America and West Indies
September 1670, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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W. Noel Sainsbury (editor)

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1889

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84-94

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'America and West Indies: September 1670, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 7: 1669-1674 (1889), pp. 84-94. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=70198 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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September 1670, 1-15

Sept. 1. 242. Order of the Governor and Council of Jamaica. Whereas the people called Quakers living at Port Royal have given several reasons why they cannot against their consciences bear arms, by which they seem very obstinate in that matter, which reasons are looked upon as weak and frivolous and dangerous and destructive to all government, yet out of compassion and pity to those poor misled people, and out of respect to the gentlemen and merchants living in that town, who by a late order of court-martial are ordered to guard every night in person, it is hereby ordered that such person who pays three able and sufficient soldiers shall be excused from his personal watching, otherwise said order of court-martial to be put in execution, as also the statute for regulating the militia and against those who have not constantly in their houses the quantity of powder and ball, arms and other necessaries therein appointed. 2 pp. [Col. Entry Bk., No. 34, pp. 203–205.]
Sept. 9/19.
London.
243. Memorial of the French Ambassador Colbert concerning American commerce. Has received orders to assure the King of England that in the execution of the edict of 10th June last concerning the commerce of America nothing shall be done contrary to the good intelligence his most Christian Majesty will maintain with the King of England; and that English ships shall receive in all places under his Majesty's obedience all the good treatment they receive from the English themselves, on condition that they shall not trade in the islands of America. Besides the orders already sent to De Baas, his Christian Majesty's Lieut.-General, letters have again been written to him; but as complaints are often received from thence of the small assistance and even ill-treatment of the French by the English, the French Ambassador desires the King to renew his orders to his commanders in Jamaica, Barbadoes, and other islands and places in America, to assist the French as much as they can, to maintain good correspondence with his Christian Majesty's commanders, and compose all petty differences between the two nations, leaving the decision to the two Kings where they cannot agree. Endorsed, Read at the Foreign Committee, 10th Sept. 1670. French. 2 ½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXV., No. 57.]
Sept. 9/19.
London.
244. English translation of the preceding. Endorsed, Received London. from Mr. Bridgman, 16 Sept. 1670. 2 pp. [Col. Papers,Vol.XXV., No. 58.]
Sept. ?
Shaftesbury
Papers.
245. Governor Sayle and Council at Ashley River to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Since writing their former letter by way of Virginia they have sent to demand the captain of the sloop and the rest of their men detained by the Spaniards, and gave strict orders to those who were sent not to trust themselves with the Spaniards, but some of them being deluded by the friars at Sta. Katharina went ashore, and so two more men are lost, Joseph Bailey and John Collins. Can get no answer either from the Governor of St. Augustine or the Friar, so desire their Lordships directions how to demean themselves in this matter. Two of the Council having acted in said embassy contrary to instructions, have been suspended from the council table. Have not above one month's provisions in the Colony, so are forced to send the sloop to the Summer Islands for provision to keep their people from perishing and to charge bills upon their Honours' agents at Barbadoes to pay sugar for the provisions taken up at the Summer Islands. Their necessities are so great that they must either do this or desert the settlement, which were a great pity, for Sayle is confident there was never a more hopeful design set on foot; he has been in several places, but never was in a sweeter climate than this. They have discovered abundance of good land, and believe there is good land enough for millions of people to live and work on. There is nothing planted but thrives very well; some flax sowed thrives very well; good wine, tobacco, silk, and all sorts of English grain and manufactures may be plentifully produced, and Gov. Sayle conceives the land will bear sugar canes. In 10 or 12 years doubtless their Honours may have return from hence suitable to their great expenses, therefore they beseech that they may employ the ships to fetch more people, that the design may not fall for want of an industrious management, which a little more expense will preserve. They use their utmost endeavours for the advancement of their Honours' interests, and have written to the Summer Islands and New England to gain what people they may to promote the design. Signed by William Sayle, Flor. O'Sullivan, Joseph West, Step. Bull, Paul Smyth, Ralph Marshall, Samuel West, and Jos. Dalton, secretary. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shafteebury Papers, Section IX., No. 42.]
