America and West Indies
November 1-15, 1676

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1893

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479-494

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'America and West Indies: November 1-15, 1676', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 9: 1675-1676 and Addenda 1574-1674 (1893), pp. 479-494. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70114 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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November 1–15, 1676

Nov. 1.
Whitehall.
1102. Philip Lloyd to the Sub-Governor and Deputy-Governor of the Royal African Company. To send by bearer the paper they showed the writer yesterday containing account of the number of negroes supplied to Barbadoes. Annexed,
1102. i. Account of negroes laden aboard five ships by the agents of the Royal African Company at Guinea, and sold at Barbadoes between March and June 1676. Total number shipped, 1,588; sold, 1,372; besides 224, which could not be sold there, sent to Nevis, and 200 for Jamaica. N.B.—The Lords of Trade reported on the foregoing papers, see Order in Council, Nov. 10, No. 1125. 1½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 26; also Col. Entry Bks., Vol. I., pp. 49–51, and Vol. VI., pp. 107, 108.]
[Nov. ?]1103. Caveat that neither Perient Trott nor any other have any letter from his Majesty to the Governor of the Somers Islands to permit any ship to lade there without the knowledge of the Company for the Plantation of said Islands. Notice to be given to Richard Chandler, Aldermanbury, London, near the Conduit. ¼ p. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XLV., p. 28.]
Nov. 1.1104. The present state of the soldiers designed for Virginia. The ships' names, the number of men to be put on board, the number of men on board, and the places where they ride. "The magazine of provision for the soldiers, we doubt not but will be ready and shipped by Saturday night next." [Nov. 4.] 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 27.]
Nov. 2.
Office of the Ordnance.
1105. Estimate for hods and bags of sacks for carrying earth for the fortifications, to be forthwith provided out of his Majesty's stores and the sent to Virginia, together with a gunsmith, engineer, and gunners with tools and flock beds furnished. Signed. Total, 228l. 7s. 2d. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 28.]
Nov. 2–7.
Whitehall.
1106. Journal of the Lords of Trade and Plantations. The Commissioners of Customs attend to give their opinions on the grievances from Barbadoes. They conceive that unless there were great abuses practised in making and filling the casks the Farmers would not trouble to weigh them which does therefore seem unavoidable. Their Lordships think fit to refer this to my Lord Treasurer. Concerning the Acts of Trade and Navigation. Arguments of Sir George Downing on the necessity of maintaining the present method of trade for the increase of shipping and welfare of "Old England" that Barbadoes has the least reason to complain, the customs of sugars being inconsiderable in comparison with tobacco; last year the customs on Barbadoes sugars amounted but to 25,000l. (?) of which 5,000l. (?) were again exported; customs on Virginia tobacco were 135,000l. of which but 35,000l. were again exported. Sir Peter Colleton thinks it is his Majesty's interest to suspend some part of those laws which are hurtful to English trade, and compares the English customs to those paid by the Portuguese. Further arguments on both sides. The Lords do not come to any resolution the Lord Privy Seal [Lord Anglesey] being absent.
Nov. 7.The Lords agree upon a report to his Majesty upon the above paper of grievances and Sir Jonathan Atkins' letter [of 4th July last, see ante, No. 973]. See the report of this date, No. 1116. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., pp. 240–242.]
Nov. 3.
Whitehall.
1107. Order of the King in Council. That the embargo laid by order of 30th September last on all ships bound for Virginia and Maryland be continued, and the bonds of the several masters not delivered up, notwithstanding the masters' pretensions of now entering their ships in the Custom House for Barbadoes or any other of his Majesty's Plantations. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., pp. 134–135.]
Nov. 3.
Whitehall.
1108. The King to the Governor and Council of the Massachusetts Colony in New England. We doubt not but you have heard of the disorders in Virginia raised by Nathaniel Bacon, the younger, the leader of a rebellion there. Having confidence in your loyalty and that you abhor such treasonable actions, and to prevent the contagion of so bad an example in other colonies, his Majesty hereby requires them if said Bacon or any of his accomplices shall for their safety or otherwise retreat to the Colony of New England to cause him and them to be forthwith seized and secured and give immediate notice thereof to the Governor of Virginia; and, further, to issue forth proclamation "straightly" forbidding any inhabitant of said Colony of New England to join with said rebels or afford them any assistance of any kind whatsoever. Mem.—Letters of the same tenor and date were writ to the Colony of New Plymouth, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., pp. 115, 116, and Vol. XCV., pp. 159, 160.]
