America and West Indies
October 1676

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1893

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459-481

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'America and West Indies: October 1676', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9: 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674 (1893), pp. 459-481. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70113 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Contents

October 1676

Oct. 2.
Office of the Ordnance.
1047. Estimate of the charge of Ordnance Ammunition and other stores and provisions of war to be forthwith issued out of the King's stores and sent to Virginia, besides those ordered to be sent thither by the warrant of the Lords of the Council of 21st July last, according to a former estimate presented 14th June 1676. Total, 2,238l. 2s. 0d. Signed, Edward Sherburne, Jonas Moore, and Edward Conyers. Endorsed, "Read, October 3rd, 1676." 2 pp. With the marginal note, "Estimate of stores sent to Virginia." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 58; also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 70–72.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
1048. Order of the King in Council. That Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master of his Majesty Ordnance, do cause certain stores [as per preceding Estimate] to be forthwith provided and transported to Virginia and delivered to the Governor there. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 72, 73.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
1049. Warrant to the Attorney-General. To prepare a Bill for his Majesty's signature containing a Commission (as herein set forth) to Herbert Jeffreys, Sir John Berry, and Francis Moryson, to inquire into grievances in Virginia. 4 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCV., pp. 117–120.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
1050. The King's Commission to Herbert Jeffreys, Sir John Berry, and Francis Moryson. Whereas great divisions and distractions have arisen and great disorders have been committed in Virginia, and having been informed that these evils have in a great measure been occasioned by grievances which our good subjects have lain under, the particulars whereof are yet to us unknown; and because by reason of the great distance of said plantation, our good subjects there cannot easily make known to us their grievances, we, being willing to be informed of the premises, to the end we may apply fit and speedy remedies, do appoint Herbert Jeffreys, Sir John Berry, and Francis Moryson, our Commissioners to inquire into and report unto us all such grievances and pressures which any of our loving subjects have suffered or do suffer, and especially all causes which have occasioned the late rebellion, with power to receive informations brought to them; also to inquire by examination of witnesses upon oath or by other ways into all grievances and pressures aforesaid and all other things which have occasioned the late rebellion and to report their opinion or any two of them touching the premises, to the end we may give orders for redress of said grievances and for the future well government of the plantation. With power to send for such persons, papers, and records as may be useful for the better carrying on of our service hereby intended, willing and requiring our Governor, his Deputy Governor, and all Officers within said plantation to be aiding and assisting in the execution of this Commission. And, lastly, that said Commissioners carefully observe such instructions as have been or shall be given or sent to them in writing under our royal signet and sign manual. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 83–85.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
1051. The King's Commission to Sir John Berry. Whereas we have thought fit to send ships and forces to Virginia for suppressing the rebellion and reducing the rebels there, we hereby appoint you our Commander-in-Chief at sea for that expedition. You are therefore to take upon you and execute that command according to the best of your judgment and experience for our service. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., p. 121, and Vol. XCV., pp. 166, 167.]
Oct. 3.
Whitehall.
1052. Order of the King in Council. Approving certain Commissions and a pardon relating to his Majesty's Colony of Virginia (all of which are calendared) and directing the Lord Chancellor of England to cause the Great Seal to be affixed to said Commissions and Pardons. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 81, 82.]
Oct. 3.1053. "Mr. Secretary Williamson's notes concerning the expedition to Virginia." The levying of the men. Captain Jeffreys, with the help of the other four captains and their officers, to raise 500 men in a fortnight at 20s. per man, to bring them to the Tower as they are raised, and as mustered 25 at a time to enter into the King's pay at 8d. per diem, to be sent off from the Tower on ship board as soon as they come to the number of fifty, an officer with a guard going with them. Beds, pillows, rugs, and blankets to be provided for the 500 old men as well as for the 500 new men, Captain Jeffreys to be trusted with the money to pay according to the rates agreed on with the navy. The ships to be below Gravesend before taking in the men. Estimate of clothes, victuals, &c., to be provided by Captain Jeffreys, for the 1,000 soldiers, the money to be furnished by the Lord Treasurer. The pay of the men when in Virginia. Contingencies, surgery, boats to land the men, stores of war. Commissions to be prepared for the officers of the five companies according to the names to be given in by Mr. Locke. Establishments to be prepared by Mr. Locke. 8 pp. Two copies; one copy with corrections in Secretary Williamson's hand, the other being a fair copy. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., Nos. 59, 60.]
Oct. 4.
Newmarket.
1054. Four Commissions appointing respectively John Tonge, Quartermaster, Jonathan Grover, Surgeon, William Clerk, Chaplain, and William Morris, Adjutant, to the five companies of footguards employed by the King in an expedition to Virginia under the command of Captain Herbert Jeffreys. [Dom. Entry Bk., Car. II., Vol. XXIX., pp. 183, 184, 188, 189.]
Oct. 4–8.1055. Commissions to the Officers of the five Companies of Foot in his Majesty's Regiment of Guards to be employed in the expedition to Virginia, of which Captain Herbert Jeffreys is Commander-in-Chief, and William Earl of Craven, John Earl of Mulgrave, Sir Charles Lyttleton, and John Russell are Colonels; viz., Thomas Fairfax, William Meole, Charles Middleton, John Muslowe, and Edward Picks, Captains; Francis Hellin, Walter Morgan, Henry Taylor, John Tonge, and — Webb, Lieutenants; Thomas Moile, Edward Rouse, Thomas Sanders, John Thorne, and Thomas Trousbeck, Second Lieutenants; and George Ange, John Jeffreys, William Matthews, Edward Savile, and Thomas Seymour, Ensigns. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXIX., pp. 166–183, and p. 190.]
October ?1056. "Account of how many of the five hundred soldiers now to be sent to Virginia are of the regimented and how many of them are of the non-regimented companies." Names of the places from whence they are drawn, and the numbers of soldiers. Also of the regimented and non-regimented companies. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 61.]
October ?1057. Estimate of the immediate clothing for six Corporals and three Drummers of each Company, being in all thirty Corporals and fifteen Drummers. Total, 89l. 12s. 6d. For magazine clothes, computed for forty-five men, 71l. 5s. Total, 160l. 17s. 6d. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 62.]
October ?1058. Estimate of the Charge for the immediate clothing of the soldiers and magazine of cloth under the Commissary of Victuals for the expedition to Virginia. Total, 3,200l. Besides for bedding and clothes for 30 Corporals and 15 drums (sic) and bedding for 30 Sergeants. 1 p. Two copies. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., Nos. 63, 64.]
October ?1059. An Account of the draught of soldiers for the ships for Virginia, being 24 Companies of the Regiment of Foot Guards and 12 Companies of the Coldstream Regiment of Guards, in all 425 soldiers. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 65.]
Oct. 7.
Newmarket.
1060. The King to Captain Herbert Jeffreys. Orders in reference to the new levies of men, in part of the five hundred volunteers he is to raise for the King's service in Virginia, who are to be lodged in the Tower of London and paid at the rate of 8d. per diem each man until there be twenty-five men, when they are to be mustered, and as their numbers increase to embark by fifty or somewhat more from Tower wharf until they be carried below Gravesend and there put aboard the ships which are to carry them to Virginia. Also orders after the landing of "your men" in Virginia in reference to the victualling of the soldiers and the keeping of exact accounts, "which you are to cause to be defalked for out of their pay after their landing, although the soldiers be allowed victuals aboard ship without any defalcations, … and you are to take care that meet defalcations be made for any of the said magazine clothes out of their pay that use them." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 66.]