Sept. 9.
Albemarle
Point.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
246. Governor Sayle and Council to Anthony Lord Ashley and the rest of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. For some time since the despatch of the Carolina from this place to Virginia and the sloop to Bermuda for provisions and supplies they have been put to purchase their maintenance from the Indians; party of Indians sent by the Spaniards against them near the river's mouth, who on the return of the Carolina fired upon Henry Brayne and his company although they showed him a white flag. Mounted their great guns and fortified and put themselves in a reasonable good posture to receive them, also sent out a party of friendly Indians to discover their camp, but the Spanish Indians had then retreated. The safe arrival of the Carolina with provisions for eight months has much encouraged the people; so hope to defend their Lordships' interests and their own rights till they receive further aid, which they very much stand in need of. Have despatched the Carolina to Barbadoes, where they understand is a considerable number of people ready to be shipped for this place, which will conduce much to their own safety and the ease of their people, who have been too much overprest with watching already. Have not lost above four people, who died from distempers usual in other parts. Supply of all sorts of stores wanted, especially clothing, as the winter is like to prove pretty sharp; also 10 barrels of powder. Have received cows and hogs from Virginia, but at an immoderate rate, 30s. for a hog which might be bought in England for 10s. Suggest that a small stock be kept at Bermuda. The Bahama Islands being lately settled and as yet no patent, may be worth their Lordships' notice. In great want of an able minister, by whose means corrupted youth might be very much reclaimed, the people instructed, and the Sabbath and service of God not neglected. The Israelites' prosperity decayed when their prophets were wanting, for where the ark of God is there is peace and tranquillity. Pray the want thereof may never be known to their Lordships or this place. Signed by Wm. Sayle, Flor. O'Sullivan, Ste. Bull, Jos. West, Wm. Scrivenor, Ralph Marshall, Paul Smyth, Samuel West, and Jos. Dalton, secretary. 2 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 31.]
[Sept. 9.]
Shaftesbury
Papers.
247. Governor Sayle and Council at Ashley River to [Lord Ashley]. Certify at his request that Joseph Dalton was elected one of the Council, and that in confidence of his abilities and integrity they have appointed him secretary and register for this Colony. For a continuance or any grant thereof they have directed him to his Lordship. Signed by William Sayle, Step. Bull, Joseph West, Will. Scrivenor, Flor. O'Sullivan, Ralph Marshall, and Samuel West. Endorsed by John Locke, "Council at Ashley River recommendation of J. Dalton to be secretary and register. 9? Sept. 70." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 29.]
Sept. 9.
Albemarle
Point.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
248. Jos. Dalton to Anthony Lord Ashley, Chancellor of the Exchequer, at Whitehall. His Lordship has had a full account of the harbours, situations, and hopefulness of this place, which indeed deserves no other than an excellent commendation. The Colony is indeed safely settled and with a very propitious aspect, there only remains the preservation of it, which consists chiefly in two things, careful supplies and a wise politic government, which two diamonds he has borrowed for this structure from the ruins of other settlements of this nature of the English especially, who have been very unsuccessful of late, which he thinks might very easily have been prevented and a free disbursement of a penny in the morning have saved a pound at night. Recommends the employment of a ship of considerable burthen for three or four years to transport people and their goods to this place gratis, they finding their own provisions, and that there be a perfect store of all necessaries belonging to a new settlement till the people have a produce of their own.; hunger-starved infancy seldom produces strong maturity, consumptions may be reasonably prevented, but chargeably recovered. Servants' apparel is chiefly wanted. Represents the charge that lies upon government in this place, chiefly in reference to the clandestine actions of the Spaniards, who "start blood with a prick at a thousand miles distance," the principal grudge of the Spaniards against them, according to the estimate of Hen. Woodward, our interpreter, who had a good opportunity during his confinement at St. Augustine to discover the truth. The people in very good plight, especially since provisions came from Virginia, but are unable to discharge their duties to the Lords Proprietors by these alarms, being more like soldiers in a garrison than planters; advises a favourable mitigation of freight for their goods. Hears of the loss of the Port Royal upon the Bahama Islands, but the truth is not yet manifested. Absolute necessity of a speedy despatch of ships to this place; his Lordship may know by a penny how a shilling is coined; his desire is only to give a hint or be as a spark for a nobler flame. Begs his Lordship will pardon a pen stupefied with zeal for the prosperity of Carolina. The Governor and Council having conferred upon him the office of secretary and register for this Colony, he desires88 he may be treated with the same favour as the first adventurers, being one of the first that set forward this design, and that as he has struggled through the worst, so may he have a small share of the better. Very little paper in the Colony, most of it being lost and damnified in the voyage. No provision being made for his office, there is not one book wherein to record anything, one of considerable bulk in folio especially wanted to register grants in. Freedom of trade for seven years should be published in England to invite planters. 2 pp. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftebury Papers, Section IX., No. 30.]