Nov. 5.
Whitehall.
1109. The King to Sir William Berkeley, Governor of "Virginia in the West Indies." Letter of recall. That in regard of his age and infirmities, which make him less able to undergo the great burthen and fatigue of business in Virginia, especially at this time when evil-disposed persons have much increased the difficulties and troubles of his employment there, the King is pleased to condescend to his request for permission to retire from thence, and hereby orders him to repair to England to give and account of the present commotions in the Colony. Herbert Jeffreys is appointed Lieutenant-Governor. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., p. 127, and Vol. XCV., pp. 174, 175.]
Nov. 5.
Whitehall.
1110. The King to Sir Henry Chicheley. The troubles and disorders of our Colony of Virginia growing every day to a greater height by the treasonable and rebellious actions of Nathaniel Bacon the younger and his accomplices there, the King has sent forces to join with our good and loyal subjects there for the suppression of that rebellion and resettling that Colony in its former peace and quietness, and has appointed Herbert Jeffreys Commander-in-Chief and Lieutenant-Governor; his Majesty relies upon Sir Henry Chicheley's ready disposition to assist said jeffreys with his best counsel and advice. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., p. 128, and Vol. XCV., pp. 176, 177.]
Nov. 5.
Whitehall.
1111. Establishment for the Engineer, Commissary of Stores, Master Gunner, the four Gunners and a Gunsmith, as settled by his Majesty, on the report of Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master General of the Ordnance, to go in the present expedition for Virginia, in addition to his Majesty's former establishments for that expedition. James Archer, junior, engineer, Thomas Stavely, commissary of stores and master gunner. Total expense per annum, 584l. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 29.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
1112. Warrant to Ralph Montague, Master of the King's Great Wardrobe. To prepare two colours for each of the five companies of the King's foot guards, now sending upon an expedition to Virginia, viz., for Captain Herbert Jeffreys' company, two colours, with a crowned lion passant upon the crown; for Captain Edward Picks' company two colours, with the Royal oak crowned; for Captain John Mutlowe's company two colours, the ground blue with a red cross in a white field; for Captain Charles Middleton's company two colours, white waved with lemon, equally mixed with the red cross quite through with J. D. Y. [James Duke of York] in cipher, in gold; and for Captain William Meole's company two colours, the ground green with a red cross in a white field. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXIX., pp. 185, 186.]
Nov. 6.
Whitehall.
1113. Warrant to the Master General of the Ordnance. To deliver out of his Majesty's stores fire hundred arms more for the use of forces now sending upon an expedition to Virginia, also to prepare estimate for fifteen drums, halberds, powder, shot, lanterns, and candles, in a fit proportion to the one thousand men now going upon this expedition; and, lastly, for five tents of double canvas for the five captains commanding said forces. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II., Vol. XXIX., p. 187.]
Nov. 6.1114. Memorandum concerning the provisions and necessaries for sick men in Virginia, calculated as is usual at 12d. per head for six months, according to which, "by the same measure approved of by his Majesty last night," the provision to be made for the 1,130 men going will amount to 47l., and to be allowed for kettles and skillets, 3l.; and that the Lord Treasurer be moved concerning 243l. 6s. 8d., which is four months' pay, upon the additional establishments for a mate to the Commissary of Provisions and Deputy Paymaster, the adjutant, and officers of the train; and likewise for setting apart money for the surgeon's chest, about 53l. That my Lord Treasurer take order for payment of same upon account to John Knight, Surgeon-General. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 30.]
Nov. 7.
Whitehall.
1115. Journal of the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Ordered that the letter sent by his Majesty to New England on 22nd December 1675 (see ante, No. 755) concerning the pretentions of Mason and Gorges and the answer of the Governor of Boston be read. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., p. 242.]
Nov. 7.
Council Chamber, [Whitehall].