Oct. 7.
Newmarket.
1061. "Establishment of the forces for the expedition to Virginia," as settled by his Majesty. To consist of five companies, of two hundred soldiers and officers for each Company, with a Deputy Paymaster, Chaplain, Surgeon, and Quartermaster, at a total cost of 16, 139l. 1s. per annum. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 67.]
Oct. 7.
Navy Office.
1062. Estimate of the charge of transporting 1,000 men from hence to Virginia, including victuals and freight, also for providing brandy, bread, and cheese for victualling said 1,000 men for three months after their arrival. Total, 8,068l. 6s. 2 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 68.]
1063. Secretary Coventry to the Lord High Treasurer. It having been resolved last night at the Committee of Foreign Affairs that the contingent money for the forces going upon the present expedition to Virginia should be issued out of the Warrant of Captain Jeffreys the Commander-in-Chief, takes the liberty to acquaint his Lordship, that he may give such orders as he shall think fit. ½ p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXVI., p. 214d.]
Oct. 7 ?1064. Account of his Majesty's Orders passed in Secretary Coventry's office concerning the expedition to Virginia. Endorsed: "Recd. 30 Oct. 1676 at 9 of clock at night." To Lords of the Admiralty approving estimate prepared by officers of the Navy, and directing the shipping of the soldiers in Long Reach. For adding 77 non-commissioned officers to be provided in the same manner as the 1,000 men. For two months provisions over and above the three months allowed by the estimate for the whole number of men employed in this present expedition. To the Master of the Ordnance for providing 1,500 "swyns feathers." Commissions for five Captains, five Lieutenants, five Second Lieutenants, and five Ensigns; also for a Surgeon. "The names we have from Mr. Locke." To the Master of the Ordnance for providing 30 hoes "to be passed;" also bags or sacks instead of baskets. For three and fifty men more to be added to the 1,077, and to be provided for in the same manner in every particular. Endorsed, "Recd. 30 Oct. 1676 at 9 of clock at night." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 69.]
Oct. 10.
Westminster.
1065. Grant of pardon to the Governor and Assembly of Virginia. Whereas Nathaniel Bacon the younger, of Virginia, combining with divers indigent and seditious persons in the month of June last, traitorously levied war against his Majesty and his Government, and with his complices, to the number of 500, beset the Governor and Assembly of said plantation in the Statehouse in James City, and said rebels holding up their muskets ready charged and cocked, threatened to murder the said Governor and Assembly unless they would grant a commission to said Bacon constituting him Commander-in-Chief of certain forces to be raised, and would pass certain pretended Acts which were offered them by said Bacon and his adherents, and more particularly one whereby the said rebels might be pardoned for their said treason, all which Acts said Governor and Assembly were (for fear of their lives) compelled to pass. And though his Majesty is satisfied that his said Governor and Assembly were not guilty of any ill-affection towards him in passing said pretended Acts, yet that they may not be subject to any question or be in danger of any punishment for their assent to said pretended Acts and for granting said pretended Commission, his Majesty hereby pardons them, in as ample manner as if their names were particularly mentioned, for all crimes and misdemeanours by any of them committed about the passing and granting of said pretended Acts and Commission, and from all punishments, &c., by reason of the premises. And these Letters Patents shall be taken most favourably for said Governor and Assembly. 1 Memb. [Pat. Roll, 28 Car. II., pt. 1, No. 10.]
Oct. 10.
Westminster.
1066. The King's grant to all his subjects inhabiting the Colony of Virginia:—That they shall have their immediate dependence on the Crown of England under such Governors as his Majesty, his heirs and successors, shall appoint, and upon no other person. The Governor to be resident in that country unless his Majesty shall command his presence in England or elsewhere, in which case a Deputy shall be chosen as hath been used, unless his Majesty shall nominate such Deputy. And if any Governor die another may be chosen as hath been used until his Majesty shall appoint a new Governor. All lands now possessed by the several planters or inhabitants shall be confirmed to them and their heirs for ever where any man's interest shall not be prejudiced thereby. And for the encouragement of such as shall go to dwell in said plantation there shall be assigned to every such person 50 acres as hath been used, to be held of his Majesty in free and common soccage. All lands that shall escheat to his Majesty shall be enjoyed by the possessor and his heirs for ever, paying 2 lbs. of tobacco for every acre, which is the rate set by the Governor. And the Governor or Deputy and Council, or any five of them, whereof the Governor or Deputy to be one, shall have power to hear and determine all treasons, murders, felonies, and other offences committed within said government, and proceed therein as near as may be to the laws of England. And lastly every clause in these Letters Patent shall be construed in the most beneficial sense for the advantage of his Majesty's subjects of Virginia, as well against his Majesty as against every other person. 1 Memb. [Pat. Roll, 28 Car. II., pt. 1, No. 11.]
Oct. 12.1067. Answer of Edward Randolph to several heads of inquiry concerning the present state of New England. I. Boston.—(1.) The Government, the legislative power, is seated in a general court, consisting of the Governor, Deputy Governor, 10 magistrates and deputies from the towns, which is the supreme judicature; the Governor, Deputy Governor, and magistrates are chosen every year by the freemen of the Colony, the deputies by the freemen of the towns which have more than 20 freemen; no attorney can be chosen deputy; none but church members can be freemen; no law can be made without the consent of the major part of the magis trates and deputies; the Governor has a casting vote, and can summon any Court at his pleasure. The executive power is vested in the Governor and Council, which sits twice a week; there are two Courts of Assistants a year to hear appeals and capital cases, and county courts to hear smaller charges; the Governor and Deputy Governor agreeing, or three magistrates consenting, can reprieve a condemned criminal till the next General Court; every magistrate is a Justice of the Peace, and can determine any cause under 40s., and commit to prison for breach of the laws; the Governor and magistrates at all assemblies have a public table kept, and their necessary expenses borne at the charge of the Colony; insult to the established authority is punished by fine, whipping, imprisonment, disfranchisement, or punishment, treason to the State by death; as a mark of sovereignty they coin money of four sorts, stamped with "Massachusetts" and a tree in the corner on one side, and "New England" with the year "1652" and the value of the coin on the other (1652 is the era of their commonwealth); the transportation of this money is forbidden on penalty of confiscation of goods; commissions are made out by the Governor, with the consent of the Council; passes by the Governor alone, with copy of the forms of commissions and passes. (2.) Laws contrary to those of England. The magistrates do not mind the letter of the law where their public interest is concerned; they regard more the quality and disposition of the persons than the nature of the offence, and can see no evil in church members, against whom it is difficult to get a verdict; it is accounted a breach of their privileges to urge the observation of the laws of England; the laws most contrary to the laws of England are,—excommunicated and condemned persons may make wills; the word of God is the law to be followed in capital cases where there is no other; an injunction in point of doctrine cannot be put on a church officer; the observance of Christmas Day and other festivals and non-attendance at their meetings on Sunday are punished; pressing is forbidden except in wars enterprised by the commonwealth; only magistrates are permitted to join persons in marriage; strangers fleeing from religious persecution are to be protected, thus Whalley, Goffe, and others were received by Mr. Guggius and other magistrates; possession of land for five years gives a title; no oaths to be required except those commanded by the General Court. The only oaths are those of fidelity to the government imposed on all persons, strangers, and inhabitants; the oaths of allegiance and supremacy are not taken, sends copies of the oaths of a stranger and an inhabitant. (3) Number of church members, freemen, inhabitants, servants, professions, estates, men able to bear arms. Number of church members compared with the dissenting party very inconsiderable, not