 1½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 36.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
492. Two fair copies of the preceding. [Col. Entry Bks., No. LXXVIII., p. 21, and No. XCIII. p. 135.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
493. The King to the Governor of Virginia. Recommending Edward Cranfield, Richard Dickinson, and Mark Brent, who his Majesty has sent as Commissioners to Surinam, to take care of and embark all the King's subjects willing to leave that Colony and settle themselves in any other of his Majesty's plantations, and commanding him to receive with all kindness and friendship such as desire to settle under his government. Mem.—That similar letters were sent to the Governors of the Leeward Islands, and to Barbadoes, and were first put into Sir Robt. Southwell's hands at the Committee for Plantations, 30th March 1675 (see No. 504). 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 93, p. 53.]
March ?494. An account of his Majesty's plantations in America, whether governed by Proprietors, Corporations, Companies, or by Governors immediately appointed by his Majesty. The plantations governed by his Majesty's immediate Commissions are Virginia and the Province of Accomack, Jamaica, &c., &c. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. 97, p, 1.]
March 29.495. Account by Capt. Dudley Lovelace, of the Dutch fleet on the coast of Newfoundland, in 1673. Capt. Dudley Lovelace of New York, with 50 soldiers all prisoners, in several Dutch ships, were brought on the coast of Newfoundland, 4th Sept. 1673, and carried into Ferryland Harbour, where the enemy plundered and destroyed cattle, household goods and stores belonging to the following inhabitants, viz., Lady Kirke, Lady Hopkins, George and David Kirke and their brother, Wm. Jones, Ez. Dibble, John Kent, Phil. Davis, Wil. Robins, Chr. Holland, John Heard, Robt. Love, and many others, to the value of 2,000l., and took four great guns, the fort being out of repair. The day following, 30 fishing boats belonging, as the inhabitants said, to Nix Nevill of Dartmouth, cum sociis, were burnt in the Harbour, as much fish as the ships could carry taken, and the inhabitants forced to send six hogs and a bullock to each ship, as a composition for what the Dutch left behind. On the 9th the Dutch plundered Will. Pollard's house, 3 miles distant, of fish, stuff, provisions, and household, amounting to 400l., and burnt there 40 fishing boats, warehouses, &c., besides taking several prizes to their general rendezvous at Fioll (Fayal). Names of the Dutch Commanders and ships, viz., three ships of 40 guns and one of 36, under Admiral Nich. Boes. "To the truth of this I am ready to depose, Dudley Lovelace." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 37.]
March 29.
St. Jago de la Vega.
496. Minutes of the Council of Jamaica. Sir Thos. Lynch praying a longer time for bringing in his account of arms and ammunition, by reason of the sickness of Col. Theodore Cary, Captain of Fort Charles, ordered, that Sir Henry Morgan, Lieut.Col. Robt. Byndlosse, and Col. W. Beeston receive and examine the account, and make return thereof to his Excellency. [Col. Entry Bk., No. XXXV., 398.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
497. Warrant to the Attorney-General. To prepare a Bill for the Royal Signature to pass the Great Seal, containing a Grant to William Killegrew, Esq., of the office of Surveyor-General of Jamaica, void by the forfeiture of [blank] Burford, late Surveyor-General there, to exercise the same by himself or his sufficient deputy for life, with all fees and advantages enjoyed by said Burford or any other person (see No. 515). 1 p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. 14, p. 134.]
March 30.
Whitehall.
498. Minutes of the Committee of Trade and Plantations. Newfoundland. Several merchants attended as Messrs. Houblon, Gould, Child, Perrot, Scut, Pollexfen, Herne, Braddyl, Newland, the Re-' corder of Dartmouth, &c., and Mr. Hinton, the petitioner, who could urge nothing but what was expressed in his papers. Mr. Houblon urged some calculations showing that though the French out-did us in cheapness of victualling at sea, it was balanced by the excessive wages, &c., they pay, and that the French could not sell cheaper than we, but rather otherwise. Then calculations were urged to show how much dearer it was to the adventurers than to the planters to catch fish which was impugned to the contrary, which seeming to be made out did much incline the Lords because of the nursery of seamen to adhere to the old way, and especially when Mr. Child urged that a colony at Newfoundland the more it prospered the less it would be to the advantage to Old England, for it would adhere to and depend on New England, and be no more to his Majesty than Ireland. If no colony then no Governor; nor could one be maintained out of the fish trade, nor the same regulations imposed as in other plantations, the fish being all the proper vent of foreign markets. A paper of 10 reasons by Mr. Perrot read, and all the merchants discourses except Messrs. Houblon and Gould's the same way; the Lords seemed to conclude against a Governor, but thought the trade should have some better regulation and government, and would meet on Thursday to examine the progress of the French, and what may be fit to secure us against their augmentation there. 1½ pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. CIV., 14, 15.]