1116. Report of the Lords of Trade and Plantations to the King. On petition of the Council and Assembly of Barbadoes in obedience to his Majesty's Order in Council of 24th November 1675 (see ante, No. 714), together with a paper of grievances under three headings. 1. Concerning the Farmers weighing their casks of sugars. 2. The supply of negroes by the Royal African Company. 3. The Acts of Trade and Navigation. The main matter is the third head for a dispensation of the Acts of Trade and Navigation. Need not lay before his Majesty the evil consequence that any subjects should presume to petition against the laws they live under, and call them grievances, the whole frame of the trade and navigation would be destroyed by such a dispensation, and could only be done by his Majesty in Parliament, the whole nation being concerned in it. Conceives his Majesty's subjects of the Plantations would hardly presume to make any address of this kind to his Majesty were they not connived at by his Majesty's Governors, "and this we find to be the ground of this particular case," for in Governor Atkins' answers to some inquiries we find him, if not the prompter, yet the consenter with the inhabitants, and that he labours with more arguments than they do themselves, when it was the duty of the Goveanor on the contrary to have suppressed any such address. Are therefore of opinion that it is very necessary for his Majesty's service that Governor Atkins should by letter from his Majesty be severely reprehended for his error and mistake by his concurrence in encouraging the people, and that for the future he should suppress any such notions which tend to the ruin of trade. As to the first head, they say there never was any duty more cheerfully paid than the 4½ per cent., yet Governor Atkins desires they may be eased of it for a time for their encouragement. Also Governor Atkins continues that complaint against the want of supply of negroes, though Colonel Thornborough confesses they have been very well supplied for twelve months. Both these points may very fitly be taken notice of to Governor Atkins, who should endeavour to hinder and not promote complaints [see the King's letter to Gov. Atkins, No. 1179]. Setting these particulars aside which deserve his Majesty's reprehension, to all the heads of inquiry he has given a very good answer and deserves to be commended. Signed by Anglesey only. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 31.]
Nov. 7.
office of the Ordnance.
1117. An estimate of the charge of the powder, arms, bandaliers, match, small shots, partizans, drums, candles, and lanthorns, to be further provided and issued out of his Majesty's stores and sent to Virginia. Total, 947l. 1s. 8d. Signed. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 32; also Col. Entry Bk., No. LXXX., p. 75, headed, "4th Estimate of Stores sent to Virginia."]
Nov. 7.
Whitehall.
1118. Warrant to the Attorney-General. To prepare a Bill for his Majesty's signature, containing a commission to Herbert Jeffreys to be Lieutenant-Governor of Virginia, as follows:—Whereas Sir William Berkeley has represented that in respect of his great age and bodily weakness he is at present unable to execute the duties of his office, which are become the more burthensome by reason of the present rebellion, and has earnestly besought leave to retire, and that some other person be appointed Governor. It is the King's pleasure that said Sir William Berkeley shall with all possible speed return to England to give a perfect account of the condition of said Colony, and in the absence of said Governor his Majesty has thought fit to appoint Herbert Jeffreys LieutenantGovernor of Virginia, with power during Sir William Berkeley's absence to execute the authorities and jurisdictions belonging to the office of Governor and Captain-General of our Forces in said Colony. And in case it shall happen that said Sir William Berkeley shall depart this life, to execute all the powers of Governor until his Majesty declare his pleasure. With power to said Herbert Jeffreys to execute martial law during this present war, and to pardon treasons, felonies, and other misdemeanors relating to the present war and rebellion, said Berkeley not to be accountable or responsible for any failure or misdemeanor of said Jeffreys belonging to the office of chief Governor. And after the death of said Herbert Jeffreys, Captain Edward Picks, and on his death Captain John Mutlowe, Captain Charles Middleton, and Captain William Meole, severally and successively one after the death of the other, to execute the powers hereby granted to said Jeffreys. The Council of said Colony and all his Majesty's loving subjects to be assisting to said Jeffreys and the other persons aforesaid successively. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., pp. 86–90, and Vol. XCV., pp. 121–128.]
Nov. 7.
Whitehall.
1119. Warrant to the King's Lieutenants of Westmoreland and Cumberland. Not to dispose of the place of Master-Master of the trained bands of those counties during the absence of Captain John Tonge, lieutenant in his Majesty's regiment of foot guards called the Coldstreams, who his Majesty hath now commanded upon an expedition to Virginia, but to permit him to execute the same by a sufficient deputy till his return. [Dom. Entry Bk., Chas. II. Vol. XLIV., p. 38.]