more than a sixth of the whole; the most wealthy of all professions are well affected to the King, only interest drawing the people to think well of the religion and government; inhabitants (including Hampshire and Maine) about 150,000; professions and mechanical arts of all kinds thrive well; about 30 merchants are esteemed worth from 10,000l. to 20,000l.; no servants but on hired wages, except a few who serve four years for the charge of being transported thither; not above 200 slaves and these brought in their own ships from Guinea and Madagascar; 30,000 and 40,000 able to bear arms, 4,000 in Boston. (4.) Military forces. No standing army, but only trained bands, 12 troop of horse and 6,000 foot, 160 men besides officers in a troop; there are no pikemen, they being of no use against the Indians; the pay in time of war is 6l. a month to a captain of horse, 4l. to a foot captain, 1s. a day beside victual to a common soldier, in peace the officers have an allowance for their expenses on muster days; the present Governor, Leverett, the only old soldier in the service, having served as a captain of horse under Cromwell; the Governor is always General, the Major-General is chosen from the magistrates, they are places of good profit and no danger, as they stay at home and share the spoil while younger men command in the field. (5.) Castles and forts. Three miles from Boston on an island a castle with 38 guns and a battery of six, commanding the entrance to the channel; none can sail out of Boston without sending the Governor's pass to the captain for which 10s. is paid or 14s. if it is a Bill of Health; a small brick fort at the south end of Boston with 12 guns but of little use; a platform on the north side commanding the river mounted with five demi-culverins and two small guns; a small fort at Marblehead, but of little use; at the mouth of the Piscataqua is a fort with five guns built by John Mason; every vessel above 20 tons not belonging to the inhabitants of the Colony pays ½lb. of powder the ton or 9d. in money; in the stores are 1,000 barrels of powder and 6,000 small arms lately come from England; a powder mill at Dorchester, and great quantities of salt-petre on the islands and swamps, the powder good as English, the master of the work Eversden formerly of Battle in Sussex; great guns have formerly been cast but the works fell from a quarrel of the undertakers; plenty of iron ore and as good iron made as in Spain, six forges for ironmaking. Boston built in a very strong position, easily defensible. (6.) Boundaries. The present limits are as large as the government please to make them, who declare that they do not yet know the boundaries of their commonwealth, spite of the Commissioners' decision in 1665. (7.) Relations with their neighbours the French and New York government. The Boston people continue a private trade with the French and Indians and openly keep on their fishing on the coast of Acadia, though forbidden by the French King's Lieutenant; last year the French Governor, La Bourn, inhibited this trade and laid an imposition of 400 cod on vessels fishing on their coasts; the Boston government imposes on the French and encourages an interloping trade, causing to the inhabitants dread of a French invasion, and looks on the French with an evil eye, believing they had a hand in the Indian wars; there have been disputes with New York so that trade is stopped between the two governments; a great outcry was made against the Fort Albany for supplying the Indians during the war, but it is supposed to be malicious; the New York government was very friendly during the war and Colonel Andros offered to engage the Mohawk and Maquot Indians against Philip, but his offers were slighted, nevertheless, he kept these Indians from taking part with Philip. (8.) Causes of the war with the Indians. Various reports; some attribute it to an imprudent zeal in the magistrates to Christianise the Indians and an over strict enforcement of the laws against drunkenness, some to the machinations of vagrant and jesuitical priests stirring up the Indians to extirpate the English, some to injuries offered to Philip; the Massachusetts government declare the causes to be punishment for the breach of the fifth commandment, for men wearing long hair and periwigs made of women's hair, for women wearing borders of hair and for cutting, curling, and laying out their hair and disguising themselves by following strange fashions in their apparel, for profaneness in the people in not frequenting meetings and for going away before the blessing, and for suffering the quakers to live among them; the English have contributed much to their misfortunes by teaching the Indians the use of arms and admitting them to muster; the praying Indians have been the most barbarous enemies, their leader, Captain Tom, being lately hanged at Boston; notwithstanding the law of 1653 forbidding arms to be sold to the Indians the Massachusetts government have granted licences to sell; in the war 600 English have been slain many of loyal principles, the church members having liberty to stay at home and not hazard their lives in the wilderness; the loss is reckoned at 150,000l., 1,200 houses burnt, 8,000 cattle killed, many thousand bushels of grain burnt, of which the Massachusetts has not been damnified one third part, the loss falling on Plymouth and Connecticut; the war is now ended and a peace of amity made with the Indians. (9.) Commodities, imports, trade, &c. Commodities consist chiefly of naval stores, cattle, and provisions, which are exported to Virginia, Jamaica, Maryland, Barbadoes, Nevis, St. Christopher's, Antigua, &c. (to which are sent "houses ready framed"), Spain, Portugal, the Straits and England; tobacco, sugar, indigo, cottonwool, ginger, logwood, fustic, cocoa, and rum are imported and again transported. They trade with most parts of Europe from which they directly import all kinds of merchandise, so that little is left for English merchants to import; some ships have been sent to Guinea, Madagascar, &c., and some to Scanderoon; there are built in the Colony 730 ships varying from 6 to 250 tons, there are 30 master shipbuilders; no notice is taken of the Navigation or Plantation Acts. (10.) Taxes, fines, duties, revenue. There is a poll-tax of 1s. 8d. a head, a land-tax of a penny in the pound, merchants' estates being rated at the common estimation, workmen at their wages, and strangers at the value of their cargo; there are also fees in law-suits varying from 20s. to 10s.; magistrates, ministers, and elders pay no taxes; there are duties on provisions and wines imported, and on ships, taxes on the selling of wine and beer and fees for licence to sell ammunition to the Indians; no custom on exports except on horses; the revenue is computed at upwards of 20,000l. and is disposed of as the Governor and magistracy think fit without giving any account to the country; 50,000l. was raised for the Indian war; the duties, taxes, &c., are commonly paid in money; there is a reasonable quantity of silver monies, but no gold. (11.) How generally affected towards the English government. The inhabitants are generally desirous of submitting to a general government to be established by the King; some of the magistracy are well affected, but the rest are of different principles, as, Governor Leverett, Deputy Governor Symonds, [Thos.] Danforth, [Edw.] Ting, Major Clark, Hawthorn (continued a magistrate spite of a summons to England); these, who with a few others of the same faction keep the country in slavery, have continually disobeyed the King's letters of 1662, 1664, 1665, 1666, and of March last, reserving a power to alter or disannul any law not agreeable with their humour; the most popular and well-principled men are Major Dennison, Bradstreet, and Dudley in the magistracy, and of military men, Captains Curwin, Saltonstal, Brattle, Richards, Gilham, Mosely, Majors Savage, Champernoon, Shapleigh, and Phillips; the rest of the magistracy are Pinchon and Stoughton; the magistrates generally continue in office till death by virtue of a law commanding the former magistrates to be first put to vote at elections; the clergy civil and well inclined to the King, but kept under by the ruling elders. (12.) Ecclesiastical Government, Universities, &c. Church government is in the hands of lay elders; the formation of a church not allowed without the approbation of three magistrates and the elders of neighbour churches; every church has liberty of electing and ordaining officers and ministers, of exercising God's ordinances according to the scripture, of celebrating days of fasting, &c.; no injunction put on any church besides the institution of the Lord; there is liberty of admission and expulsion, but the civil authority has power to see the peace, ordinances and rules of Christ observed; no church censure degrades a man from any civil post; interrupting a minister is punished by a fine of 5l.; the Boston ministers are paid by a collection, the others by a rate. There are three colleges at Cambridge, seven miles from Boston, one of timber covered with shingles of cedar at