March 30.499. Richard Hooper and Thomas Gearing, Mayors of Barnstaple and Bideford, to the Council for Trade and Plantations. Have received their Honors orders of 25th Feb. last, relating to the settlement, government, and trade of Newfoundland, and consulted with those concerned in those matters, and now deliver their opinions which are contained in nine articles, and identical with, being almost word for word the same as, the Report of the Council of Plantations [see preceding volume, No. 362 IV.]. Conceive nothing can more conduce to the encouragement and increase of the trade than the continuance in the ancient way, without imposing a Governor, which would be a great burden and hindrance to their voyages for the reasons stated. Because a Governor cannot be maintained without a tax on the fish, train, &c., which the poor fishermen cannot bear, and though it should be small, it would be a great hindrance to loading their ships. The land being well nigh as big as England, with many harbours and landing places and the inhabitants few and unarmed, it is impossible for a Governor without a very great force to prevent the incursion of an enemy. There is no need of a Governor, for the masters are well able to govern their seamen and fishermen, and the inhabitants being few and scattered, it is not possible for one Governor to prevent abuses of the planters; it is therefore desired that no planters be suffered to winter in that barren wilderness at all, for these reasons: Because they generally keep tippling houses and debauch the seamen and fishermen on the Sabbath days; they purloin victuals, salt, and fishing necessaries; they pull down stages when the ships are gone, for firewood and covetousness of the nails, spikes, bolts, &c., which would serve next year, so that the ships are enforced to go a month the sooner, to the expense of victuals and tiring out of the fishermen; they possess the best fishing places, so that many ships have their voyages almost spoiled for want of conveniences; and in time of war the planters shelter the seamen, who are thereby kept from his Majesty's service; lastly, that the country itself is a mere rocky barren soil incapable of cultivation not capable of improvement, and fit only for fishing. Names of the ports with the numbers of planters living there, total, 23 ports and 43 planters; no forces or fortifications in any of them, nor any alien inhabiting there. Send these reasons by Richard Harris, whom they have appointed their correspondent in this affair, to attend their Honours. Endorsed, "Received from Mr. Harris, 7 April 1675." 3½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 38.]
March 30.500. Copy of part of the preceding from "Names of the ports, &c." Endorsed by Williamson. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 39.]
March 30.501. A List of the Papers and Despatches delivered to Mr. Cranfield at his departure as his Majesty's Commissioner for Surinam under the broad seal. His Commission and Instructions and the private ones; the Articles of Breda; the Treaty of Feb. 1673–74; Articles of surrender by Crynsens and Byam; copies of Major Banister's despatches, and of John Baker's Instructions by the Advice boat; circular Letters to the Governors abroad; copies of the points advised by the Council and of the charter parties and sailing orders; the Orders and Despatches from the States General, including Resolution of the States on Sir Wm. Temple's demand that order be given for executing the 5th Article of the Treaty of 1673–74, their Instructions for the Governor of Surinam, and a fresh letter to him to execute them punctually; Resolution of the States General to have Brent's name put in for Gorges', and order to the Governor to admit him; three passes from the States General for the frigate and two flyboats; extract from the Deputies of Zealand's letter to their principals for their orders to accompany those of the States General; and States of Zealand's letter to their deputies at the Hague, enclosing copies of their orders to the Governor of Surinam of the 16th Feby. 1674–75; with memorandum of receipt of the above by Edw. Cranfield from Sir Robt. Southwell, 30 March 1675. 2½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 40.]