[Nov. 7.]1120. Petition of John Downing, gentleman, inhabitant of Newfoundland, to the King. That petitioner's father was sent to Newfoundland armed with the King's father's commission and instructions from the then Lords Proprietors to plant people there and reduce the Indians to civility and religion, and to that purpose several laws and orders were then made and sent over by the King's father to be observed. That after some years when the forts were secured, and the fisheries brought into some regularity and security, petitioner's father died, and since his death petitioner and others of his Majesty's subjects have settled there, and lived for many years under said laws and orders, and have built houses and "cleansed the wilderness" to keep cattle, and have erected stages and rooms for their fisheries, and have hitherto lived with their wives and children in peace and comfort. But now some of his Majesty's subjects, upon pretence of a patent from his Majesty, have destroyed petitioner's houses and stages and driven away the inhabitants. Pray his Majesty to command that no such outrages be committed for the future, so that petitioner may find security for himself, his wife and family. With reference to Lords of Trade and Plantations to take such order herein as shall seem meet for petitioner's relief. 7th November 1676. Annexed,
1120. i. King Charles I.'s commission to John Downing and William Rigby going to Newfoundland with instructions from the Lords Proprietors. Westminster, 24th June 1640.
1120. ii. Instructions from the Lords Proprietors, Patentees of Newfoundland to John Downing of London, merchant, concerning the affairs of their Lordship there, and others interested and adventurers therein. Whitehall, 20th June 1640.
1120. iii. Laws, rules, and ordinances whereby the affairs and fishery of Newfoundland are to be governed until the Parliament shall take further order. Whitehall, 16th June 1652. Endorsed, "Recd. 9 Nov. 1676; Read 24 Nov. 1676." Together, 7 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos., 33 33 I., II., III.]
Nov. 8.
office of the Ordnance.
1121. A memorial of all the estimates delivered from the Office of Ordnance for his Majesty's service upon this present expedition to Virginia, from 14th June to 8th November 1676. Total, 11,178l. 3s. 6d. Signed. Mem.—That there is already a tally struck upon the Customs for the first of the estimates, viz., 2,497l. 6s. 8d., so that there is yet wanting order for the remaining sum of 8,680l. 16s. 10d. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 34; also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., p. 77.]
Nov. 9.
Derby House.
1122. S. Pepys to Matthew Lock. Has sent a memorial to Secretary Coventry's office, in order to obtain warrant for provision of brandy for the men on their passage. What has been done as to accommodation of the officers in the great cabins of the merchantmen taken up by his Majesty for his service to Virginia. Annexed,
1122. i. Account of the distribution on shipboard of the officers and men designed for Virginia. Together, 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos. 35, 35 I.]
Nov. 9.1123. Thomas Ludwell to Secretary Williamson ? Being within a little time to depart from England towards Virginia, and doubting lest his maliciously unjust enemies may have been as industrious to wound him by their whippers on the Exchange as he fears they have endeavoured to do at Court, could not with any satisfaction leave England and not endeavour to clear himself of as many faults as he hears are laid to his charge, especially to himself, from whom he has received so many favours. Affirms in the presence of God that during the whole time he has executed the office of Secretary of State of Virginia he has never exacted or taken from any man one farthing more than his due, hundreds of times less, and many times nothing from those who wanted it. When some of his clerks have exacted exorbitant fees he has written to the County Courts desiring the Justices to publish to the people to bring their complaints to the Courts and he would displace the clerks, and the people should have satisfaction; two clerks were displaced, and a third clerk cleared himself before the Governor and Council. Answers to the charge of taking more than his due for passes; the fees are 5s. to the Governor, 2s. 6d. to the Secretary, and 2s. 6d. to the Clerk of the County where the party lived. "Claybourne paying 150l. sterling for granting a pass without security or certificate." Sir W. Berkeley resolved, when he re-entered the government, to quit at once that power and danger by resigning it to the Assembly, who by a law conferred it on Ludwell, upon which he justly claimed the Governor's 5s., and his own 2s. 6d., and the Clerk's (of the County) 2s. 6d., making the whole 10s. Justifies his conduct in the division he made, and the proposition he had of the 200l. per annum allowed by the Assembly to the Council for their attendance to public business, and the complaint of one of the Council, after he came to England "if I were as troublesome as he is malicious I would put him to prove his assertion, which I know he cannot." As to