the charge of Mr. Harvard and bearing his name, one a small brick building called the Indian College, where some few Indians did study, but now converted to a printing house. New College built at the public charge and covered with tiles, not quite finished by reason of the late Indian war, containing 20 chambers for students, two studies in a chamber, a hall for chapel, a convenient library with books of the Fathers and school divines, and many English books of the late nonconformist writers, especially Mr. Baxter and Dr. Owen; here they teach Hebrew before they well understand Latin, no formalities or distinctions of habits or other decencies as in England, much less those exhibitions and supports for scholars; they take no degree above Master of Arts; their commencement is kept yearly on August 2nd in the meeting-house at Cambridge where the Governor and Magistrates are present, attended with throngs of illiterate elders and members who are entertained with English speeches and verses; most of the students are come from England and at present no settled President, but Mr. Oakes, a rigid Independent, supplies his place; the President's allowance is 100l. a year and a good house; there are but four fellowships, the two senior have 30l. per annum, the two junior 15l., but no diet allowed; these are the tutors: Mr. Thomas Graves, an ingenious and worthy person, was put by his fellowship by the late President, Dr. Hoare, for refusing to renounce the Church of England; the Government of the colleges is in the hands of the Governor and Magistrates. II. New Plymouth and Connecticut. The laws of England are observed, the oath of allegiance taken, writs, &c., in the King's name; inhabitants about 80,000, there are no slaves; few merchants, the Colonies being supplied with commodities from Boston; number of men fitting to bear arms about 20,000; the country fertile; a great quantity of whale oil is made there; the Navigation Acts are observed, they have no ships of burthen; the people are loyal; the Governor of New Plymouth, Winslow, is popular and was General of the united forces against the Indians; the Connecticut Governor is William Leet; the losses the Colonies have sustained amount to near 100,000l. 16 pp. Endorsed, "Read 16th November 1676." Part printed in. Palfrey's New England III., 240. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 70; also Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LX., pp. 114–161, and Vol. CIV., p. 250.
Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
1068. The King's additional Instructions to Sir William Berkeley, Governor of Virginia. 1. To be no more obliged to call an Assembly every year but only once in two years unless upon some emergent occasion; also fourteen days shall be prefixed for their sitting and no longer. 2. To take care that the members be elected only by freeholders. 3. To endeavour to make a good peace with the neighbour Indians, and to make use of the assistance of the Commissioners, whom he shall treat with all due respect and provide them with a convenient house and lodging. 4. Not to suffer any one, during these troubles, to go on board any merchant ships. 5. Immediately on the arrival of the Commissioners to call a new Assembly. 6. To declare null and void all proceedings of the late Assembly, wherein Bacon and his accomplices were pardoned and force and violence offered to the Assembly. 7. To summon and seize Bacon and proceed to his trial or send him hither as may be judged most convenient. 8. In case Bacon refuse to surrender himself, immediately to publish his Majesty's proclamation and endeavour to surprise Bacon. 9. To reduce to a moderate proportion the salary of the Assembly members. 10. To give once a year an account to the Lords of Trade and Commissioners of Customs of those several things directed in his former Instructions. Mem.—The Commissioners going away before Colonel Jeffreys, carried these Instructions with them. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., pp. 111–114, and Vol. XCV., pp. 154–158.]
Oct. 13.
Whitehall.
1069. Secretary Sir Joseph Williamson to Secretary Coventry. Sends part of the Flanders mail. The other larger paper is copy of one left this evening by the Virginia Agent, being an account of the state of things in that Colony on the 10th August, as it is brought by Evelyn's ship, which has been long expected, and to which the agents have referred them for a full account of things. Extract. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XLIII., p. 119.]
Oct. 18.
Boston.
1070. Governor Leverett "with the consent of the Council" to Sir Joseph Williamson. Received the King's letters of 18th February 1675–76 on 3rd September last, referring to the memorial of the Dutch Ambassador, which were communicated to the General Court. Have drawn up a bare narrative of the transaction without any plea to be presented to the King, and have committed it to William Stoughton and Peter Bulkley; request him to be assistant in their accesses to the King and dispatch of this and other business. 1 p., with seal. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 71.]
[Oct. 18.]1071. "Answer of the Governor and Council of Massachusetts to the complaint of the Extraordinary Ambassador of the StatesGeneral, 22nd January 1675–6, which came to our hands 8th September 1676." [The Ambassador's complaint is dated 26th July/ 5th August 1675, see ante, No. 821 I.] Captain Jurian Aronson, commanding the ship Flying Posthorse of Curaçoa, came into the Massachusetts harbour in 1674 and asked permission of the Governor to come up to Boston to repair and revictual his ship, he having been at the River Pantagoult, and there made himself master of the fort and brought the French Governor his prisoner, showing his commission, which was against English as well as French. The Governor, having the proclamation of the peace, granted him permission, and he informed the Governor that he had not left any men to keep possession of his conquest, but had dismantled the fort and brought away the guns. On his taking leave the Governor asked him if he had given commission to any to keep any part of that country, or had given a copy of his commission to that end, but he said he had not, nor would he make himself liable for others' actions; this was in October 1674. He left in Boston several that had been in his company; among them John Rhodes, a Boston man, Cornelius Andreson, a Dutchman, and Peter Rodrigo, a Flanderkin. John Rhodes, said to be the principal, told the Governor he was going a trading to the eastward, but not to take vessels coasting and trading there, that they had no commission to do so. In December following William Waldron complained that coming homewards Andreson, Rhodes, and others fired two guns at him and commanded him to anchor; they came on board and forcibly took peltry to the value of about 60l., carried himself and goods to their vessel, and made him set his hand to a writing drawn by John Rhodes that they had taken nothing but peltry, and had taken it in New Holland. In February 1674–75 John Freak, merchant, complained that a small vessel of his, under command of George Manning, on the voyage home from the eastward, was, in the river of St. John, by John Rhodes and some Dutchmen, his complices, in December last, piratically seized and the master wounded. Several others, of the Massachusetts jurisdiction also complained and asked that measures might be taken for security. Whereupon the Governor commissioned Captain Samuel Moseley, who took John Rhodes, Peter Rodrigo, Peter Grant, Thomas Mitchell, and Edward Young in Thomas Mitchell's vessel, and afterwards the other vessel with Cornelius Andreson, John Thomas, and John Williams, and returned to Boston 2nd April 1675. Examined by the Governor and Council, they owned the seizing of the goods, but denied that they had done it piratically, and Peter Rodrigo produced a paper with three seals. Cornelius Andreson produced another without seals for liberty to trade, keep the country, and sail on the coast, for which they were not seized, but for piratically seizing vessels, and so were committed to trial. Peter Rodrigo, John Rhodes, Richard Fowler, Randolph Judson, Peter Grant, and Cornelius Andreson were, all except Andreson, sentenced to death, but reprieved, and on their petition acknowledging the justness of the Court's proceedings pardoned and banished the Colony on pain of death. So that what was done was not because the English would not suffer any Hollanders to be nigh them, but to suppress the piratical practices of English, Dutch, or other nations; of them that were brought to trial there was but one Dutchman, four Englishmen, and one Flanderkin. Did not or do they judge it tolerable that any government, much less one deriving its authority from the King, suffer any to associate themselves and by ways of hostility molest quietminded subjects in their lawful occasions; had the matter been truly laid before the States-General they would have seen the justice of the proceedings. Signed, John Leverett, Governor. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., No. 72.]