Sept. 9.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
249. Entry of the preceding in "Carolina letter book." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 12, 14, 16, 18, 20.]
Sept. 9.
Albemarle
Point
Shaftesbury
Papers.
250. Flor. O'Sullivan to [Lord Ashley]. Wrote a particular account of all things by the Carolina by the way of Virginia, but is doubtful whether it came to his hands. The country proves good beyond expectation, abounding in all things, as good oak, ash, deer, turkeys, partridges, rabbits, turtle and fish, and the land produces anything that is put into it, they have tried it with corn, cotton, and tobacco and other provisions, which prove very well; it is also stored with peaches, strawberries, and other pleasant fruits. They are settled at Key-awah, 20 leagues to the northward of Port Royal, which did not prove according to reports, and have built their town upon Albemarle Point, seated upon the river called by them Ashley River, where they are fortifying themselves. Has made several discoveries into the country, and cannot give a better character of it than it deserves. Are humbly thankful for store of provisions, for they were forced to live upon the Indians, who were very kind to them. Their ship about going to Barbadoes, from whence they expect more people and fresh supplies. Expect a ship from England with more people; the Lords Proprietors would do well to grant a free passage to passengers for some time. Pray send us a minister qualified according to the Church of England. Hope the worst is past if their Lordships will stand by them. Instructions should be sent to lay out the land to the people as it lies, that the good and the bad may go together, by which means people will not inhabit at a distance. Account of the taking of Mr. Rivers and others by the Spaniards at Sta. Katherina, where they still remain. Sir John Yeamans left them at Bermuda, where was taken one CoL Sayle for Governor. O'Sullivan procured there 20l. in provisions, which assisted the people very much. Is sorry to give account of the loss of the Port Royal upon the Bahama Islands, all being lost but the master and two or three men. Desires his Lordship to order the Governor and Council what he is to have for salary, for according to their proposals he is not able to live; the country is troublesome to survey, and 10l is little enough for a thousand, which is all he desires. Complains of Capt. Brayne for refusing to carry pipe staves to Barbadoes for him. Desires Lord Craven would appoint Ralph Marshall one of the Council, his deputy, Mr. Bowman having left them in Ireland. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 34.]
Sept. 9.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
251. Entry of the preceding in "Carolina Letter Book." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 20, 22, 24.]
Sept. ?
Shaftesbury
Papers.
252. Note [in the handwriting of John Locke] of provisions at Ashley River. 140 men had seven weeks provisions from 25th June, which is to the middle of August. At Barbados are thirty barrels of 200 bushels of flour and twenty barrels of about 4,500 lbs. of beef, which is provision for 140 men 90 days more, which is to the middle of November. The Carolina had from Virginia the produce of a cargo of 270l.; what that is I cannot tell, but if we are not cheated cannot be less than six months, which is to the middle of May. Besides all this they have crop, which if it produce according to Virginia will at least 1,000 bushels of Indian corn, besides roots and beans, which crop I judge was ripe by the middle of August. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 28.]
Sept. 10.
Albemarle
Point.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
253. Governor Sayle to Lord Ashley. Sends a relation of the country of which his honour has the happiness to be a Proprietor; a more healthful, fruitful, and pleasant place the world doth not afford. Beseeches him to be mindful in sending supplies and more people to strengthen them against their enemies, for the Spaniard watcheth only for an opportunity to destroy them; also a pink of about 80 tons, for one vessel is not sufficient to attend them. Refers to their general letter for a more particular account. 1 p. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 32.]