his having had a hand in the oppression of the people, and in the other errors committed in the Government, affirms there is not a man in the whole country that has strove more for the good of those people than he has, or has laboured more to keep things in a right channel, and is sure none can accuse him for having ever received a penny or pound of tobacco from the people by bribe or public gift. Thought he had done enough in his first and second papers given in to the Cabinet Council to propose sending Commissioners to inquire into grievances, and when he heard of the paper given in by Colonel Moryson for the better settlement of those unhappy differences, applied himself to him, though uncommanded, and gave him the hints about rectifying the errors in the Assembly, which will be found the best means to cure our disorders. Nor can he be justly accused more than any one of the whole Assembly for any taxes laid upon the people, since a Secretary hath no more than a single vote. Has thus troubled him with a long narration of his sad case, which is the more deplorable as he offered to lend the country 500l. free of interest for three years, and when that would not do undertook to serve them at his own charge. Had not the discontents of the people against those patents seemed to threaten great disorders would never have engaged himself so much to his loss in seeking a remedy for them. Desires he will do Ludwell right to his Majesty's Ministers with whom he has interest, observes some of them of late have not looked favourably on him. Begs he will do this before Ludwell waits on them to receive their commands and take his leave. 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 36.]
Nov. 10.1124. The Privy Council to Sir Thomas Chicheley, Master of his Majesty's Ordnance. Requiring him forthwith to give directions for providing several stores (as per estimate, see ante, No. 1117), and transporting them to Virginia, to be delivered to the Governor there for the use of said Colony. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. LXXX., p. 76.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
1125. Order of the King in Council. On report of Lords of Trade and Plantations [see ante, No. 1116], in obedience to his Majesty's Order in Council of 24th November 1675, upon petition of Council and Assembly of Barbadoes, and annexed paper of grievances. That as to the second head, that the Royal African Company hath not sent sufficient supplies to the Island, and hath sold those sent at dearer rates than when the trade was open, their Lordships find that the Island had been well supplied for twelve months' past, and that the interruption was caused by the Dutch war. Colonel Thornborough confesses the island has been well supplied, and their Lordships conceive this may fitly be taken notice of in his Majesty's letter to Sir Jonathan Atkins, who should endeavour to hinder complaints and not promote them, especially when the ground of them is removed, as in this of the negroes. His Majesty approves and hereby orders that the Lords prepare draft of letter to Governor Atkins as proposed, to be transmitted to Secretary Coventry for the King's signature [see No. 1179]. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. I., pp. 51–53; also Vol. VI., pp. 109–114.]
Nov. 10.1126. "Order of reference in the business of Sir H. Morgan and Colonel Byndlosse, at Jamaica." There having been some complaints against Sir Henry Morgan and Colonel Byndlosse, at Jamaica, concerning their correspondence with French privateers, his Majesty commanded Secretary Coventry to transmit the same to Lord Vaughan, Governor of Jamaica, to be examined by the Council there; which having been accordingly done and matter of fact returned from thence thither, his Majesty hath further commanded Secretary Coventry to put the papers concerning that matter into the hands of the Lords Committee of Trade and Plantations to consider the whole matter, and to report to his Majesty their opinion. By direction of Secretary Coventry, John Cooke. "Rec. 10 Nov. Read 30 Nov. 1676." 1 p. [Col. Papers., Vol. XXXVIII., No. 37; also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., p. 94.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
1127. John Cooke to W. Blathwayte. Mr. Le Pin will deliver him two bundles of papers relating to Jamaica by Secretary Coventry's directions to be presented to the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Begs he will return a list of these and other papers he received yesterday from Secretary Coventry, that we may enter their titles. "Rec. 10 Nov. 1676, with the papers relating to Jamaica." 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 38.]
Nov 10.1128. Mem.—On perusal of several papers, ordered by Lords of Trade and Plantations that a breviat be made of the particular charges and proofs brought against Sir Henry Morgan and Colonel Byndlosse. Then follow the articles against Sir H. Morgan and proofs, and the articles against Lieutenant Colonel Byndlosse and proofs. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos. 39, 40; also Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XXIX., pp. 101–104.]