Oct. 19.
Whitehall.
1072. Journal of Committee of Trade and Plantation. Packet received from Mr. Chaplain from Sir Jonathan Atkins' containing letters to their Lordships of 4/14th July and 15th August last [see ante, Nos. 973, 1022]. 23 articles of his answers to inquiries read. Ordered that Secretary Coventry be desired to impart to their Lordships Governor Atkin's letter concerning the confiscation of the ship [Salisbury] by De Baas, and that inquiry be made what has become of the 350 barrels of powder and stores valued at 6,000l., mentioned in the 10th Article. Commissioners of Customs to be sent to for the scheme of trade between England and Barbadoes. All ships coming from thence July and August, and none arriving 'till Christmas, there is no hearing from Barbadoes within that time. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., p. 228.]
Oct. 20.
Port Royal, Jamaica.
1073. Sir Henry Morgan to [Secretary Coventry]. Thanks for all his favours. Here hath happened a little transaction which may not possibly be written by my Lord to his Honour. On 27th September, being at his own house, Captain William Bragg, a man of very good fame and estate both here and in England, dined with Sir Henry, and after dinner, discoursing of Sir Thomas Modyford, was pleased to say that Sir Thomas was a traitor and that he could prove it, and desired to go home for England with said Sir Thomas. Asked him why he did not acquaint his Excellency, he said he was not so well acquainted with him as he was with Sir Henry, and therefore he would tell the latter, which immediately he did, Colonel Cary being witness. The words spoken are here enclosed, which Sir Henry wrote down immediately. My Lord received Sir Henry very well, sent to Captain Bragg not to go out of town, who he would examine before the Council the next day, when my Lord sent the Marshall to bring Bragg, but he was gone. Then Colonel Ballard was ordered to send a squadron of horse to fetch him, but Bragg came immediately. Sends his deposition, which is not so full as he told Sir Henry, but thinks it shows Sir Thomas has no love for his Majesty, and that truly he wants only power, and not will, to trust him. He now sues Bragg in an action for 10,000l., and often says it is not the first time he has been indicted for treason. If not treason or misprision, it certainly is a great misdemeanour, and Sir Thomas ought not to be Chief Justice. Hopes Secretary Coventry will see by this how very zealous Sir Henry is for his Majesty's service. Encloses,
1073. i. Words spoken by Captain William Bragg to Sir Henry Morgan. That Captain Bragg declared Sir Thomas Modyford was guilty of treason, for he told Bragg he had got two counties to rebel against the King, because he had done things against Acts of Parliament, and Sir Thomas had left Andrew Arguile to solicit more. Essex and Suffolk were "solicited" by Sir Thomas, and Arguile was to get Norfolk, and they were sure of Cornwall. Signed by Sir Henry Morgan, Jamaica, 27th September 1676.
1073. ii. Deposition of William Bragg, aged forty-five. That in March last, being at his house in St. Jago de la Vega, Sir Thomas Modyford told this deponent that in his letters Andrew Arguile said he had discoursed with several clothiers about the Guinea trade, and the loss they sustained in their trade since the Guinea Company, upon which they had made a mutiny in one or two counties at the assizes, and Sir Thomas added he did not question that his next letters would tell him several other counties had joined, and that "he had rather have the love of his subjects than of the King." 1st October 1676. Two copies.
1073. iii. Sir Thomas Modyford's declaration against William Bragg. That William Bragg, of the parish of St. Katherine, gentleman, summoned to answer Sir Thomas Modyford, of said parish, Bart., of a plea, &c. That whereas said Sir Thomas is a good, pious, and faithful subject, and a man of good name, credit, and repute with the King, and of good fame and conversation with all his Majesty's liege people to whom he was known from the time of his nativity until this day, and so was esteemed, received, known, and reputed; and whereas said Sir Thomas is at present in great credit, favour, and repute with his Majesty, as by his Majesty's great trust reposed in him doth appear by being made his Majesty's Chief Justice of this Island, which he hath faithfully and truly discharged for near two years; said Bragg, being of the premises not ignorant, of mere malice, plotting, and contriving the name, fame, and allegiance of said Sir Thomas to render scandalous and infamous to his Majesty's good subjects, certain false, scandalous, and malicious words in the presence and hearing of several of his Majesty's liege people spoke, published, and proclaimed in these English words following [as contained in the deposition of William Bragg above mentioned], under colour and pretence of which false words Sir Thomas, in the name, fame, and allegiance, which before he usually had, is altogether impaired and lost, beside the hazard of his own life and fortune and ruin of his posterity, to the damage of him the said Sir Thomas of ten thousand pounds, and therefore he bringeth his suit. Mem.—Secretary Coventry delivered to Lords of Trade and Plantations [the above] three papers [I., II., III.] concerning Sir Thomas Modyford and William Bragg. Together, 5 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVII., Nos. 73, 73, I., II., III.; also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., p. 106.]
Oct. 21.1074. Secretary Coventry to [the Attorney-General]. His Majesty was pleased to order last night at the Committee of Foreign Affairs that he forthwith prepare a commission empowering Herbert Jeffreys to command in chief five companies of foot, consisting of one thousand soldiers, appointed for the present expedition to Virginia, with power to fill up the vacant places of lieutenants and ensigns, and a clause for using Martial Law during said expedition. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCV., p. 117.]
Oct. 21.1075. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the present Government and Assembly of the county of Albemarle. Have received their letters of 17th November 1675 and 28th March last by the hands of Thomas Miller, and assure them they will never part with the county of Albemarle "but will always maintain our province of Carolina entire as it is." Their reasons for this resolution to maintain and preserve them in English rights and liberties and the being so contiguous to Virginia is of great importance. Expected the well-planting of their Province would have long since had better progress as well as the rivers Pamplico and Newse, and that a way and intercourse by land would have been discovered between you and our plantation on Ashley River, and the neglect of these has been the cause that hitherto we have had no more regard for you as looking upon you as a people that neither understood your own nor regarded our interest, but some of us discoursing with [Thomas] Eastchurch, your Speaker, who is now come over, and Thomas Miller who brought their letters, they have fully satisfied us that the fault was not in you, but in those persons into whose hands we had committed the government, and that several of you that had made attempts for discovery of a way by land to the plantation on Ashley River, as also to plant more southward upon Pamplico and Newse, were with great violence and injustice deprived of any powers to proceed any further in such worthy undertakings, and some of you that were planted on the south side of Albemarle were commanded back, to your great prejudice and inconvenience. Are very well pleased with their proceedings with Lieutenant-Colonel Jenkins, and their settlement of the Council and Government until they heard further from their Lordships, and with the maintenance of their due respect and regard to fair justice, but must blame them and either disallow their sending Thomas Miller or any person to be tried in Virginia, which is a prejudice to the authority their Lordships derive from his Majesty's grant, but cannot reflect on them when their Lordships consider their apprehensions that Sir William Berkeley was sole proprietor. Utterly dislike trying or condemning any person without a jury. Have given instructions to their Governor and Committee that they earnestly press them to settle the south side of the River Albemarle as much as may be in towns, it being a frontier settlement, and should be made a security against incursions of Indians; three towns to be settled; would have the first and chief town Roanoke Island, and the place where the Council assemble, the second town should be placed on the west side of the little river's mouth, and the third town upon the neck of land between Salmon Creek and Marratock River, these three to be the only places for ships to lade and unlade, with such other necessary privileges as the Governor and Council have been ordered to advise the Assembly to grant. Finding Mr. Eastchurch, their Speaker, to be of a very good family, and a discreet and worthy man, and well instructed in their Lordship's desires concerning these particulars, have chosen and authorised him to be Governor of Albemarle, and have appointed deputies, and the Assembly are to choose the same number to make up the Great Council. Thomas Miller has delivered a paper of complaints of great oppressions and injuries which their Lordships refer to the Council and Assembly, and earnestly desire that justice be done, and certify their proceedings therein. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XX., p. 111–113.]