Sept. 10.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
254. Entry of the preceding in the "Carolina Letter Book belonging to the Earl of Shaftesbury." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, p. 8.]
Shaftesbury
Papers.
255. "Mr. Cartaret s relation of their planting at Ashley River." Sailing from Bermuda 26th February, they came up with the land between Cape Romana and Port Royal, and in 17 days the longboat went ashore; friendliness of the natives, who made signs where they should best land and stroked them on their shoulders saying "Bony conraro Angles," gave them brass rings and tobacco. Brought the ship next day to anchor in a handsome channel. The Governor, whom they took in at Bermuda, with several others went ashore to view the land some three leagues distance. Carried ashore by the Indians, who gave them the stroking compliments of the country and brought deer skins to trade with, for which they gladly took knives, beads, and tobacco; food made by the women, "a pretty sort of bread," and hickory nuts, a walnut in shape, brought by them. Came to the hut palace of his Majesty of the place, who took the Governor on his shoulders and carried him into the house in token of his cheerful entertainment, where they had nuts and root cakes and water, for they use no other liquor. While there the King's three daughters entered the palace, all in new robes of new moss, which they are never beholden to the tailor to trim up, with plenty of beads of divers colours about their necks. Could not imagine that the savages could so well deport themselves, coming in according to their age, saluting the strangers and stroaking them. Understanding their business to St. Helena, these Indians told them the Westoes were a ranging sort of people reputed to be man-eaters, and had ruinated that place, killing the Indians and destroying their habitations, and that they had done the like at Keyawah, the Casseeka of which place was within one sleep (24 hours) of them. Leaving that place called Sowee, and carrying the Casseeka of Keyawah with them, a very ingenious Indian and a great linguist, they sailed to the southward of Port Royal and entered the river (the opening of which did not appear to them as Col. Sandford related). Explorations and soundings. Cannot say much of the channel, being but a landsman, but the Governor, Capt. Brayne, and himself (Mr. Carterett) took the longboat upon discovery, of which Capt. Brayne will give a more perfect account than he can; a small kind of whale plentiful in this river, some say of the sperm kind. Weighed from Port Royal river and ran in between St. Helena and Combohe, where they lay at anchor. Gladly received by the Indians, who hoped to be protected from the Westoes and brought venison and skins for trade; fertility of the land at St. Helena, where was a mile and a half of clear land ready to plant. Oysters in great plenty, though not so pleasant to the taste as your Wallfleet oyster; also wild turkeys far bigger than our tame ones. The sloop bought at Bermuda was despatched to Keyawah to view that land so much commended by the Casseeka, and brought back a report that the land was more fit to plant in than at St. Helena, which begot a question whether to remove thither, the Governor adhering to Keyawah and most being of a temper to follow, though they knew no reason for it, imitated the rule of the inconsiderate multitude and cried out for Keyawah, yet some dissented; thus we came to Keyawah, where the land is as much as one as at St. Helena. 4 pp. Endorsed as above by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX, No. 23.]
Sept. 12.
Albemarle
Point.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
256. Governor Sayle and Council to Lord Ashley and the rest of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Cannot omit to lay before them the difficulties which Dr. Woodward [hath met with] from the first discovery of these parts, and of the settlement here, with the great use he stands us in at present. The great love and courtesy with which he is treated by the Indians, how he was surprised by the Spaniard at St. Helena and taken prisoner to St. Augustine, which being surprised by Serle, Woodward was carried to the Leeward Isles, where he shipped surgeon of a privateer, but was cast away 17th August 1669 in a hurricane at Nevis, where, we happening to touch, Woodward manifested his ready inclination to promote their Lordship's service in this expedition. By constant travelling and enquiry amongst the natives, who are greatly affected towards him, he is able to give a more exact account of the discovery of several places and rivers than ever they heard before.91 He has lately been fourteen days' journey westward as far as the fruitful country of Chafytachyque, the Emperor, who highly approved a true league and friendship with the English, and sent presents by the doctor on his return, and is himself expected in person in forty days. The doctor hath been lately very useful in dealing with the Indians for supplies, and would have embarked this time for England but that they cannot well dispense with his absence from the Colony because of his familiar acquaintance amongst the natives, and his knowledge of their language. Signed by William Sayle, Joseph West, Will. Scrivenor, Flor. O'Sullivan, Ralph Marshall, and Jos. Dalton, secretary. 1 p. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 36.]