1129. List of Papers touching Sir Henry Morgan and Colonel Byndlosse":—1. Letter from Lord Vaughan to Secretary Coventry, dated 2nd August 1676 (calendared, see No. 1006). 2. A state of the case on the examination of Sir Henry Morgan and Colonel Byndlosse before his Excellency and Council. 6 pp. Received from Secretary Coventry, 9th November 1676. 3. Exemplification of all the proceedings upon the citation of Sir Henry Morgan and Colonel Robert Byndlosse before the Council held at Port Royal, 24th July 1676. Received from Secretary Coventry, 9th November 1676. By the St. George, Captain Alford (calendared, see No. 998). 4. Sir Henry Morgan to [Secretary Coventry]. Account of his trial before the Governor and Council of Jamaica. Beseeches his Majesty to suspend giving his judgment till the next ships come which will bring other depositions he hopes will clear all. "But if his Majesty should be deaf to all and these things should give his Majesty occasion to put me out that he will be graciously pleased to order that I may be tried here at his Court of King's Bench where the witnesses are. . . . .and if ever I err in one tittle, then let me ever be condemned for the greatest villian in the world, and as God is my judge and witness I have never entertained a thought in my life but what hath been really devoted to his Majesty's service and interest nor never will." Jamaica. 1676, August 2. "Received 4th October." 5. Sir Henry Morgan to [Secretary Coventry]. Thanks for his abundant favours. Can only say, it being not in my power to make my Lord prove it, that I never since I came here writ a line to any of the privateers, therefore the copies sent are forged on purpose to my prejudice. Waited upon his Excellency expecting he would have warned me to appear before the Council, but he said nothing of it, but as I know it is false I will, the first Council, myself move it and desire what is laid to my charge may be proved which I know is impossible. "I sucked the milk of loyalty and if I would have sold one little part of it I might have been richer than my enemies ever will be." As for Colonel Byndlosse, knows nothing of crime in him, but his being related to Sir Henry, for he lives twenty miles from Port Royal, has a wife and five or six children and one of the best estates in this island, therefore he is an understanding man and would not venture that hazard and estate against nothing. His unhappiness is he serves a superior here that is jealous of all his actions and put himself to study Sir Henry's ruin for what reason knows not. Refers to Mr. Cranfield and Captain Davis who have known his actions. 3 p. Endorsed, "Sir H. Morgan now out of date. Received 4th September by Captain Hoskins of Bristol." 6. Captain John Bennett's Commission in French signed by Ogeron, Governor of the Tortugas and the coast of San Domingo and condemnation of his prize. April 1675. Also Ogeron's letter to Attorney. 7. Sir Henry Morgan to Captain John Bennett. Is commanded by the Captain General to acquaint all the privateers, both English and French, that they shall have at all times as much liberty of this port as ever they had, and that they may with abundance of safety come hither. Will send his Lordship protection under hand and seal so that they need not be afraid of any harm although here is a King's frigate. They may assure themselves of his Excellency's favour and friendship, Jamaica, Port Royal. 1675, March 25. 8. Sir Henry Morgan to the Privateers, Captains Rogers, Wright, Nevill, Bennett, Pryniar, and to all others acting under French Commissions as well English as French. Is com manded by the General to tell them they are welcome to this island and shall have all the privileges they ever had and Port Royal is free to them. Hopes their experience of him will give him the reputation that he intends not to betray them, Jamaica, Port Royal. 1675, March 26. 9. Colonel Robert Byndlosse to [Secretary Coventry]. Is advised that Lord Vaughan has charged the writer to his Honour for contracting with the French Governor to receive the tenths for his Commissions. Account of his being summoned before the Council on 24th July of the matters objected against him, and his answers. Begs him to believe he would as soon cut his own throat as do a thing willingly in the least to incur his Majesty's displeasure. Cannot tell how he has disobliged my Lord; thinks his fault is being allied by marriage to Sir H. Morgan, if so, is contented, and it's as great a riddle to Jamaica what Sir Harry hath done. Implores his aid that his Majesty may have a right understanding of his case. 3 pp. Jamaica. 1676, July 29. Received, 11th October. 10. Articles to be exhibited against Robert Byndlosse before his Excellency and the Council. 1 p. 11. Answers of Colonel Byndlosse to the preceding articles. Certified copy. 4 pp. 12. Governor Lord Vaughan's reply to the preceding answers of Colonel Byndlosse. 