Oct. 21.1076. Warrant to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, to prepare fifteen hundred "Swyns Feathers," to be made use of in the present expedition to Virginia. [Dom. Entry Bk., Car. II., Vol. XXIX., p. 172.]
Oct. 24.1077. Estimate of the charge of the drums, halberts, and partizans, &c., further ordered for his Majesty's service, for the soldiers now going to Virginia by his Majesty's warrant, together with swynes feathers and other stores of war. Total, 4,655l. 15s. Signed:—Edward Sherburne, Jonas Moore, and G. Wharton. Endorsed, "Approved 25 October 1676." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 1; also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 73, 74, with memorandum in margin:—Third estimate of stores for Virginia.]
Oct. 24.
Jamaica.
1078. Governor Lord Vaughan to Lords of Trade and Plantations. Has endeavoured to do his duty in advising them of every thing that has occurred here. Sends now a very exact map of this town and harbour of Port Royal, by which the natural advantages of it may be plainly seen, and how capable it is of being made very considerable if the fortifications were completed. Five weeks since sent the Phœnix and his own Secretary Mr. Atkinson to Carthagena to discourse some matters with the Governor of that place relating to the Peace, the Governor used him with great respect, and entertained him five days in his own house. No news of the galleons this year, but the Nova Hispania fleet went from the Havannah about two months since. 1 p. Endorsed, "Rec. 22 Aug. 1677, per Capt. Keates, Commander of the London Merchant." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 2; also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., pp. 134, 135.]
Oct. 24.
Jamaica.
1079. Governor Lord Vaughan to Sir Robert Southwell. Has directed to him a map of this town and harbour to be presented to their Lordships. Has taken great pains in it that it may be exact, and endeavoured to make this place fully understood. Hopes their Lordships will believe he has perfectly answered all their inquiries and obeyed their commands. 1 p. Endorsed, "Rec. 22 Aug. 1677." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 3.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
1080. Order of the King in Council. That Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master of his Majesty's Ordnance, do cause the several stores to be forthwith provided, according to preceding estimate [No. 1077], and transported to Virginia for his Majesty's service. [Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXX., pp. 74, 75.]
Oct. 25.
Whitehall.
1081. Order of the King in Council. That in the Proclamation about the rebellion in Virginia, the reward to be given for taking of Nathaniel Bacon shall be three hundred pounds sterling, to be paid in money by the Lieutenant-Governor; and the other alterations thought fit to be made in said Proclamation read and approved. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., p. 133.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
1082. Secretary Sir Joseph Williamson to the Duke of Monmouth. In obedience to his Grace's commands of this morning, has caused his books of entry to be exactly searched and cannot find that any despatch relating to the present matter of Virginia has passed his office. [Dom. Entry Bk., Charles II., Vol. XLIII., p. 124.]
Oct. 26.1083. Names of the officers of the five companies to be commissioned for the expedition to Virginia:—Captains Herbert Jeffreys, Edward Picks, John Mutlowe, Charles Middleton, and William Meoles, also names of the Lieutenants, Second Lieutenants, and Ensigns. 1 p. Two copies. [Col Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos. 4, 5.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
1084. Journal of the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Sir Jonathan Atkins' relation of the present state of Barbadoes [see ante, No. 973.]. Read 24th Article, and upon mention made in the 25th Article of the desperate state of the English Plantations and the difficulties of maintaining them, the Lords think fit to reprehend Sir Jonathan Atkins for using these expressions without giving any reasons for them. And where he proposes a liberty of trade as necessary for settling a new Plantation, the Lords take notice of this notion as dangerous in regard of the old ones and prejudicial to England itself, and resolve to give him a cheque for upholding this maxim of free trade. Read 26th Article where he insists upon the inconvenience of the Act of Trade and Navigation which does therefore confirm their Lordships in the resolution of returning their severest censures of these dangerous principles which he entertains contrary to the settled laws of the Kingdom and the apparent advantage of it [see the Lords of Trade report to the King, No. 1116]. 27th to 32nd Articles read. Upon the whole their Lordships agree to return their acknowledgments and approbation of this discourse and will take notice of such points as require a more particular answer. Sir Jonathan Atkins having made reflections upon a paper lying before the Committee, called the "Grievances of Barbadoes," presented by petition to his Majesty in Council, 24th November 1675 [see ante, No. 714], and referred to their Lordships, it is thought fit they be again taken into consideration. Read the Article concerning 4½ per cent, and an Act for regulating the gauge of cask in Barbadoes. Ordered that both the Farmers and Commissioners of Customs have copies of both these papers, and be directed to attend Tuesday (31st October). As to second Article concerning negroes, answer read of the Royal African Company of 6th July last, ordered that it be sent to the Agent of Barbadoes, and that he and some of the Royal African Company attend next Committee. On last Article complaining of being obliged to bring all their commodities to one market, ordered that copy of these grievances he sent to Commissioners of Customs and that they attend, when summoned, with their opinions. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., pp. 235–236.]
Oct. 26.1085. Minutes of the Lords of Trade and Plantation. The paper called the "Grievances of Barbadoes" again read, together with an Act for regulating the gauge of cask in Barbadoes. Annexed,
1085. i. Act for regulating the gauge of sugar cask. Read and passed the Assembly, April 15, 1675. John Higinbotham, Clerk to the Assembly. Read and passed the Council and consented to by his Excellency. 1675, April 15. Edwin Stede, Deputy Secretary. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. VI., pp. 97–99.]
Oct. 26.1086. Part of the general letter from the [Bermudas] Company to the Governor. Send copy of Petition of Thomas Ward and "order you to return us your opinions what is fit for us to do therein." In the meantime, let him continue on the four acres of land therein mentioned, and, for the future, let no petitions come without your opinions and thoughts concerning them. Attested copy, Richard Banner, Secretary, Endorsed, "This went to the Governor Sir John Heydon. Read, 21 Oct. 1679." Extracts from this general letter, but not the above "part" of it, are printed in "Memorials of the Bermudas," by General Sir J. H. Lefroy, II. 444–446. In another general letter, dated 1st October 1677, the Company remind the Governor that they sent a copy of Ward's petition for his opinion. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 6.]
Oct. 27.
Whitehall.