Sept.
Albemarle
Point at
Keyawah.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
257. Joseph West to Lord Ashley at Little Exeter House in the Strand. Refers to his last of 27 June [see ante, No. 203.] Has heard nothing as yet of their men who went to Sta. Katherina to look for his Lordship's kinsman, Mr. Rivers, and the rest of the men detained there by the Spaniards. Have oftentimes been alarmed by them, and by Indians, who were within 12 miles of our settlement when the ship came from Virginia on 23rd August, but the noise of their great guns struck such a terror upon the Indians that the Spaniards could not persuade them to come upon the settlement. Provisions and live cattle brought by the ship from Virginia. They have not yet taken up any land but what joins the town, and that at 10 acres per head, because they will not separate before more people come. Mr. Brayne says many people are in readiness to come from Barbadoes, so a ship has been despatched thence so as to be here again before the winter. They have already well fortified themselves. The people continue very well in health and the country seems to be very healthful and delightsome, and corn and other things planted at their first coming thrive very well, only the garden seeds, which were not good, but believes the ground will bear anything that is put in it, and that it is as hopeful a design as ever was put on foot. Our Governor is very aged, and hath much lost himself in his government, and would have caused a Parliament amongst them altho' they could not make 20 freemen in the Colony besides the Council, and had made an order for it had not they who were Deputies and some few of the Council vigorously withstood it. Doubts he will not be so advantageous to a new Colony as they did expect. Hopes his Lordship will send him new instructions for the disposal of the Proprietors stores, for the Governor says that those signed by his Lordship and Sir Peter Colleton are not sufficient. Has sent to Sir Peter for a present supply of stores; they are grown short in many things, which he hopes will be sent in the spring. Has taken four servants into his Lordship's service, belonging to Capt. Bayley, and shall keep them and Maj. Hambleton's until further orders. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 38.]
Sept.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
258. Entry of the proceeding in the "Carolina Letter Book." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 10, 11.]
1670.
Sept. 12.
Albemarle
Point.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
259. Stephen Bull to "the Lord Ashley Cooper at Exeter House with my duty present." Sent in his last letter a full relation of their voyage from Bermuda and what was discovered at Port Royal and this place, with such reasons as he could obtain from the Governor for deserting Port Royal, which, in the judgment of Bull and several other gentlemen, was very much inviting for a settlement and admirable good land. This place is very good land, and with his honour's encouragement in sending ships and supplies during their infancy, there is no question to be made but that it is likely to be one of the best settlements in the Indies. Recommends the granting a free passage for a year or two to persons coming from Barbadoes and the Leeward Isles, they would then in a short time be well peopled. The country is fit for any produce, and everything planted thrives beyond expectation. He brought hither orange and lemon trees, also lime, pomegranate, and fig trees, and plaintains, and they thrive and flourish very bravely. This is as healthful a place as ever was settled, but four persons lost, and they in a declining condition before they landed. They have lately taken up in a semi-circle about the town 10 acres a head, and have chosen in this river above and below the town their great lots. There is land sufficient here for some thousands of people, where they may make very brave and happy settlements. Scarcity of provisions when the Carolina sailed for Virginia in May last, not above two months' provisions at a pint of peas a man per diem; received great assistance from the Indians, who sold them provisions at very reasonable rates, and taking notice of their necessities, brought them daily one thing or another; they seem to be very well pleased at our settling here, expecting protection from other sort of Indians called the Westoes, which has been promised. Dr. Woodward has travelled 10 days up into the Main to see the Emperor of this part of the Indians, who made him very welcome, and sent down skins to our Governor, and made a firm league of friendship and that he would visit us in 10 days. About 200 Spaniards and 300 Indians from about St. Augustine came within six miles of us, but the Carolina frigate arriving, they withdrew their camp and marched home after some 30 in ambuscade had fired at Capt. Brayne, who received no hurt. In their camp was found a vizor representing an Indian, which it is conceived was to keep some Englishman with them undiscovered. The Governor ill with feaver and ague, and being aged, his recovery is very much feared; he hath acted or endeavoured to act several things which have not been altogether agreeable to the concessions, but it is rather imputed to self will and weakness than to any other design or his own interest. Complaints against Capt. O'Sullivan, a very dissentious troublesome man in all particulars and exacts strangely for fees. Mr. Rivers having been taken by the Spaniard, and his employment void, would be glad to serve in the same capacity. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 35.]