1 p. Certified copy. 13. Deposition of Robert Byndlosse, aged forty years, before Colonel Thomas Fuller, one of his Majesty's Council. 1676, August 1. 2 pp. 14. Order of Council for sending Colonel Byndlosse to view the several forts at Port Royal. Missing. 15. Examination of Charles Barré before Governor Lord Vaughan. That soon after his Excellency's arrival he copied several letters for Sir Henry Morgan, one was directed to Captain Bennett and the other to Rogers and other Privateers. Port Royal, 1676, August 28. 16. Colonel Robert Byndlosse to [Secretary Coventry]. Complains of the Governor's proceedings as to the charges he has brought against Byndlosse. None of the papers sent home signed by the Council, for the Governor saw not one man of them but would have cleared us since nothing was proved and it was plain prejudice. My Lord does all to make Byndlosse a great friend to the Privateers. Is now a planter and has lived for nine years 20 miles from Port Royal, yet, notwithstanding his settled and easy condition which he so much loves, is willing to hazard his life and undergo any hardship for his Majesty's service, at whose command he will go in this frigate with a tender of six or eight guns and so deal with the privateers at sea, and in their holes bring in the chief of them to his Majesty's obedience or bring in their heads and destroy their ships. 3 pp. Jamaica, 1676, September 12. Received, 9th January 1677. 17. Deposition of Charles Barré, Secretary to Sir Henry Morgan, Lieutenant-General of Jamaica. That about March 1675 he did copy by Sir Henry's orders two letters Sir Henry had written with design to have sent them to the captains of several privateers, to advise to come to Jamaica with prizes and they should be well received, but understood Sir Henry wrote said letters by consent of Lord Vaughan and sent him copies of each letter to underwrite his approbation, which the Governor deferring Sir Henry refused to send said letters. Confesses accepting Captain Smith's offer to go a trading voyage with him, but positively denies he was sent by Sir Henry to treat or act any business with the French or English privateers neither did Sir Henry. Also touching Lord Vaughan's examination of this deponent after his return from his said voyage. 2 pp. Port Royal, 1676, September 12. "Received from Mr. Secretary Coventry and read 31st January 1677, sent by Colonel Byndlosse." [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., Nos. 41–55; also Col. Entry Bk, Vol. XXIX, pp. 105–106.]
Nov. 11.
Whitehall.
1130. The King's instructions to Herbert Jeffreys, Sir John Berry, and Francis Moryson, his Majesty's Commissioners for Virginia. 1. To embark on board the Bristol and transport themselves to Virginia. 2. Being arrived they shall inform themselves truly and thoroughly of the state of affairs in that Colony. 3. To be assistant to the Governor with their advice whenever he shall demand it, and particularly in renewing a peace with the neighbour Indians. 4. To inform themselves how his Majesty's instructions to Governor Berkeley (of 12th September 1662, see No. 368 in a previous volume) have been pursued, and wherein there hath been any failure, upon what grounds and by whose neglect and wilful fault. 5. To inform themselves of all grievances, but particularly of that which the people seem so much concerned in, the great salary paid to the members of the Assembly. 6. To possess his Majesty's subjects there that, as he will be severe in punishing the guilty, so he will be indulgent and direct proportionable redress to the just complaints of his oppressed people. 7. To make particular acquaintance of the Council there, in order to a clearer information of affairs in general. 8. To make a particular inquiry into the militia. 9. Also into the laws, and return their remarks thereon. 10. To send accounts of their proceedings. 4 pp. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., pp. 117–120, and Vol. XCV., pp. 161–165.]
Nov. 11.
Whitehall.
1131. The King's instructions to Herbert Jeffreys, LieutenantGovernor of Virginia, and Commander-in-Chief of his Majesty's forces there. These are comprised under eight heads, and are identical with the additional instructions to Sir W. Berkeley, dated 13th October 1676 (see ante, No. 1068); but articles 7 and 8 of Berkeley's additional instructions in reference to Bacon are omitted. In article 9 (7 in these instructions) is an addition, that whatever duties were formerly payable to Governor Berkeley out of the Colony of Virginia for support of the Government, Jeffreys shall receive himself to the same use during his being Commander -in-Chief there. 3 pp. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., pp. 122–124, and Vol. XCV., pp. 167–171.]