March 30.502. Copy of preceding. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVIII., 1–4.]
(March 30.)503. Memoranda of various Papers and Despatches mentioned above, viz.:—
A list of such papers as Mr. Cranfield is to receive out of Sec. Williamson's office.
Papers delivered to Sir Robt. Southwell, March 30, 1675. Despatch for Surinam.
Draft list of Despatches for Surinam.
Orders and Despatches from the States in the matter of Surinam, in the handwriting of Sec. Williamson.
Together, 4 papers. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, Nos. 41–44.]
(March.)504. Circular Letter from the King to the Governors of the Plantations. To receive with all kindness such of his Majesty's subjects as shall be brought from Surinam by his Majesty's Commissioners, Edward Cranfield, Richard Dickinson, and Mark Brent, proportioning to each planter by the head double the quantity of land usually allowed to others, and taking care that they be provided with provisions, if necessary, at moderate rates; and account thereof as herein set forth. To examine complaints of passengers of any failure of orders given to the masters, and give account thereof to one of his Majesty's Secretaries of State and to the Officers of the Navy. Endorsed, "Draft of a Letter to the Governors of Plantations in favour of those of Surinam, viz., to the Govr of Barbadoes, Leeward Islands, Jamaica. Md, that to the Govr of Barbadoes, he be not ordered to allow the planters double quantity of land, there being none to spare, but to favour their settlemt the best he can. And quære, if the Govr of Barbadoes, Sr J. Atkins, have the Leeward Islands under him, or that they remain under Col. Stapleton." 2½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, No. 45; also Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXVIII., 27–29.]
March 31.
Whitehall.
505. Sec. Sir Joseph Williamson to Sir Jonathan Atkins, Governor of Barbadoes. This comes only to give cover to enclosed packet of ordinary occurrences; and till he has the occasion of doing him more considerable service, means to continue paying his respects in the little newses of these parts, in return for which still begs what passes in those parts, with particular information of the present state of those Colonies, especially Barbadoes, as well for the satisfaction of a man's curiosity, as for their necessary information. In margin, "With Collections of News and Gazettes from Jan. 20 to 29 March 1675." [Col. Entry Bk., No. XCIII., fol. 137.]
March.506. Robert Mason's title to the province of New Hampshire. John Mason was appointed Governor of Newfoundland in 1616, and, along with Sir Ferdinando Gorges, was the first to whom a patent was granted by the Council of New England, with a large tract of land called New Hampshire; expended upwards of 20,000l. on the province, and died about 1638, leaving his widow to execute the estate during the minority of his grandson, Robert Mason. Captain Norton, one of her stewards, was brought to account by his successor, Joseph Mason, and cast in great sums of money, to avoid the payment of which he went into the colony of Massachusetts, and entered himself a church member of the Boston congregation, and incited the Massachusetts to seize on New Hampshire, while the heir was under age. Thus suiting their design of making themselves a free State, they invaded New Hampshire and compelled the inhabitants to submission, and imposed taxes and tried to compel the agent and heir to comply with their usurped power, but were not able. Robert Mason has always prosecuted his right since he came of age, and has spent about 700l. on it. He had addressed several petitions to the King, offering to resign his grant, and asking for relief against the Massachusetts. After an examination of these complaints by several persons of quality at Doctors Commons, they gave a report to the King in Feby. 1661, setting forth Mason's right to the province and the losses he had sustained, to the amount of 5,000l., but leaving the means of righting him to the King, it being a matter of State. In 1665 Commissioners were sent, who, not meeting with a civil reception at Boston, went to New Hampshire and Maine and found a welcome reception and ready compliance, and declared these countries to be out of the government of the Bostoners. The inhabitants of the two provinces are willing to comply with the King's wish of establishing his government there, and all the masts sent to England in the Great Duke of York were cut off Robert Mason's land. Another commission for settling boundaries was agreed upon in 1671, but was stopped by the Dutch war. This being ended, Robert Mason and Ferdinando Gorges propose to resign their grants to the King and take others with less privileges. 3 pp. Two copies. [Col. Papers, Vol. 34, Nos. 46, 47.]