1087. "By the King. A Proclamation for the suppressing a rebellion lately raised within the Plantation of Virginia." Whereas Nathaniel Bacon, the younger, of the Plantation of Virginia, and others his adherents and complices, being persons of mean and desperate fortunes, have lately in a traitorous and rebellious manner levied war within the said Plantation against the King, and more particularly being assembled in warlike manner to the number of about 500 persons, did, in June last, besiege the Governor and Assembly, and by menaces and threats of present death compel said Governor and Assembly to pass divers pretended Acts. To the end that said Nathaniel Bacon and his complices may suffer such punishment as they justly deserve, his Majesty doth declare that said Nathaniel Bacon and all his Majesty's subjects as have taken arms under and assisted or shall hereafter take arms or assist said Nathaniel Bacon in carrying on the war shall be guilty of high treason. And his Majesty strictly commands his loving subjects to use their utmost endeavours to secure the persons of the said Nathaniel Bacon and his complices in order to bring them to their legal trial. And his Majesty doth declare that such person or persons as shall apprehend said Nathaniel Bacon shall have a reward from his Majesty's royal bounty of 300l. sterling, to be paid in money by the LieutenantGovernor. And because many of Bacon's adherents may have been seduced by him into this rebellion by false pretences, his Majesty doth declare that if within twenty days of the publishing this Proclamation any such adherent submits himself to his Majesty's government, and takes the oath of obedience and gives security for his future good behaviour, such person is hereby pardoned; but those who shall not accept this offer of pardon, but persist in said rebellion, their servants or slaves as shall take arms under his Majesty's Governor or Commander-in-Chief shall have their liberty and be for ever free from the service of said offenders. And that his Majesty's loving subjects may understand how careful his Majesty is to remove all just grievances, he hath not only given instructions to reduce the salaries of the Members of the Assembly to such moderate rates as may render them less burthensome to the country, but hath also sent Herbert Jeffreys, Sir John Berry, and Francis Moryson, his Majesty's Commissioners, to inquire into and report to his Majesty all such other grievances as his Majesty's subjects within said Plantation do at present lie under, to the end such redress and relief may be made as shall be agreeable to his Majesty's royal wisdom and compassion. And his Majesty hereby declares that the pretended Acts and Laws made in the Assembly held at James city in June last shall be null and void. Bacon died of a bloody flux, 26th October, the day before the date of this Proclamation. Printed. Two copies, also MS. copy, 6 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos. 7–9, also Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., pp. 129–132, and Vol. XCV., pp. 140–144.]
October ?1088. Names of the officers designed for Virginia out of the regiments of foot. Four of the five Captains to be commissioned in a paper No. 1083 are identical with this list, but Captain Robert Walters is herein substituted for Captain Edward Picks. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 10.]
Oct. 27.
Ordnance Office.
1089. A particular account of Ordnance, Mortar pieces with equipage and all other stores of war now ordered for Virginia. Signed by Edward Sherburne. Endorsed, "Rec. 30th October 1676." 6 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 11.]
October ?1090. The names of the Engineer James Archer, junior, at 10s. per diem, the gunners, &c., now ordered to go along with the train of Artillery from the Office of the Ordnance for Virginia. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 12.]
October ?1091. Memorandum of the names of the officers and soldiers going on board the men-of-war to Virginia. In the Henry and Anne, Captain Jeffreys, Lieutenant Rouse, and Ensign Grymes with 195 men. In the Constant a Sergeant and 19 men. In the Barnaby, Captain Edward Picks, Lieutenant Hetley and Ensign William Mathews, and 116 men. In the Recovery, Lieutenant Webb, the rest of Captain Picks' officers and men to make up 100. In the William and Robert, Captain Charles Middleton, Lieutenants Francis Hobbin and Thorne, and 167 men. In the Constant, Ensign John Jeffreys and 48 men. In the Francis, Captain John Mutlowe, Lieutenant Thomas Troutbeck, Ensign Seymour and 97 men. In the Merchant's Consent, Lieutenant John Tonge and 79 men, and 39 men in the Constant. In the Golden Lyon, Captain William Meoles, Lieutenant Thomas Sanders and 148 men. In the Constant, Lieutenant Walter Morgan and the rest of the officers to make up 69 men. Total, 1,094 officers and men on board eight ships. Two Papers. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos. 13, 14.]
Oct. 28.1092. Names of the hired ships and their Commanders with the number of soldiers to be carried on each, for transport to Virginia. Total, eleven ships with 1,105 soldiers and 500 "new raised men on board." See the King's letter to Colonel Jeffreys in reference to these new raised men or volunteers, ante No. 1060. The three ships not mentioned in previous paper are the Dartmouth and the Rose at Sheerness and the Deptford at Portsmouth. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 15.]
Oct. 30.
Jamaica.
1093. Governor Lord Vaughan to Lords of Trade and Plantations. Received their Lordships letter of 28th July, yesterday concerning the condemnation of Deane the pirate [see ante, No. 1001]. Long since gave an account of the trial and sent an exemplification to Secretary Coventry. The reasons that induced him to proceed in that manner. It has had a very good effect, and been the means of reclaiming divers of the privateers "who I believe had not else come in." Upon his great repentance, confession of his faults and often petitioning, did about a month since grant him a pardon under the great seal of this island, "so if I was not right in the law no great harm is done, it being very prudential and seasonable at that time to do what I did, however, I humbly beg your Lordships particular directions for the future." 2 pp. Endorsed, "Rec. 22nd August 1677, by Captain Keate's, Commander of the London Merchant." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 16.]
Oct. 30.
Jamaica.
1094. Governor Lord Vaughan to Sir Robert Southwell. Has just received his of 31st July [see ante, No. 1002]. Perceives by the objections made to the laws they are not likely to be returned confirmed. His only desire is that if a power be sent him over to re-enact he may likewise receive particular directions as to what amendments their Lordships would have passed. Was commanded by his instructions on his arrival to re-enact and make a good body of laws, and he passed no law or gave his assent to any except that for naturalisation but what was already in force and had been twice re-enacted by Sir Thomas Lynch. Would not consent to the Act for free importation of negroes passed by his predecessor. Has answered their Lordships' letter, and cannot but take notice that in the trial of the pirate he is blamed for asserting the Admiral's jurisdiction, and in the case of the interloper he is blamed for not defending it. Has fully vindicated himself in both. It is the business of receiving complaints against a Governor which makes him thus reflected on, but when their Lordships know how much both themselves and himself have been abused by the officious untruths of some busy people, hopes they will do themselves and him that right and justice for the future never to condemn him before he is heard. Understands that one Martyn has likewise made his solicitations to their Lordships, and that some have been so unfaithful to the Governor as to sign his papers. Has long since advised Secretary Coventry of the truth of the whole case which he now recapitulates. Prays him to acquaint their Lordships with what he writes and "that in all such cases they would please to suspend their own beliefs till they receive my information." 2 pp. Endorsed, "Rec. 22nd August 1677." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 17.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
1095. Minute of the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Ordered that when any letters are sent to the Plantations, notice be taken by what conveyance they are dispatched. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., p. 237.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
1096. Journal of the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Sir Charles Wheler and Colonel Strode, farmers of the 4½ per cent., attend and complain of the great abuses practised in the making of cask and filling the sugar. The Farmers affirm this duty was given his Majesty in lieu of the 40s. per head due to the King by the Earl of Carlisle's patent, that they have raised their cask in Barbadoes from 1,200 to 1,600, and have increased some of them to four staves more than ordinary. Arguments of Sir Peter Colleton, Mr. Bandas, and Colonel Thornborough, and of the Farmers on the other side. Those of Barbadoes offer to agree upon a medium between two extremes of sugars to be rammed into a cask and negligently thrown in. Resolved to refer the regulations to the Lord Treasurer who is about farming this duty for a new term. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., pp. 237, 238.]