Nov. 11.
Whitehall.
1132. Additional instructions for Herbert Jeffreys, LieutenantGovernor of Virginia and Commander-in-Chief of our forces there. 1. To embark with all convenient speed, and make the best of his way to Virginia. 2. Upon his arrival, to take all advantages upon the enemy, in order to the suppression of the rebellion there, in case he finds the rebels still in arms, and in landing his forces to take the advice of Sir John Berry and Colonel Moryson. 3. To endeavour to speak with Sir W. Berkeley or some of the Council as soon as he can. 4. To publish his Majesty's proclamation if not done before his arrival, and if Bacon fall into his hands to make his process there or send him on shipboard with proofs of his crimes. To the end that he may not easily make his escape letters have been written to New York, to New England, and to Maryland to seize said Bacon, and return him prisoner. [Col. Entry Bks., Vol. LXXX., pp. 125, 126, and Vol. XCV., pp. 172–174.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
1133. The King to John Lord Vaughan, Governor of Jamaica. His Majesty having thought fit to send some ships of war, and a good number of land forces for suppressing the rebellion in Virginia, and having employed certain merchant ships in that service, should any of the said ships by stress of weather or accident be driven upon the island, he is to take all possible care to see them refitted, &c. Similar letters were written to Sir Jonathan Atkins, Governor of Barbadoes, and Colonel William Stapleton, Governor of the Leeward Islands. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCV., pp. 180–182].
Nov. 14.1134. Secretary Coventry to the Attorney-General. To consult with the Lord Chancellor in drawing up a new Commission of Oyer and Terminer, both concerning the number and persons fittest for the quorum. Sends such names as at present occur to him; if the King think fit to add or alter any he shall have notice. Annexed,
1134. i. Mem.—In pursuance of the above letter of 14th November 1676, a Commission of Oyer and Terminer was prepared and passed under the Great Seal, dated 16th November, 28 Car. II. The names of the Commissioners are as follows:—
Sir William Berkeley, Governor.
Herbert Jeffreys, Lieutenant-Governor.
The Captain General of the Forces.
Sir Henry Chicheley.
Sir John Berry.
Thomas Ludwell, Secretary.
Colonel Francis Moryson.
Abraham Wood.
Colonel Nathaniel Bacon, senior.
Colonel Nicholas Spencer.
Colonel Philip Ludwell.
Colonel William Cole.
Major Leigh.
Captain Ralph Wormeley, or any two or more, the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, or Captain-General of the Forces to be one. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCV., pp. 183–185.]
Nov. 14.
Whitehall.
1135. Journal of the Lords of Trade and Plantations. Their Lordships taking notice of a letter from the magistrates of Boston, excusing their not sending over agents so suddenly by reason of page start="494"/> the Indian War and other impediments, order a letter to be prepared for his Majesty's signature requiring them with all speed to convene a general Court for the deputing of agents, those former obstacles being now ceased. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. CIV., p. 248.]
Nov. 15.
Whitehall.
1136. Secretary Coventry to Sir W. Berkeley. The uproars of Virginia have been so "stupendious" since his only letter of 3rd June last, that in any age but ours, that hath been accustomed to prodigies, they would hardly find belief. His Majesty and Council, much disturbed at receiving no account of his affairs there, their intelligence being from persons unknown here, have many times doubted whether he were alive or no. The King hath sent over a supply of both men and ships, the ships to be commanded by Sir John Berry, the men by Colonel Jeffreys. And considering the earnestness of his petition, and how much the increasing of Bacon's rebellious party hath rendered the affairs more insupportable to a man of his age, his Majesty hath written a letter to him calling him hence to receive a perfect account of the state of affairs from his mouth, and hath granted a commission to Colonel Jeffreys to act in his stead under the title of Lieutenant-Governor. [Col. Entry Bk., Vol. XCV., No.177.]
Nov. 15.1137. Certificate of some of the officers going to Virginia who desire their pay may be satisfied and paid in England to their assigns during their absence. Signed by Hert. Jeffreys, Edward Picks, John Mutlowe, Ch. Myddelton, Will. Meoles, and J. Tonge. 1p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXXVIII., No. 56.]