Sept. 12.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
260. Entry of the preceding in "Carolina Letter Book." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 26–34.]
1670.
Sept. 15.
Ashley River,
America,
lat. 31,
45 min.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
261. William Owen to Lord Ashley. Although something to the northward of Port Royal, considers they have made choice for the better, having pitched upon a point defended by the main river with a creek on one side and inaccessible marsh on the other which at high tides is overflown, this is now pallisaded and with a very small charge might be made impregnable. Thinks he shall not very much err in saying that a good inlet, a healthy country, security and seasonable supplies perform a settlement. Healthiness of the climate, only one dead from England and he of a lingering and consumptive distemper. The great point in this design is security for they are near a zealous and potent neighbour. The Spanish friars will never cease to promote their tragic ends by the Indians whom they instruct only to admire the Spanish nation and pay them adoration equal to a deity. These have the advantage of the Indian tongue and incline the Indians to do any thing and make war by these Indians upon those who disoblige them. Account of St. Augustine which is but an impotent garrison with not above 200 soldiers. The great reverence the Spaniards exact from the Indians will in a very short time decline, for by conversing with our Indians they become more and more satisfied of the grandeur of the English and say we are stronger than the Spaniard which makes them not a little proud of our friendship. How the Friars get intelligence of our affairs and tamper with the Indians who gave information of an intention to destroy the English who thus were kept in arms ten days. The friendly Indians who came to their assistance. Is persuaded that they might have mustered 1,000 Bowmen. Has seen one of their captains speak to his people half an hour with the greatest passion that could be, inveighing against the Spaniards and applauding the English for the axes, beads, and knives they had brought them and showing what massacre they would do if the English made use of them as scouts. Account of the attack of the Spanish Indians upon Captain Brayne on his return from Virginia in the Carolina who fired seven or eight guns at them, "and since we have not heard from them but our Indians tell us they are gone. This is the third affront the Spaniard offered us by Indians since they heard of us here." The Spaniard will say these are the actings of Banditti when it is his own contrivance. There are several for certain at St. Augustine who have commissions of reprisals for the damages done there by Captain Searle. If we had but 500 persons here the Friars would remove from the adjacent parts with all the speed they could. Wishes they well knew how to demean themselves as they do not wish to infringe the strict league at home with the Spaniard. Account of Indian tribes, the Westoes they say are Man-eaters, of whom our Indians are more afraid than little children are of the Bull beggars in England. Expect the Emperor of Tatchequiha a very fruitful country, five days journey to the Northwest, some of his people being already come, the Indian Dr. says where the Emperor lives the land is of a red mould, plenty of black and white marble and abundantly stored with mulberries, of which fruit they make cakes which Owen has tasted. This design well prosecuted will be as well profitable as honorable, Five hundred more people would render them secure and five hundred more a perfect settlement without the least dread from Spain or Indian. Hopes his Lordship's care for supplies of necessaries for a short time will make them in some measure capable to stand upon their own legs, this country being fertile and of a wonderful growth Requests freight free of some goods and servants to be sent to him from England. Endorsed by John Locke. [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 37.]
Sept. 15.
Shaftesbury
Papers.
262. Entry of the preceding in "Carolina Entry Bk." [Shaftesbury Papers, Section IX., No. 55, pp. 36–54.]