Oct. 31.—
Nov. 1.
1097. Journal of the Assembly of Barbadoes. After debate, was passed with amendments, an Act to prevent the inconveniences upon the inhabitants of this Island by forestallers, engrossers, and regrators; as also an Act to prevent the breaking up and taking away of any rocks or stones in the sea before this Island.
Nov. 1.Edwyn Stede appeared to answer complaints against him by Captain James Vaughan and Robert Rich; after debate the House think fit to waive the three first articles against Stede, and that the last be considered at their next meeting. The Act for securing possession of negroes and slaves returned by his Excellency and Council with amendments agreed to and passed. Also an Act to explain a clause in the Act for establishing the Court of Common Pleas. Agreed at their next sittings to consider the presenting a sum of sugars to his Excellency for his support in the Government of this Island. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XIII., pp. 235–237.]
1098. "Proposals, most humbly offered to his most sacred Majesty by Thomas Ludwell and Robert Smith, for the reducing the Rebels in Virginia to their obedience." It being evidently true that that Colony has always been and in the worst of times eminently loyal to the Crown of England, they cannot believe that the present disorders have their beginning from disaffection to his Majesty or his government either here or there, or that the infection hath seized upon any of the better or more industrious sort of people, but from the poverty and uneasiness of some of the meanest, whose discontents render them easy to be mislead, and, as they believe this to be the sole cause of these troubles, so are confident that, upon the first appearance of his Majesty's resentment of their disobedience and commands on all his subjects to return to their duty, there will be a speedy separation of the sound parts from the rabble, and many who now follow Bacon, out of opinion that they do his Majesty and the country service against the Indians, will quit the party when they understand it to be rebellion, and the hands of those who abhor the present disaffection will be strengthened by his Majesty's resolution of vindicating his authority and punishing the principal offenders against it. To effect which they suggest two ways: either to send a force superior to any that can be brought against it, or a smaller number of men to assist those ready to obey his Majesty's commands. Also, that it will be for his Majesty's service that his Majesty's authority be justified in the person of Sir W. Berkeley before his removal from the government, for the reasons given. That a frigate proceed directly to James Town able to land 200 men. Suggestions for taking or killing Bacon, and the prevention of further mischiefs by him or his assistants. And that the Lords Proprietors of Maryland be commanded not to receive any inhabitants of Virginia. Offer for consideration, as the most effectual means to reduce Virginia to a lasting obedience, that those grants which have and still do so much disturb their minds may be taken in, and their just privileges and properties settled for the future on a solid foundation, the fear of forfeiting which would keep them in perpetual awe. 2 pp. Signed. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 18.]
October.1099. Colonel Francis Moryson to Sir William Jones, AttorneyGeneral. It is so far from his opinion that it is anyways necessary for a Commission to issue from hence to exercise martial law in Virginia, that he conceives it the most destructive means that can be used to attain the ends intended by it. Conceives it must be either for carrying on the war against the Indians or for quelling the mutiny amongst the English. If for the first, argues that, from the nature of the enemy and manner of their fight, the war must be managed by the inhabitants there and not by forces sent from hence, and that most of the war on our side must be defensive; the great expense of sending men over, and no towns to quarter them in, five hundred men must be lodged in three hundred houses; the dangers of sickness; the King has no exchequer there, and instead of a help they will be an insupportable burthen to the people. The country wants no men to fight if the enemy will appear, and if not, who can find them in their coverts ? The Indian way of fighting is only by surprise, so that all our offensive war is but hunting them like wolves and not fighting with them as men. We may feel them once a week and yet not see them once a year; they will burn a house or two to-night and be forty miles off to-morrow. How the Governor successfully managed a former war, by sending small parties out in July and August to burn the Indians' corn that bordered on our frontiers, and to secure the houses from sudden assault he strengthened the weak families by joining two or three families together, and pallisadoed their houses, which forced the enemy to sue for peace. Replies to the objection that may be made that there is more need now, since there is a mutiny of the English, and the people refused to march with the Governor against the Indians. The defection must be greater than is owned here, or else how should it come to pass that amongst so many thousand reputed honest men there should not be found a thousand to fight five hundred inconsiderable fellows ? by which it is evident the major part of the country is distempered, and it is to be feared, if martial law be sent, it would make many more declare themselves. Arguments: This defection at this distance has an ugly aspect, yet the face of things would soon be changed if his Majesty would send two or more discreet Commissioners into the country to inquire into their grievances and faithfully report them, "for grievances undoubtedly they must have, or else 'tis impossible that a country of so signal a loyalty should, in so short a time, show more of disloyalty than any part of his Majesty's dominions." Is confident, if this course be taken, and the King promise redress and pardon to all who lay down arms, the heads of the rebels excepted, his Majesty would quickly find they will return to their old obedience, and leave those miserable wretches to the King's mercy. But if the people remain stubborn, no better way "can be thought on" than was found practical in the time of the late usurpation, to send two small frigates to prohibit trade. As to what concerns the Governor, he must have contracted odiums in so long a time of government, yet is confident the grievances justly laid to his charge will go in a little room, therefore shall desire that the Commissioners may be ordered, if any complaints be brought against him, civilly to desire the Governor's own answer to present to his Majesty, "that one great seal may not arraign another." Apologises for the length of this letter, but thinks the weightiness of the matter may excuse it. Fears there will be wrong measures taken; it is the last paper he shall write in this agency, and concludes it with a protestation that he has never offered anything to any Minister of State but what he thought necessary for his Majesty's service. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXXI., pp. 6–16.]
Oct.—Nov.1100. Notes by Secretary Sir Joseph Williamson concerning Barbadoes, being brief abstracts of the contents of Governor Atkins' letters and his answers to inquiries [see ante, No. 973]. Also in reference to the price and supply of negroes and the 4½ per cent. The Act for gauging sugar casks; the King's customs on sugars from Barbadoes and tobacco from Virginia, and the reports of Sir George Downing and Sir Peter Colleton; also trade between England and Holland, and how to advance the Navy of England. 10 pp. [Col. Papers. Vol. XXXVIII., No. 19.]
Oct.—Dec.1101. Depositions of Mathew Sheares, Master of the Pellican, taken before Lord Vaughan 17th October 1676, concerning the treatment he met with while endeavouring to get water on the north side of Cuba from a Spanish vessel, and his escape. Of John Pursley and Mathew Lowe, taken 10th November 1676, that they were kept prisoners at the Havannah near 15 months like slaves, but made their escape; 42 English prisoners there, eighteen of whose names deponents remember and are noted. Of Mathew Lowe of Port Royal, Mariner, taken 4th December 1676; made his escape from Havannah where he had been prisoner near twenty months, where two vessels belonging to Jamaica, John Ewers and John White, Masters, were made prize and the men made slaves, the number of English prisouers there between forty and fifty; heard the Governor say there was no peace in the Indies, and it was lawful for the Spaniards to take all they met with. Of David de Rocque, taken 28th December 1676; was seaman to a French barque fishing off Cuba and taken by a Spanish vessel who had also an English vessel and two more vessels at her stern, an English sloop and Bermudean barque. Of William Green and Henry Smith, taken 28th December 1676, to the same effect as preceding deposition. And of Francisco Antonio in Spanish. Together, six papers. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos. 20–25.]